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The Kings Bay periscope ( 10-25-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00275

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00275


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Kings Bay, county rolls out red carpet for week-long salutee annual memorial cer emony by World War II Subma rine Veterans, with the Tolling of the Boats, will be Nov. 2 at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veter ans Memorial Pavilion. e event highlights a weeklong visit by the Sub Vets. Events aboard Kings Bay and in Camden County begin Tuesday with their arrival and wrap up Saturday. Kings Bay Command Mas ter Chief Randy Huckaba said he is looking forward to the week. Each year we are privi leged to host our submarine heroes here in Kings Bay, he said. I am always impressed at how the area commands and community come together to make this a memorable event. A tentative schedule includes museum, submarine and Trident Training Facility tours, receptions and steak fry at the CPO Goat Locker, a Pirates Cove Galley breakfast with Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Har vey L. Guey, Jr., and the memo rial service at 10 a.m. Nov. 2. A World War II Navy study re ports the Japanese Merchant Marine lost 8.1 million tons of vessels during the war, with submarines accounting for 4.9 mil lion tons, or 60 percent, of losses. Additionally, U.S. submarines sank 700,000 tons of naval ships, about 30 percent of the total lost, including eight aircraft carriers, one battleship and 11 cruisers. Of the total 288 U.S. subma rines deployed, including those stationed in the Atlantic, 52 submarines were lost with 48 lost in the Pacic. American submariners, who comprised only 1.6 percent of the Navy, suered the highest loss rate in the U.S. Armed Forc es, with 22 percent killed. More than 300 take part in o-road race at NSB Kings Bay With the rst beams of sun light streaming through the trees, the initial Navy Adven tures Unleashed O Road 5K Challenge run took place at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bays Etowah Park, Oct. 17. NAU, a Morale, Welfare and Recreation cross-programing endeavor with the Kings Bay Outdoor Recreation, Liberty and Fitness, oered individuals and commands an opportunity to take their physical readiness run o the beaten path. e course proved to be a bit challenging as the natural landscape provided participants an element of intensity, dodging tree limbs, roots and uneven ter rain. The off-road event was well represented with more than 300 Navy, Coast Guard, Marines, civilians and dependents taking the sunrise challenge and choosing the 5K run or 2 mile walk options. Up next, Saturday, Nov. 17, NAU Kings Bay will have canyon zip lining, with special pricing for Liberty Sailors. After that, on Saturday, Dec. 1 at Etowah Park will be Rug ged Recreation Uprising. e festivities begin with an o-road 5K race. e day will include outdoor activities for the entire Kings Bay community, with a paintball tourna ment, bouncy houses, halo jump, climbing wall, kids in the dirt challenge, entertain ment, food and prizes for top nishers. Discover your rush with Navy Up Periscope What are you going to be for Halloween? Page 9 Group 10 Rear Adm. Tofalo spreads Navy word in Orlando Page 4 Stop it Protect yourself, escape domestic violence Pages 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com WW II Sub Vets coming Freedom 5K ESA run a hitSWFLANT in high gear for Oct. 13 employee activity As the sand gnats began to take their toll on the 48 runners and walkers in front of the Missile Display at Strate gic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Kings Bay the morning of Oct. 13, HMC Roy Holder signaled the start of the Fall SWFLANT Employee Services Association Freedom 5K Run/Walk. It was a welcomed start! e group moved o quickly and the early pace was set by MTC Jules Alarcon. e group, made up of a diverse group of SWLANT civilian and military person nel, left the start as a swarm, but thinned out to single le by the halfmile mark. With groups beginning to form, the race headed for the turn at Eagles Hammock Campground. Alarcon was still leading the way at the half way point, closely followed by Lt. Alexander McGinnis, MT1 Gene Reale and MT2 Joel Sor to. Scattered throughout the eld, running and walking partners were there to provide support and encouragement for one another. One such pair was the only father-son duo in the race, Je and Jaxen Brewer. Jaxen was the youngest competi tor and biggest motivator. At 3 years old he never missed a stride and ran with the biggest smile of the group. As the runners spread out over the last half of the race, the four-man breakaway of Alarcon, McGinnis, Petty and Reale separated themselves from the rest of the eld by 3 minutes. But the last half mile belonged to Sorto. (They) crossed the finish line together at what was a sprint for the little guy.Adventures Unleashed debuts with Etowah Park 5K ... the natural land scape provided par ticipants an element of intensity ... Admiral tours basesCommander, Fleet Forces, Command, visits Kings BayCommander, Fleet Forces Command, visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Na val Station Mayport to meet with senior leaders during a series of leadership calls Oct. 16 to 18. During the visit, Adm. Bill Gortney presented his philosophies on leadership and took questions from base leaders. While the trip is simi lar to trips he will du plicate many times, for the eets top admiral, a trip to Northeast Florida is al ways special. Its always great, he said. I grew up on the St. Johns River water skiing on Doctors Inlet, and its always nice to come back to Northern Florida. Its home. Growing up as the son of a Navy captain, he moved to Jack sonville, Fla., in 1970 when his father retired and took a job aboard NAS Cecil Field. at year was his sophomore year at Orange Park High School,

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 e new commissary rewards card now oered at all 247 military commissaries worldwide oers a glimpse into what the Defense Commissary Agency is working to provide its customers: the same selection, conveniences and quality as the most popular commercial grocery store chains, but even better customer service and lower prices. ats the vision of Joseph H. Jeu, who took the helm of what amounts to the nations 11th-largest grocery story chain a year and a half ago and is steering into new waters to provide patrons what he calls the Commissary Benet 2020 the most advanced commissary service theyve ever experienced. We have to pay attention to what happens in the private sector, know the trends and be sure we are right along with them or maybe, in some ways, ahead of them, Jeu told Amer ican Forces Press Service. We want to be equal or better. By many standards, military com missaries are already there, he not ed. Patrons rated commissaries at 4.72 on a scale of 5 on a recent com missary customer satisfaction sur vey. In the industrywide American Customer Satisfaction Index, commissaries ranked 81 six points above the industry average of 76. Only one commercial grocery chain scored higher. Jeu attributes some of that suc cess to the fact that military family members, retirees and veterans make up 64 percent of the commis sary workforce. When two-thirds of your workforce is military related, it means we understand who our cus tomers are and what they are going through, he said. It says, We care and appreciate what you do. But Jeu acknowledged that the biggest attraction commissaries of fer boils down to price. Selling prod ucts at 5 percent over cost, with the surcharge invested directly into new construction, renovation and equip ment upgrades, commissaries typically save shoppers about 32 percent compared to civilian supermarkets. Savings are even higher in some high-cost areas, such as Hawaii, where commissary shoppers typi cally save about 50 percent. Looking ahead, Jeu is exploring new ways to maximize consumer savings without increasing the $1.4 billion subsidy Congress authorizes to operate the commissaries. For example, the new commissary rewards card allows shoppers to download coupons directly onto the card and redeem them at checkout. Fort Lee, Va., home of the Defense Commissary Agency, served as a test bed for the cards in August, and as of early this month, theyre available at every commissary worldwide. Jeu said hes been amazed at how well the cards have been received, even among coupon-savvy commis sary shoppers who typically rank within the top three among the na tions top coupon clippers. About half of those who received a card went online to register it into the system so they could begin using it. ats a very high rate of accep tance, Jeu said. is is a service our customers very clearly accept. Another idea in the works is the opening of warehouse stores that of fer even deeper discounts by selling products in bulk. Jeu is eyeing regions with multiple commissaries Virginias Tidewater area, San Antonio and San Diego, among them with hopes of con verting one traditional commissary into a box store. e rst could happen sometime next year. In addition to bulk items, each warehouse store will sell meat, produce, deli and bakery goods, but with a smaller selection than at traditional commissaries, he ex plained. Meanwhile, recognizing a growing trend in the commercial grocery industry, DECA is exploring ways to connect with and serve its custom ers using online technology and smartphones. In a test started about a year ago at Fort Lee, commissary customers can order a customized deli sandwich online, then pick it up at the store. Now Jeu wants to expand the con cept to allow customers to preor der groceries online, then arrive at the commissary to nd their order packed and ready for pickup. DECA plans to test the curbside pickup plan from Mondays to Fridays be ginning in the spring at Fort Lee and possibly one or two other commis saries to see how shoppers like it. I believe it will be successful, and if it is, we will expand it to other stores, Jeu said. Also using online technology, DECA plans to extend its services to more parts of the country with large populations of reserve and National Guard members, but no commis saries. at initiative, started on the West Coast in 2008, enables reservecomponent members to preorder and prepay electronically from a selection of several hundred items, most sold in bulk. Trucks arrive at a designated site with the orders packed and ready for pickup. During the last scal year, DECA staged more than 100 of these onsite sales. It worked out pretty well, Jeu said. We denitely want to do more of that. At 1 p.m., Nov. 3, the Tigers and Gyrenes will come head-to-head at Camden County High Schools Chris Gilman Stadium. Edward Waters College will face Ave Maria University in the only col lege football competition in Cam den County. You know what a Tiger is, but for those of you who dont know what a Gyrene is, here you go: A Gyrene is remembered with great nostalgia by older Americans who identify the name with that special breed of young men who fought the desper ate battles of Belleau Wood and the island campaigns of the Pacic. ese men formed the battle history of the United States Marine Corps and fashioned an ethos that inspires the men and women who serve in todays Corps. Jacksonvilles Edward Waters and Ave Maria will vie for the winning title of the historic Ralph J. Bunche Classic. L. J. Williams, event chair, said that the Classic is expected to draw hundreds of visitors who will be contributing to the economy of Camden County. College football fans from several states will be staying in our hotels, eating in our restaurants and hav ing the opportunity to discover all that Camden County has to oer, Williams said. Our hopes are that these visitors will return and spend more time here and tell others what a great place we live in. Williams added locals are en couraged to attend as well, to show support for this classic event and to honor its name same, Ralph J. Bunche. Bunche was an American political scientist and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. He was the rst person of color to be so honored in the history of the Prize. He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he received the Medal of Freedom from President John F. Kennedy. Bunche founded a trade school that later became an all-black high school in Camden County. e community can become in volved through sponsorships and/ or by purchasing tickets to the game. General admission to the game is $10 in advance, $12 on game day and for children/students $5 in ad vance and $7 on game day. Family packages are available, and groups of 20 are eligible for a discount. Tickets may be purchased at the Kingsland and St. Marys Welcome Centers, retail outlets and on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at Mo rale, Welfare and Recreation. For ticket information, call Emma Rogers at (912) 222-2188, and for ticket or vendor information, call L. J. Williams at (912) 552-4494. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Red Ribbon contest offers prizese National Family Partnership is oering $1,000 to the school and an iPad to the student who wins the 27th annual Red Ribbon Week contest by decorating the front of their home with the message e Best Me is Drug Free For more information, visit redribbon.org/contest.Housing resident survey ongo inge annual Resident Satisfaction Survey runs to Nov. 1. Let the installation and the Navy know how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Un accompanied Housing is meeting your needs and provide input for changes. UH represen tatives will visit each command to provide an opportunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents. Contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manag er, at 573-8953 for more information.Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd.. Plans include a penta gon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water feature. Donations are taken through Oct. 26, with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3, and can be dropped at the Kingsland De pot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Vet job fair in Jacksonville Nov. 1e U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the mil itary-to-civilian recruitment rm RecruitMilitary have a hiring event for military veterans at EverBank Field 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., ursday, Nov. 1. For more informatin, visit events.recruitmili tary.com/events/jacksonville-veteran-job-fairnovember-1-2012#registration Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jack sonville as a oating Naval Museum. To regis tration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org. Now hear this! Parents of children with special needs know how daunting it can be to successfully navigate educational systems in order to secure the servic es and supports. In particular, writing an Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, can be a challenging process lled with questions and concerns. e Child and Youth Education Services oce, with support from Georgia Parent to Parent, will host a free IEP Clinic at the Kings Bay Youth Center from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27. e 16 one-hour sessions, shared by two counselors, will be assigned on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Each counseling session will in clude a 15 minute in-take process and 45 minutes of counseling. Ex ceptional parents will have an op portunity to meet with a trained counselor to review the details of their IEP details, get answers to questions and receive suggestions about how to best advocate for their children with special needs. To register for a counseling ses sion or to nd out more information about this program, call the Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer at (912) 5738986 or e-mail clainetta.jeerson@ navy.mil or kingsbaylo@navy.mil.Special needs IEP Workshop oered College football at Camden Nov. 3 Ralph J. Bunche Classic Commissaries will be oering more Navy commissary

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where he would meet his future wife, Sherry. Gortney spent the next three years working sum mer jobs on board NAS Jacksonville. He spent a summer as a lifeguard at the base swimming pool. He spent another summer working as a carpenters assistant, helping build the Patriots Point base housing area behind the hospital. is exchange and this commissary are not the same ones that I used to go to when I was growing up, but this is home for me, Gortney said. Even though he grew up in a Navy family and spent so much time on base, Gortney said he could never see himself as a Sail or when he was younger. I wanted no part of the Navy, he said. I felt that way because I moved around all my life as a Navy brat, but when I was about half way through college, I decided I didnt want to be a lawyer. I was a history major, and I didnt know what I would do with a history degree if I wasnt going to law school. At that point, Gortney said, something changed within him. In our business, we have a lot of father-son or father-daughter relationships where you follow the path of your parents, he said. At a very early age, I wanted to y, and I would wear my fathers ight gear like any other kid did, and I think that spark came back to me when I was in college. Twenty-seven years later, Gortney would nd himself back aboard NAS Jacksonville, not as a summer hire, but as a four-star admiral. While he said the landscape has changed dramatically since his high-school years, so has the Navys war ghting ca pabilities. Gortney specically mentioned the arrival of the P-8A Poseidon air craft and the opening of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center. e good news is that were replacing the P-3s that were here when I was in high school with P-8s. I just had a chance to tour a P-8 and it was great, and I got to y the simulator and it was a lot of fun, he said. e helicopters are also more advanced. Weve gone from H-3s to H-60s, so we have much more capable helos out there on the seaboard. Gortney said Jacksonville is the perfect location to base Poseidon aircraft, not just geographically, but also because of the strong community sup port for the military. Jacksonville is just a super Navy town. North Florida is very support ive of the Navy and has been for years, he said. Its a great place to oper ate from, and its a great place to train from. e air station is a historical one, and its a real jewel. It has, for decades, provided terric support forward. I wouldnt want to y P-8s anywhere else. Despite all the things that have changed on and around NAS Jacksonville since Gortneys lifeguarding days at the base pool, there is at least one thing that remains the same. e one constant is the quality of the people our Sailors, chief petty o cers, ocers and civilians that help make this place run, he said. eyre just phenomenal, and they are the greatest strength that we have. Recognizing how comfortable its customers, particularly younger ones, have become with smart phone technology, DECA plans to branch out into what industry refers to as mobile commerce. A new app to be introduced soon will provide generic information about store locations and hours and sales promotions. But Jeu plans to broad en the service so shoppers can use their smartphones to get price comparisons and even place grocery orders. To ensure only au thorized users have access to the system, they will en ter their Defense Enroll ment Eligibility Reporting System, or DEERS, infor mation, he explained. While giving commis sary shoppers more op tions and more conve nience, DECA continues to ensure its providing the items they want. When a new product comes out, we want to have those items at the same time as commercial grocery stores, Jeu said, while re moving stock thats not moving from its shelves. Its a constant balancing act, and something we constantly monitor, he said. We want to be sure we are oering the prod ucts our customers want. To continue to do so, DECA continues explor ing ways to reduce over head and streamline its operations. Its been an ongoing process that began with the merger of four sepa rate commissary systems into one in 1991, Jeu said. at consolidation weed ed out duplication, creat ing a more streamlined organization that has re duced operating costs by $700 million over the past two decades. For the last 20 years, we have done our part, but we will continue to search for new eciencies, and at the same time, provide the same level of savings for our people, Jeu said. At the same time, DECA stands as a Defense De partment model, boasting 10 consecutive years of clean annual nancial statements -something Defense Secretary Leon Panetta wants institution alized departmentwide by 2015. While exploring and rolling out new services and oerings, the DECA sta plans to tap into Facebook, Twitter and other social media to bet ter-connect with its cus tomers. We want this to be in teractive, to ask questions of our customers. What do they think of this new concept? Do they have new ideas of how we can do better? Jeu said. We want to be asking more questions to ensure we continue to live up to our customers expectations.Gortney More THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Orlando Port of Call Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 SCIENCE DAY PHOTOS BY VALERIE TEMPLE His pace could not be matched as he sprinted away from the group and crossed the line at 20:25, with a 15 second advan tage over McGinnis, followed by Alarcon. e rst civilian across was Bob Birke, at 24:02. He was closely followed by Bill Legge and Tom Giron. e rst female across was Allison Busuttil. Hand in hand, Jaxen Brewer and his father crossed the nish line to gether at what was a sprint for the little guy. But he was a giant in heart. Still with a smile on a face, his proud dad asked him if he wanted some water to cool down. Can I have a coke? he asked in reply. And here came the sand gnats again. SWFLANT nished out the morning with a com mand picnic at Lake D. e burgers and hot dogs were on the grill by 11 a.m., and the crowd stued by 1 p.m. Adventures Unleashed. For more information on upcoming NAU events, like us on facebook/ mwrkingsbay. NAU is over-age-18 pro gramming initiative for the thrill of adventure, the love of nature and the quest for excitement. Miki Gilbert, Navy Adventures Unleashed coor dinator, is working handin-hand with Liberty, Fitness, Outdoor Recre ation and Information, Tickets and Travel to add an element of extreme in tensity to your recreation and tness pursuits. eres a whole wave of extreme out there, right now, and were going to ride it, Gilbert said. I enjoy motivating people, to see them push harder than they thought pos sible. UnleashedFreedom

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e Night Glow Golf Tournament is Friday, Oct. 26 at Trident Lakes Golf Course with a 3 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civil ians. Nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes, for each person, golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Battle of the Border At KB Finnegans Irish Pub, starting at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 join the excitement. Wear your team col ors and receive $1 domestic drafts until 6 p.m. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Haunted Halloween Horror Spin Ride Its 6 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex., free for active duty military, retirees and their families. Its $2.50 for authorized civilians, contractors and guests. eres a prize for the best costume. Light refreshments follow. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Horror Hoops 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament Saturday, Oct. 27 Sign in by 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 27. Double elimination format. $50 team registration fee. Rosters are due and registration closes at noon, ursday, Oct. 25. First place receives championship shirts, team trophy and individual trophy. Second place will receive runner-up shirts. You also can sign up at www.kingsbay sports.leagueapps.com. Need more information? Call (912) 573-8908. Spooky Bowling Special From 1 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31 enjoy $1 games and $1 shoe rental at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. More information? Call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Kickball League Registration is open to all active duty, DoD, dependents and civilians 18 and older. ere will be a Captains meeting at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 7 in the Fitness Complex classroom. You also can register online at www.kingsbaysports.league apps.com. For more information, call (912) 573-8908. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will con tinue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addi tion to the Pro Shop, Rack-N-Roll also oers oil line pat terns. Reserve your choice of oiled patterns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including linage and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not available on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights through Oct. 31, face horrors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one top ping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, deli cious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reserv ists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for oth ers. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by call ing Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration begins on Monday, Oct. 29. Active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most re cent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for con rmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of reg istration. No outside food al lowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Oct. 27 and 28 Brave. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups start Just for kids Liberty call Night Glow Golf is Oct. 26 President Barack Obama recently announced his nominations for two key military lead ership positions in Europe and Afghanistan. e president is nomi nating Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen to serve as NATOs su preme allied com mander for Europe and commander of U.S. Euro pean Command and Ma rine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. to succeed Allen as commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. If conrmed, Allen would succeed Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis, who will retire in the spring after three decades of ser vice. Dunford currently serves as assistant com mandant of the Marine Corps. Both nominations are subject to Senate con rmation. For more than a year, Obama said, Allen has served with distinction in Afghanistan, guiding his forces through a critical period in the countrys transition. e president noted his personal reli ance on Allens counsel and lauded his devotion to national security and U.S. service members. Under General Allens command, we have made important progress towards our core goal of defeating al-Qaida and ensuring they can never return to a sovereign Af ghanistan, Obama said in a written statement. Working with our Afghan partners and international civilians, the forces under General Allens command have moved forward with a transition to Afghan se curity forces, who will take the lead for security across the country next year. Obama noted that Al lens leadership of the coalition in Afghanistan has required close relationships with NATO nations and other partners. Allen, Dunford tabbed for posts 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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I always get dressed up to greet the kids on Halloween, but I usually just wear stuff I have around the house. In 2008, I wore a hard hat and coveralls, grabbed a toilet plunger and became Joe the Plumber. Remember him? Then I was Old MacDonald (bib overalls, straw hat), a baseball player (Marlins jersey and hat, softball pants) and Old MacDonald again. This year Ill wear my football referee stuff, with a sign around my neck that says REPLACEMENT REF NEED WORK. MASN Zoe Kleinstiven Security Force Battalion Phoenix, Ariz. Im not dressing up, but my daughter is going to be a lion. Joaquin Newbold Family member Philadelphia Spiderman. MA3 Johnny Oliver Security Force Battalion Fancy Farm, Ky. Aladdin. My girlfriends name is Jasmine and she thought that would be cute. Michael Jones Retired Navy Washington D.C. A civilian. I just retired. After 24 years, its a great switch. ET2 Michael Ely USS Rhode Island Gold Gautier, Miss. A medieval knight in shining armor. I go to Renaissance Fairs, so its a costume I have. Heather Norton Family member Groton, Conn. An Elvis impersonator. I found a pair of sunglasses that reminded me of Elvis, so I looked online for a costume. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Constitution and her crew headed under way from the ships berth in Charlestown, Mass. Oct. 19, in commemoration of the ships launching day 215 years ago. is was the last of this years ve scheduled underway demonstrations for Constitution, during which the ship celebrated the bicentennial of the War of 1812. is has been quite a year for both the ship and the crew, and to be under way is the perfect way to celebrate her 215th birth day, said Cmdr. Matthew Bonner, Constitutions 72nd commanding o cer. e fact she can still go to sea and occasionally sail is a testament not only to her design, but also the dedication and skill of the people who maintain this beautiful ship. Constitution started boarding guests at 8 a.m., many of them family and friends of current crew members. Shortly after 10 a.m. with more than 349 guests in attendance, she departed her pier. At 11 a.m., Constitution performed a 21-gun salute near Fort Independence on Castle Island. Fort Independence is a state park that served as a defense post for Boston Harbor at one time. At noon, Bonner announced Constitutions 2012 Berenson and Leadership award winners. e Berenson award winner went to the Sailor who consistently gave the best tours of Con stitution. e Leadership award went to the Sailor who demonstrated the best leadership qualities. Both awards were deter mined by vote of their peers. I felt so privileged to be given an award on the ships birthday in front of all my family and friends, said Seaman Stephen Beck, Constitutions 2012 Berenson Award winner. History has always been a huge interest for me, and to be able to educate the public about our ship and Naval heritage is an amaz ing feeling. e ship also red an ad ditional 17 shots at 12:15 p.m. as she passed the Coast Guard Station, the former site of the Edmund Hartt shipyard where Con stitution was built. Each round of this salute honored the 16 states that comprised America when Constitution launched in 1797 and one in honor of the ship. e ship returned pier-side at 1 p.m.USS Constitution sets sail THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nas, 21, was arrested Oct. 17 in down town Manhattan after he allegedly attempted to detonate what he believed to be a 1,000-pound bomb at the New York Federal Reserve Bank on Liberty Street in lower Manhat tans nancial district. e defendant faces charges of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to provide material support to al Qaeda. e arrest of Nas was the culmination of an un dercover operation dur ing which he was closely monitored by the FBI New York Field Oces Joint Terrorism Task Force. e explosives that he allegedly sought and at tempted to use had been rendered inoperable by law enforcement and posed no threat to the public. According to the criminal complaint led in the Eastern District of New York, defendant Nas, a Bangladeshi national, trav eled to the United States in January 2012 for the pur pose of conducting a ter rorist attack on U.S. soil. Unbeknownst to Nas, one of the individuals he attempted to recruit was actually a source for the FBI. rough the inves tigation, FBI agents and NYPD detectives working with the JTTF were able to closely monitor Nas as he attempted to imple ment his plan. In a written statement intended to claim respon sibility for the terrorist bombing of the Federal Reserve Bank on behalf of al Qaeda, Nas wrote that he wanted to destroy America and that he be lieved the most ecient way to accomplish this goal was to target Ameri cas economy. In this statement, Nas also included quotations from our beloved Sheikh Osama bin Laden to justify the fact that Nas expected that the attack would involve the killing of women and children. During the investigation, Nas came into contact with an FBI under cover agent who posed as an al Qaeda facilitator. At Nas request, the under cover agent supplied Nas with 20 50-pound bags of purported explosives. Naf is then allegedly worked to store the material and as semble the explosive device for his attack. Nas purchased components for the bombs detonator and conducted surveillance for his attack on multiple occasions in New York Citys nancial district in lower Man hattan. roughout his interactions with the undercover agent, Nas re peatedly asserted that the plan was his own and was the reason he had come to the United States. Early Oct. 17, Nas met the undercover agent and traveled in a van to a ware house located in the East ern District of New York. While en route, Nas ex plained to the undercover agent that he had a Plan B that involved conduct ing a suicide bombing operation in the event that the attack was about to be thwarted by the police. Upon arriving at the warehouse, Nas assem bled what he believed to be a 1,000-pound bomb inside the van. Nas and the undercov er agent then drove to the New York Federal Reserve Bank. During this drive, Terror suspect arrested aer alleged bomb plot 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Pirates Cove Galley menus Nas armed the purported bomb by assembling the detonator and attaching it to the explosives. Nas and the undercover agent parked the van next to the New York Federal Reserve Bank, exited the van, and walked to a nearby ho tel. ere, Nas recorded a video statement to the American public that he intended to release in con nection with the attack. During this video statement, Nas said, We will not stop until we attain victory or martyrdom. Nas then repeatedly, but unsuccessfully, at tempted to detonate the bomb, which had been assembled using the inert explosives provided by the undercover agent. JTTF agents arrested Nas immediately after he attempt ed to detonate the bomb.Plot THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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Anger management seminar Oct. 31Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 31. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 25 and 29. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 to Nov. 1. For more information and to regis ter, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops October is Domestic Violence Aware ness month. e Commander Naval In stallation Command has designated this years theme Home is not a War Zone: Bringing Peace to Relationships. Wear ing a purple ribbon during the month of October brings awareness to our community to stop Domestic Violence. Protect ing Yourself and Escaping from Domestic Violence. Getting out of an abusive or violent rela tionship isnt easy. Maybe youre still hop ing that things will change or youre afraid of what your partner will do if he discovers youre trying to leave. Whatever your reasons, you probably feel trapped and helpless. But help is available. ere are many resources avail able for abused and battered women, in cluding crisis hotlines, shelters, even job training, legal services and childcare. You deserve to live free of fear. Start by reaching out. Your Bill of Rights You have the right to be you. You have the right to put yourself rst. You have the right to be safe. You have the right to love and be loved. You have the right to be human not perfect. You have the right to be angry and protest if you are treated unfairly or abu sively by anyone. You have the right to earn and control your own money. You have the right to ask questions about anything that aects your life. You have the right to make decisions that aect you. You have the right to grow and change, and that includes changing your mind. You have the right to say no. You have the right to make mistakes. You have the right not to be respon sible for others adults problems. You have the right not to be liked by everyone. You have the right to control your own life and to change it if you are not happy with it as it is. Please contact the Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate for support and assis tance at (912) 573-4512.Protecting yourself, escaping violence Strand gives insight into trauma Russell Strand, chief of the Army Military Police School Family Advo cacy Law Enforcement Training Pro gram, was aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Oct. 9 and 10. He presented four three-hour training sessions titled Trauma e Impact of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault to command leader ship and the Kings Bay community. Strand said trauma victims under go emotional changes and provided characteristics of an oender. His presentations explored the impact of trauma on victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse. Strand discussed how leadership and rst responders can reduce the impact of additional trauma on vic tims and provided a better under standing on how to assist victims. Strand targeted his presentations to each audience. Participants said they would attend further presenta tions, due to Strands knowledge and how he easily engaged the audience on dicult and sensitive topics. He made an impression on the ac tive duty members who attended. He is a professional, teaching how to be supportive of victims of trauma and to have a better understanding of how trauma impacts victims. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Kings Bay, county rolls out red carpet for week-long salutee annual memorial ceremony by World War II Submarine Veterans, with the Tolling of the Boats, will be Nov. 2 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion. e event highlights a weeklong visit by the Sub Vets. Events aboard Kings Bay and in Camden County begin Tuesday with their arrival and wrap up Saturday. Kings Bay Command Mas ter Chief Randy Huckaba said he is looking forward to the week. Each year we are privileged to host our submarine heroes here in Kings Bay, he said. I am always impressed at how the area commands and community come together to make this a memorable event. A tentative schedule includes museum, submarine and Trident Training Facility tours, receptions and steak fry at the CPO Goat Locker, a Pirates Cove Galley breakfast with Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., and the memorial service at 10 a.m. Nov. 2. A World War II Navy study re ports the Japanese Merchant Marine lost 8.1 million tons of vessels during the war, with submarines accounting for 4.9 mil lion tons, or 60 percent, of losses. Additionally, U.S. submarines sank 700,000 tons of naval ships, about 30 percent of the total lost, including eight aircraft carriers, one battleship and 11 cruisers. Of the total 288 U.S. submarines deployed, including those stationed in the Atlantic, 52 submarines were lost with 48 lost in the Pacic. American submariners, who comprised only 1.6 percent of the Navy, suered the highest loss rate in the U.S. Armed Forces, with 22 percent killed. More than 300 take part in o-road race at NSB Kings Bay With the rst beams of sunlight streaming through the trees, the initial Navy Adventures Unleashed O Road 5K Challenge run took place at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Etowah Park, Oct. 17. NAU, a Morale, Welfare and Recreation cross-programing endeavor with the Kings Bay Outdoor Recreation, Liberty and Fitness, oered individuals and commands an opportunity to take their physical readiness run o the beaten path. e course proved to be a bit challenging as the natural landscape provided participants an element of intensity, dodging tree limbs, roots and uneven terrain. The off-road event was well represented with more than 300 Navy, Coast Guard, Marines, civilians and dependents taking the sunrise challenge and choosing the 5K run or 2 mile walk options. Up next, Saturday, Nov. 17, NAU Kings Bay will have canyon zip lining, with special pricing for Liberty Sailors. After that, on Saturday, Dec. 1 at Etowah Park will be Rugged Recreation Uprising. e festivities begin with an o-road 5K race. e day will include outdoor activities for the entire Kings Bay community, with a paintball tourna ment, bouncy houses, halo jump, climbing wall, kids in the dirt challenge, entertainment, food and prizes for top nishers. Discover your rush with Navy Up Periscope What are you going to be for Halloween? Page 9 Group 10 Rear Adm. Tofalo spreads Navy word in Orlando Page 4 Stop it Protect yourself, escape domestic violence Pages 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com WW II Sub Vets coming Freedom 5K ESA run a hitSWFLANT in high gear for Oct. 13 employee activity As the sand gnats began to take their toll on the 48 runners and walkers in front of the Missile Display at Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Kings Bay the morning of Oct. 13, HMC Roy Holder signaled the start of the Fall SWFLANT Employee Services Association Freedom 5K Run/Walk. It was a welcomed start! e group moved o quickly and the early pace was set by MTC Jules Alarcon. e group, made up of a diverse group of SWLANT civilian and military personnel, left the start as a swarm, but thinned out to single le by the halfmile mark. With groups beginning to form, the race headed for the turn at Eagles Hammock Campground. Alarcon was still leading the way at the half way point, closely followed by Lt. Alexander McGinnis, MT1 Gene Reale and MT2 Joel Sorto. Scattered throughout the eld, running and walking partners were there to provide support and encouragement for one another. One such pair was the only father-son duo in the race, Je and Jaxen Brewer. Jaxen was the youngest competitor and biggest motivator. At 3 years old he never missed a stride and ran with the biggest smile of the group. As the runners spread out over the last half of the race, the four-man breakaway of Alarcon, McGinnis, Petty and Reale separated themselves from the rest of the eld by 3 minutes. But the last half mile belonged to Sorto. (They) crossed the finish line together at what was a sprint for the little guy.Adventures Unleashed debuts with Etowah Park 5K ... the natural land scape provided par ticipants an element of intensity ... Admiral tours basesCommander, Fleet Forces, Command, visits Kings BayCommander, Fleet Forces Command, visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport to meet with senior leaders during a series of leadership calls Oct. 16 to 18. During the visit, Adm. Bill Gortney presented his philosophies on leadership and took questions from base leaders. While the trip is similar to trips he will duplicate many times, for the eets top admiral, a trip to Northeast Florida is always special. Its always great, he said. I grew up on the St. Johns River water skiing on Doctors Inlet, and its always nice to come back to Northern Florida. Its home. Growing up as the son of a Navy captain, he moved to Jacksonville, Fla., in 1970 when his father retired and took a job aboard NAS Cecil Field. at year was his sophomore year at Orange Park High School,

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 e new commissary rewards card now oered at all 247 military commissaries worldwide oers a glimpse into what the Defense Commissary Agency is working to provide its customers: the same selection, conveniences and quality as the most popular commercial grocery store chains, but even better customer service and lower prices. ats the vision of Joseph H. Jeu, who took the helm of what amounts to the nations 11th-largest grocery story chain a year and a half ago and is steering into new waters to provide patrons what he calls the Commissary Benet 2020 the most advanced commissary service theyve ever experienced. We have to pay attention to what happens in the private sector, know the trends and be sure we are right along with them or maybe, in some ways, ahead of them, Jeu told American Forces Press Service. We want to be equal or better. By many standards, military commissaries are already there, he noted. Patrons rated commissaries at 4.72 on a scale of 5 on a recent commissary customer satisfaction survey. In the industrywide American Customer Satisfaction Index, commissaries ranked 81 six points above the industry average of 76. Only one commercial grocery chain scored higher. Jeu attributes some of that success to the fact that military family members, retirees and veterans make up 64 percent of the commissary workforce. When two-thirds of your workforce is military related, it means we understand who our customers are and what they are going through, he said. It says, We care and appreciate what you do. But Jeu acknowledged that the biggest attraction commissaries offer boils down to price. Selling products at 5 percent over cost, with the surcharge invested directly into new construction, renovation and equipment upgrades, commissaries typically save shoppers about 32 percent compared to civilian supermarkets. Savings are even higher in some high-cost areas, such as Hawaii, where commissary shoppers typically save about 50 percent. Looking ahead, Jeu is exploring new ways to maximize consumer savings without increasing the $1.4 billion subsidy Congress authorizes to operate the commissaries. For example, the new commissary rewards card allows shoppers to download coupons directly onto the card and redeem them at checkout. Fort Lee, Va., home of the Defense Commissary Agency, served as a test bed for the cards in August, and as of early this month, theyre available at every commissary worldwide. Jeu said hes been amazed at how well the cards have been received, even among coupon-savvy commissary shoppers who typically rank within the top three among the nations top coupon clippers. About half of those who received a card went online to register it into the system so they could begin using it. ats a very high rate of acceptance, Jeu said. is is a service our customers very clearly accept. Another idea in the works is the opening of warehouse stores that offer even deeper discounts by selling products in bulk. Jeu is eyeing regions with multiple commissaries Virginias Tidewater area, San Antonio and San Diego, among them with hopes of converting one traditional commissary into a box store. e rst could happen sometime next year. In addition to bulk items, each warehouse store will sell meat, produce, deli and bakery goods, but with a smaller selection than at traditional commissaries, he explained. Meanwhile, recognizing a growing trend in the commercial grocery industry, DECA is exploring ways to connect with and serve its customers using online technology and smartphones. In a test started about a year ago at Fort Lee, commissary customers can order a customized deli sandwich online, then pick it up at the store. Now Jeu wants to expand the concept to allow customers to preorder groceries online, then arrive at the commissary to nd their order packed and ready for pickup. DECA plans to test the curbside pickup plan from Mondays to Fridays beginning in the spring at Fort Lee and possibly one or two other commissaries to see how shoppers like it. I believe it will be successful, and if it is, we will expand it to other stores, Jeu said. Also using online technology, DECA plans to extend its services to more parts of the country with large populations of reserve and National Guard members, but no commissaries. at initiative, started on the West Coast in 2008, enables reservecomponent members to preorder and prepay electronically from a selection of several hundred items, most sold in bulk. Trucks arrive at a designated site with the orders packed and ready for pickup. During the last scal year, DECA staged more than 100 of these onsite sales. It worked out pretty well, Jeu said. We denitely want to do more of that. At 1 p.m., Nov. 3, the Tigers and Gyrenes will come head-to-head at Camden County High Schools Chris Gilman Stadium. Edward Waters College will face Ave Maria University in the only college football competition in Camden County. You know what a Tiger is, but for those of you who dont know what a Gyrene is, here you go: A Gyrene is remembered with great nostalgia by older Americans who identify the name with that special breed of young men who fought the desperate battles of Belleau Wood and the island campaigns of the Pacic. ese men formed the battle history of the United States Marine Corps and fashioned an ethos that inspires the men and women who serve in todays Corps. Jacksonvilles Edward Waters and Ave Maria will vie for the winning title of the historic Ralph J. Bunche Classic. L. J. Williams, event chair, said that the Classic is expected to draw hundreds of visitors who will be contributing to the economy of Camden County. College football fans from several states will be staying in our hotels, eating in our restaurants and having the opportunity to discover all that Camden County has to oer, Williams said. Our hopes are that these visitors will return and spend more time here and tell others what a great place we live in. Williams added locals are encouraged to attend as well, to show support for this classic event and to honor its name same, Ralph J. Bunche. Bunche was an American political scientist and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. He was the rst person of color to be so honored in the history of the Prize. He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he received the Medal of Freedom from President John F. Kennedy. Bunche founded a trade school that later became an all-black high school in Camden County. e community can become involved through sponsorships and/ or by purchasing tickets to the game. General admission to the game is $10 in advance, $12 on game day and for children/students $5 in advance and $7 on game day. Family packages are available, and groups of 20 are eligible for a discount. Tickets may be purchased at the Kingsland and St. Marys Welcome Centers, retail outlets and on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at Morale, Welfare and Recreation. For ticket information, call Emma Rogers at (912) 222-2188, and for ticket or vendor information, call L. J. Williams at (912) 552-4494. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Red Ribbon contest offers prizese National Family Partnership is oering $1,000 to the school and an iPad to the student who wins the 27th annual Red Ribbon Week contest by decorating the front of their home with the message e Best Me is Drug Free For more information, visit redribbon.org/contest.Housing resident survey ongo inge annual Resident Satisfaction Survey runs to Nov. 1. Let the installation and the Navy know how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Un accompanied Housing is meeting your needs and provide input for changes. UH represen tatives will visit each command to provide an opportunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents. Contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manag er, at 573-8953 for more information.Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd.. Plans include a penta gon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water feature. Donations are taken through Oct. 26, with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3, and can be dropped at the Kingsland De pot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Vet job fair in Jacksonville Nov. 1e U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the mil itary-to-civilian recruitment rm RecruitMilitary have a hiring event for military veterans at EverBank Field 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., ursday, Nov. 1. For more informatin, visit events.recruitmili tary.com/events/jacksonville-veteran-job-fairnovember-1-2012#registration Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Vets Day 5K benefits ship efforte Salute to Veterans 5K Run is Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and will benet the Jacksonville Historic Naval Ship Association in its eorts to bring a retired Guided Missile Destroyer, the Charles F. Adams, DDG-2 to downtown Jacksonville as a oating Naval Museum. To registration www.1stplacesports.com/salute.html.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. Tick ets are available at the Festivals Web site at old citymusicfest.com. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndunlap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their depen dents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. For more information, go to the Events Calendar at www.WorldGolfHallof Fame.org. Now hear this! Parents of children with special needs know how daunting it can be to successfully navigate educational systems in order to secure the servic es and supports. In particular, writing an Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, can be a challenging process lled with questions and concerns. e Child and Youth Education Services oce, with support from Georgia Parent to Parent, will host a free IEP Clinic at the Kings Bay Youth Center from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27. e 16 one-hour sessions, shared by two counselors, will be assigned on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Each counseling session will include a 15 minute in-take process and 45 minutes of counseling. Exceptional parents will have an opportunity to meet with a trained counselor to review the details of their IEP details, get answers to questions and receive suggestions about how to best advocate for their children with special needs. To register for a counseling ses sion or to nd out more information about this program, call the Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer at (912) 5738986 or e-mail clainetta.jeerson@ navy.mil or kingsbaylo@navy.mil.Special needs IEP Workshop oered College football at Camden Nov. 3 Ralph J. Bunche Classic Commissaries will be oering more Navy commissary

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where he would meet his future wife, Sherry. Gortney spent the next three years working summer jobs on board NAS Jacksonville. He spent a summer as a lifeguard at the base swimming pool. He spent another summer working as a carpenters assistant, helping build the Patriots Point base housing area behind the hospital. is exchange and this commissary are not the same ones that I used to go to when I was growing up, but this is home for me, Gortney said. Even though he grew up in a Navy family and spent so much time on base, Gortney said he could never see himself as a Sailor when he was younger. I wanted no part of the Navy, he said. I felt that way because I moved around all my life as a Navy brat, but when I was about half way through college, I decided I didnt want to be a lawyer. I was a history major, and I didnt know what I would do with a history degree if I wasnt going to law school. At that point, Gortney said, something changed within him. In our business, we have a lot of father-son or father-daughter relationships where you follow the path of your parents, he said. At a very early age, I wanted to y, and I would wear my fathers ight gear like any other kid did, and I think that spark came back to me when I was in college. Twenty-seven years later, Gortney would nd himself back aboard NAS Jacksonville, not as a summer hire, but as a four-star admiral. While he said the landscape has changed dramatically since his high-school years, so has the Navys war ghting capabilities. Gortney specically mentioned the arrival of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft and the opening of the new P-8A Integrated Training Center. e good news is that were replacing the P-3s that were here when I was in high school with P-8s. I just had a chance to tour a P-8 and it was great, and I got to y the simulator and it was a lot of fun, he said. e helicopters are also more advanced. Weve gone from H-3s to H-60s, so we have much more capable helos out there on the seaboard. Gortney said Jacksonville is the perfect location to base Poseidon aircraft, not just geographically, but also because of the strong community support for the military. Jacksonville is just a super Navy town. North Florida is very supportive of the Navy and has been for years, he said. Its a great place to operate from, and its a great place to train from. e air station is a historical one, and its a real jewel. It has, for decades, provided terric support forward. I wouldnt want to y P-8s anywhere else. Despite all the things that have changed on and around NAS Jacksonville since Gortneys lifeguarding days at the base pool, there is at least one thing that remains the same. e one constant is the quality of the people our Sailors, chief petty ocers, ocers and civilians that help make this place run, he said. eyre just phenomenal, and they are the greatest strength that we have. Recognizing how comfortable its customers, particularly younger ones, have become with smart phone technology, DECA plans to branch out into what industry refers to as mobile commerce. A new app to be introduced soon will provide generic information about store locations and hours and sales promotions. But Jeu plans to broaden the service so shoppers can use their smartphones to get price comparisons and even place grocery orders. To ensure only authorized users have access to the system, they will enter their Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, or DEERS, information, he explained. While giving commissary shoppers more options and more convenience, DECA continues to ensure its providing the items they want. When a new product comes out, we want to have those items at the same time as commercial grocery stores, Jeu said, while removing stock thats not moving from its shelves. Its a constant balancing act, and something we constantly monitor, he said. We want to be sure we are oering the products our customers want. To continue to do so, DECA continues exploring ways to reduce overhead and streamline its operations. Its been an ongoing process that began with the merger of four separate commissary systems into one in 1991, Jeu said. at consolidation weeded out duplication, creating a more streamlined organization that has reduced operating costs by $700 million over the past two decades. For the last 20 years, we have done our part, but we will continue to search for new eciencies, and at the same time, provide the same level of savings for our people, Jeu said. At the same time, DECA stands as a Defense Department model, boasting 10 consecutive years of clean annual nancial statements -something Defense Secretary Leon Panetta wants institutionalized departmentwide by 2015. While exploring and rolling out new services and oerings, the DECA sta plans to tap into Facebook, Twitter and other social media to better-connect with its customers. We want this to be interactive, to ask questions of our customers. What do they think of this new concept? Do they have new ideas of how we can do better? Jeu said. We want to be asking more questions to ensure we continue to live up to our customers expectations.Gortney More THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Orlando Port of Call Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 5 SCIENCE DAY PHOTOS BY VALERIE TEMPLE His pace could not be matched as he sprinted away from the group and crossed the line at 20:25, with a 15 second advantage over McGinnis, followed by Alarcon. e rst civilian across was Bob Birke, at 24:02. He was closely followed by Bill Legge and Tom Giron. e rst female across was Allison Busuttil. Hand in hand, Jaxen Brewer and his father crossed the nish line to gether at what was a sprint for the little guy. But he was a giant in heart. Still with a smile on a face, his proud dad asked him if he wanted some water to cool down. Can I have a coke? he asked in reply. And here came the sand gnats again. SWFLANT nished out the morning with a command picnic at Lake D. e burgers and hot dogs were on the grill by 11 a.m., and the crowd stued by 1 p.m. Adventures Unleashed. For more information on upcoming NAU events, like us on facebook/ mwrkingsbay. NAU is over-age-18 programming initiative for the thrill of adventure, the love of nature and the quest for excitement. Miki Gilbert, Navy Adventures Unleashed coordinator, is working handin-hand with Liberty, Fitness, Outdoor Recreation and Information, Tickets and Travel to add an element of extreme intensity to your recreation and tness pursuits. eres a whole wave of extreme out there, right now, and were going to ride it, Gilbert said. I enjoy motivating people, to see them push harder than they thought possible. UnleashedFreedom

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e Night Glow Golf Tournament is Friday, Oct. 26 at Trident Lakes Golf Course with a 3 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civil ians. Nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes, for each person, golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Battle of the Border At KB Finnegans Irish Pub, starting at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 join the excitement. Wear your team col ors and receive $1 domestic drafts until 6 p.m. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Haunted Halloween Horror Spin Ride Its 6 to 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex., free for active duty military, retirees and their families. Its $2.50 for authorized civilians, contractors and guests. eres a prize for the best costume. Light refreshments follow. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Horror Hoops 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament Saturday, Oct. 27 Sign in by 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 27. Double elimination format. $50 team registration fee. Rosters are due and registration closes at noon, ursday, Oct. 25. First place receives championship shirts, team trophy and individual trophy. Second place will receive runner-up shirts. You also can sign up at www.kingsbay sports.leagueapps.com. Need more information? Call (912) 573-8908. Spooky Bowling Special From 1 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31 enjoy $1 games and $1 shoe rental at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. More information? Call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Kickball League Registration is open to all active duty, DoD, dependents and civilians 18 and older. ere will be a Captains meeting at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 7 in the Fitness Complex classroom. You also can register online at www.kingsbaysports.league apps.com. For more information, call (912) 573-8908. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addi tion to the Pro Shop, Rack-N-Roll also oers oil line pat terns. Reserve your choice of oiled patterns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including linage and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not available on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights through Oct. 31, face horrors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 19 to 23, closed anksgiving, for ages kin dergarten to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and IAs registration begins on Monday, Oct. 29. Active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Monday, Nov. 5 and DoD contractors and all others will start Tuesday, Nov. 13. You can register Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Cost is based on total family income. Most re cent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for con rmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of reg istration. No outside food al lowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Oct. 27 and 28 Brave. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Camp signups start Just for kids Liberty call Night Glow Golf is Oct. 26 President Barack Obama recently announced his nominations for two key military leadership positions in Europe and Afghanistan. e president is nominating Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen to serve as NATOs su preme allied com mander for Europe and commander of U.S. European Command and Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. to succeed Allen as commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. If conrmed, Allen would succeed Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis, who will retire in the spring after three decades of service. Dunford currently serves as assistant commandant of the Marine Corps. Both nominations are subject to Senate conrmation. For more than a year, Obama said, Allen has served with distinction in Afghanistan, guiding his forces through a critical period in the countrys transition. e president noted his personal reliance on Allens counsel and lauded his devotion to national security and U.S. service members. Under General Allens command, we have made important progress towards our core goal of defeating al-Qaida and ensuring they can never return to a sovereign Afghanistan, Obama said in a written statement. Working with our Afghan partners and international civilians, the forces under General Allens command have moved forward with a transition to Afghan security forces, who will take the lead for security across the country next year. Obama noted that Allens leadership of the coalition in Afghanistan has required close relationships with NATO nations and other partners. Allen, Dunford tabbed for posts 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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I always get dressed up to greet the kids on Halloween, but I usually just wear stuff I have around the house. In 2008, I wore a hard hat and coveralls, grabbed a toilet plunger and became Joe the Plumber. Remember him? Then I was Old MacDonald (bib overalls, straw hat), a baseball player (Marlins jersey and hat, softball pants) and Old MacDonald again. This year Ill wear my football referee stuff, with a sign around my neck that says REPLACEMENT REF NEED WORK. MASN Zoe Kleinstiven Security Force Battalion Phoenix, Ariz. Im not dressing up, but my daughter is going to be a lion. Joaquin Newbold Family member Philadelphia Spiderman. MA3 Johnny Oliver Security Force Battalion Fancy Farm, Ky. Aladdin. My girlfriends name is Jasmine and she thought that would be cute. Michael Jones Retired Navy Washington D.C. A civilian. I just retired. After 24 years, its a great switch. ET2 Michael Ely USS Rhode Island Gold Gautier, Miss. A medieval knight in shining armor. I go to Renaissance Fairs, so its a costume I have. Heather Norton Family member Groton, Conn. An Elvis impersonator. I found a pair of sunglasses that reminded me of Elvis, so I looked online for a costume. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Constitution and her crew headed underway from the ships berth in Charlestown, Mass. Oct. 19, in commemoration of the ships launching day 215 years ago. is was the last of this years ve scheduled underway demonstrations for Constitution, during which the ship celebrated the bicentennial of the War of 1812. is has been quite a year for both the ship and the crew, and to be underway is the perfect way to celebrate her 215th birthday, said Cmdr. Matthew Bonner, Constitutions 72nd commanding ocer. e fact she can still go to sea and occasionally sail is a testament not only to her design, but also the dedication and skill of the people who maintain this beautiful ship. Constitution started boarding guests at 8 a.m., many of them family and friends of current crew members. Shortly after 10 a.m. with more than 349 guests in attendance, she departed her pier. At 11 a.m., Constitution performed a 21-gun salute near Fort Independence on Castle Island. Fort Independence is a state park that served as a defense post for Boston Harbor at one time. At noon, Bonner announced Constitutions 2012 Berenson and Leadership award winners. e Berenson award winner went to the Sailor who consistently gave the best tours of Constitution. e Leadership award went to the Sailor who demonstrated the best leadership qualities. Both awards were determined by vote of their peers. I felt so privileged to be given an award on the ships birthday in front of all my family and friends, said Seaman Stephen Beck, Constitutions 2012 Berenson Award winner. History has always been a huge interest for me, and to be able to educate the public about our ship and Naval heritage is an amazing feeling. e ship also red an ad ditional 17 shots at 12:15 p.m. as she passed the Coast Guard Station, the former site of the Edmund Hartt shipyard where Con stitution was built. Each round of this salute honored the 16 states that comprised America when Constitution launched in 1797 and one in honor of the ship. e ship returned pier-side at 1 p.m.USS Constitution sets sail THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 9

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Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nas, 21, was arrested Oct. 17 in down town Manhattan after he allegedly attempted to detonate what he believed to be a 1,000-pound bomb at the New York Federal Reserve Bank on Liberty Street in lower Manhat tans nancial district. e defendant faces charges of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to provide material support to al Qaeda. e arrest of Nas was the culmination of an undercover operation during which he was closely monitored by the FBI New York Field Oces Joint Terrorism Task Force. e explosives that he allegedly sought and at tempted to use had been rendered inoperable by law enforcement and posed no threat to the public. According to the criminal complaint led in the Eastern District of New York, defendant Nas, a Bangladeshi national, trav eled to the United States in January 2012 for the pur pose of conducting a ter rorist attack on U.S. soil. Unbeknownst to Nas, one of the individuals he attempted to recruit was actually a source for the FBI. rough the investigation, FBI agents and NYPD detectives working with the JTTF were able to closely monitor Nas as he attempted to implement his plan. In a written statement intended to claim responsibility for the terrorist bombing of the Federal Reserve Bank on behalf of al Qaeda, Nas wrote that he wanted to destroy America and that he believed the most ecient way to accomplish this goal was to target Americas economy. In this statement, Nas also included quotations from our beloved Sheikh Osama bin Laden to justify the fact that Nas expected that the attack would involve the killing of women and children. During the investigation, Nas came into contact with an FBI undercover agent who posed as an al Qaeda facilitator. At Nas request, the undercover agent supplied Nas with 20 50-pound bags of purported explosives. Nafis then allegedly worked to store the material and assemble the explosive device for his attack. Nas purchased components for the bombs detonator and conducted surveillance for his attack on multiple occasions in New York Citys nancial district in lower Manhattan. roughout his interactions with the undercover agent, Nas repeatedly asserted that the plan was his own and was the reason he had come to the United States. Early Oct. 17, Nas met the undercover agent and traveled in a van to a warehouse located in the Eastern District of New York. While en route, Nas explained to the undercover agent that he had a Plan B that involved conducting a suicide bombing operation in the event that the attack was about to be thwarted by the police. Upon arriving at the warehouse, Nas assembled what he believed to be a 1,000-pound bomb inside the van. Nas and the undercover agent then drove to the New York Federal Reserve Bank. During this drive, Terror suspect arrested aer alleged bomb plot 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Pirates Cove Galley menus Nas armed the purported bomb by assembling the detonator and attaching it to the explosives. Nas and the undercover agent parked the van next to the New York Federal Reserve Bank, exited the van, and walked to a nearby hotel. ere, Nas recorded a video statement to the American public that he intended to release in connection with the attack. During this video statement, Nas said, We will not stop until we attain victory or martyrdom. Nas then repeatedly, but unsuccessfully, at tempted to detonate the bomb, which had been assembled using the inert explosives provided by the undercover agent. JTTF agents arrested Nas immediately after he attempt ed to detonate the bomb.Plot THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012 11

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Anger management seminar Oct. 31Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 31. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 25 and 29. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 to Nov. 1. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops October is Domestic Violence Awareness month. e Commander Naval Installation Command has designated this years theme Home is not a War Zone: Bringing Peace to Relationships. Wearing a purple ribbon during the month of October brings awareness to our community to stop Domestic Violence. Protecting Yourself and Escaping from Domestic Violence. Getting out of an abusive or violent relationship isnt easy. Maybe youre still hoping that things will change or youre afraid of what your partner will do if he discovers youre trying to leave. Whatever your reasons, you probably feel trapped and helpless. But help is available. ere are many resources available for abused and battered women, including crisis hotlines, shelters, even job training, legal services and childcare. You deserve to live free of fear. Start by reaching out. Your Bill of Rights You have the right to be you. You have the right to put yourself rst. You have the right to be safe. You have the right to love and be loved. You have the right to be human not perfect. You have the right to be angry and protest if you are treated unfairly or abusively by anyone. You have the right to earn and control your own money. You have the right to ask questions about anything that aects your life. You have the right to make decisions that aect you. You have the right to grow and change, and that includes changing your mind. You have the right to say no. You have the right to make mistakes. You have the right not to be responsible for others adults problems. You have the right not to be liked by everyone. You have the right to control your own life and to change it if you are not happy with it as it is. Please contact the Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate for support and assistance at (912) 573-4512.Protecting yourself, escaping violence Strand gives insight into trauma Russell Strand, chief of the Army Military Police School Family Advocacy Law Enforcement Training Program, was aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Oct. 9 and 10. He presented four three-hour training sessions titled Trauma e Impact of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault to command leadership and the Kings Bay community. Strand said trauma victims under go emotional changes and provided characteristics of an oender. His presentations explored the impact of trauma on victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse. Strand discussed how leadership and rst responders can reduce the impact of additional trauma on victims and provided a better understanding on how to assist victims. Strand targeted his presentations to each audience. Participants said they would attend further presentations, due to Strands knowledge and how he easily engaged the audience on dicult and sensitive topics. He made an impression on the active duty members who attended. He is a professional, teaching how to be supportive of victims of trauma and to have a better understanding of how trauma impacts victims. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 25, 2012

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