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The Kings Bay periscope ( 11-01-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00276

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00276


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County liaison group in Watson buildingFor the past three years, Sheila McNeill has been steering e Camden Partnership from an oce in the back of Sheilas Hallmark. e oce location made it easier for her to run her store and TCP si multaneously. e price was right too. ere was no cost to the Part nership. McNeill knew she was going to close Sheilas Hallmark around Aug. 1, so TCP began looking for an alter nate location for its oce. Fortunately, LaVonda Turner, Bro ker at Watson Realty, contacted Mc Neill in June and oered a furnished oce in the Watson building for TCP oce. McNeill started working from her new oce location on August 8. While the location of TCP opera tions has changed, its vision remains strong and true: to be the primary resource and preferred partner in military/community issues. Its mission is as follows, To ad vocate, support and strengthen mili tary missions, and improve the quality of life for our military members by enhancing military and community partnerships. ese are some of TCPs eorts to wards those goals: Increase military missions at Kings Bay: TCP met with the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Up Periscope World War II Sub Vet recall perilous times Page 9 Prevent fires NSB Kings Bay Fire Dept. puts out word Page 5 Dinner, movie Unaccompanied housing bar racks has program Page 9 CYP spotlights activities in Lights on Aerschool Lights on Afterschool is an annual event hosted by e Afterschool Alliance. e purpose of Lights on Afterschool is to bring awareness to the impor tant role that after-school programs play in the lives of the children that attend them. After-school pro grams around the United States participate in this event. is year, the Morale Welfare and Recreation Youth Center at Naval Aer-school not an aerthought Camden Partnership gets new digs World War II Submarine Veterans memorialize lost shipmates with ceremonye annual memorial ceremony by World War II Submarine Veterans, with the Tolling of the Boats, will begin at 10 a.m., Friday, Nov. 2 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion. e ceremony will be followed by a re ception and tours of the Trident Training Facility. An afternoon submarine tour is be ing oered. Fridays activities wrap up with Trident Ret Facility/Chief Petty Ocer As sociation steak night at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Har vey L. Guey, Jr., will be guest speaker at the memorial service. Submarine Group Ten Command Master Chief Shaun Garvin will serve as master of ceremonies. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will deliver the remembrance. WELCOME TO JANE WAYNE DAY Marine Corps Security Force Battalion gives ladies a sample of military drills Fall in! On the double! Move it! Move it! Move it! Spouses and extended family members of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion were treated to a Jane Wayne Day, Oct. 13. Jane Wayne Day lets wives and family members participate in various activities that the service members deal with on a monthly basis. It also gives them a chance to spend an entire day with their Marine or Sailor, an opportunity that is rarely af forded given the demanding work schedule most Marine Corps Security Forces personnel have, said Lt. William Green, Family Readiness ocer for the battalion. Lt. Col. Kevin Moody, Marine Corps Security Force Battalion commanding ocer, welcomed the family members and thanked them It was great having my family here to experience what we go through ... Cpl. Jaime OCampo NSB Kings Bay MCSFBn Remembrance Friday Sandy lashes EastSize and intensity of storm historicHurricane Sandy made landfall along the New Jersey coast, late Monday. As of Tuesday morning, the storm had already wreaked hav oc across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast and was expected to aect millions more Americans as it moved northwest, dumping rain and kicking up winds of up to 80 mph. Forecasters warned the storm is historic in size and intensity. New York City and At lantic City appeared to be among the cities most aected in early reports. In New York, ve deaths were been blamed on Sandy. Both cities faced widespread ooding and major disruptions to the power grid. At least 16 deaths in seven states were reported includ ing at least seven in New York as Sandy pummeled the Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com More on Pages 3, 5

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 At 1 p.m., Nov. 3, the Tigers and Gyrenes will come head-to-head at Camden County High Schools Chris Gilman Stadium. Edward Waters College will face Ave Maria University in the only col lege football competition in Cam den County. You know what a Tiger is, but for those of you who dont know what a Gyrene is, here you go: A Gyrene is remembered with great nostalgia by older Americans who identify the name with that special breed of young men who fought the desper ate battles of Belleau Wood and the island campaigns of the Pacic. ese men formed the battle history of the United States Marine Corps and fashioned an ethos that inspires the men and women who serve in todays Corps. Jacksonvilles Edward Waters and Ave Maria will vie for the winning title of the historic Ralph J. Bunche Classic. L. J. Williams, event chair, said that the Classic is expected to draw hundreds of visitors who will be contributing to the economy of Camden County. College football fans from several states will be staying in our hotels, eating in our restaurants and hav ing the opportunity to discover all that Camden County has to oer, Williams said. Our hopes are that these visitors will return and spend more time here and tell others what a great place we live in. Williams added locals are en couraged to attend as well, to show support for this classic event and to honor its name same, Ralph J. Bunche. Bunche was an American political scientist and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. He was the rst person of color to be so honored in the history of the Prize. He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he received the Medal of Freedom from President John F. Kennedy. Bunche founded a trade school that later became an all-black high school in Camden County. e community can become in volved through sponsorships and/ or by purchasing tickets to the game. General admission to the game is $10 in advance, $12 on game day and for children/students $5 in ad vance and $7 on game day. Family packages are available, and groups of 20 are eligible for a discount. Tickets may be purchased at the Kingsland and St. Marys Welcome Centers, retail outlets and on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at Mo rale, Welfare and Recreation. For ticket information, call Emma Rogers at (912) 222-2188, and for ticket or vendor information, call L. J. Williams at (912) 552-4494. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland yard sale to benet Veterans Me morial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave. e Veter ans Day Parade will form at Steens, 550 Leet St., at 9 a.m. and begin at 10 a.m., going north on U.S. 17 and ending at Satilla Street and Wil liams Avenue. At 11 a.m. a recognition cer emony will be held at the Veterans Memorial Park, followed by a noon catsh dinner at the Depot. For more information, call Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown De velopement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Wounded Warrior ride Nov. 10Ride to Remember 2012, to support Wound ed Warrior project, will begin with registration at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 9, 10003 New Kings Road, Jacksonville. e ride will nish with lunch in St. Augustine. For more information, call Todd Dinwiddie at 9904) 608-1220.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jack sonville as a oating Naval Museum. To regis tration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org.Ft. Clinch re-enactment weekendFort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla., will host a Union Gar rison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 3 and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Nov 4. Visitors can interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. For more infor mation, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! College football at Camden Nov. 3 Ralph J. Bunche Classic In recognition of No vember as Georgia Apply to College Month the Child and Youth Edu cation Services oce is hosting a workshops designed to help middle school students, high school students and their parents understand how to make the best choices about high school and life after graduation. e workshop will be 6:30 to 8 p.m., ursday, Nov. 8 at the Naval Sub marine base Kings Bay Youth Center. Topics are as follows: Where do we start? Parents and students will be introduced to web site gacollege411. org as an important planning tool. Understanding high school course selec tion and pathways. Student services person nel will help students and parents understand the academy system at Camden County High School and the pathways requirements for graduation. Making $ense of financial aid. Where do you find the money for college? A financial aid advisor will be on hand to explain changes to the Georgia Hope Scholarship and other funding options. e Kings Bay Youth Center is inside the Jackson Gate on Char lie Smith, Jr. Highway, Georgia Spur 40, just past Crooked River El ementary School. After entering the gate, make the rst right onto USS Wahoo Avenue and proceed to the Youth Center at the end of the street. No special base access is required for attending events at the Kings Bay Youth Center. All are welcome to at tend. For more information contact Clainetta Jeer son, School Liaison Of cer at (912) 573-8986 or call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Applying to college series oeredThe World War II Submarine Veterans who are visiting us this week to memorialize their fallen shipmates were born and grew up in an America that was very different from today. ey were born in the early 1920s, only years removed from a worldwide inuenza epidemic that killed an estimated 50 million people, including 675,000 in the United States. When these men were came into the world, the Navy was ying biplanes for the rst time o a car rier deck. Before they were teenagers, unfettered by hypnotic handheld devices, most of them were introduced to work, not household chores, but real work, made necessary by the Great Depres sion, another disaster which made todays economic speed bump look like a Sunday church ice cream social. ere was no time for boredom. ere was only the constant struggle to help put food on the family table. I was born less than a decade after these men ended World War II. America was dierent then, too. But I grew up with a link to their generation. ey were my heros. My generation grew up out in the yard, thrown out of the house to get the stink blown o ya! But I can remember Saturday afternoons at the Witkowski brothers modest home, standing outside a screened window too high to see in, listing to sounds of the action movie being watched by their father, himself a World War II veteran. Sometimes it was Indians whooping and rie shots, but more often it was screeching planes, exploding bombs, and machine gun and artillery re. We didnt play video games ghting space aliens or robots or zombies or sword-wielding gerbils. We played war, lying in the high weeds of vacant lots, ghting Ger mans and Japanese. Into the 1960s, World War II was still fresh. I didnt know anything about rock n roll, Vietnam or women. ey were all still in my future. But I knew about World War II. Barrels Witkowski had been in the Navy at Okinawa. e Keutzer kids dad piloted a B-17 over Ger many. Jims dad, Lefty Matekaitis, went ashore at Omaha Beach on DDay. ey didnt talk about it to us, but it was known. ese men were the fathers of my friends. After the war, these men came home and went back to work. ey built careers. ey raised families. e loved, and they grieved. Some struggled. My brother Greg is named for Marine ghter ace Gregory Pappy Boyington, whose post-war life was a continuing battle. But these men put America on their shoulders and quietly carried us into a new era of prosperity. e men of this era who are with us are submarine veterans. I have never understood how someone could serve on a submarine. My favorite thing about being in the Navy was getting up in the morning, grabbing a cup of coee on the mess decks and heading out before colors for a smoke and to watch the sun rise over the Atlantic. at, and searching the Milky Way at night through the big eyes. e ocean air was so fresh I couldnt believe it. When I went back to Illinois I thought I was walking into a greenhouse. All I could smell was dirt and chlorophyll. Im envious of submariners. I couldnt do it. Get outside! I digress. Ill not go into casualties at Pearl Harbor and the war that followed, or 9/11 and subsequent wars. eyre documented. Weve all paid a price. What I will say is the United States is strong. It always has been. Todays military is as strong as any in our history. Its up to all to continue the legacy of a strong America. at would keep faith with our salute to the men who are with us here this week. ese guys were, still are my heros By Bill Wesselho Old School

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Pirates Cove menus A scientist whose work has been funded by the Oce of Naval Research for more than 30 years received the Nobel Prize in physics Oct. 9 for his investigations into the quan tum mechanics of matter and light-research that has resulted in the worlds most accurate clock. A physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colora do-Boulder, Dr. David J. Wineland was hailed for his contributions to the measurement and control of individual quantum systems, or isolating and trapping atoms and photons to scrutinize the relationship between light and matter. is practice lies at the heart of the quest for precision clocks and the worlds most powerful computers. Dr. Wineland is the 63rd Nobel laureate that weve sponsored, said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder. is signicant achievement underscores the vision and skill of ONR program ocers to identify and invest in the best scientic talent in the U.S. and around the world. ONR in 1977 pro vided the rst funding out side of NIST for Wine land and fellow researchers when they began exploring the possibilities of laser cooling to manipulate atoms using light. is technique has found its way into many aspects of experimental atomic physics, and through our continued funding from ONR has enabled us to now real ize the worlds most pre cise clocks, said Wineland, whose research into trapped-ion atomic clocks continues to be supported by ONR. His recent research helped create a clock that would not stray more than a second from actual time over the course of 30 bil lion years. Dr. Charles Clark, who oversees ONRs Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Program, said this level of precision opens a world of possibilities for Sailors and Marines, who rely on atomic clocks stationed on satellites to pro vide accurate GPS mea surements for operations on land, at sea and in the air. Greater precision in the measurement of time also leads to greater preci sion in measurement and control of the frequen cies of electromagnetic waves, Clark said. ese have many uses in U.S. Navy applications such as enhanced sensitivity of radar, greater security of communications and improved sensing of changes of Earths magnetic and gravitational elds, among others. Winelands researchalong with that of co-re cipient Serge Haroche, a professor at the College de France and Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris-also moves scientists closer to creating quantum com puters that one day could solve complex problems at speeds unheard of with todays machines. Wineland previously received the National Medal of Science in 2007. e Nobel Prize is awarded each year to trailblazers in cultural and sci entic elds. As Nobel laureates, Wineland and Haroche will receive a medal, a diploma and share a $1.2 million prize. Nobel to Navy associate Guard reports for duty As more governors de clared states of emergency in advance of Hurricane Sandy, the National Guard stood ready to respond to the aftermath of the storm. It was a busy weekend for the National Guard Coordination Center at Ar lington, Va., as a 7.7 magnitude earthquake that struck British Columbia, Canada, late Saturday trig gered tsunami warnings in Alaska and Hawaii and advisories in California and Oregon. Hawaii Gov. Neil Aber crombie declared a state of emergency. Meanwhile, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jer sey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia were among juris dictions declaring a state of emergency in advance of Hurricane Sandy. e National Guard Co ordination Center was reporting 369 Guard mem bers already activated in Delaware, North Carolina and Virginia as of Sunday. e numbers of Guard members and states were expected to increase. e National Guard is the hometown team, said Army Sta Sgt. Wayne Woolley of the New Jersey National Guard. Soldiers and Airmen live in these communities, and they are eager to help and want to keep their fellow citizens safe. e National Guard Bu reau wis monitoring the situation closely and co ordinating with state, fed eral and local partners to ensure a coordinated and ecient response, Guard ocials said. e National Guard the nations rst military responder supports the Federal Emergency Man agement Agency response and that of U.S. Northern Command, among other agencies. More than 61,100 Na tional Guard members are available to assist civilian authorities in potentially aected states in support of relief eorts. Available National Guard resources include almost 140 rotarywinged aircraft to perform search and rescue, recon naissance and personnel or cargo-carrying missions. In addition to the hur ricane and the tsunami, on Sunday National Guard members were supporting the Department of Home land Security in the four Southwest border states, conducting Counterdrug operations in multiple states, providing force protection in California and key asset protection in New York. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 JANE W AYNE DAY NSB Kings Bay Marine Corps Security force battalions for taking time out of their busy schedules to experience Marine Corps Security Force life. After receiving a safety brief and the event schedule for the day, the families were outtted with kevlar helmets and ak jackets. en they loaded into Bearcat vehicles for transport to the obstacle course. Once there, the wives put to scaling walls, jumping over barricades and performing other physically draining activities. Divided into groups, they moved on to the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program facility for demonstrations, after which they were able to practice defensive postures, strikes and takedown moves on each other, and their loved ones. Jane Wayne participants then were loaded back into Bearcats and headed to the track to participate in the Ma rine Combat Fitness Test. Master Sergeant Franklin Acree, Battalion OPS chief, told the families the CFT is exactly like the one their ser vice members go through. e family members who ran the course nished covered in sweat, and some said that they never wanted to do the course ever again. At the indoor simulated marksmanship trainer, they were able to test their skills in ring the M16 rie, the M9 pistol and the M240G medium machine gun. ISMT is a ring range that allows the person an opportunity to re 45 training rounds for each simulated weapon, while they are judged by reaction time and their sight ing ability on a target. It was great hav ing my family here to experience what we go through here at the battalion, said Cpl. Jaime OCampo, battalion NBC/range operations noncommissioned ocer in charge. After weapons, the family members were given the op portunity to suite up in Mission Oriented Protective Pos ture gear, which included a gas mask and head-to-toe protective clothing. Jane Wayne participants marched over to Marine Corps Security Force Battalion quad, where they enjoyed a dem onstration by military working dogs. Finally, it was time to take a break for lunch. Family members did not bring their lunches or eat at the galley. e commanding ocer in stead treated them to a selection of Meals Ready to Eat. Participants had a wonderful time tasting the wide variety of MREs. Some elected to save them as a souvenir. All the family members that went through the course nished with a sense of accomplishment and deep appreciation for what their spouses go through, Green said. e families then nished the day with the commanding ocer giving all family members an ocial Marine Corps Security Force Battalion T-shirt for completing the day. Now the families can go home and tell their ser vice members they were a Marine/Sailor for the day, Moody said. e spouses know they are just as much a part of the battalion as their Marine and Sailor. Gunnery Sgt. Craig Garrett, upper left, walks an obstacle while, from left, Master Sgt. Franklin Acree, Lt. Col. Kevin Moody (partially hidden) and Pfc. Garret Hadley escort Jane Waynes to the obstacle course. Photos by HM2 Melissa Croom and MA3 Johnny Oliver The spouses know they are just as much a part of the battalion as their Marine or Sailor Lt. Col. Kevin Moody NSB Kings Bay MCSFBn

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 5 Sandy keeps eet in port Commander, Fleet Forc es modied guidance for all Navy ships in Hampton Roads, Va. Ships in port were di rected to remain in port. Ships at sea continued to maneuver to clear the path of the storm. e Navy orders a sor tie during potentially ex treme weather conditions to reduce the risk of signif icant damage to ships and piers during high winds and seas. Ships planning to get underway on Saturday were no longer go to sea because the projected winds and storm surge in the Navys ports in Hampton Roads would not ex ceed the ability of our ships to remain safely in port. We kept a very close watch on the storm all night, said Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. As a result of these pro jected changes, we de termined that the safest place for the ships not al ready underway is in port. While we have made these prudent decisions for our ships, I dont want to understate the signicance of the situation. Sandy remains a powerful storm. Ships in port were to take extra precautions to avoid potential damage from the powerful storm. Commanding ocers had a number of options when staying in port, depending on the severity of the weather. Standard measures for ships rid ing out heavy weather in port include extra moor ing lines; placing the anchor on the bottom while alongside the pier; and removal of shore power cables, heavy or elevated brows, and any lighter ob jects that could create haz ards during high winds. As a precautionary mea sure, Commander Navy Installations Command ordered all installations in the Hampton Roads area to remain at Tropical Cyclone Condition ree as Sandy was forecast to bring high winds and rain to the Mid-Atlantic coast. Tropical Cyclone Condition ree means de structive winds of greater than 50 knots associated with a tropical system, are expected within 48 hours. Additional measures tak en by local Navy commands included pulling dozens of small craft out of the water at various locations around Hampton Roads. e ves sels will remained out of the water until after the storm passed. It is important for all of our Sailors, civilians, and family members take all appropriate precautions as the storm approaches, and I would encourage the general public to do the same, Gortney said. Im a boat owner, and mine is out of the water and I am using a checklist to make sure my family and I are ready for the potential impacts of Sandy here in the Hampton Roads area. Fire Prevention Week 2012 NSB Kings Bay Fire DepartmentFire Prevention Week 2012 was a great success, from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., signing a Fire Prevention Proclamation to the last tour and static display at the bases Child Development Center. More than 800 people attended fire department tours, underwent training and visited safety information displays. The children enjoyed seeing the re trucks, reghters, a safety video, playing in mascot Sparkys Bounce House and the Fire Safety Coloring Page Contest. Fire Department members thank everyone, including teachers, parents and sponsors for a great Fire Safety Campaign. In the rst major U.S. Coast Guard search and rescue operation associated with Hurricane Sandy, the Coast Guard has rescued 14 people from life rafts in the Atlan tic Ocean approximately 90 miles southeast of Hatteras, N.C. e searchcontinuedfor two people who remain missing from the crew of HMS Bounty. e owner of the 180-foot, three-mast tall ship HMS Bounty, a replica of the original British transport vessel built for the 1962 lm Mutiny on the Bounty, starringMarlon Brandon, contacted Coast Guard Sector North Carolina after losing communication with the crew late Sunday evening. e 5th Coast Guard District com mand center in Portsmouth, Va., subsequently received a signal from the emergency distress position indicating radio beacon registered to the Bounty conrming the distress and position. A Coast Guard search airplane was launched from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City Sunday evening which established communication with the Bountys crew upon arriving on scene. e vessel was report edlysinking in 18-foot seas accompanied by 40-mph winds. By the time two Coast Guard rescue helicopters from Elizabeth City arrived on scene at approximately 6:30 a.m., the 16 crew members had reportedly divided among two 25-man lifeboats and were wearing cold weather survival suits and life jackets. Air crews located and rescued 14 of the 16 crew members. e HMS Bounty sank but the mast is still visible. Movie Bounty sinks

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Intramural Kickball League registration is open to all active duty, DoD, dependents and ci vilians 18 and older. ere will be a captains meeting at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 7 in the Fit ness Complex classroom. You also can register online at www. kingsbay sports.league apps.com. For more information, call (912) 573-8908. Military Family Appreciation Day Its 3 to 10 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 3 at Under the Pines Park, with carnival rides, hay rides, face painters, balloon art, inflatables, laser tag, arts and crafts, and lots of music. There will be Pucker Powder Art for $2, caricatures for $1 and cotton candy for for $1. Tickets for these are at the ticket booth. Entrance to the festival is free, and there will be food available for purchase. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4564. The Canyons Zip Line Tour ~ Unleash your inner beast with Navy Adventures Unleashed Saturday, Nov. 17 at e Canyons in Gainesville, Fla. Cost is $74 per person over age 18, which includes all equip ment, nine zips, hiking, rope bridges and a rappel, plus a mini jump school. e rst 10 Liberty eligible patrons price is $64. A van departs from the Big EZ at 7:30 am. Registration payment due Nov. 11. Space is limited. Sign-up and pay at the Big EZ. Closed toe shoes are a must, bring money for food on the way home and loose clothing highly recom mended for men. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Old City Music Fest Sunday, Nov. 11. Travel with Liberty to St. Augustine for a huge Country Concert, for active duty only. Charlie Daniels Band, .38 Special, Craig Morgan and Glorianna featured. Space limited to rst 14 who sign up. Ticket and transportation provided. A van departs the Big EZ at 11 am. Bring money for food and beverages. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their fami lies. Authorized civilians, con tractors and guests will contin ue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appe tizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration is ongoing. Active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees, regis tration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/ Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Youth Basketball Registration is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 and Nov. 10 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. Its $60 each for child for Active Duty and Reservists, $65 per child for military retirees, DoD civilians and NSB contractors. Cost includes uniform. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 3 and 4 is Madagascar 3, Nov. 10 and 11 Hugo Nov. 17 and 18 Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups going Just for kids Liberty call Kickball captains meet Nov. 7 Navy College educational information

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active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more informa tion call (912) 573-9492.MWR Red Ribbon winner Golfers with a cause Security and Navy leader ship. TCP lobbied exten sively and successfully in Washington, D.C. for retention of Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Teams, including the MSST unit located in St. Marys. Increase the footprint of military contractors in Camden County: TCP collaborated with the National Navy League to become the rst com munity or state to have a booth exhibit at the Navy Leagues annual Sea-Air Symposium, which fea tures the largest group of defense contractors ever assembled. e symposium also attracted VIPs from DOD and all branches of the service. e Georgia/Camden County exhibit was visited by many VIPs and defense contractors. Everyone went away having a much better understanding of what Camden County has to oer. TCP works aggres sively with state govern ment as a representative for military bases. Enhance the relations between local military and civilian communities: is is the third year TCP has spon sored forums and base tours intended to educate personnel inside and outside the base on what each community does and how they interact. e forums and tours are open to the public, but require reservations, so names of attendees can be given to security for base access. e forum and tour dates are pub lished in the local news paper. TCP also hosted the annual A Community that Cares event with keynote speakers and the annual Honoring our Elected Ocials recep tion. McNeill is enter ing her 17th year as a member of the board of directors with the Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. TCP has created a syn ergy with the Jacksonville Chamber Military Aairs Committee to leverage the proximity of Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the Blount Island Command and NSB Kings Bay. e synergy created by these four geographically-close installations, as well as their working relation ships and sharing of com mon activities, is bene cial as TCP prepares for the next Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission, and in working to increase mis sions and provide ways to improve the quality of life for the military. Providing military position papers: TCP researched and authored military position papers for the annual Atlanta and Washington, D.C. y-ins. As requested, TCP provided numerous position papers to its congres sional delegation, as well as to the Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. Maintain and improve TCP web site: e web site was recently reorganized, thanks to the eorts of Dave Burch and Nelson Dowling, a senior market ing major at the College of Coastal Georgia. eir eorts, current articles and informative content results in a web site of which TCP is proud of. e web site is at thecam denpartnership.org. While the aforementioned are primarily military focused, TCP also is heavily involved in sus taining and enhancing the quality of life of all residents in the area. Nonmilitary benets that result from TCP actions are aimed at improving the success of this community for individuals and businesses, by providing better educational oppor tunities, greater long-term stability and economic de velopment and growth. e Camden Partnership desires that this commu nity become a place where young people can grow, de velop and nd meaningful, long-term employment, as well as personal and profes sional fulllment. Submarine Base Kings Bay hosted a Skill-a-on Oct. 18 to highlight some of the clubs the Youth Center of fers. e clubs that were fea tured were Garden, Earth, Naturalist; Track and Field; Fine Arts; and Start SMART/SMART Kids. e goal was to highlight the core areas of after-school programming such as character and leadership, health and life skills, the arts, career and education, and sports, tness and so cial recreation. All children who are enrolled in the School Age Care Program are automatically registered to participate in 4-H and Boys and Girls Club of America club activities. For more information about enrolling children, contact the MWR Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Partners School e service is marked by the Tolling of the Bell, the Sounding of the Div ing Alarm, the placing of a wreath, a rie salute and Taps. Saturday, sub vets are invited to a Wounded War riors memorial ceremony at Oak Grove Cemetery, Gilman Waterfront Park events and a low country boil at the St. Marys Eagles Club. Todays activities began with a breakfast at the Pirates Cove Galley with Capt. Guey, submarine tours and a Navy Submarine Support Command CPOA barbecue. East Coast with 80 mph winds and severed power to more than 8.1 million customers, e Associated Press reported. e New York Times re ported that 70 to 80 per cent of Atlantic City, N.J. was under water. e chief of emergency services told the paper the city was un der siege. Some 12,500 ights were cancelled and public transportation was shut down from Washington to Boston by Tuesday. Dozens of homes have been destroyed in a mas sive re in the New York City borough of Queens. e center of Sandy was near Philadelphia, the National Hurricane Center reported late Monday. e storms large wind eld spread rainfall to the mountains of West Virgin ia. About two feet of snow fell in some places and about 200,000 customers were without power in West Virginia, where the temperatures were well below freezing.Sub VetsSandy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Bob Hall USS Parche (SS 384) Portsmouth, N.H. We sank four ships in 46 minutes. They tried to ram us on the surface and missed by about 50 feet. (Another time) they depth-charged us. I was a cook and a baker, so I slept through most of the day. It was just as well I slept through that. Harry Irving USS Pilefish (SS 307) Deltona, Fla. We had a tough time on our first patrol. We went beyond the depth we were built to go. We were built to go 500 feet and we went 528 feet. Everybody was scared. There were no atheists onboard. Jim Tobin USS Steelhead (SS 280) Wilmington, N.C. We were follow ing a convoy and attacked. We found out they had a couple of escorts, and they kept us down for 10 hours with depth charges. That was tough. Another time we were out 73 days, and all we had left to eat was rice. Harvey Bartle USS Bumper (SS 333), USS Brill (SS 330) Liberty, Ky. I tell my grandkids, when youre 18 or 19 years old, all of the times are good. We had some great liberty in Australia. We had some pretty rough times, too. But being here with my boys make them all seem good. Daniel Rosey Rosenfeld USS Bang (SS 385) Miami I put the USS Bang into commission and made all six wartime patrols. We sank six and damaged more. We took 16 hits and had no control over the boat. Tokyo Rose said they sank us, but they didnt. Charles Brown USS Puffer (SS 268) Keokuk, Iowa In we ran aground north of Borneo and took five hours to get off ... (Later) a depth charge opened our main induction and drove us down to 570 feet. Red Whatley USS Spot (SS 413) Greenwood, S.C. We got caught on the surface by a Japanese DD and didnt have enough water to sub merge, so we had to fight it out with our 5-inch gun. We hit it at the waterline, and it moved off and sank the next day. Its been my pleasure the last three years to talk to the World War II Submarine Veterans and make them part of Up Periscope. Ive heard a lot of good stories. Some were funny, some terrifying and some heartwarming. They will tell you they are common men, yet with uncommon bravery they fought through some of the most dire and desperate circumstances imaginable. Here are seven all-too-brief pieces of their experiences. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Classic Dinner and a movie at the Barracks THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 9

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Pretrial hearings for two major court cases one involving the alleged perpetrators behind the 9/11 terror attacks and the other involving the soldier charged with the largest in telligence leak in U.S. his tory are converging this week as attorneys operat ing in two very dierent legal systems focus on the issue of classied informa tion in the courtroom. e pre-trial hearing for Khalid Sheik Mohammed, who has confessed to planning the 9/11 at tacks from A to Z, and four others who allegedly trained, nanced or ar ranged transportation for the 19 hijackers entered its fourth day Oct. 18 at Naval Air Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Mohammeds codefendants in the case are his nephew, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali; Walid Muhammad Salih Mubarak bin Attash, charged with selecting and training some of the hijackers; and Ramzi Bi nalshibh and Mustafa Ahmed Adam al Hawsawi, accused with helping nance the attacks. Meanwhile, at Fort Meade, the second day of pre-trial hearings continued for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. He is an Army intelligence specialist ac cused of downloading and transmitting classied information to the whistleblowing group WikiLeaks while he was deployed to Iraq. e legal systems being used to prosecute these cases are signi cantly dierent. Manning, as a mem ber of the U.S. military, is subject to the Uniformed Code of Military Justice. is system has roots dat ing back to the Revolution ary War, and is intended to promote good order and discipline in the armed forces. e 9/11 defendants, on the other hand, will be tried through a mil itary tribunal governed by the Military Commissions Act of 2009. Manning is charged with aiding the enemy; wrong fully causing intelligence to be published on the Inter net, knowing that it is ac cessible to the enemy; theft of public property or re cords; transmitting defense information; and fraud and related activity in connec tion with computers. e charges against him also include violation of Army Regulations 25-2 Information Assurance and 380-5 Department of the Army Information Security Program. If found guilty, Manning could receive up to life in prison. He also could be reduced to E-1, the lowest enlisted grade, and face a total forfeiture of all pay and allowances and dis honorable discharge. Military commissions, on the other hand, apply to an alien unprivileged enemy belligerent who has engaged in hostilities, or who has purposefully and materially support ed hostilities against the United States, its coalition partners or was a part of al Qaeda. e 9/11 de fendants were captured in Pakistan between 2002 and 2003 and have been conned at Guantanamo Bay since 2006. ey were charged dur ing their arraignment in May with terrorism, conspiracy, attacking civilians, attacking civil ian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily in jury, murder in violation of the law of war, destruc tion of property in vio lation of the law of war, hijacking or hazarding a vessel or aircraft. If found guilty, they could receive the death penalty. A casual peek into the courtrooms gives a glimpse into one of the most obvious dierences between the UCMJ and military commission processes. By law, Manning is not required to attend pro ceedings regarding his case, but a military lawyer with more than 20 years experience said on back ground that hes never seen a service member not attend. Photographers outside the courtroom yesterday captured images of Manning being escorted from the court room in his Army dress blue uniform with goldcolored private rst class rank on his sleeves. Army Col. James Pohl, the judge presiding over the 9/11 case, ruled earlier this week that the defen dants dont have to attend their court sessions, as long as they sign a waiver form each morning they choose to skip. When they do elect to attend, they can dress as they choose as long as their attire doesnt include U.S. military uniform items or prisoner garb in a color that would misrepresent their security status at the detention facility. Mohammed quickly took advantage of both rulings. He opted out of court the rst day after Pohl ruled that he could the day the judge also took up the wardrobe is sue. Mohammed initially elected not to attend the third day of pre-trial hear ings, then showed up later that morning wearing a camouage vest over his traditional white tunic. Most of the distinctions between the UCMJ and military commission legal processes are less obvious to those without legal training, and the discus sion could ll textbooks. One big question being debated during the 9/11 hearings, for example, is whether the defendants have constitutional rights. However, a central con cern in both the Manning and 9/11 cases is the issue of how classied informa tion is dealt with in court. Today, the fourth day of pretrial hearings for the 9/11 suspects continued to focus on the balance between protecting clas sied information that, if made public, could jeopardize U.S. national security, and the constitutional mandate that court pro ceedings be open to the public. e prosecution and U.S. government lawyers say protections are need ed to prosecute the case without disclosing clas sied information that would threaten U.S. na tional security. In contrast, the defen dants defense teams ac cused prosecutors of using an overly broad banner of national security to safe guard information vital to providing a solid defense. Echoing them were lawyers representing the American Civil Liberties Union and media groups, who said the government wants to squelch informa tion the public deserves to know. Pohl is expected to rule this week on a protec tive order the prosecution has requested to spell out what provisions are pro tected and which ones arent. A central issue in both the 9/11 and Manning cases involves information regarding the defendants detention. For Manning, that in volves time when he was allegedly mistreated while being held in a Marine Corps brig at Quantico, Va. Of primary concern re garding the 9/11 defen dants is time they spent in the hands of the CIA be fore being transferred to Guantanamo Bay. Both cases also require hammering out details about witnesses who can be called. In Mannings case, for example, some witnesses names have been redacted from the motion and are considered to be classied as se cret. At Guantanamo Bay, the issue involves whether the defense is required to give the prosecution a heads up about what tes timony the witnesses it calls are likely to provide something the government would weigh in de ciding whether to y a wit ness to the court. Meanwhile, Army Col. Denise Lind, the judge hearing he Manning case, ordered the prosecution yesterday to release hundreds of emails about his incarceration to the de fense team. Linds ruling covered all but 12 of about 600 emails regarding a range of issues: from Mannings visitor list and provisions to ensure he had proper uniforms to plans for responding to protesters and media queries. ese emails, added to ones already in the pos session of Mannings de fense attorneys, bring to 1,200 the total number of emails that will presum ably be used to argue that their client was treated il legally. Lind also issued rulings that would allow parts of CIA, FBI and Depart ment of Homeland Secu rity documents used in the case to be redacted.Classied info key in 9/11, WikiLeaks cases e commander of Na val Education and Training Command visited the Fleet Anti-Submarine Training Center recently as part of a two-day tour of NETCs San Diego learn ing sites. is was Rear Adm. Don Quinns rst visit to the learning site, which is part of the Center for Surface Combat Systems domain, since assuming command at NETC in January. FLEA SWTRA CEN Com manding Officer Capt. Richard omas provid ed Quinn an overview of training and tour of labs and trainers. Rear Adm. Quinn was able to see the spectrum of training we provide, from basic individual skills to team trainers, omas said. He observed crew members from USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) conducting their Anti-Submarine Team Trainer Refresher Course. is was a great opportu nity for him to get a rst hand look at Sailors hon ing their ASW skills o the ship. As Quinn toured the PC Open-Architecture Recongurable Training Sys tem lab, Chief Sonar Tech nician Justin Chianese discussed the importance of the simulated trainer. PORTS has been in use for a year and a half and it has been very benecial for the Navy, Chianese said. We are now able to train 12 students at a time versus the four we used to training, and as a re sult, we have removed two weeks of course time. Quinn was impressed with what he observed in both the labs and class rooms. e instructors and sta at Fleet ASW Train ing Center in San Diego are training the worlds nest Sailors, Quinn said. Using a mix of classroom sessions, simulation, and hands on labs, they teach Sailors how to employ and maintain complex systems such as the AN/ SQQ-89(V) Anti-Submarine Warfare / Undersea Warfare Combat System (ASWCS / USWCS). In the hands of well trained Sail ors, these systems provide our surface warships with a seamlessly integrated undersea/anti-submarine warfare detection, localization, classication and targeting capability. Our undersea superi ority ensures U.S. forces are able to project power or signal unacceptable risk to adversaries con templating aggression, Our instructors ensure that our Sailors are trained to respond quickly to cri ses and eliminate threats, setting the foundation for the Fleet to answer all bells and operate for ward. With a sta of nearly 240 military and civilian personnel, FLEASWTRA CEN provides tactical and technical training, using a blended learning solution that includes hands-on training, standard class rooms, computer-based learning, and simulators. NETC commander visits anti-sub school Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 5, 19 and 26. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Car-buying strategies examined Nov. 7This two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include nego tiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This class is for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 7. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation, call 573-9783.Pre-marital workshop offered Nov. 7The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 7. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Oct. 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This pro gram will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 to noon p.m., Nov. 8. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 6, 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be regis tered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Great Lakes holds emergency drills Naval Station Great Lakes conducted Ex ercise Citadel RumbleReliant Midwest Oct. 15 to 18 to evaluate the training and readiness of Sailors and civilians to respond to emer gency situations. e exercise consist ed of two events. e rst scenario Oct. 16, simulated a landslide east of Bldg. 62. e simulated land slide struck a fuel stor age tank and caused a fuel spill that entered Lake Michigan causing a large environmental incident in the simu lated scenario. ese exercises are conducted four times a year per installation to better prepare rstresponders for mass casualties and anti-ter rorism, said Mark Wegge, Navy Region Mid west training director. Since we had the landslide a few years ago, the possibility of a slide taking out the fuel tank is more of a possi bility, said Randy Car men, installation train ing ocer and scene controller. e second event, conducted Oct. 17, simulated the National Weather Service issuing a tornado warning for northeastern Cook County and eastern Lake County, with a funnel reported in the Libertyville area with winds over 40 miles per hour in the simulated scenario. NSGL emergency dispatch notied personnel of the danger and issued verbal instructions to take immediate shelter. Lake County also simulated tornado warning sirens. e scenario simulated a tornado touch down in the eld just west of the visitors cen ter, Bldg. 6130. It trav eled east causing struc tural damage to the Fisher Clinic, Bldg. 237, Boorda Hall, Bldgs. 33 and 34 and Bach elor Enlisted Quarters (BEQs) 634/635. e tornado also caused downed trees and street lights. It blew out windows and left piles of debris in its wake. ere were re ported injuries at the Fisher Clinic creating a mass casualty event. e role players re quired emergency family assistance centers services and the occupants of the BEQs were relocated. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 11

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Representing the U.S. Navy, Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead was named the 2012 AllMilitary Wilderness Challenge champions, Oct. 6, with a winning overall time of 7:11:13. Defending champions, Team HT-18B from Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Milton, Fla., came in sec ond with a time of 7:24:01 and Team MCAS New River Patriots from Marine Corps Air Station, Jack sonville, N.C., was third with a time of 7:29:23. e challenge was spon sored by Mid-Atlantic Re gion, Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown and ACE Adventure Resort, West Virginias largest outdoor outtter. More than 200 military personnel representing all ve branches of the Armed Forces competed in a series of ve outdoor adventure races, 52 miles over two days-in the heart of the Appalachian Moun tains and on the New and the Gauley Rivers in West Virginia. Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead was comprised of four Na val ocers from four dif ferent commands across the country: Cmdr. Sue Himes, State Department; Cmdr. Todd Gagnon, Navy Information Operations Command, Fort Gordon, Ga.; Cmdr. Andrew Cawl eld, Commanding O cer, Navy Operational Support Center, Baltimore, Md.; and Lt. j.g. Travis Dill, NIOC, Fort Meade, Md. eir camaraderie, ded ication and determination brought them together for this win. Between the four of us, weve all had a lot of experience doing the Wilderness Challenge. Even though we never trained together, we knew what we had to do, Himes said. We all got along they were all quality guys with the right attitude a per fect balance of the desire to win with the desire to have fun while doing it. I couldnt have asked for a better team. Forty-one teams participated in the Wilderness Challenge, competing in an 8K mountain run, a 12-mile mountain bike race, a 14-mile forced hike through the mountains, a 13-mile whitewater raft race on the Gauley River and a seven-mile kayak race on the New River. For the 12th year, West Virginia has hosted the event and the state is quickly becoming a familiar site for everyone involved. It was such a pleasure to be involved in the 2012 All-Military Wilderness Challenge at Ace Adventure Resort, and what an honor it is for West Vir ginia to host this exciting event year after year, said Keith Gwinn, Cabinet sec retary, West Virginia Department of Veterans As sistance. He attended the chal lenge to support the teams and represent the state of West Virginia in welcom ing the participants. For a state that truly embraces military veter ans and also oers some of the most extreme outdoor adventures, there couldnt be a better match, he added. For some of the chal lengers, it was not only the spirit of competition, but the chance to compete against the top athletes in the military that brought them to the Wilderness Challenge. We are all seasoned athletes who compete on our own in various types of endurance events (tri athlons, marathons, ul tra marathons, half Ironmans, etc.) so we all knew what we needed to do in dividually to be ready for this endurance event, Ga gnon said. In its 12th year, the AllMilitary Wilderness Challenge is reaching com mands from all across the United States, from as far away as Iowa and even Puerto Rico. Over the challenges two days, teams had to deal with everything from at tires to broken wrists in their quest for the title of most extreme military team. Every team dealt with adversity, whether it was injuries, illness, fatigue, or breakdowns, Cawleld said. Our team (Tram ple the Weak, Hurdle the Dead) possessed a positive attitude which allowed us to pull together and en courage each other when faced with obstacles. A positive attitude, a little perspective and the ability to laugh at yourself are attributes our team possessed and it made the entire experience enjoyable. e top teams from each branch of service were also recognized at the awards ceremony. For the Army, Team Dog and Pony Show from U.S. Army Reserve Unit, Ames, Iowa, were rst with a time of 8:56:12. For the Air Force, Team OL-Q from Defense Secu rity Service, Quantico, Va., were rst with a time of 9:29:18. For the Coast Guard, Team Ducky Fuzz & the Master of Rubber from the Deployable Operations Group, Arlington, Va., were rst with a time of 7:44:10. Team HT-18B also took top honors for the Marine Corps and Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead for the Navy. e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agen cys Legged Squad Sup port System program re cently demonstrated two robotic pack mule pro totypes for Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos and DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar. e rst platform underwent its initial out door test earlier this year and has matured through continual testing and im provements to the point that two functioning plat forms have started to run through the paces similar to what they could one day experience carrying gear for a squad of Marines or Soldiers. e goal of the LS3 pro gram is to demonstrate that a legged robot can unburden dismounted squad members by car rying their gear, autono mously following them through rugged terrain and interpreting verbal and visual commands. Weve rened the LS3 platform and have begun eld testing against re quirements of the Marine Corps, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hitt, DARPA program manager. e vision for LS3 is to combine the ca pabilities of a pack mule with the intelligence of a trained animal. During the event, the LS3 prototype completed trotting and jogging mo bility runs, perception vi sualization demonstration and a soldier-bounded autonomy demonstration. e demo also exhibited reduced noise levels for the robots. LS3 is now roughly 10 times quieter than when the platform rst came online, so squad members can carry on a conversation right next to it, which was dicult before, Hitt said. Other improvements include the ability to go from a 1to 3-mph walk and trot over rough, rocky terrain, easily transition to a 5-mph jog and, eventually, a 7-mph run over at surfaces, showing the versatility needed to accompany dismounted units in various terrains. e LS3 has demon strated it is very stable on its legs, but if it should tip over for some reason, it can automatically right itself, stand up and carry on. LS3 also has the ability to follow a human leader and track members of a squad in forested terrain and high brush. In July, DARPA and the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory began a 2-year platform-renement test cycle with the rst DAR PA/MCWL-hosted test planned for December 2012 on a military base. Testing will continue approximately every quar ter at military bases across the country, culminating in a Marine Corps Ad vanced Warghting Ex periment wherein the LS3 will be embedded with a squad for an operational exercise. Augmenting small dis mounted units with au tonomous capabilities can be a potent force multipli er, said Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise, commanding gener al, MCWL. e concerted eorts being made to bet ter dene autonomous ro botic capabilities that help (lighten the load) provide greater mobility and agil ity to dismounted Marine and Army forces across the battle space, further demonstrate what can be achieved through partner ing with DARPA and other DoD entities in support of the Warghter. 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e Naval Postgraduate School graduated one of the largest classes in the universitys history earlier this summer. More than 400 students earned their advanced degrees in the Summer quarter, including nine doctoral graduates. e ceremonys keynote speaker oered another unique aspect to the class. Vice Adm. Mark I. Fox, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Operations, Plans and Strategy, was not only the ceremonys premier speaker, he was also a proud parent with his own son, Lt. Collin R. Fox, a member of this quarters graduating class completing a masters de gree in system analysis. Im delighted to speak at the Naval Postgraduate School graduation cer emony, he said. I had originally planned to at tend the event only as a proud dad, but the op portunity to address the graduates, including one of my sons, of such a pres tigious academic institution is a real honor. I com pleted the Aviation Safety Ocers course at NPS in 1986, and appreciate the enduring partnership between the Navy and the local community. Its al ways a treat to spend time on the Central California coast. Fox began his formal remarks noting that com mencement marked the culmination of one phase of many lives, and the beginning of a new and exciting phase lled with hope and anticipation for the future alumni. First and foremost, congratulations to the graduates, he said. It is appropriate that we pause to recognize your excellence, your discipline and your accomplishment. He con tinued, citing his own envy of the graduat ing class and his desires to attend the institution he has so much respect for as a junior ocer. Of course, all of this would be impossible without the Naval Postgradu ate School, an institution which is internationally renowned for academic excellence ... a world-class faculty and sta, a worldclass institution and a world-class location, he said. Recounting the memorial service for astronaut Neil Armstrong at the Na tional Cathedral in Wash ington, D.C., the previous week, he remarked that it brought back a lot of memories from his youth, as well as a more recent personal memory of when he and his wife hosted Armstrong, Jim Lovell and fellow NPS graduate Eu gene Cernan in Bahrain while commanding the U.S. 5th Fleet. He noted that they were remarkable and patriotic, but widely unassuming seeing their own accomplishments not as their own, but on behalf of the nation as a whole. He recounted the re markable levels of change that society has seen over the past several decades, but emphasized that ad vanced education pro vides the intellectual fuel for that evolution. We have seen the great est increase in prosperity in human history in our lives, how has this happened? he said. Good work in hard science and engineering ... tremendous growth in the analog to digital age and infor mation technologies have come along. But the real driver, I would submit, has been the movement of goods and services around the globe, he said, with institutions like NPS representing the brain. Fox focused on the global commons, and he made a point of the important roles of collaboration in protecting this critical driver of human prosper ity. ere are people who wish us ill. ere are ter rorists, pirates, state ac tors who would choose to disrupt us, he said. Over 30 nations have come together as we speak, in the largest international mine countermeasures exercise which is going on in the 5th Fleet and NAVCENT area of responsibility, to demonstrate the ability to do strictly defensive op erations, to demonstrate that we can clear mines and work together and of fer a deterrent to aggres sive behavior. Fox continued by connecting these current challenges of the global commons of the sea to the commons of today, and tomorrow. Outer space, cyberspace ... while there are no own ers of these commons, they are absolutely critical to societys continued ad vancements, he said, and collaboration will con tinue to be a key in resolv ing the complex issues of these domains. We will not do things by ourselves in the future. We will work with partners, people who share our val ues, and work together to accomplish great things, he said. I appreciate the opportunity to see team work and partnership being formed here with the international students. A total of 410 students graduated earning 419 degrees this past quarter, including nine Ph.D.s, one mechanical engineer and 47 international students. Navy postgrad class huge A crew of aquanauts yes aquanauts! left sur face life and submerged themselves in the worlds only undersea laboratory, Aquarius, for two weeks. ey were participating in NEEMO 16, a mission designed to help mold future space missions. Aquarius, operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, allows aquanauts and astronauts alike to conduct research and simulate mission activities in the waters low gravity. Diving in an underwater laboratory necessitates a unique expertise. It requires plenty of knowl edge about underwater operations and skills held by very few individuals. It was just the kind of job for a Coast Guard diver. Coast Guard divers go through dive school at the Naval Dive and Sal vage Training Center in Panama City, Fla. ecur riculum student divers are taught over the course of four months focuses on marine engineering and underwater construction as well assalvage skills. e Coast Guard also specializes in SCUBA operations, providing high mobility for dive operations. e joint operation included partners from NOAA, NASA, Europe an Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and the Navy. Due to their specialized training, Coast Guard div ers participating in the joint operations were uti lized in various capacities. Working with NASA and NOAA was enlighten ing, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Jason Fields. Being able to work with future as tronauts, NOAA dive team members and Navy divers was a great opportunity. From running the sup plies needed to live in the Aquarius Habitat, to tending the umbilicals of the as tronauts as they practiced their mission, all I can say is it was an awesome mis sion to be a part of e Coast Guards div ers acted as support crew for the mission complet ing 28 dives accumulating more than 800 minutes ofbottom time. e divers tended the aquanauts in water to simulate weightlessness in space, so the aquanauts could conduct eective and realistic tests. Coast Guard divers also ran supplies back and forth from the surface to the Aquarius underwater lab and assisted in the op eration of submersibles. When not directly sup porting the aquanauts they were actively sup porting other divers as deck hand support and standing by ready to deploy if a mishap occurred. Fields and another div er, Petty Ocer 2nd Class David Bradbury, know a lot about the importance of staying vigilant inthe eventof any dive emer gencies. Both Fields and Bradbury are safety div ers for the new underwa ter egress facility more commonly known as the dunker at Aviation Technical Training Center Elizabeth City. eir diving prociency, focusing on safety and procedure, enables aviators from the Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps, to learn how to egress, or exit, their aircraft in the event of anemergency. ey were able to use these same skills on the joint mission, but applied them to an open water environment. While they shared best practices from their routine dives, they also learned from their fellow divers from partner agencies.Divers at home in space THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 13

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County liaison group in Watson buildingFor the past three years, Sheila McNeill has been steering e Camden Partnership from an oce in the back of Sheilas Hallmark. e oce location made it easier for her to run her store and TCP simultaneously. e price was right too. ere was no cost to the Partnership. McNeill knew she was going to close Sheilas Hallmark around Aug. 1, so TCP began looking for an alternate location for its oce. Fortunately, LaVonda Turner, Broker at Watson Realty, contacted McNeill in June and oered a furnished oce in the Watson building for TCP oce. McNeill started working from her new oce location on August 8. While the location of TCP operations has changed, its vision remains strong and true: to be the primary resource and preferred partner in military/community issues. Its mission is as follows, To advocate, support and strengthen military missions, and improve the quality of life for our military members by enhancing military and community partnerships. ese are some of TCPs eorts towards those goals: Increase military missions at Kings Bay: TCP met with the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Up Periscope World War II Sub Vet recall perilous times Page 9 Prevent fires NSB Kings Bay Fire Dept. puts out word Page 5 Dinner, movie Unaccompanied housing bar racks has program Page 9 CYP spotlights activities in Lights on Aerschool Lights on Afterschool is an annual event hosted by e Afterschool Alliance. e purpose of Lights on Afterschool is to bring awareness to the important role that after-school programs play in the lives of the children that attend them. After-school programs around the United States participate in this event. is year, the Morale Welfare and Recreation Youth Center at Naval Aer-school not an aerthought Camden Partnership gets new digs World War II Submarine Veterans memorialize lost shipmates with ceremonye annual memorial ceremony by World War II Submarine Veterans, with the Tolling of the Boats, will begin at 10 a.m., Friday, Nov. 2 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion. e ceremony will be followed by a reception and tours of the Trident Training Facility. An afternoon submarine tour is being oered. Fridays activities wrap up with Trident Ret Facility/Chief Petty Ocer Association steak night at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., will be guest speaker at the memorial service. Submarine Group Ten Command Master Chief Shaun Garvin will serve as master of ceremonies. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will deliver the remembrance. WELCOME TO JANE WAYNE DAY Marine Corps Security Force Battalion gives ladies a sample of military drills Fall in! On the double! Move it! Move it! Move it! Spouses and extended family members of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion were treated to a Jane Wayne Day, Oct. 13. Jane Wayne Day lets wives and family members participate in various activities that the service members deal with on a monthly basis. It also gives them a chance to spend an entire day with their Marine or Sailor, an opportunity that is rarely afforded given the demanding work schedule most Marine Corps Security Forces personnel have, said Lt. William Green, Family Readiness ocer for the battalion. Lt. Col. Kevin Moody, Marine Corps Security Force Battalion commanding ocer, welcomed the family members and thanked them It was great having my family here to experience what we go through ... Cpl. Jaime OCampo NSB Kings Bay MCSFBn Remembrance Friday Sandy lashes EastSize and intensity of storm historicHurricane Sandy made landfall along the New Jersey coast, late Monday. As of Tuesday morning, the storm had already wreaked havoc across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast and was expected to aect millions more Americans as it moved northwest, dumping rain and kicking up winds of up to 80 mph. Forecasters warned the storm is historic in size and intensity. New York City and Atlantic City appeared to be among the cities most aected in early reports. In New York, ve deaths were been blamed on Sandy. Both cities faced widespread ooding and major disruptions to the power grid. At least 16 deaths in seven states were reported including at least seven in New York as Sandy pummeled the Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com More on Pages 3, 5

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 At 1 p.m., Nov. 3, the Tigers and Gyrenes will come head-to-head at Camden County High Schools Chris Gilman Stadium. Edward Waters College will face Ave Maria University in the only college football competition in Camden County. You know what a Tiger is, but for those of you who dont know what a Gyrene is, here you go: A Gyrene is remembered with great nostalgia by older Americans who identify the name with that special breed of young men who fought the desperate battles of Belleau Wood and the island campaigns of the Pacic. ese men formed the battle history of the United States Marine Corps and fashioned an ethos that inspires the men and women who serve in todays Corps. Jacksonvilles Edward Waters and Ave Maria will vie for the winning title of the historic Ralph J. Bunche Classic. L. J. Williams, event chair, said that the Classic is expected to draw hundreds of visitors who will be contributing to the economy of Camden County. College football fans from several states will be staying in our hotels, eating in our restaurants and having the opportunity to discover all that Camden County has to oer, Williams said. Our hopes are that these visitors will return and spend more time here and tell others what a great place we live in. Williams added locals are encouraged to attend as well, to show support for this classic event and to honor its name same, Ralph J. Bunche. Bunche was an American political scientist and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. He was the rst person of color to be so honored in the history of the Prize. He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he received the Medal of Freedom from President John F. Kennedy. Bunche founded a trade school that later became an all-black high school in Camden County. e community can become involved through sponsorships and/ or by purchasing tickets to the game. General admission to the game is $10 in advance, $12 on game day and for children/students $5 in advance and $7 on game day. Family packages are available, and groups of 20 are eligible for a discount. Tickets may be purchased at the Kingsland and St. Marys Welcome Centers, retail outlets and on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at Morale, Welfare and Recreation. For ticket information, call Emma Rogers at (912) 222-2188, and for ticket or vendor information, call L. J. Williams at (912) 552-4494. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. is 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave. e Veterans Day Parade will form at Steens, 550 Leet St., at 9 a.m. and begin at 10 a.m., going north on U.S. 17 and ending at Satilla Street and Williams Avenue. At 11 a.m. a recognition ceremony will be held at the Veterans Memorial Park, followed by a noon catsh dinner at the Depot. For more information, call Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Wounded Warrior ride Nov. 10Ride to Remember 2012, to support Wounded Warrior project, will begin with registration at 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 9, 10003 New Kings Road, Jacksonville. e ride will nish with lunch in St. Augustine. For more information, call Todd Dinwiddie at 9904) 608-1220.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jacksonville as a oating Naval Museum. To registration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org.Ft. Clinch re-enactment weekendFort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla., will host a Union Garrison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 3 and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Nov 4. Visitors can interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. For more information, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! College football at Camden Nov. 3 Ralph J. Bunche Classic In recognition of No vember as Georgia Apply to College Month the Child and Youth Edu cation Services oce is hosting a workshops designed to help middle school students, high school students and their parents understand how to make the best choices about high school and life after graduation. e workshop will be 6:30 to 8 p.m., ursday, Nov. 8 at the Naval Submarine base Kings Bay Youth Center. Topics are as follows: Where do we start? Parents and students will be introduced to web site gacollege411. org as an important planning tool. Understanding high school course selection and pathways. Student services personnel will help students and parents understand the academy system at Camden County High School and the pathways requirements for graduation. Making $ense of financial aid. Where do you find the money for college? A financial aid advisor will be on hand to explain changes to the Georgia Hope Scholarship and other funding options. e Kings Bay Youth Center is inside the Jackson Gate on Charlie Smith, Jr. Highway, Georgia Spur 40, just past Crooked River Elementary School. After entering the gate, make the rst right onto USS Wahoo Avenue and proceed to the Youth Center at the end of the street. No special base access is required for attending events at the Kings Bay Youth Center. All are welcome to attend. For more information contact Clainetta Jeerson, School Liaison Ofcer at (912) 573-8986 or call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Applying to college series oeredThe World War II Submarine Veterans who are visiting us this week to memorialize their fallen shipmates were born and grew up in an America that was very different from today. ey were born in the early 1920s, only years removed from a worldwide inuenza epidemic that killed an estimated 50 million people, including 675,000 in the United States. When these men were came into the world, the Navy was ying biplanes for the rst time o a carrier deck. Before they were teenagers, unfettered by hypnotic handheld devices, most of them were introduced to work, not household chores, but real work, made necessary by the Great Depression, another disaster which made todays economic speed bump look like a Sunday church ice cream social. ere was no time for boredom. ere was only the constant struggle to help put food on the family table. I was born less than a decade after these men ended World War II. America was dierent then, too. But I grew up with a link to their generation. ey were my heros. My generation grew up out in the yard, thrown out of the house to get the stink blown o ya! But I can remember Saturday afternoons at the Witkowski brothers modest home, standing outside a screened window too high to see in, listing to sounds of the action movie being watched by their father, himself a World War II veteran. Sometimes it was Indians whooping and rie shots, but more often it was screeching planes, exploding bombs, and machine gun and artillery re. We didnt play video games ghting space aliens or robots or zombies or sword-wielding gerbils. We played war, lying in the high weeds of vacant lots, ghting Germans and Japanese. Into the 1960s, World War II was still fresh. I didnt know anything about rock n roll, Vietnam or women. ey were all still in my future. But I knew about World War II. Barrels Witkowski had been in the Navy at Okinawa. e Keutzer kids dad piloted a B-17 over Germany. Jims dad, Lefty Matekaitis, went ashore at Omaha Beach on DDay. ey didnt talk about it to us, but it was known. ese men were the fathers of my friends. After the war, these men came home and went back to work. ey built careers. ey raised families. e loved, and they grieved. Some struggled. My brother Greg is named for Marine ghter ace Gregory Pappy Boyington, whose post-war life was a continuing battle. But these men put America on their shoulders and quietly carried us into a new era of prosperity. e men of this era who are with us are submarine veterans. I have never understood how someone could serve on a submarine. My favorite thing about being in the Navy was getting up in the morning, grabbing a cup of coee on the mess decks and heading out before colors for a smoke and to watch the sun rise over the Atlantic. at, and searching the Milky Way at night through the big eyes. e ocean air was so fresh I couldnt believe it. When I went back to Illinois I thought I was walking into a greenhouse. All I could smell was dirt and chlorophyll. Im envious of submariners. I couldnt do it. Get outside! I digress. Ill not go into casualties at Pearl Harbor and the war that followed, or 9/11 and subsequent wars. eyre documented. Weve all paid a price. What I will say is the United States is strong. It always has been. Todays military is as strong as any in our history. Its up to all to continue the legacy of a strong America. at would keep faith with our salute to the men who are with us here this week. ese guys were, still are my heros By Bill Wesselho Old School

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Pirates Cove menus A scientist whose work has been funded by the Oce of Naval Research for more than 30 years received the Nobel Prize in physics Oct. 9 for his investigations into the quantum mechanics of matter and light-research that has resulted in the worlds most accurate clock. A physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado-Boulder, Dr. David J. Wineland was hailed for his contributions to the measurement and control of individual quantum systems, or isolating and trapping atoms and photons to scrutinize the relationship between light and matter. is practice lies at the heart of the quest for precision clocks and the worlds most powerful computers. Dr. Wineland is the 63rd Nobel laureate that weve sponsored, said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder. is signicant achievement underscores the vision and skill of ONR program ocers to identify and invest in the best scientic talent in the U.S. and around the world. ONR in 1977 pro vided the rst funding outside of NIST for Wine land and fellow researchers when they began exploring the possibilities of laser cooling to manipulate atoms using light. is technique has found its way into many aspects of experimental atomic physics, and through our continued funding from ONR has enabled us to now realize the worlds most precise clocks, said Wineland, whose research into trapped-ion atomic clocks continues to be supported by ONR. His recent research helped create a clock that would not stray more than a second from actual time over the course of 30 billion years. Dr. Charles Clark, who oversees ONRs Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Program, said this level of precision opens a world of possibilities for Sailors and Marines, who rely on atomic clocks stationed on satellites to provide accurate GPS measurements for operations on land, at sea and in the air. Greater precision in the measurement of time also leads to greater precision in measurement and control of the frequencies of electromagnetic waves, Clark said. ese have many uses in U.S. Navy applications such as enhanced sensitivity of radar, greater security of communications and improved sensing of changes of Earths magnetic and gravitational elds, among others. Winelands researchalong with that of co-recipient Serge Haroche, a professor at the College de France and Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris-also moves scientists closer to creating quantum computers that one day could solve complex problems at speeds unheard of with todays machines. Wineland previously received the National Medal of Science in 2007. e Nobel Prize is awarded each year to trailblazers in cultural and scientic elds. As Nobel laureates, Wineland and Haroche will receive a medal, a diploma and share a $1.2 million prize. Nobel to Navy associate Guard reports for duty As more governors declared states of emergency in advance of Hurricane Sandy, the National Guard stood ready to respond to the aftermath of the storm. It was a busy weekend for the National Guard Coordination Center at Arlington, Va., as a 7.7 magnitude earthquake that struck British Columbia, Canada, late Saturday triggered tsunami warnings in Alaska and Hawaii and advisories in California and Oregon. Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie declared a state of emergency. Meanwhile, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia were among jurisdictions declaring a state of emergency in advance of Hurricane Sandy. e National Guard Coordination Center was reporting 369 Guard members already activated in Delaware, North Carolina and Virginia as of Sunday. e numbers of Guard members and states were expected to increase. e National Guard is the hometown team, said Army Sta Sgt. Wayne Woolley of the New Jersey National Guard. Soldiers and Airmen live in these communities, and they are eager to help and want to keep their fellow citizens safe. e National Guard Bureau wis monitoring the situation closely and coordinating with state, federal and local partners to ensure a coordinated and ecient response, Guard ocials said. e National Guard the nations rst military responder supports the Federal Emergency Management Agency response and that of U.S. Northern Command, among other agencies. More than 61,100 Na tional Guard members are available to assist civilian authorities in potentially aected states in support of relief eorts. Available National Guard resources include almost 140 rotarywinged aircraft to perform search and rescue, recon naissance and personnel or cargo-carrying missions. In addition to the hurricane and the tsunami, on Sunday National Guard members were supporting the Department of Homeland Security in the four Southwest border states, conducting Counterdrug operations in multiple states, providing force protection in California and key asset protection in New York. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 JANE WAYNE DAY NSB Kings Bay Marine Corps Security force battalions for taking time out of their busy schedules to experience Marine Corps Security Force life. After receiving a safety brief and the event schedule for the day, the families were outtted with kevlar helmets and ak jackets. en they loaded into Bearcat vehicles for transport to the obstacle course. Once there, the wives put to scaling walls, jumping over barricades and performing other physically draining activities. Divided into groups, they moved on to the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program facility for demonstrations, after which they were able to practice defensive postures, strikes and takedown moves on each other, and their loved ones. Jane Wayne participants then were loaded back into Bearcats and headed to the track to participate in the Marine Combat Fitness Test. Master Sergeant Franklin Acree, Battalion OPS chief, told the families the CFT is exactly like the one their service members go through. e family members who ran the course nished covered in sweat, and some said that they never wanted to do the course ever again. At the indoor simulated marksmanship trainer, they were able to test their skills in ring the M16 rie, the M9 pistol and the M240G medium machine gun. ISMT is a ring range that allows the person an opportunity to re 45 training rounds for each simulated weapon, while they are judged by reaction time and their sighting ability on a target. It was great having my family here to experience what we go through here at the battalion, said Cpl. Jaime OCampo, battalion NBC/range operations noncommissioned ocer in charge. After weapons, the family members were given the opportunity to suite up in Mission Oriented Protective Posture gear, which included a gas mask and head-to-toe protective clothing. Jane Wayne participants marched over to Marine Corps Security Force Battalion quad, where they enjoyed a demonstration by military working dogs. Finally, it was time to take a break for lunch. Family members did not bring their lunches or eat at the galley. e commanding ocer instead treated them to a selection of Meals Ready to Eat. Participants had a wonderful time tasting the wide variety of MREs. Some elected to save them as a souvenir. All the family members that went through the course nished with a sense of accomplishment and deep appreciation for what their spouses go through, Green said. e families then nished the day with the commanding ocer giving all family members an ocial Marine Corps Security Force Battalion T-shirt for completing the day. Now the families can go home and tell their ser vice members they were a Marine/Sailor for the day, Moody said. e spouses know they are just as much a part of the battalion as their Marine and Sailor. Gunnery Sgt. Craig Garrett, upper left, walks an obstacle while, from left, Master Sgt. Franklin Acree, Lt. Col. Kevin Moody (partially hidden) and Pfc. Garret Hadley escort Jane Waynes to the obstacle course. Photos by HM2 Melissa Croom and MA3 Johnny Oliver The spouses know they are just as much a part of the battalion as their Marine or Sailor Lt. Col. Kevin Moody NSB Kings Bay MCSFBn

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 5 Sandy keeps eet in port Commander, Fleet Forces modied guidance for all Navy ships in Hampton Roads, Va. Ships in port were directed to remain in port. Ships at sea continued to maneuver to clear the path of the storm. e Navy orders a sortie during potentially extreme weather conditions to reduce the risk of significant damage to ships and piers during high winds and seas. Ships planning to get underway on Saturday were no longer go to sea because the projected winds and storm surge in the Navys ports in Hampton Roads would not exceed the ability of our ships to remain safely in port. We kept a very close watch on the storm all night, said Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. As a result of these projected changes, we determined that the safest place for the ships not already underway is in port. While we have made these prudent decisions for our ships, I dont want to understate the signicance of the situation. Sandy remains a powerful storm. Ships in port were to take extra precautions to avoid potential damage from the powerful storm. Commanding ocers had a number of options when staying in port, depending on the severity of the weather. Standard measures for ships riding out heavy weather in port include extra mooring lines; placing the anchor on the bottom while alongside the pier; and removal of shore power cables, heavy or elevated brows, and any lighter objects that could create hazards during high winds. As a precautionary measure, Commander Navy Installations Command ordered all installations in the Hampton Roads area to remain at Tropical Cyclone Condition ree as Sandy was forecast to bring high winds and rain to the Mid-Atlantic coast. Tropical Cyclone Condition ree means destructive winds of greater than 50 knots associated with a tropical system, are expected within 48 hours. Additional measures tak en by local Navy commands included pulling dozens of small craft out of the water at various locations around Hampton Roads. e ves sels will remained out of the water until after the storm passed. It is important for all of our Sailors, civilians, and family members take all appropriate precautions as the storm approaches, and I would encourage the general public to do the same, Gortney said. Im a boat owner, and mine is out of the water and I am using a checklist to make sure my family and I are ready for the potential impacts of Sandy here in the Hampton Roads area. Fire Prevention Week 2012 NSB Kings Bay Fire DepartmentFire Prevention Week 2012 was a great success, from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., signing a Fire Prevention Proclamation to the last tour and static display at the bases Child Development Center. More than 800 people attended fire department tours, underwent training and visited safety information displays. The children enjoyed seeing the re trucks, reghters, a safety video, playing in mascot Sparkys Bounce House and the Fire Safety Coloring Page Contest. Fire Department members thank everyone, including teachers, parents and sponsors for a great Fire Safety Campaign. In the rst major U.S. Coast Guard search and rescue operation associated with Hurricane Sandy, the Coast Guard has rescued 14 people from life rafts in the Atlantic Ocean approximately 90 miles southeast of Hatteras, N.C. e searchcontinuedfor two people who remain missing from the crew of HMS Bounty. e owner of the 180-foot, three-mast tall ship HMS Bounty, a replica of the original British transport vessel built for the 1962 lm Mutiny on the Bounty, starringMarlon Brandon, contacted Coast Guard Sector North Carolina after losing communication with the crew late Sunday evening. e 5th Coast Guard District command center in Portsmouth, Va., subsequently received a signal from the emergency distress position indicating radio beacon registered to the Bounty conrming the distress and position. A Coast Guard search airplane was launched from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City Sunday evening which established communication with the Bountys crew upon arriving on scene. e vessel was reportedlysinking in 18-foot seas accompanied by 40-mph winds. By the time two Coast Guard rescue helicopters from Elizabeth City arrived on scene at approximately 6:30 a.m., the 16 crew members had reportedly divided among two 25-man lifeboats and were wearing cold weather survival suits and life jackets. Air crews located and rescued 14 of the 16 crew members. e HMS Bounty sank but the mast is still visible. Movie Bounty sinks

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Intramural Kickball League registration is open to all active duty, DoD, dependents and civilians 18 and older. ere will be a captains meeting at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 7 in the Fitness Complex classroom. You also can register online at www. kingsbay sports.league apps.com. For more information, call (912) 573-8908. Military Family Appreciation Day Its 3 to 10 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 3 at Under the Pines Park, with carnival rides, hay rides, face painters, balloon art, inflatables, laser tag, arts and crafts, and lots of music. There will be Pucker Powder Art for $2, caricatures for $1 and cotton candy for for $1. Tickets for these are at the ticket booth. Entrance to the festival is free, and there will be food available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4564. The Canyons Zip Line Tour ~ Unleash your inner beast with Navy Adventures Unleashed Saturday, Nov. 17 at e Canyons in Gainesville, Fla. Cost is $74 per person over age 18, which includes all equip ment, nine zips, hiking, rope bridges and a rappel, plus a mini jump school. e rst 10 Liberty eligible patrons price is $64. A van departs from the Big EZ at 7:30 am. Registration payment due Nov. 11. Space is limited. Sign-up and pay at the Big EZ. Closed toe shoes are a must, bring money for food on the way home and loose clothing highly recom mended for men. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Old City Music Fest Sunday, Nov. 11. Travel with Liberty to St. Augustine for a huge Country Concert, for active duty only. Charlie Daniels Band, .38 Special, Craig Morgan and Glorianna featured. Space limited to rst 14 who sign up. Ticket and transportation provided. A van departs the Big EZ at 11 am. Bring money for food and beverages. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration is ongoing. Active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees, regis tration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/ Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Youth Basketball Registration is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 and Nov. 10 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. Its $60 each for child for Active Duty and Reservists, $65 per child for military retirees, DoD civilians and NSB contractors. Cost includes uniform. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 3 and 4 is Madagascar 3, Nov. 10 and 11 Hugo Nov. 17 and 18 Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups going Just for kids Liberty call Kickball captains meet Nov. 7 Navy College educational information

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active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more informa tion call (912) 573-9492.MWR Red Ribbon winner Golfers with a cause Security and Navy leadership. TCP lobbied extensively and successfully in Washington, D.C. for retention of Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Teams, including the MSST unit located in St. Marys. Increase the footprint of military contractors in Camden County: TCP collaborated with the National Navy League to become the rst com munity or state to have a booth exhibit at the Navy Leagues annual Sea-Air Symposium, which fea tures the largest group of defense contractors ever assembled. e symposium also attracted VIPs from DOD and all branches of the service. e Georgia/Camden County exhibit was visited by many VIPs and defense contractors. Everyone went away having a much better understanding of what Camden County has to oer. TCP works aggres sively with state govern ment as a representative for military bases. Enhance the relations between local military and civilian communities: is is the third year TCP has sponsored forums and base tours intended to educate personnel inside and outside the base on what each community does and how they interact. e forums and tours are open to the public, but require reservations, so names of attendees can be given to security for base access. e forum and tour dates are published in the local newspaper. TCP also hosted the annual A Community that Cares event with keynote speakers and the annual Honoring our Elected Ocials reception. McNeill is entering her 17th year as a member of the board of directors with the Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. TCP has created a synergy with the Jacksonville Chamber Military Aairs Committee to leverage the proximity of Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the Blount Island Command and NSB Kings Bay. e synergy created by these four geographically-close installations, as well as their working relationships and sharing of common activities, is benecial as TCP prepares for the next Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission, and in working to increase missions and provide ways to improve the quality of life for the military. Providing military position papers: TCP researched and authored military position papers for the annual Atlanta and Washington, D.C. y-ins. As requested, TCP provided numerous position papers to its congressional delegation, as well as to the Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. Maintain and improve TCP web site: e web site was recently reorganized, thanks to the eorts of Dave Burch and Nelson Dowling, a senior market ing major at the College of Coastal Georgia. eir eorts, current articles and informative content results in a web site of which TCP is proud of. e web site is at thecam denpartnership.org. While the aforementioned are primarily military focused, TCP also is heavily involved in sustaining and enhancing the quality of life of all residents in the area. Nonmilitary benets that result from TCP actions are aimed at improving the success of this community for individuals and businesses, by providing better educational opportunities, greater long-term stability and economic development and growth. e Camden Partnership desires that this commu nity become a place where young people can grow, de velop and nd meaningful, long-term employment, as well as personal and profes sional fulllment. Submarine Base Kings Bay hosted a Skill-a-on Oct. 18 to highlight some of the clubs the Youth Center offers. e clubs that were featured were Garden, Earth, Naturalist; Track and Field; Fine Arts; and Start SMART/SMART Kids. e goal was to highlight the core areas of after-school programming such as character and leadership, health and life skills, the arts, career and education, and sports, tness and social recreation. All children who are enrolled in the School Age Care Program are automatically registered to participate in 4-H and Boys and Girls Club of America club activities. For more information about enrolling children, contact the MWR Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Partners School e service is marked by the Tolling of the Bell, the Sounding of the Diving Alarm, the placing of a wreath, a rie salute and Taps. Saturday, sub vets are invited to a Wounded Warriors memorial ceremony at Oak Grove Cemetery, Gilman Waterfront Park events and a low country boil at the St. Marys Eagles Club. Todays activities began with a breakfast at the Pirates Cove Galley with Capt. Guey, submarine tours and a Navy Submarine Support Command CPOA barbecue. East Coast with 80 mph winds and severed power to more than 8.1 million customers, e Associated Press reported. e New York Times reported that 70 to 80 percent of Atlantic City, N.J. was under water. e chief of emergency services told the paper the city was under siege. Some 12,500 ights were cancelled and public transportation was shut down from Washington to Boston by Tuesday. Dozens of homes have been destroyed in a massive re in the New York City borough of Queens. e center of Sandy was near Philadelphia, the National Hurricane Center reported late Monday. e storms large wind eld spread rainfall to the mountains of West Virginia. About two feet of snow fell in some places and about 200,000 customers were without power in West Virginia, where the temperatures were well below freezing.Sub VetsSandy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Bob Hall USS Parche (SS 384) Portsmouth, N.H. We sank four ships in 46 minutes. They tried to ram us on the surface and missed by about 50 feet. (Another time) they depth-charged us. I was a cook and a baker, so I slept through most of the day. It was just as well I slept through that. Harry Irving USS Pilefish (SS 307) Deltona, Fla. We had a tough time on our first patrol. We went beyond the depth we were built to go. We were built to go 500 feet and we went 528 feet. Everybody was scared. There were no atheists onboard. Jim Tobin USS Steelhead (SS 280) Wilmington, N.C. We were following a convoy and attacked. We found out they had a couple of escorts, and they kept us down for 10 hours with depth charges. That was tough. Another time we were out 73 days, and all we had left to eat was rice. Harvey Bartle USS Bumper (SS 333), USS Brill (SS 330) Liberty, Ky. I tell my grandkids, when youre 18 or 19 years old, all of the times are good. We had some great liberty in Australia. We had some pretty rough times, too. But being here with my boys make them all seem good. Daniel Rosey Rosenfeld USS Bang (SS 385) Miami I put the USS Bang into commission and made all six wartime patrols. We sank six and damaged more. We took 16 hits and had no control over the boat. Tokyo Rose said they sank us, but they didnt. Charles Brown USS Puffer (SS 268) Keokuk, Iowa In we ran aground north of Borneo and took five hours to get off ... (Later) a depth charge opened our main induction and drove us down to 570 feet. Red Whatley USS Spot (SS 413) Greenwood, S.C. We got caught on the surface by a Japanese DD and didnt have enough water to sub merge, so we had to fight it out with our 5-inch gun. We hit it at the waterline, and it moved off and sank the next day. Its been my pleasure the last three years to talk to the World War II Submarine Veterans and make them part of Up Periscope. Ive heard a lot of good stories. Some were funny, some terrifying and some heartwarming. They will tell you they are common men, yet with uncommon bravery they fought through some of the most dire and desperate circumstances imaginable. Here are seven all-too-brief pieces of their experiences. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Classic Dinner and a movie at the Barracks THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 9

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Pretrial hearings for two major court cases one involving the alleged perpetrators behind the 9/11 terror attacks and the other involving the soldier charged with the largest in telligence leak in U.S. his tory are converging this week as attorneys operat ing in two very dierent legal systems focus on the issue of classied informa tion in the courtroom. e pre-trial hearing for Khalid Sheik Mohammed, who has confessed to planning the 9/11 attacks from A to Z, and four others who allegedly trained, nanced or arranged transportation for the 19 hijackers entered its fourth day Oct. 18 at Naval Air Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Mohammeds codefendants in the case are his nephew, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali; Walid Muhammad Salih Mubarak bin Attash, charged with selecting and training some of the hijackers; and Ramzi Binalshibh and Mustafa Ahmed Adam al Hawsawi, accused with helping nance the attacks. Meanwhile, at Fort Meade, the second day of pre-trial hearings continued for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. He is an Army intelligence specialist accused of downloading and transmitting classied information to the whistleblowing group WikiLeaks while he was deployed to Iraq. e legal systems being used to prosecute these cases are signicantly dierent. Manning, as a member of the U.S. military, is subject to the Uniformed Code of Military Justice. is system has roots dating back to the Revolutionary War, and is intended to promote good order and discipline in the armed forces. e 9/11 defendants, on the other hand, will be tried through a military tribunal governed by the Military Commissions Act of 2009. Manning is charged with aiding the enemy; wrong fully causing intelligence to be published on the Inter net, knowing that it is ac cessible to the enemy; theft of public property or re cords; transmitting defense information; and fraud and related activity in connec tion with computers. e charges against him also include violation of Army Regulations 25-2 Information Assurance and 380-5 Department of the Army Information Security Program. If found guilty, Manning could receive up to life in prison. He also could be reduced to E-1, the lowest enlisted grade, and face a total forfeiture of all pay and allowances and dishonorable discharge. Military commissions, on the other hand, apply to an alien unprivileged enemy belligerent who has engaged in hostilities, or who has purposefully and materially supported hostilities against the United States, its coalition partners or was a part of al Qaeda. e 9/11 defendants were captured in Pakistan between 2002 and 2003 and have been conned at Guantanamo Bay since 2006. ey were charged during their arraignment in May with terrorism, conspiracy, attacking civilians, attacking civilian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily injury, murder in violation of the law of war, destruction of property in violation of the law of war, hijacking or hazarding a vessel or aircraft. If found guilty, they could receive the death penalty. A casual peek into the courtrooms gives a glimpse into one of the most obvious dierences between the UCMJ and military commission processes. By law, Manning is not required to attend proceedings regarding his case, but a military lawyer with more than 20 years experience said on background that hes never seen a service member not attend. Photographers outside the courtroom yesterday captured images of Manning being escorted from the courtroom in his Army dress blue uniform with goldcolored private rst class rank on his sleeves. Army Col. James Pohl, the judge presiding over the 9/11 case, ruled earlier this week that the defen dants dont have to attend their court sessions, as long as they sign a waiver form each morning they choose to skip. When they do elect to attend, they can dress as they choose as long as their attire doesnt include U.S. military uniform items or prisoner garb in a color that would misrepresent their security status at the detention facility. Mohammed quickly took advantage of both rulings. He opted out of court the rst day after Pohl ruled that he could the day the judge also took up the wardrobe issue. Mohammed initially elected not to attend the third day of pre-trial hearings, then showed up later that morning wearing a camouage vest over his traditional white tunic. Most of the distinctions between the UCMJ and military commission legal processes are less obvious to those without legal training, and the discussion could ll textbooks. One big question being debated during the 9/11 hearings, for example, is whether the defendants have constitutional rights. However, a central concern in both the Manning and 9/11 cases is the issue of how classied information is dealt with in court. Today, the fourth day of pretrial hearings for the 9/11 suspects continued to focus on the balance between protecting classied information that, if made public, could jeopardize U.S. national security, and the constitutional mandate that court proceedings be open to the public. e prosecution and U.S. government lawyers say protections are needed to prosecute the case without disclosing classied information that would threaten U.S. national security. In contrast, the defendants defense teams accused prosecutors of using an overly broad banner of national security to safeguard information vital to providing a solid defense. Echoing them were lawyers representing the American Civil Liberties Union and media groups, who said the government wants to squelch information the public deserves to know. Pohl is expected to rule this week on a protective order the prosecution has requested to spell out what provisions are protected and which ones arent. A central issue in both the 9/11 and Manning cases involves information regarding the defendants detention. For Manning, that involves time when he was allegedly mistreated while being held in a Marine Corps brig at Quantico, Va. Of primary concern regarding the 9/11 defendants is time they spent in the hands of the CIA before being transferred to Guantanamo Bay. Both cases also require hammering out details about witnesses who can be called. In Mannings case, for example, some witnesses names have been redacted from the motion and are considered to be classied as secret. At Guantanamo Bay, the issue involves whether the defense is required to give the prosecution a heads up about what testimony the witnesses it calls are likely to provide something the government would weigh in deciding whether to y a witness to the court. Meanwhile, Army Col. Denise Lind, the judge hearing he Manning case, ordered the prosecution yesterday to release hundreds of emails about his incarceration to the de fense team. Linds ruling covered all but 12 of about 600 emails regarding a range of issues: from Mannings visitor list and provisions to ensure he had proper uniforms to plans for responding to protesters and media queries. ese emails, added to ones already in the pos session of Mannings de fense attorneys, bring to 1,200 the total number of emails that will presum ably be used to argue that their client was treated il legally. Lind also issued rulings that would allow parts of CIA, FBI and Department of Homeland Security documents used in the case to be redacted.Classied info key in 9/11, WikiLeaks cases e commander of Naval Education and Training Command visited the Fleet Anti-Submarine Training Center recently as part of a two-day tour of NETCs San Diego learning sites. is was Rear Adm. Don Quinns rst visit to the learning site, which is part of the Center for Surface Combat Systems domain, since assuming command at NETC in January. FLEA SWTRA CEN Com manding Officer Capt. Richard omas provided Quinn an overview of training and tour of labs and trainers. Rear Adm. Quinn was able to see the spectrum of training we provide, from basic individual skills to team trainers, omas said. He observed crewmembers from USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) conducting their Anti-Submarine Team Trainer Refresher Course. is was a great opportunity for him to get a rsthand look at Sailors honing their ASW skills o the ship. As Quinn toured the PC Open-Architecture Recongurable Training System lab, Chief Sonar Technician Justin Chianese discussed the importance of the simulated trainer. PORTS has been in use for a year and a half and it has been very benecial for the Navy, Chianese said. We are now able to train 12 students at a time versus the four we used to training, and as a result, we have removed two weeks of course time. Quinn was impressed with what he observed in both the labs and classrooms. e instructors and sta at Fleet ASW Training Center in San Diego are training the worlds nest Sailors, Quinn said. Using a mix of classroom sessions, simulation, and hands on labs, they teach Sailors how to employ and maintain complex systems such as the AN/ SQQ-89(V) Anti-Submarine Warfare / Undersea Warfare Combat System (ASWCS / USWCS). In the hands of well trained Sailors, these systems provide our surface warships with a seamlessly integrated undersea/anti-submarine warfare detection, localization, classication and targeting capability. Our undersea superiority ensures U.S. forces are able to project power or signal unacceptable risk to adversaries contemplating aggression, Our instructors ensure that our Sailors are trained to respond quickly to crises and eliminate threats, setting the foundation for the Fleet to answer all bells and operate forward. With a sta of nearly 240 military and civilian personnel, FLEASWTRACEN provides tactical and technical training, using a blended learning solution that includes hands-on training, standard classrooms, computer-based learning, and simulators. NETC commander visits anti-sub school Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 5, 19 and 26. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Car-buying strategies examined Nov. 7This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This class is for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 7. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Pre-marital workshop offered Nov. 7The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 7. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Oct. 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 to noon p.m., Nov. 8. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 6, 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Great Lakes holds emergency drills Naval Station Great Lakes conducted Exercise Citadel RumbleReliant Midwest Oct. 15 to 18 to evaluate the training and readiness of Sailors and civilians to respond to emergency situations. e exercise consisted of two events. e rst scenario Oct. 16, simulated a landslide east of Bldg. 62. e simulated landslide struck a fuel storage tank and caused a fuel spill that entered Lake Michigan causing a large environmental incident in the simulated scenario. ese exercises are conducted four times a year per installation to better prepare rstresponders for mass casualties and anti-terrorism, said Mark Wegge, Navy Region Midwest training director. Since we had the landslide a few years ago, the possibility of a slide taking out the fuel tank is more of a possibility, said Randy Carmen, installation training ocer and scene controller. e second event, conducted Oct. 17, simulated the National Weather Service issuing a tornado warning for northeastern Cook County and eastern Lake County, with a funnel reported in the Libertyville area with winds over 40 miles per hour in the simulated scenario. NSGL emergency dispatch notied personnel of the danger and issued verbal instructions to take immediate shelter. Lake County also simulated tornado warning sirens. e scenario simulated a tornado touchdown in the eld just west of the visitors center, Bldg. 6130. It traveled east causing structural damage to the Fisher Clinic, Bldg. 237, Boorda Hall, Bldgs. 33 and 34 and Bachelor Enlisted Quarters (BEQs) 634/635. e tornado also caused downed trees and street lights. It blew out windows and left piles of debris in its wake. ere were reported injuries at the Fisher Clinic creating a mass casualty event. e role players required emergency family assistance centers services and the occupants of the BEQs were relocated. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 11

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Representing the U.S. Navy, Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead was named the 2012 AllMilitary Wilderness Challenge champions, Oct. 6, with a winning overall time of 7:11:13. Defending champions, Team HT-18B from Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Milton, Fla., came in second with a time of 7:24:01 and Team MCAS New River Patriots from Marine Corps Air Station, Jacksonville, N.C., was third with a time of 7:29:23. e challenge was sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Region, Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown and ACE Adventure Resort, West Virginias largest outdoor outtter. More than 200 military personnel representing all ve branches of the Armed Forces competed in a series of ve outdoor adventure races, 52 miles over two days-in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains and on the New and the Gauley Rivers in West Virginia. Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead was comprised of four Naval ocers from four different commands across the country: Cmdr. Sue Himes, State Department; Cmdr. Todd Gagnon, Navy Information Operations Command, Fort Gordon, Ga.; Cmdr. Andrew Cawleld, Commanding Ocer, Navy Operational Support Center, Baltimore, Md.; and Lt. j.g. Travis Dill, NIOC, Fort Meade, Md. eir camaraderie, dedication and determination brought them together for this win. Between the four of us, weve all had a lot of experience doing the Wilderness Challenge. Even though we never trained together, we knew what we had to do, Himes said. We all got along they were all quality guys with the right attitude a perfect balance of the desire to win with the desire to have fun while doing it. I couldnt have asked for a better team. Forty-one teams participated in the Wilderness Challenge, competing in an 8K mountain run, a 12-mile mountain bike race, a 14-mile forced hike through the mountains, a 13-mile whitewater raft race on the Gauley River and a seven-mile kayak race on the New River. For the 12th year, West Virginia has hosted the event and the state is quickly becoming a familiar site for everyone involved. It was such a pleasure to be involved in the 2012 All-Military Wilderness Challenge at Ace Adventure Resort, and what an honor it is for West Virginia to host this exciting event year after year, said Keith Gwinn, Cabinet secretary, West Virginia Department of Veterans Assistance. He attended the challenge to support the teams and represent the state of West Virginia in welcoming the participants. For a state that truly embraces military veterans and also oers some of the most extreme outdoor adventures, there couldnt be a better match, he added. For some of the challengers, it was not only the spirit of competition, but the chance to compete against the top athletes in the military that brought them to the Wilderness Challenge. We are all seasoned athletes who compete on our own in various types of endurance events (triathlons, marathons, ultra marathons, half Ironmans, etc.) so we all knew what we needed to do individually to be ready for this endurance event, Gagnon said. In its 12th year, the AllMilitary Wilderness Challenge is reaching commands from all across the United States, from as far away as Iowa and even Puerto Rico. Over the challenges two days, teams had to deal with everything from at tires to broken wrists in their quest for the title of most extreme military team. Every team dealt with adversity, whether it was injuries, illness, fatigue, or breakdowns, Cawleld said. Our team (Tram ple the Weak, Hurdle the Dead) possessed a positive attitude which allowed us to pull together and en courage each other when faced with obstacles. A positive attitude, a little perspective and the ability to laugh at yourself are attributes our team possessed and it made the entire experience enjoyable. e top teams from each branch of service were also recognized at the awards ceremony. For the Army, Team Dog and Pony Show from U.S. Army Reserve Unit, Ames, Iowa, were rst with a time of 8:56:12. For the Air Force, Team OL-Q from Defense Security Service, Quantico, Va., were rst with a time of 9:29:18. For the Coast Guard, Team Ducky Fuzz & the Master of Rubber from the Deployable Operations Group, Arlington, Va., were rst with a time of 7:44:10. Team HT-18B also took top honors for the Marine Corps and Team Trample the Weak, Hurdle the Dead for the Navy. e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agencys Legged Squad Support System program recently demonstrated two robotic pack mule prototypes for Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos and DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar. e rst platform underwent its initial outdoor test earlier this year and has matured through continual testing and improvements to the point that two functioning platforms have started to run through the paces similar to what they could one day experience carrying gear for a squad of Marines or Soldiers. e goal of the LS3 program is to demonstrate that a legged robot can unburden dismounted squad members by carrying their gear, autonomously following them through rugged terrain and interpreting verbal and visual commands. Weve rened the LS3 platform and have begun eld testing against requirements of the Marine Corps, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hitt, DARPA program manager. e vision for LS3 is to combine the capabilities of a pack mule with the intelligence of a trained animal. During the event, the LS3 prototype completed trotting and jogging mobility runs, perception visualization demonstration and a soldier-bounded autonomy demonstration. e demo also exhibited reduced noise levels for the robots. LS3 is now roughly 10 times quieter than when the platform rst came online, so squad members can carry on a conversation right next to it, which was dicult before, Hitt said. Other improvements include the ability to go from a 1to 3-mph walk and trot over rough, rocky terrain, easily transition to a 5-mph jog and, eventually, a 7-mph run over at surfaces, showing the versatility needed to accompany dismounted units in various terrains. e LS3 has demonstrated it is very stable on its legs, but if it should tip over for some reason, it can automatically right itself, stand up and carry on. LS3 also has the ability to follow a human leader and track members of a squad in forested terrain and high brush. In July, DARPA and the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory began a 2-year platform-renement test cycle with the rst DARPA/MCWL-hosted test planned for December 2012 on a military base. Testing will continue approximately every quarter at military bases across the country, culminating in a Marine Corps Advanced Warghting Experiment wherein the LS3 will be embedded with a squad for an operational exercise. Augmenting small dismounted units with autonomous capabilities can be a potent force multiplier, said Brig. Gen. Mark R. Wise, commanding general, MCWL. e concerted eorts being made to better dene autonomous robotic capabilities that help (lighten the load) provide greater mobility and agility to dismounted Marine and Army forces across the battle space, further demonstrate what can be achieved through partnering with DARPA and other DoD entities in support of the Warghter. 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e Naval Postgraduate School graduated one of the largest classes in the universitys history earlier this summer. More than 400 students earned their advanced degrees in the Summer quarter, including nine doctoral graduates. e ceremonys keynote speaker oered another unique aspect to the class. Vice Adm. Mark I. Fox, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Operations, Plans and Strategy, was not only the ceremonys premier speaker, he was also a proud parent with his own son, Lt. Collin R. Fox, a member of this quarters graduating class completing a masters degree in system analysis. Im delighted to speak at the Naval Postgraduate School graduation ceremony, he said. I had originally planned to attend the event only as a proud dad, but the opportunity to address the graduates, including one of my sons, of such a prestigious academic institution is a real honor. I completed the Aviation Safety Ocers course at NPS in 1986, and appreciate the enduring partnership between the Navy and the local community. Its always a treat to spend time on the Central California coast. Fox began his formal remarks noting that commencement marked the culmination of one phase of many lives, and the beginning of a new and exciting phase lled with hope and anticipation for the future alumni. First and foremost, congratulations to the graduates, he said. It is appropriate that we pause to recognize your excellence, your discipline and your accomplishment. He con tinued, citing his own envy of the graduat ing class and his desires to attend the institution he has so much respect for as a junior ocer. Of course, all of this would be impossible without the Naval Postgraduate School, an institution which is internationally renowned for academic excellence ... a world-class faculty and sta, a worldclass institution and a world-class location, he said. Recounting the memorial service for astronaut Neil Armstrong at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., the previous week, he remarked that it brought back a lot of memories from his youth, as well as a more recent personal memory of when he and his wife hosted Armstrong, Jim Lovell and fellow NPS graduate Eugene Cernan in Bahrain while commanding the U.S. 5th Fleet. He noted that they were remarkable and patriotic, but widely unassuming seeing their own accomplishments not as their own, but on behalf of the nation as a whole. He recounted the remarkable levels of change that society has seen over the past several decades, but emphasized that advanced education provides the intellectual fuel for that evolution. We have seen the greatest increase in prosperity in human history in our lives, how has this happened? he said. Good work in hard science and engineering ... tremendous growth in the analog to digital age and information technologies have come along. But the real driver, I would submit, has been the movement of goods and services around the globe, he said, with institutions like NPS representing the brain. Fox focused on the global commons, and he made a point of the important roles of collaboration in protecting this critical driver of human prosperity. ere are people who wish us ill. ere are terrorists, pirates, state actors who would choose to disrupt us, he said. Over 30 nations have come together as we speak, in the largest international mine countermeasures exercise which is going on in the 5th Fleet and NAVCENT area of responsibility, to demonstrate the ability to do strictly defensive operations, to demonstrate that we can clear mines and work together and offer a deterrent to aggressive behavior. Fox continued by connecting these current challenges of the global commons of the sea to the commons of today, and tomorrow. Outer space, cyberspace ... while there are no owners of these commons, they are absolutely critical to societys continued advancements, he said, and collaboration will continue to be a key in resolving the complex issues of these domains. We will not do things by ourselves in the future. We will work with partners, people who share our values, and work together to accomplish great things, he said. I appreciate the opportunity to see teamwork and partnership being formed here with the international students. A total of 410 students graduated earning 419 degrees this past quarter, including nine Ph.D.s, one mechanical engineer and 47 international students. Navy postgrad class huge A crew of aquanauts yes aquanauts! left surface life and submerged themselves in the worlds only undersea laboratory, Aquarius, for two weeks. ey were participating in NEEMO 16, a mission designed to help mold future space missions. Aquarius, operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, allows aquanauts and astronauts alike to conduct research and simulate mission activities in the waters low gravity. Diving in an underwater laboratory necessitates a unique expertise. It requires plenty of knowledge about underwater operations and skills held by very few individuals. It was just the kind of job for a Coast Guard diver. Coast Guard divers go through dive school at the Naval Dive and Salvage Training Center in Panama City, Fla. ecurriculum student divers are taught over the course of four months focuses on marine engineering and underwater construction as well assalvage skills. e Coast Guard also specializes in SCUBA operations, providing high mobility for dive operations. e joint operation included partners from NOAA, NASA, European Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and the Navy. Due to their specialized training, Coast Guard divers participating in the joint operations were utilized in various capacities. Working with NASA and NOAA was enlighten ing, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Jason Fields. Being able to work with future as tronauts, NOAA dive team members and Navy divers was a great opportunity. From running the sup plies needed to live in the Aquarius Habitat, to tending the umbilicals of the as tronauts as they practiced their mission, all I can say is it was an awesome mis sion to be a part of e Coast Guards divers acted as support crew for the mission completing 28 dives accumulating more than 800 minutes ofbottom time. e divers tended the aquanauts in water to simulate weightlessness in space, so the aquanauts could conduct eective and realistic tests. Coast Guard divers also ran supplies back and forth from the surface to the Aquarius underwater lab and assisted in the operation of submersibles. When not directly supporting the aquanauts they were actively supporting other divers as deck hand support and standing by ready to deploy if a mishap occurred. Fields and another diver, Petty Ocer 2nd Class David Bradbury, know a lot about the importance of staying vigilant inthe eventof any dive emergencies. Both Fields and Bradbury are safety divers for the new underwater egress facility more commonly known as the dunker at Aviation Technical Training Center Elizabeth City. eir diving prociency, focusing on safety and procedure, enables aviators from the Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps, to learn how to egress, or exit, their aircraft in the event of anemergency. ey were able to use these same skills on the joint mission, but applied them to an open water environment. While they shared best practices from their routine dives, they also learned from their fellow divers from partner agencies.Divers at home in space THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 1, 2012 13

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