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The Kings Bay periscope ( 11-08-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00277

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00277


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PAGE 1

Second consecutive award, to compete for top Navy honor For the second consecutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast selected Naval Air Station Jacksonville as the 2012 Installation Excellence Award nominee for the Commander, Naval Installation Commands Installation Excellence Award Oct. 31. e station was also the recipient of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award and the 2012 Presidential Installation Excel lence Award. It will now go on to compete with 76 other installations for the CNIC Installation Excellence Award. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and Naval Support Activity Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations, respectively for the FY-12 CNIC Installation Excellence Award, said Com mander, Navy Region South east Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. Our cross-functional panel of experts considered excellent packages from all of our instal lations. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submitted the best packages in their respec tive categories, demonstrat ing how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the eet, ghter and family. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of op erational and warghter readi ness support functions, better mission performance and superb quality of life for military men and women and their fami lies. Community outreach pro grams set it apart from 17 other Southeast installations. e nomination exemplied the total commitment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air instal lation as one of the contenders for the CNIC award. In a message to base person nel, NAS Jax Commanding Of cer Capt. Bob Sanders said, Congratulations. You have been named the best large in stallation in the Southeast region. You truly are the best at what you do and I want to per sonally thank you. I cannot tell you how proud I am to be a part of this outstanding organization. e contributions of every person military, DoD civilian and contractor is valued. We are truly one team, one ght in pursuit of excellence and sup port to the eet, ghter and fam ily. With the mission of support ing the eet, ghter and family, NAS Jax is the premier instal lation for delivering eective, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their fami lies and civilian employees. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax in stalled 1,140 square-feet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks for ward to competing at the CNIC level. e winner of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award will be nominated for the Com mander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence. Established in 1984, the award recognizes the outstanding eorts of personnel in the operations and maintenance of military installations worldwide. Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard top brass speak at county community forumLast month the community had an opportunity to hear from the top military leadership in Camden County. e Navy, Marines and Coast Guard had some heavy hitters at this continuing series of Kings Bay Camden Community Forums, who helped broaden the con nection between the military and county residents. In this third year of forums/tours joint ly sponsored by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and e Camden Partnership the community response was superb. e purpose of the Kings Bay Cam den community forums and tours is to strengthen and enhance the relation ship between the military and civilian communities in the Camden area and to educate and promote their collective in terests in Camden County. At the Oct. 14 forum, the audience of more than 60 civilians and military personnel heard briengs on each of their respective services, Cap. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., commanding ocer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Cmdr. Steve Love, commanding ocer, Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit; Lt. Col. Kevin Moody, commanding ocer, Ma rine Corps Security Force Battalion and Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baer, commanding o cer, Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. After their brieng they answered questions from the audience. Up Periscope After World War II, Sub Vets build new lives Page 11 Remember Kings Bay has service for World War II fallen Pages 4, 5 Sandys wake Navy, Marines, Coast Guard respond with help Pages 3, 11-12, 14-15Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com NAS Jacksonville named best in Southeast Region November Military Family MonthSacrices of those backing front-line military not forgotten In our military families, we see the best our country has to of fer. ey demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our great ness for centuries to come, Presi dent Barack Obama said in his proclamation declaring the month of November as Military Family Month. e proclamation reads: Since our Nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all back grounds and beliefs have banded together to ght for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each of them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recomNov. 2 memorial service highlights week-long visit at NSB Kings BayMore than 30 World War II Submarine Veterans gathered Nov. 2 for their annual memorial ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion. NSB Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr. was guest speaker at the memorial. As I look into the crowd and reect over interactions with veterans of our subma rine force throughout my career, and especially those of the last two days, I stand in awe, Guey said. It is a true privi lege to even be under the same roof as those who held the line after Pearl Harbor and brought vic tory to a long and brutal war. We have 31 submarine veterans of World War II with us today. Its because of each of you that we are gathered here, and Im pleased to welcome you back to the submarine force and to Kings Bay. e ceremony was followed by a recep tion and tours of the Trident Training Fa cility and tours of USS Maryland (SSBN 738). Fridays activities wrapped up with a Trident Ret Facility/Chief Petty Ocer Association steak night at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. e event highlighted a week-long visit by the Sub Vets. Events aboard Kings Bay and in Camden County began Tuesday with their arrival and ended Saturday. Other activities scheduled during the visit included a tour of the St. Marys Sub marine Museum and a Pirates Cove Galley breakfast.World War II Sub Vets remember fallen NSB leaders address Partnership

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As hundreds of ocers donedn new rank during promotion cer emonies across the eet Nov. 1, of cials remind ocers to update their ocer photo in their military records. Ocer promotions typically oc cur on the rst of each month. So, as a new group of ocers pin on their new rank and update their ID cards, they must also remember to update their ocial photo, said Capt. Bruce Deshotel, assigned to Ocer Career Transition Division, Navy Personnel Command, which coordinates of cer promotion lists, each month. New photographs are required for all ocers within three months after acceptance of promotion. NAVADMIN 103/07, released in April 2007, re-instituted the require ment for ocers to submit photo graphs for their permanent service records. e photo must also contain the following information: LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, MIDDLE INI TIAL GRADE/SSN LAST FOUR/ DESIGNATOR(s) dd/MONTH ABBREVIATION/yy, for example, 09 OCT 10. According to MILPERSMAN 1070-180, ocers may write the re quired information on a piece of paper, poster board or white board in two-inch letters, which may be hand-written. Deshotel said the process is sim ple. Take the white board, poster or paper along with a digital camera and a shipmate into the passageway. Stand up against the bulkhead (left shoulder forward), while a shipmate takes the full-length photo. e photograph must be in color and display a full-length, threequarter view of the member, left shoulder forward. A plain, at background provides sucient contrast to highlight details of the uniform. e photo must be 4 inches in width and 6 inches in height. Save the picture to a hard drive, then copy and paste it into the submis sion form (link below). Type in requested information, print the form with the picture and sign the form. Mail the completed, signed form to: Navy Personnel Command Pers-312C 5720 Integrity Dr. Millington, TN 38055-3120 NAVPERS form 1070/884 is avail able at www.npc.navy.mil/Refer enceLibrary/Forms/PAVPERS/. Complete listings of active duty and Reserve ocers authorized promotion Nov. 1 are contained in NAVADMINS 316/12 and 317/12. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland yard sale to benet Veterans Me morial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave. e Veter ans Day Parade will form at Steens, 550 Leet St., at 9 a.m. and begin at 10 a.m., going north on U.S. 17 and ending at Satilla Street and Wil liams Avenue. At 11 a.m. a recognition cer emony will be held at the Veterans Memorial Park, followed by a noon catsh dinner at the Depot. For more information, call Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown De velopement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Wounded Warrior ride Nov. 10Ride to Remember 2012, to support Wound ed Warrior project, will begin with registration at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 9, 10003 New Kings Road, Jacksonville. e ride will nish with lunch in St. Augustine. For more information, call Todd Dinwiddie at 9904) 608-1220.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jack sonville as a oating Naval Museum. To regis tration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs. Now hear this! e Defense Department will work with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to ensure the nancial health of service members and their families, Defense Secre tary Leon E. Panetta said Oct. 19. Panetta and Holly Petraeus, the bureaus assistant director for ser vice members concerns, spoke spe cically about the nancial burden of student loans place. e No. 1 reason people in the service lose their security clearance is because of nancial problems, Pa netta said. And thats something that we absolutely now have to address. Petraeus presented the results of a report on the challenges that service members face in repaying student loans. is is a problem, Panetta said, noting that some 41 percent of service members are paying o an education-related loan. Im concerned that the report that is being issued today warns of student loan companies that not only may confuse service members, but even violate the law in the ap proach that they take, he said. Petraeus said she repeatedly hears of the burden of education loans whenever she visits troops. Service members are entering the military with student loan debt, and as a result facing both nancial challenges and paperwork challeng es, she said. In one case, a sailor told her of en tering the Navy carrying $100,000 in student loan debts. He joined the Navy because it was the only way he believed he could make it, but most of his Navy paycheck was going towards paying o those loans, she said. Petraeus said this is not an isolat ed case, and she is concerned that service members are not getting the information they need about pro grams and policies that could help them reduce that debt signicantly while they are on active duty. is is an opportunity for us to x an issue that is impacting the nancial readiness of the force and caus ing harm to military consumers, she said. We need to be proactive in addressing problems in the ser vicing of student loans for members of our military. e student loan problem may be in the same category as home loans. In past years, the bureau found that mortgage lenders consistently failed to give troops the protections they earned under the Service Members Civil Relief Act. ere are real concerns of a simi lar problem with student loan ser vicing and SCRA violations, Petrae us said. In fact, I think the problem may be greater with student loans than it was with mortgages because I believe many more young service members enter active duty with stu dent loans than with a mortgage. Service members are having prob lems invoking consumer protection rights under the legislation. ey do not know about repay ment alternatives, and student loan servicers are providing them with inaccurate or incomplete informa tion about their options, she said. And they are confused by eligibility requirements for benets that are so complicated that they either cant gure out what they are entitled to or dont realize that taking one ben et might exclude them from being eligible for another, more helpful one. And this is real money. Petraeus said the young sailor carrying the $100,000 debt burden could pay nearly $25,000 extra if he doesnt receive the active-duty interest rate cap. And if he stays in the Navy for 10 years but doesnt know about or doesnt use the income-based re payment plan, the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program and the SCRA rate cap, he could lose out on nearly $76,000 that he could have cut o his debt in those 10 years, she said. e bureau will be teaming up with DOD to train judge advocate general personnel, personal nan cial managers and education ser vice ocers so that they know about these benets and consumer protection, she said. We also plan to push out the message through a variety of media to all service members, Petraeus said. We want them to know that even if they did not know about or ask for student loan repayment ben ets when they entered the military, its not too late to do it now.Military to get help with loan issues Financial protection Ocers reminded to update photos Personnel Command Ocials from the Defense and Veterans Aairs departments par ticipated in a panel discussion here Oct. 19 about eorts to prepare ser vice members for the transition to civilian life. Danny Pummill, director of VA/ DOD liaison for Veterans Aairs, and Susan S. Kelly, director of DODs Transition to Veterans Program Of ce, explained the new Transition Assistance Program during the 10th annual Military Reporters and Edi tors Conference. is isnt your death-by-Power Point TAP from the 1990s, Pummill said, referring to a side-intensive one-day seminar for transitioning service members in days gone by. [e new TAP] is well planned and thought out. [TAP] is an adult, interactive learning environment similar to college, with small-group [discus sions], as well as one-on-one-counseling, he said. It used to be we had a classroom of upwards of 350 people. Now, our max is 50, and spouses are encouraged to attend. A number of pilot studies were conducted over the past year, Kelly said, including with the National Guard and reserves. We found that the needs of sin gles separating from a rst tour were dierent than, say, a career soldier with a family getting ready to retire, she said. We also found that each of the services have dierent cultures and personalities. For example, sol diers and Marines respond to [infor mation] dierently than a roomful of airmen. e new TAP will feature pre-sep aration classes ranging from health care, life insurance and disability to higher education, vocational train ing and home loans, Kelly said. By the end of 2013, Transition Goals-Plans-Success, known as GPS, will replace TAP, Kelly said. She explained that GPS is a class room and one-on-one session with service members and their spouses to formulate a plan, including a de tailed budget. e plan could be vocational training or college, she explained, in which case the service member would meet with a repre sentative from that institution and begin the paperwork process. Service members wanting to start a business would meet with a rep resentative from the Small Business Administration to go over the fea sibility of their business plan and funding resources. For those wanting to enter the private or government sector work force, she said, employment spe cialists would assist with resume Return to civilian life in spotlight Transition Assistance 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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writing and job searches, and meetings could be ar ranged with subject-mat ter experts in the targeted occupational elds. Service members also would have a Plan B in place in case something didnt work out. Other aspects of the plan include meetings with counselors to focus on the social and psy chological factors, which Kelly said are just as im portant to transitioning service members because they are used to living in a structured environment and need to be better pre pared to be on their own. Kelly said special eorts are being made to reach out to Guard and reserve service members to en sure they are getting all the assistance they need. For those living far from military installations, she said, transition teams would be sent out, and some training that other wise would take place in a classroom could be done in a virtual classroom setting. By the end of 2014, ser vice members will prepare for transitioning across their military life cycle, Kelly said. In other words, training programs with timetables will be formally instituted as soon as a ser vice member enters the military. In addition to being mil itary ready, they will now be career ready, she said. e transition eort es tablished by the Veterans Opportunity to Work Act is a joint eort of the De fense, Labor, VA, and Edu cation departments, along with the Small Business Administration, the Oce of Personnel Management and the White House Do mestic Policy Council. If someone told me six government agencies would come up with a plan, I wouldnt have be lieved it would work, said Pummill, who served in the Army for 34 years. Ive been meeting with them for a year now, and were working things through. Its a model for how government agencies can get together and share manpower and resources and do the right thing, in this case for service mem bers, and this is best plan possible to take care of our service members,.TAP mit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military families, we see the best our coun try has to oer. ey dem onstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centu ries and the values that will preserve our great ness for centuries to come. With loved ones serv ing far from home, mili tary spouses take on the work of two. eir chil dren show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each commu nity they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their families as well as they serve us. rough First Lady Mi chelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulll this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. Last year, we chal lenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 veterans and mili tary spouses by the end of 2013. To date, they have al ready exceeded that chal lenge, hiring over 125,000 veterans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep ghting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a combat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their families feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patriots who keep our country safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have per ished in the line of duty. is month, we rearm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. Now, therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation.Family Previous to Hurricane Sandys landfall, the Coast Guard pre-positioned resources to better ensure the services ability to support search and rescue operations immediately following the storm. is planning and prepara tion paid o, as the Coast Guards help was needed before Sandy even made landfall when the HMS Bounty began sinking in the Atlantic Ocean with 16 souls aboard. While the dramatic res cue aboard Bounty has captured the nations at tention, Coast Guard helicopter crews were also busy responding to mul tiple requests to rescue people who were trapped in their homes in the wake of the storm. Coast Guard aircrews were sent from both air stations Atlantic City and Cape Cod to provide search and rescue response. In just one of these rescues, three people, trapped in their home from the extreme high tides, were saved by a MH65T Dolphin aircrew. As the three people were taken to area hospitals in the safety of a Coast Guard helicopter, another crew assisted New York Police marine units with nine people in distress. Despite the hard work of emergency responders, people are still in need. Airboats, traditionally used for ice rescues in the Great Lakes region, were dispatched from the 9th Coast Guard District to support this need. ese unique boats can operate in shallow water and are able to help out in ooded communities and more than a dozen Coast Guardsmen from stations in Ohio and Michigan de ployed to the East Coast to support Sandy response operations. We are providing crew members and assets that are normally used for ice rescue operations and are now going to be used in a completely dierent envi ronment, said Capt. Je Ogden, commander of Sector Detroit.Coast Guard duels Sandy before, during, aer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Nov. 2, 2012 World War II Sub Vets

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5 Photos by NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer Scott Bassett

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 19 and 26. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be regis tered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Nov. 26The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries, benefits how to interpret job announcements and deter mine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Dominos Pizza wants to say thanks for a great year. So on ursday, Nov. 15, Dominos will be oering a large one topping pizza for $4.99! is oer is for carry out only and is good from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Nov. 15 only at the Kings Bay Dominos! Movie Under the Stars at 6 p.m., Saturday, No. 17 the new venue for the movie will be at the Adult Football Field, across from the Youth Soccer Fields. From the Stimson Gate, take the first right onto USS Daniel Boone Avenue, and then another first right onto USS Lewis & Clark Road to the park ing area by the fields. Admission is free for Brave, rated PG. Dominos will be offer any size, any toppings pizza for $10. Bring your blankets, your lawn chairs and dont forget the kids. For more information call (912) 5734564. Wobble Gobble 5K Run Its Wednesday, Nov. 14 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Sign-up at 6:30 am with the race beginning at 7 am. Bring a canned food item for donation, which will benefit Camden House. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, spon sored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All participants are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. The Canyons Zip Line Tour Unleash your inner beast with Navy Adventures Unleashed Saturday, Nov. 17 at e Canyons in Gainesville, Fla. Cost is $74 per person over age 18, which includes all equip ment, nine zips, hiking, rope bridges and a rappel, plus a mini jump school. e rst 10 Liberty eligible patrons price is $64. A van departs from the Big EZ at 7:30 am. Registration payment due Nov. 11. Space is limited. Sign-up and pay at the Big EZ. Closed toe shoes are a must, bring money for food on the way home and loose clothing highly recommended for men. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Old City Music Fest Sunday, Nov. 11. Travel with Liberty to St. Augustine for a huge Country Concert, for active duty only. Charlie Daniels Band, .38 Special, Craig Morgan and Glorianna featured. Space limit ed to rst 14 who sign up. Ticket and transportation provided. A van departs the Big EZ at 11 am. Bring money for food and beverages. For more informa tion call (912) 573-4548. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their fami lies. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will contin ue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration is ongoing. Active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees, regis tration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/ Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Youth Basketball Registration is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. Its $60 each for child for Active Duty and Reservists, $65 per child for military retirees, DoD civilians and NSB contractors. Cost includes uni form. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 10 and 11 IS Hugo Nov. 17 and 18 Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups going Just for kids Liberty call Pizza biz shows appreciation

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Fifty years after they discovered Soviet mis siles poised to strike the United States from Cuba, two intelligence ocers met with hundreds of their current-day counterparts to commemorate the anniversary of the crisis that nearly brought the world to nuclear war. Dino Brugioni and Vin cent DiRenzo were part of a small group from the CIAs National Pho tographic Interpretation Center who worked for 13 tense days in October 1962 to avert disaster. ey joined an Oct. 15 panel discussion at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springeld, Va. A photo interpreter, DiRenzo led the NPIC team and formed the initial conclusion about the presence of Soviet medium-range ballistic mis siles in Cuba from analysis of U-2 spy plane imagery. Considering the sever ity of the identication, we gured wed be in for a long night, DiRenzo said. He indicated that the ini tial assessment was not a slam dunk, as convinc ing people of the true sig nicance of the nd was dicult. While DiRenzo was absolutely sure, the image did not show clearly iden tiable missiles, but rather, long, canvas-covered ob jects that, to the layman, could be almost anything. Brugioni was instrumental in arming Presi dent John F. Kennedy with intelligence needed to navigate this perilous moment in history. Black Saturday, we had gone to [defense readiness condition] 2, Brugioni said. Fourteen hundred bombers were loaded with nuclear weapons; 50 B-52s were in the air; eight Polaris submarines were at sea; 125 [intercontinen tal ballistic missiles] were ready to re; there was tac tical aviation; there was 60 or missiles in England, 30 Jupiter missiles in Italy, and 15 Jupiters in Turkey. at morning we met with Art Lundahl and told him that all 24 pads were operational, meaning that within four to six hours, 24 missiles could be coming at the United States. I remember Lundahl said, I dont want to scare the hell out of them, but I want to make sure they understand the danger. Fifty years after the United States stood on the brink of nuclear war with the Soviet Union, a historian spoke to a Pen tagon audience about how President John F. Kennedy and other leaders dealt with a still-dangerous situation following the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. David G. Coleman, a professor of history at the University of Vir Photo analysts recall Cuban Missile Crisis Crisis pivot point in JFK presidency 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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ginia, provided glimpses into how the president dealt with dicult situ ations, while consulting with leaders such as De fense Secretary Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk and National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. e crisis was a 13-day stando between the United States and the So viet Union over Soviet missiles deployed to Cuba that were capable of carry ing nuclear warheads to the U.S. mainland. it began Oct. 16, 1962, when Kennedy received intelligence proving there were missile sites on Cuba. is led to a military quar antine. e crisis is con sidered to have ended Oct. 28, 1962, when Soviet Pre mier Nikita Khrushchev sent a message to Ken nedy promising he would withdraw the missiles. Coleman said Kennedy thought it would be absurd for the Soviets to hand over nuclear weap ons to the Cubans, though this was exactly what they had planned. ey aban doned the idea because they started perceiving Castro as potentially unstable and capable of starting a nuclear war. But the issue wasnt just about removing the missiles. e Soviets dis agreed about what ex actly constituted oensive weapons, and there were negotiations that lasted until Nov. 20, 1962. Coleman said the crisis and the period imme diately afterward was a pivot point in the Kennedy administration in which the president stood rm on some things. In the end, Kennedy is remembered as a hero for his handling of the situa tion, and many consider the peaceful resolution of this crisis one of the high points of presidential ac complishments during the 20th century.Kennedy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 9

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Robert Wise USS Trout, USS Bluefish, USS Whiting Philadelphia I changed my rate from steward to engi neer. I got out after 22 years and became a power plant engineer in civil service. Walter Anderson USS Snook, USS Dace Plymouth, Ill. I went to Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois and studied accounting and economics with a minor in international stud ies. I completed that in three years while working 40 hours a week at three jobs. George Bass USS Boarfish Miami I stayed in the Navy. Im a 30-year guy. I stayed on subma rines. Thats all I ever served on, six in my time. I went all the way to Master Chief. Charles Crews USS Spot Mulford, Ga. I went to work in civil service at Ft. McPherson, Georgia. I worked in the audio visual center for 37 years and became the chief of the center. Frank Boarman USS Spot Ohio County Ky. I immediately went to college at Brescia College in Owensboro, Kentucky, and got married. Then I start ed as an office clerk with a company that manufactured steel gas tanks and ended up president. Bob Plotts USS Becuna Easton, Pa. I had to come home to Easton and make a living. I had a wife, and a daughter when I got home. I worked 38 years at Ingersoll Rand. I tested pumps for nuclear submarines. Joe Clark USS Bream Greensboro, N.C. I started working in my hometown of Greensboro, North Carolina, at Hertz Rent-a-Car I ran it for 40 years and never got a promotion. I started as manager and ended as manager and part owner.By the end of World War II, the Navy had more than 250 submarines. But post-war era plans called for 230 Navy ships of all types. Each branch of the military underwent tremendous down sizing. Most men returned home within a year after the war. They were simply discharged, left to their own devices regarding what to do with their lives. Heres what some of our World War II Submarine Veterans did with their lives after Aug. 14, 1945. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Navy continued to provide disaster relief in support of the Feder al Emergency Manage ment Agency, national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas aected by Hurricane Sandy, Nov. 4. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in posi tion o the coast of New York and New Jersey supplying military per sonnel and equipment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying air craft to aid in the mis sion with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: two SH-60s four MH-53Es six CH-53Es six UH-1Ns and one MH-53. Several of these helos departed for Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the dam aged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a Landing Utility Craft capable of transporting cargo, ve hicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has a landing utility craft capable of transport ing cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. is LCU ferried supplies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable Fleet helps with relief THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 11

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e Defense Depart ment launched a signi cant airlift event to quick ly get power restoration equipment to New York, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Nov. 1. e Federal Emergency Management Agency asked DOD to airlift equip ment from Southern Cali fornia to New York, he said. e Air Mobility Com mand responded and some of the needed equipment quickly got in the air. Aircraft and crews from 12 active duty, Air Nation al Guard and Air Force Re serve bases across the nation are rotating through March Air Reserve Base in Southern California, where they will pick up 10 civilian power experts, 637 short tons of supplies and equipment to support relief eorts on the East Coast, Little said. e personnel and equipment were from the Southern California Edison Utility Company and arrives at Stewart Air Na tional Guard Base in New burgh, N.Y., on 12 C-17 Globemasters and ve C-5 Galaxy aircraft by the after noon of Nov. 1, Little said. e cargo included 10 cherry picker trucks, four line trucks, a at-bed dig ger, eight trouble trucks and a mobile command center, he said. ere were also a num ber of support trucks, maintenance trucks and all the equipment need ed to operate as soon as they roll o the planes, Little added. Most of the crews manning the trucks arrived in New York via commercial air, he said. e Navy moved three ships the USS Wasp, the USS San Antonio and the USS Carter Hall toward the Northeast, Little said. ere had been no request for the capabilities of the ships, but DOD considered this a prudent move, to ensure the ships would be available if needed, he said. e military provided generators and pumping equipment to New York and New Jersey, Little said. e National Guard remained busy in re sponse to recovery eorts throughout New York and New Jersey, he noted. e New Jersey Nation al Guard was very busy yesterday (Oct. 31) rescu ing the people of Hoboken who are still stranded due to ooding, Little said. roughout the state, the New Jersey National Guard has rescued more than 2,000 residents from ooded areas. In addition, the New York National Guard re sponded to Bellevue Hos pital, where more than 700 patients needed to be evacuated, he said. I cant say enough about the seless soldiers and airmen throughout the Northeast, Little said. Airli helps to restore power to New York City 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Pirates Cove menus e amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) pulled in to Naval Station Mayport Nov. 2, to host the Navy Marine Corps Classic basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas, Nov. 9 Bataan be honored by the City of Jacksonville during its annual Week of Valor. e annual Week of Valor is a tribute to military members and their families. e event celebrates the city of Jacksonvilles longterm relationship with the Navy, and the long tradition of support the city and its surrounding communities have provided Sailors and Marines, said Capt. Erik Ross, commanding ocer of the Bataan. During guided ship tours, Bataan will showcase the ship on the pier at Na val Station Mayport. Sailors will engage the public with displays and a pregame concert performed by Little Big Town at the pier-side entertainment complex. It is an awesome opportunity to host a basketball game on a ight deck, but the event means much more than that, said Ross. It is about recognizing the rela tionship between the community and our military.USS Bataan hosts Hoya-Gator hoops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

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Marines rescue residents Winds, close to 80 mph, whipped the 14-foot oodwaters through the streets of New York the night of Oct. 29 as Hurri cane Sandy bore down. During the height of the storm, a detective from the New York Police Depart ment approached the duty noncommissioned ocer of 6th Communications Battalion, 4th Marine Lo gistics Group in Brooklyn and requested assistance for a rescue operation. A transformer in the Queens neighborhood of Rockaway Beach burst, triggering a house re that soon spread to adjacent buildings. Because of the re and the rising oodwa ters, many residents were trapped. First responders attempted to help strand ed residents, but they were also trapped, bringing the number to 14. e water was too deep for the emer gency services units, so the NYPD called on the Reserve Marines. We were just checking (our training center) for damage because the storm was getting pretty bad, said Sgt. Jorge Negron, a ground radio repairman with 6th Communications Battalion. e police showed up at the gate and, after getting approval, there was no hesitation. It was just yeah, of course well help. Lt. Col. Richard Bordon aro, Inspector-Instructor for the 6th Communica tions Battalion, autho rized the use of two 7-ton trucks, as well as the ser vice of three Marines and one Navy corpsman, to conduct rescue assistance under the authority of the Defense Support of Civil Authorities directive. Sgts. Allan Donaire, Michael Roy and Jorje Negron along with Petty Ocer 2nd Class Mat thew Pulitano, a hospital corpsman, responded at approximately 10:15 p.m. As soon as we got over the bridge, the water (be tween us and the neighborhood) was so high, said Roy. SUVs were completely underwater and the ood waters were almost over the hood of our 7-ton (approximately seven feet). ere were two res rag ing when they arrived in the Breezy Pointarea one eventually destroyed 111 houses,and the other burned a power plant. When we turned the corner (and seeing the homes ablaze), it was the most disturbing thing Ive ever seen, Negron said. e entire block was on re; it looked like the road to Armageddon. e rst responders ve hicles were either waterlogged or not large enough to enter the waters, so over the next ve hours, the Marines transported members of police and re departments to dierent areas of the neighborhood. e bravery and dedi cation I saw was so great, Negron said. Everyone was riding in our truck and then the police would hop into their raft and go to a familyin need and the re department would get in their (rafts) and go straight to a re. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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of providing command and control; underwater infrastructure repair capabilities; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port sur vey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, embarked aboard San Anto nio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilowatt generators and three 250 gal lons per minute pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and control support to the Coast Guard. Kanawha, a Henry J. Kaiser-class eet replenishment oiler, got under way Nov. 2 and will operate in the open waters east of recovery operations. is logistics ship will ensure that Navy and Marine Corps forces are selfsustained with food and fuel. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion 11 is providing a convoy of 23 ve hicles and 90 Seabees prepared to as sist. eir equipment includes ve 60 kilowatt, ve 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt generators and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is providing 110 Seabees to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for tasking. FEMA issued a mission assignment to the Department of De fense requesting high-volume water pumps with qualied teams to support the operation and maintenance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, SECDEF has authorized the Navy to provide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support de watering eorts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an additional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 were to arrive Nov. 5. e embarked MEU is a Marine Corps crisis-response force thats designed to remain aoat for months at a time. e 26th MEU is uniquely suited to the task. Operating from a Navy ves sel, the units air assets have an agility that ensures aid can be delivered any where within hundreds of miles.Fleet Marines assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit are helping to clear debris in this storm-stricken community as part of Hurricane Sandy relief eorts. Marine leaders from the USS Wasp, including Marine Corps Col. Matthew G. St. Clair, the 26th MEUs commanding ocer, went airborne in an UH-1N Huey heli copter Nov. 3 to conduct disaster relief assessments and survey damage inicted by Sandy along southeastern Staten Island. e 26th MEU has been using the helicopters to sur vey damaged areas of Staten Island in preparation of follow-on support to local residents. e ights have also allowed the Marines to land in the hardest-hit areas and see what local leaders and res idents needed the most. Weve all seen the news, but to actually walk around and talk to people about what they are going through allows us to build a clearer picture as we conduct our planning, St. Clair said. Despite the devastation, seeing the communities come together and help each oth er is motivation for us. Marines always talk about One Team, One Fight and were just joining their team. e 26th MEU, with more than 300 Marines and Sailors and 12 helicopters, has been moving gear and per sonnel to the U.S. Navy amphibious ship USS Wasp, while the unit received its mission priorities and assem bled capabilities prior to going ashore to assist stormstricken residents.26th MEU at work on Staten Island THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

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Second consecutive award, to compete for top Navy honor For the second consecutive year, Commander, Navy Region Southeast selected Naval Air Station Jacksonville as the 2012 Installation Excellence Award nominee for the Commander, Naval Installation Commands Installation Excellence Award Oct. 31. e station was also the recipient of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award and the 2012 Presidential Installation Excellence Award. It will now go on to compete with 76 other installations for the CNIC Installation Excellence Award. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and Naval Support Activity Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations, respectively for the FY-12 CNIC Installation Excellence Award, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. Our cross-functional panel of experts considered excellent packages from all of our installations. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submitted the best packages in their respective categories, demonstrat ing how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the eet, ghter and family. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of operational and warghter readiness support functions, better mission performance and superb quality of life for military men and women and their families. Community outreach programs set it apart from 17 other Southeast installations. e nomination exemplied the total commitment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air installation as one of the contenders for the CNIC award. In a message to base personnel, NAS Jax Commanding Ofcer Capt. Bob Sanders said, Congratulations. You have been named the best large installation in the Southeast region. You truly are the best at what you do and I want to personally thank you. I cannot tell you how proud I am to be a part of this outstanding organization. e contributions of every person military, DoD civilian and contractor is valued. We are truly one team, one ght in pursuit of excellence and support to the eet, ghter and family. With the mission of supporting the eet, ghter and family, NAS Jax is the premier installation for delivering eective, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their families and civilian employees. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax installed 1,140 square-feet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks forward to competing at the CNIC level. e winner of the CNIC Installation Excellence Award will be nominated for the Commander in Chiefs Annual Award for Installation Excellence. Established in 1984, the award recognizes the outstanding eorts of personnel in the operations and maintenance of military installations worldwide. Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard top brass speak at county community forumLast month the community had an opportunity to hear from the top military leadership in Camden County. e Navy, Marines and Coast Guard had some heavy hitters at this continuing series of Kings Bay Camden Community Forums, who helped broaden the connection between the military and county residents. In this third year of forums/tours jointly sponsored by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and e Camden Partnership the community response was superb. e purpose of the Kings Bay Camden community forums and tours is to strengthen and enhance the relationship between the military and civilian communities in the Camden area and to educate and promote their collective interests in Camden County. At the Oct. 14 forum, the audience of more than 60 civilians and military personnel heard briengs on each of their respective services, Cap. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., commanding ocer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Cmdr. Steve Love, commanding ocer, Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit; Lt. Col. Kevin Moody, commanding ocer, Marine Corps Security Force Battalion and Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baer, commanding ocer, Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. After their brieng they answered questions from the audience. Up Periscope After World War II, Sub Vets build new lives Page 11 Remember Kings Bay has service for World War II fallen Pages 4, 5 Sandys wake Navy, Marines, Coast Guard respond with help Pages 3, 11-12, 14-15Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com NAS Jacksonville named best in Southeast Region November Military Family MonthSacrices of those backing front-line military not forgotten In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. ey demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come, President Barack Obama said in his proclamation declaring the month of November as Military Family Month. e proclamation reads: Since our Nations earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to ght for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each of them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recomNov. 2 memorial service highlights week-long visit at NSB Kings BayMore than 30 World War II Submarine Veterans gathered Nov. 2 for their annual memorial ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion. NSB Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr. was guest speaker at the memorial. As I look into the crowd and reect over interactions with veterans of our submarine force throughout my career, and especially those of the last two days, I stand in awe, Guey said. It is a true privilege to even be under the same roof as those who held the line after Pearl Harbor and brought victory to a long and brutal war. We have 31 submarine veterans of World War II with us today. Its because of each of you that we are gathered here, and Im pleased to welcome you back to the submarine force and to Kings Bay. e ceremony was followed by a reception and tours of the Trident Training Facility and tours of USS Maryland (SSBN 738). Fridays activities wrapped up with a Trident Ret Facility/Chief Petty Ocer Association steak night at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. e event highlighted a week-long visit by the Sub Vets. Events aboard Kings Bay and in Camden County began Tuesday with their arrival and ended Saturday. Other activities scheduled during the visit included a tour of the St. Marys Submarine Museum and a Pirates Cove Galley breakfast.World War II Sub Vets remember fallen NSB leaders address Partnership

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As hundreds of ocers donedn new rank during promotion ceremonies across the eet Nov. 1, ofcials remind ocers to update their ocer photo in their military records. Ocer promotions typically occur on the rst of each month. So, as a new group of ocers pin on their new rank and update their ID cards, they must also remember to update their ocial photo, said Capt. Bruce Deshotel, assigned to Ocer Career Transition Division, Navy Personnel Command, which coordinates ofcer promotion lists, each month. New photographs are required for all ocers within three months after acceptance of promotion. NAVADMIN 103/07, released in April 2007, re-instituted the require ment for ocers to submit photo graphs for their permanent service records. e photo must also contain the following information: LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, MIDDLE INI TIAL GRADE/SSN LAST FOUR/ DESIGNATOR(s) dd/MONTH ABBREVIATION/yy, for example, 09 OCT 10. According to MILPERSMAN 1070-180, ocers may write the required information on a piece of paper, poster board or white board in two-inch letters, which may be hand-written. Deshotel said the process is simple. Take the white board, poster or paper along with a digital camera and a shipmate into the passageway. Stand up against the bulkhead (left shoulder forward), while a shipmate takes the full-length photo. e photograph must be in color and display a full-length, threequarter view of the member, left shoulder forward. A plain, at background provides sucient contrast to highlight details of the uniform. e photo must be 4 inches in width and 6 inches in height. Save the picture to a hard drive, then copy and paste it into the submission form (link below). Type in requested information, print the form with the picture and sign the form. Mail the completed, signed form to: Navy Personnel Command Pers-312C 5720 Integrity Dr. Millington, TN 38055-3120 NAVPERS form 1070/884 is available at www.npc.navy.mil/ReferenceLibrary/Forms/PAVPERS/. Complete listings of active duty and Reserve ocers authorized promotion Nov. 1 are contained in NAVADMINS 316/12 and 317/12. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave. e Veterans Day Parade will form at Steens, 550 Leet St., at 9 a.m. and begin at 10 a.m., going north on U.S. 17 and ending at Satilla Street and Williams Avenue. At 11 a.m. a recognition ceremony will be held at the Veterans Memorial Park, followed by a noon catsh dinner at the Depot. For more information, call Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Wounded Warrior ride Nov. 10Ride to Remember 2012, to support Wounded Warrior project, will begin with registration at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 9, 10003 New Kings Road, Jacksonville. e ride will nish with lunch in St. Augustine. For more information, call Todd Dinwiddie at 9904) 608-1220.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jacksonville as a oating Naval Museum. To registration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs. Now hear this! e Defense Department will work with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to ensure the nancial health of service members and their families, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Oct. 19. Panetta and Holly Petraeus, the bureaus assistant director for service members concerns, spoke specically about the nancial burden of student loans place. e No. 1 reason people in the service lose their security clearance is because of nancial problems, Pa netta said. And thats something that we absolutely now have to address. Petraeus presented the results of a report on the challenges that service members face in repaying student loans. is is a problem, Panetta said, noting that some 41 percent of service members are paying o an education-related loan. Im concerned that the report that is being issued today warns of student loan companies that not only may confuse service members, but even violate the law in the approach that they take, he said. Petraeus said she repeatedly hears of the burden of education loans whenever she visits troops. Service members are entering the military with student loan debt, and as a result facing both nancial challenges and paperwork challenges, she said. In one case, a sailor told her of entering the Navy carrying $100,000 in student loan debts. He joined the Navy because it was the only way he believed he could make it, but most of his Navy paycheck was going towards paying o those loans, she said. Petraeus said this is not an isolated case, and she is concerned that service members are not getting the information they need about programs and policies that could help them reduce that debt signicantly while they are on active duty. is is an opportunity for us to x an issue that is impacting the nancial readiness of the force and causing harm to military consumers, she said. We need to be proactive in addressing problems in the servicing of student loans for members of our military. e student loan problem may be in the same category as home loans. In past years, the bureau found that mortgage lenders consistently failed to give troops the protections they earned under the Service Members Civil Relief Act. ere are real concerns of a similar problem with student loan servicing and SCRA violations, Petraeus said. In fact, I think the problem may be greater with student loans than it was with mortgages because I believe many more young service members enter active duty with student loans than with a mortgage. Service members are having problems invoking consumer protection rights under the legislation. ey do not know about repayment alternatives, and student loan servicers are providing them with inaccurate or incomplete information about their options, she said. And they are confused by eligibility requirements for benets that are so complicated that they either cant gure out what they are entitled to or dont realize that taking one benet might exclude them from being eligible for another, more helpful one. And this is real money. Petraeus said the young sailor carrying the $100,000 debt burden could pay nearly $25,000 extra if he doesnt receive the active-duty interest rate cap. And if he stays in the Navy for 10 years but doesnt know about or doesnt use the income-based repayment plan, the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program and the SCRA rate cap, he could lose out on nearly $76,000 that he could have cut o his debt in those 10 years, she said. e bureau will be teaming up with DOD to train judge advocate general personnel, personal nancial managers and education service ocers so that they know about these benets and consumer protection, she said. We also plan to push out the message through a variety of media to all service members, Petraeus said. We want them to know that even if they did not know about or ask for student loan repayment benets when they entered the military, its not too late to do it now.Military to get help with loan issues Financial protection Ocers reminded to update photos Personnel Command Ocials from the Defense and Veterans Aairs departments participated in a panel discussion here Oct. 19 about eorts to prepare service members for the transition to civilian life. Danny Pummill, director of VA/ DOD liaison for Veterans Aairs, and Susan S. Kelly, director of DODs Transition to Veterans Program Ofce, explained the new Transition Assistance Program during the 10th annual Military Reporters and Editors Conference. is isnt your death-by-PowerPoint TAP from the 1990s, Pummill said, referring to a side-intensive one-day seminar for transitioning service members in days gone by. [e new TAP] is well planned and thought out. [TAP] is an adult, interactive learning environment similar to college, with small-group [discussions], as well as one-on-one-counseling, he said. It used to be we had a classroom of upwards of 350 people. Now, our max is 50, and spouses are encouraged to attend. A number of pilot studies were conducted over the past year, Kelly said, including with the National Guard and reserves. We found that the needs of singles separating from a rst tour were dierent than, say, a career soldier with a family getting ready to retire, she said. We also found that each of the services have dierent cultures and personalities. For example, soldiers and Marines respond to [information] dierently than a roomful of airmen. e new TAP will feature pre-separation classes ranging from health care, life insurance and disability to higher education, vocational training and home loans, Kelly said. By the end of 2013, Transition Goals-Plans-Success, known as GPS, will replace TAP, Kelly said. She explained that GPS is a classroom and one-on-one session with service members and their spouses to formulate a plan, including a detailed budget. e plan could be vocational training or college, she explained, in which case the service member would meet with a representative from that institution and begin the paperwork process. Service members wanting to start a business would meet with a representative from the Small Business Administration to go over the feasibility of their business plan and funding resources. For those wanting to enter the private or government sector workforce, she said, employment specialists would assist with resume Return to civilian life in spotlight Transition Assistance 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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writing and job searches, and meetings could be arranged with subject-matter experts in the targeted occupational elds. Service members also would have a Plan B in place in case something didnt work out. Other aspects of the plan include meetings with counselors to focus on the social and psychological factors, which Kelly said are just as important to transitioning service members because they are used to living in a structured environment and need to be better prepared to be on their own. Kelly said special eorts are being made to reach out to Guard and reserve service members to ensure they are getting all the assistance they need. For those living far from military installations, she said, transition teams would be sent out, and some training that otherwise would take place in a classroom could be done in a virtual classroom setting. By the end of 2014, service members will prepare for transitioning across their military life cycle, Kelly said. In other words, training programs with timetables will be formally instituted as soon as a service member enters the military. In addition to being mil itary ready, they will now be career ready, she said. e transition eort established by the Veterans Opportunity to Work Act is a joint eort of the Defense, Labor, VA, and Education departments, along with the Small Business Administration, the Oce of Personnel Management and the White House Domestic Policy Council. If someone told me six government agencies would come up with a plan, I wouldnt have believed it would work, said Pummill, who served in the Army for 34 years. Ive been meeting with them for a year now, and were working things through. Its a model for how government agencies can get together and share manpower and resources and do the right thing, in this case for service members, and this is best plan possible to take care of our service members,.TAP mit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation. In our military families, we see the best our country has to oer. ey demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. eir children show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism. We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their families as well as they serve us. rough First Lady Michelle Obamas and Dr. Jill Bidens Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulll this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veterans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep ghting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families. When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a combat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their families feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patriots who keep our country safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have perished in the line of duty. is month, we rearm that we will always lift up our military families not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over. Now, therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation.Family Previous to Hurricane Sandys landfall, the Coast Guard pre-positioned resources to better ensure the services ability to support search and rescue operations immediately following the storm. is planning and preparation paid o, as the Coast Guards help was needed before Sandy even made landfall when the HMS Bounty began sinking in the Atlantic Ocean with 16 souls aboard. While the dramatic rescue aboard Bounty has captured the nations attention, Coast Guard helicopter crews were also busy responding to multiple requests to rescue people who were trapped in their homes in the wake of the storm. Coast Guard aircrews were sent from both air stations Atlantic City and Cape Cod to provide search and rescue response. In just one of these rescues, three people, trapped in their home from the extreme high tides, were saved by a MH65T Dolphin aircrew. As the three people were taken to area hospitals in the safety of a Coast Guard helicopter, another crew assisted New York Police marine units with nine people in distress. Despite the hard work of emergency responders, people are still in need. Airboats, traditionally used for ice rescues in the Great Lakes region, were dispatched from the 9th Coast Guard District to support this need. ese unique boats can operate in shallow water and are able to help out in ooded communities and more than a dozen Coast Guardsmen from stations in Ohio and Michigan deployed to the East Coast to support Sandy response operations. We are providing crewmembers and assets that are normally used for ice rescue operations and are now going to be used in a completely dierent environment, said Capt. Je Ogden, commander of Sector Detroit.Coast Guard duels Sandy before, during, aer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Nov. 2, 2012 World War II Sub Vets

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 5 Photos by NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer Scott Bassett

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 19 and 26. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Nov. 26The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries, benefits how to interpret job announcements and deter mine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Dominos Pizza wants to say thanks for a great year. So on ursday, Nov. 15, Dominos will be oering a large one topping pizza for $4.99! is oer is for carry out only and is good from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Nov. 15 only at the Kings Bay Dominos! Movie Under the Stars at 6 p.m., Saturday, No. 17 the new venue for the movie will be at the Adult Football Field, across from the Youth Soccer Fields. From the Stimson Gate, take the first right onto USS Daniel Boone Avenue, and then another first right onto USS Lewis & Clark Road to the parking area by the fields. Admission is free for Brave, rated PG. Dominos will be offer any size, any toppings pizza for $10. Bring your blankets, your lawn chairs and dont forget the kids. For more information call (912) 5734564. Wobble Gobble 5K Run Its Wednesday, Nov. 14 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Sign-up at 6:30 am with the race beginning at 7 am. Bring a canned food item for donation, which will benefit Camden House. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, spon sored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All participants are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. The Canyons Zip Line Tour Unleash your inner beast with Navy Adventures Unleashed Saturday, Nov. 17 at e Canyons in Gainesville, Fla. Cost is $74 per person over age 18, which includes all equip ment, nine zips, hiking, rope bridges and a rappel, plus a mini jump school. e rst 10 Liberty eligible patrons price is $64. A van departs from the Big EZ at 7:30 am. Registration payment due Nov. 11. Space is limited. Sign-up and pay at the Big EZ. Closed toe shoes are a must, bring money for food on the way home and loose clothing highly recommended for men. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Old City Music Fest Sunday, Nov. 11. Travel with Liberty to St. Augustine for a huge Country Concert, for active duty only. Charlie Daniels Band, .38 Special, Craig Morgan and Glorianna featured. Space limited to rst 14 who sign up. Ticket and transportation provided. A van departs the Big EZ at 11 am. Bring money for food and beverages. For more informa tion call (912) 573-4548. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration is ongoing. Active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees, regis tration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/ Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Youth Basketball Registration is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. Its $60 each for child for Active Duty and Reservists, $65 per child for military retirees, DoD civilians and NSB contractors. Cost includes uniform. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 10 and 11 IS Hugo Nov. 17 and 18 Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups going Just for kids Liberty call Pizza biz shows appreciation

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Fifty years after they discovered Soviet missiles poised to strike the United States from Cuba, two intelligence ocers met with hundreds of their current-day counterparts to commemorate the anniversary of the crisis that nearly brought the world to nuclear war. Dino Brugioni and Vincent DiRenzo were part of a small group from the CIAs National Photographic Interpretation Center who worked for 13 tense days in October 1962 to avert disaster. ey joined an Oct. 15 panel discussion at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springeld, Va. A photo interpreter, DiRenzo led the NPIC team and formed the initial conclusion about the presence of Soviet medium-range ballistic missiles in Cuba from analysis of U-2 spy plane imagery. Considering the severity of the identication, we gured wed be in for a long night, DiRenzo said. He indicated that the initial assessment was not a slam dunk, as convincing people of the true signicance of the nd was dicult. While DiRenzo was absolutely sure, the image did not show clearly iden tiable missiles, but rather, long, canvas-covered ob jects that, to the layman, could be almost anything. Brugioni was instrumental in arming President John F. Kennedy with intelligence needed to navigate this perilous moment in history. Black Saturday, we had gone to [defense readiness condition] 2, Brugioni said. Fourteen hundred bombers were loaded with nuclear weapons; 50 B-52s were in the air; eight Polaris submarines were at sea; 125 [intercontinental ballistic missiles] were ready to re; there was tactical aviation; there was 60 or missiles in England, 30 Jupiter missiles in Italy, and 15 Jupiters in Turkey. at morning we met with Art Lundahl and told him that all 24 pads were operational, meaning that within four to six hours, 24 missiles could be coming at the United States. I remember Lundahl said, I dont want to scare the hell out of them, but I want to make sure they understand the danger. Fifty years after the United States stood on the brink of nuclear war with the Soviet Union, a historian spoke to a Pentagon audience about how President John F. Kennedy and other leaders dealt with a still-dangerous situation following the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. David G. Coleman, a professor of history at the University of VirPhoto analysts recall Cuban Missile Crisis Crisis pivot point in JFK presidency 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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ginia, provided glimpses into how the president dealt with dicult situations, while consulting with leaders such as Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of State Dean Rusk and National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy. e crisis was a 13-day stando between the United States and the Soviet Union over Soviet missiles deployed to Cuba that were capable of carrying nuclear warheads to the U.S. mainland. it began Oct. 16, 1962, when Kennedy received intelligence proving there were missile sites on Cuba. is led to a military quarantine. e crisis is considered to have ended Oct. 28, 1962, when Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev sent a message to Kennedy promising he would withdraw the missiles. Coleman said Kennedy thought it would be absurd for the Soviets to hand over nuclear weapons to the Cubans, though this was exactly what they had planned. ey abandoned the idea because they started perceiving Castro as potentially unstable and capable of starting a nuclear war. But the issue wasnt just about removing the missiles. e Soviets disagreed about what exactly constituted oensive weapons, and there were negotiations that lasted until Nov. 20, 1962. Coleman said the crisis and the period immediately afterward was a pivot point in the Kennedy administration in which the president stood rm on some things. In the end, Kennedy is remembered as a hero for his handling of the situation, and many consider the peaceful resolution of this crisis one of the high points of presidential accomplishments during the 20th century.Kennedy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 9

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Robert Wise USS Trout, USS Bluefish, USS Whiting Philadelphia I changed my rate from steward to engineer. I got out after 22 years and became a power plant engineer in civil service. Walter Anderson USS Snook, USS Dace Plymouth, Ill. I went to Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois and studied accounting and economics with a minor in international studies. I completed that in three years while working 40 hours a week at three jobs. George Bass USS Boarfish Miami I stayed in the Navy. Im a 30-year guy. I stayed on submarines. Thats all I ever served on, six in my time. I went all the way to Master Chief. Charles Crews USS Spot Mulford, Ga. I went to work in civil service at Ft. McPherson, Georgia. I worked in the audio visual center for 37 years and became the chief of the center. Frank Boarman USS Spot Ohio County Ky. I immediately went to college at Brescia College in Owensboro, Kentucky, and got married. Then I started as an office clerk with a company that manufactured steel gas tanks and ended up president. Bob Plotts USS Becuna Easton, Pa. I had to come home to Easton and make a living. I had a wife, and a daughter when I got home. I worked 38 years at Ingersoll Rand. I tested pumps for nuclear submarines. Joe Clark USS Bream Greensboro, N.C. I started working in my hometown of Greensboro, North Carolina, at Hertz Rent-a-Car I ran it for 40 years and never got a promotion. I started as manager and ended as manager and part owner.By the end of World War II, the Navy had more than 250 submarines. But post-war era plans called for 230 Navy ships of all types. Each branch of the military underwent tremendous downsizing. Most men returned home within a year after the war. They were simply discharged, left to their own devices regarding what to do with their lives. Heres what some of our World War II Submarine Veterans did with their lives after Aug. 14, 1945. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Navy continued to provide disaster relief in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, national and local authorities in the New York and New Jersey areas aected by Hurricane Sandy, Nov. 4. USS Wasp (LHA 1), USS San Antonio (LPD 17), and USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) are in position o the coast of New York and New Jersey supplying military personnel and equipment to disaster areas. Wasp is supplying aircraft to aid in the mission with a total of 18 helicopters aboard: two SH-60s four MH-53Es six CH-53Es six UH-1Ns and one MH-53. Several of these helos departed for Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for tasking. Wasp also sent a team of damage controlmen and hull technicians to help repair the damaged Hoboken Ferry Terminal. San Antonio has four MH-60S and a Landing Utility Craft capable of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. Carter Hall also has a landing utility craft capable of transporting cargo, vehicles and personnel from ship to shore. is LCU ferried supplies and personnel ashore to Sandy Hook, N.J., Nov. 4. Both San Antonio and Carter Hall are capable Fleet helps with relief THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 11

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e Defense Department launched a signicant airlift event to quickly get power restoration equipment to New York, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Nov. 1. e Federal Emergency Management Agency asked DOD to airlift equip ment from Southern Cali fornia to New York, he said. e Air Mobility Command responded and some of the needed equipment quickly got in the air. Aircraft and crews from 12 active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve bases across the nation are rotating through March Air Reserve Base in Southern California, where they will pick up 10 civilian power experts, 637 short tons of supplies and equipment to support relief eorts on the East Coast, Little said. e personnel and equipment were from the Southern California Edison Utility Company and arrives at Stewart Air Na tional Guard Base in New burgh, N.Y., on 12 C-17 Globemasters and ve C-5 Galaxy aircraft by the after noon of Nov. 1, Little said. e cargo included 10 cherry picker trucks, four line trucks, a at-bed digger, eight trouble trucks and a mobile command center, he said. ere were also a number of support trucks, maintenance trucks and all the equipment needed to operate as soon as they roll o the planes, Little added. Most of the crews manning the trucks arrived in New York via commercial air, he said. e Navy moved three ships the USS Wasp, the USS San Antonio and the USS Carter Hall toward the Northeast, Little said. ere had been no request for the capabilities of the ships, but DOD considered this a prudent move, to ensure the ships would be available if needed, he said. e military provided generators and pumping equipment to New York and New Jersey, Little said. e National Guard remained busy in response to recovery eorts throughout New York and New Jersey, he noted. e New Jersey National Guard was very busy yesterday (Oct. 31) rescuing the people of Hoboken who are still stranded due to ooding, Little said. roughout the state, the New Jersey National Guard has rescued more than 2,000 residents from ooded areas. In addition, the New York National Guard responded to Bellevue Hospital, where more than 700 patients needed to be evacuated, he said. I cant say enough about the seless soldiers and airmen throughout the Northeast, Little said. Airli helps to restore power to New York City 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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Pirates Cove menus e amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) pulled in to Naval Station Mayport Nov. 2, to host the Navy Marine Corps Classic basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the Georgetown University Hoyas, Nov. 9 Bataan be honored by the City of Jacksonville during its annual Week of Valor. e annual Week of Valor is a tribute to military members and their families. e event celebrates the city of Jacksonvilles longterm relationship with the Navy, and the long tradition of support the city and its surrounding communities have provided Sailors and Marines, said Capt. Erik Ross, commanding ocer of the Bataan. During guided ship tours, Bataan will showcase the ship on the pier at Naval Station Mayport. Sailors will engage the public with displays and a pregame concert performed by Little Big Town at the pier-side entertainment complex. It is an awesome opportunity to host a basketball game on a ight deck, but the event means much more than that, said Ross. It is about recognizing the relationship between the community and our military.USS Bataan hosts Hoya-Gator hoops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 13

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Marines rescue residents Winds, close to 80 mph, whipped the 14-foot oodwaters through the streets of New York the night of Oct. 29 as Hurricane Sandy bore down. During the height of the storm, a detective from the New York Police Department approached the duty noncommissioned ocer of 6th Communications Battalion, 4th Marine Logistics Group in Brooklyn and requested assistance for a rescue operation. A transformer in the Queens neighborhood of Rockaway Beach burst, triggering a house re that soon spread to adjacent buildings. Because of the re and the rising oodwaters, many residents were trapped. First responders attempted to help stranded residents, but they were also trapped, bringing the number to 14. e water was too deep for the emergency services units, so the NYPD called on the Reserve Marines. We were just checking (our training center) for damage because the storm was getting pretty bad, said Sgt. Jorge Negron, a ground radio repairman with 6th Communications Battalion. e police showed up at the gate and, after getting approval, there was no hesitation. It was just yeah, of course well help. Lt. Col. Richard Bordonaro, Inspector-Instructor for the 6th Communications Battalion, authorized the use of two 7-ton trucks, as well as the service of three Marines and one Navy corpsman, to conduct rescue assistance under the authority of the Defense Support of Civil Authorities directive. Sgts. Allan Donaire, Michael Roy and Jorje Negron along with Petty Ocer 2nd Class Matthew Pulitano, a hospital corpsman, responded at approximately 10:15 p.m. As soon as we got over the bridge, the water (between us and the neighborhood) was so high, said Roy. SUVs were completely underwater and the ood waters were almost over the hood of our 7-ton (approximately seven feet). ere were two res raging when they arrived in the Breezy Pointarea one eventually destroyed 111 houses,and the other burned a power plant. When we turned the corner (and seeing the homes ablaze), it was the most disturbing thing Ive ever seen, Negron said. e entire block was on re; it looked like the road to Armageddon. e rst responders ve hicles were either waterlogged or not large enough to enter the waters, so over the next ve hours, the Marines transported members of police and re departments to dierent areas of the neighborhood. e bravery and dedication I saw was so great, Negron said. Everyone was riding in our truck and then the police would hop into their raft and go to a familyin need and the re department would get in their (rafts) and go straight to a re. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012

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of providing command and control; underwater infrastructure repair capabilities; riverine search and damage assessment; and underwater port survey. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202, embarked aboard San Antonio and Carter Hall, is providing two 15 kilowatt generators and three 250 gallons per minute pumps. Additionally, they are providing small boat and command and control support to the Coast Guard. Kanawha, a Henry J. Kaiser-class eet replenishment oiler, got underway Nov. 2 and will operate in the open waters east of recovery operations. is logistics ship will ensure that Navy and Marine Corps forces are selfsustained with food and fuel. Navy Mobile Construction Battalion 11 is providing a convoy of 23 vehicles and 90 Seabees prepared to assist. eir equipment includes ve 60 kilowatt, ve 30 kilowatt and three 15 kilowatt generators and six 725 gpm pumps along with one 1,000 gpm pump. NMCB 5 is providing 110 Seabees to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for tasking. FEMA issued a mission assignment to the Department of Defense requesting high-volume water pumps with qualied teams to support the operation and maintenance of the equipment. In support of FEMA, SECDEF has authorized the Navy to provide 30 high-volume pumps, 125 Sailors and 30 civilian technicians to support dewatering eorts. So far, 18 Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Units have arrived, with an additional 110 Sailors and 30 pumps from NMCB 5 were to arrive Nov. 5. e embarked MEU is a Marine Corps crisis-response force thats designed to remain aoat for months at a time. e 26th MEU is uniquely suited to the task. Operating from a Navy vessel, the units air assets have an agility that ensures aid can be delivered anywhere within hundreds of miles.Fleet Marines assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit are helping to clear debris in this storm-stricken community as part of Hurricane Sandy relief eorts. Marine leaders from the USS Wasp, including Marine Corps Col. Matthew G. St. Clair, the 26th MEUs commanding ocer, went airborne in an UH-1N Huey helicopter Nov. 3 to conduct disaster relief assessments and survey damage inicted by Sandy along southeastern Staten Island. e 26th MEU has been using the helicopters to survey damaged areas of Staten Island in preparation of follow-on support to local residents. e ights have also allowed the Marines to land in the hardest-hit areas and see what local leaders and residents needed the most. Weve all seen the news, but to actually walk around and talk to people about what they are going through allows us to build a clearer picture as we conduct our planning, St. Clair said. Despite the devastation, seeing the communities come together and help each other is motivation for us. Marines always talk about One Team, One Fight and were just joining their team. e 26th MEU, with more than 300 Marines and Sailors and 12 helicopters, has been moving gear and personnel to the U.S. Navy amphibious ship USS Wasp, while the unit received its mission priorities and assembled capabilities prior to going ashore to assist stormstricken residents.26th MEU at work on Staten Island THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2012 15

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