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The Kings Bay periscope ( 10-04-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00272

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00272


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PAGE 1

Renew prescriptions, seek appointments at www.relayhealth.com Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is pleased to oer a new, convenient way to connect with the clinic. Using the Internet, you can now communicate online through the RelayHealth mes saging service. e RelayHealth service is a safe, secure and condential way to communicate about your non-urgent healthcare needs. Its as easy to use as email, but incorporates stronger security measures that ensure your privacy. Any time you wish, you can use the RelayHealth service to request: Information regarding non-urgent health matters or symptoms P rescription renewals or lab results Request appointments Information about referrals Access valuable health information By using the RelayHealth service, youll be able to com municate with our clinic when its most convenient for you. All you need is access to a comput er with an Internet connection. Interested? If so, please take a few minutes to sign up. ere is no fee to register for this service Visit www.relayhealth. com and click Register. When prompted, select your assigned provider as your doctor. To ensure security, NBHC Kings Bay must accept your application before your regis tration will be complete. Allow three business days following registration for the clinic to process your registration. Additionally, you must be an eligible beneciary enrolled at Kings Bay to utilize this service. To learn more about the RelayHealth ser Navy has new MCPONStevens replaces West as senior enlisted Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick D. West gave his last hooyah during the change-of-of ce ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 28. Chief of Na val Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert was the guest speaker for the cer emony and highlighted MCPON Wests accomplishments dur Marines join Meals on WheelsA few good people needed to volunteer for program A small group of spouses at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Marine Corps Security Force Battalion recently made deliveries throughout the St. Marys area. ey volunteered their ser vices for the Meals on Wheels program. MCSFBs Meals on Wheels is a volunteer program organized by the battalions spouses of Marines and Sailors. e program is a service to provide relief for MCSFB families with new ba bies or extended illnesses. Our volunteers extend to the family members here at Kings Bay and as far away as Jackson ville, said Ginny Moody, coor dinator of the Meals on Wheels program at MCSFB. We have a total of nine volunteers, but we could always use additional help. One volunteer spouse, Dawn Breckenridge, who delivered meals from Jacksonville, said she had a great time delivering to those in need. Other volunteers like Minnie Arias, Heather Fayed, Brandi Frazier, Mika Green, Cid Platner, Crystal Garrett, Kikey Gomez and Nicole McLawhorn are the reason the program was able to launch in its rst two weeks without concerns. Chaplan Boon, his family a Meals on Wheels recipient, says that it made them feel good to see the spouses out helping. It is nice to see them taking time out of their lives to help us like this, he said. We appreci ate this very much. Moody said its a joy to know the group is taking a little pres sure o new and seasoned par ents, so they can enjoy their rst Up Periscope What do firefighters enjoy about their job? Page 9 Stop it Domestic Violence Awareness Month here Pages 2, 12 Training day Coast Guards Resolute Guardian sharpens skills Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Fire Prevention Week anchors at Kings BayCoast Guard takes aim e importance of safety stressed by Kings Bay Fire Department through station tours, info booth Have 2 Ways Out is the theme for National Fire Pre vention Week, Oct. 7 to 13. With Naval Submarine Base Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr. signing the Fire Prevention Week Proclamation, 2012 Fire Prevention Week ac tivities start with banners at each entrance to the base, a childrens color ing sheet contest, bounce house fun and the Chil drens Development Cen ter visiting Fire Station 1 for tours and a chance to see Sparky the re dog. e Fire Operations and Prevention Sections will have a booth at the Navy Exchange entrance, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 9, providing re safety information and blood pressure checks,. With all the history, stories and folklore, remember the reason this is done each year is to save lives. e most recent statistics are still staggering: One civilian fire injury is reported every 30 minutesHealth clinic oers new online service

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October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. e Commander Naval Installation Command has designated this years theme Home is not a War Zone: Bringing Peace to Relationships. Wearing a purple rib bon during October brings aware ness to our community to stop Domestic Violence. Domestic violence and abuse can happen to anyone, yet the problem is often overlooked, excused or de nied. is is especially true when the abuse is psychological, rather than physical. Noticing and acknowledg ing the signs of an abusive relation ship is the rst step to ending it. No one should live in fear of the person they love. If you recognize yourself or someone you know in the follow ing warning signs and descriptions of abuse, reach out. ere is help available. Understanding domestic violence and abuse Domestic abuse/ intimate partner abuse occurs when one person in an intimate relationship or marriage tries to dominate and control the other person. Domestic abuse that includes physical violence is called domestic violence. Domestic violence and abuse are used for one purpose and one pur pose only: to gain and maintain total control over you. An abuser doesnt play fair. Abusers use fear, guilt, shame and intimidation to wear you down and keep you under his or her thumb. Your abuser may also threaten you, hurt you or hurt those around you. Domestic violence and abuse does not discriminate. It happens among heterosexual couples and in same-sex partnerships. It occurs within all age ranges, ethnic back grounds and economic levels. And while women are more commonly victimized, men are also abused, especially verbally and emotionally, even physically as well. e bottom line is that abusive behavior is nev er acceptable, whether its coming from a man, a woman, a teenager, or an older adult. You deserve to feel valued, respected and safe. Recognizing abuse is the rst step to getting help Domestic abuse often escalates from threats and verbal abuse to violence. And while physical injury may be the most obvious danger, the emotional and psychological consequences of domestic abuse are also severe. Emotionally abusive Active duty service members and other eligible travelers now have more opportunity to take advantage of streamlined security check-in, as Transportation Security Admin istration ocials have added two more airports to the program. Eligible passengers can enter a separate security lane at participat ing airports without removing their shoes, light outerwear and belts, and they dont need to remove their laptops and 3-1-1 compliant liquids or gels from carry-on luggage. Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Va., and Char lotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, N.C., now participate in the initiative, which allows eligible passengers to volunteer in formation about themselves to expedite their airport experience through pre-screening. Since March, TSA has partnered with the Defense Department to more eciently screen active duty service members. Dulles and Charlotte Douglas join Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., and Se attle-Tacoma International in Washington state in oering the option. TSA remains committed to working with our partners across the aviation community to provide travelers the most eective secu rity in the most ecient way, TSA Administrator John S. Pistole said. Building on the success of the pilot programs at Ronald Reagan Wash ington National and Seattle-Tacoma International, we look forward to expanding our [pre-check] screen ing process to additional airports for active duty service members. TSA ocers manning the special security lane will scan presented common access cards to determine eligibility for expedited screening, and eligible service members need not be in uniform, ocials said. Additionally at both airports, select Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and US Airways frequent travelers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Trusted Traveler program members also are eligible to receive expedited screening benets for domestic travel. TSA will always incorporate ran dom and unpredictable security measures throughout the airport and no individual is guaranteed ex pedited screening, ocials said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Housing resident survey ongo inge annual Resident Satisfaction Survey runs to Nov. 1. Let the installation and the Navy know how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Un accompanied Housing is meeting your needs and provide input for changes. UH represen tatives will visit each command to provide an opportunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents. Contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manag er, at 573-8953 for more information.Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd.. Plans include a penta gon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water feature. Donations are taken through Oct. 26, with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3, and can be dropped at the Kingsland De pot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day from Nov. 9 to 11, when veterans and their de pendents receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military members and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scavenger hunt. For more in formation, go to the Events Calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Airports shorten military screening Transportation Security Domestic Violence Awareness here Domestic Violence Recent changes to OPNAVINST 5100.12J will aect all motorcycle riders. e changes will be eective Oct. 9 here at Kings Bay. Beginning that day all civilian rid ers (DoD, dependents and retirees) will only have to show a motorcycle endorsement on their drivers li cense or a motorcycle permit in or der to get base decals. All motorcycle safety training requirements for DoD personnel have been eliminated. Any DoD personnel currently signed up for classes have the option of stay ing in the class or calling NSB Safety at 573-0414 to be removed from the class. Because training is no longer mandatory personnel will have to take leave in order attend. Any civilians wishing to sign up to do so by calling NSB Safety at 5730414 or through ESAMS. Active duty personnel have rst priority for all seats/trainer bikes. While trying not to bump civilians, it must be done from time to time. Training requirements for active duty riders remain the same. Riders who own motorcycles have 60 days to complete follow on train ing after nishing their BRC. A new change for BRC riders is that they will only get one 90 temporary pass after nishing the BRC. Permanent decals will not be issued until their follow on training has been completed. Riders also will see a new class be ing oered, Advanced Rider Course Sport Bike. is class will meet the training requirements for both sport bike and cruiser riders. For more in formation on the ARC give NSB Safe ty a call at 573-0414. Every base hopes to have 100 per cent of its military riders trained. Kings Bay has gone from 51 percent in June to 81 percent in September. e goal for the end of the 2012 is 95 percent. Until recently there has been no consequence for not completing fol low on or refresher training. at too is changing. Beginning January 2013 steps will be taken to revoke the base decals for riders that are behind in motorcycle training requirements. Revocation letters will be sent to respective commands directing in dividuals to report to Security with their motorcycle to have the decal scraped. Riding or driving onboard any military installation is a privilege. NSB instructions have been updat ed to incorporate the latest person nel protective equipment changes as well. e requirements for reective has been removed. It is now highly recommended vice mandatory. Until the CNRSE instructions are updated, riders headed to NAS Jack sonville or NS Mayport will still need to wear a reective upper body gar ment during hours of darkness. Parents of children with special needs know how daunting it can be to successfully navigate educational systems in order to secure the servic es and supports. In particular, writing an Individual Education Plan, or IEP, can be a challenging process lled with questions and concerns. e Child and Youth Education Services oce, with support from Georgia Parent to Parent, will host a free IEP Clinic from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27. e 16 one-hour sessions, shared by two counselors, will be assigned on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Each counseling session will in clude a 15 minute in-take process and 45 minutes of counseling. Ex ceptional parents will have an op portunity to meet with a trained counselor to review the details of their IEP details, get answers to questions and receive suggestions about how to best advocate for their children with special needs. To register for a counseling ses sion or to nd out more information about this program, call the Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer at (912) 573-8986 or e-mail clainetta.jeer son@navy.mil or kingsbaylo@navy. mil.Special needs IEP Workshop oered Rules change for motorcycle riders Motorcycle safety 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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e Naval Legal Service Command realigned its oces Oct. 1, but its legal services to the eet did not change. Legal assistance ser vices were previously provided by Naval Legal Ser vice Oces. As a result of the realignment, a service member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of at torney, family law advice or any similar personal legal matter can now nd assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Of ce. e provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be delivered by RLSO commands. relationships can destroy your self-worth, lead to anxiety and depression, and make you feel helpless and alone. No one should have to endure this kind of pain, and your rst step to breaking free is recognizing that your situ ation is abusive. Once you acknowledge the reality of the abusive situation, then you can get the help you need. You can contact the Kings Bay Fleet and Fam ily Support Center, 5734512, and talk with the Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate. Next week: Signs at Youre in an Abusive Re lationship Month Navy sets course to CPO e Navy announced guidance for the admin istration of the Cycle 218 Chief Petty Ocer Ad vancement Examination and the Fiscal Year 2014 Active Chief Petty Ocers Selection Board via Navy message Sept. 26. NAVADMIN 294/12 pertains to rst class pet ty ocers from the Full Time Support and active component communities. Navy Selected Reserve exam dates and selection board information will be announced in a separate message. e Navy will adminis ter exams to active component and FTS Sailors Jan. 17, 2013. Exam ordering time lines, eligibility criteria, deadlines for commands to conrm eligibility lists, waiver application proce dures and special require ments are contained in the NAVADMIN. e message also out lines procedures and deadlines for submitting correspondence to the se lection board. Sailors should review their Ocial Military Per sonnel File for accuracy at www.bol.navy.mil. e message says the selection board will re view the OMPF and per formance summary record parts I, II and III of all can didates as well as any items submitted by candidates. Each eligible candidate is responsible for ensuring their OMPF is correct and up-to-date with the latest evaluations, awards and other appropriate infor mation. Candidates may sub mit a letter to the board to provide any new informa tion or missing informa tion that is not currently in their OMPF. Letters to the selec tion board for FTS CPO eligible candidates must be received by the Navy Personnel Command cus tomer service center by April 22, 2013. e FTS Selection Board is scheduled to convene May 13, 2013. Letters to the selection board for active component CPO Selection Board eligible candidates must be received at NPC cus tomer service center by May 28, 2013. e active component selection board is sched uled to convene June 17, 2013 and is the largest se lection board held at NPC. Letters to the board may be mailed or submitted electronically. Legal oce changes name THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 Resolute Guardian Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 5 Home fires killed more than 2,600 people Fire departments responded to more than 369,000 home res Candles caused more than 9,600 home res, 90 deaths, 820 injuries $370 million in damages Cooking res caused 156,400 res 410 deaths, 5,310 injuries, $993 mil lion in damages Faulty home heating caused 57,100 res, 490 deaths, 1,540 injuries, $1.1 billion in damages Children started 6,400 res, with 90 deaths, 750 injuries, $159 million in damages Heres the re clock in the United State: A fire department responded to a fire every 24 seconds One structure re is reported every 65 seconds One civilian re injury is reported every 30 min utes One home structure re is reported every 85 seconds One civilian death occurs every 2 hours and 49 minutes One outside re is reported every 50 seconds One vehicle re is reported every 146 sec onds Commemorating a conagration Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conagra tion that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. e re began on Oct. 8, but did most of its damage on Oct. 9. According to legend, the re broke out after a cow, belonging to Catherine OLeary, kicked over a lamp, setting rst the barn, then the whole city on re. People have been blam ing the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. OLeary, for more than 130 years. But recent re search by Chicago histo rian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this ver sion of events. e Moo myth Like any good story, the case of the cow has some truth to it. e great re al most certainly started near the barn where Mrs. OLeary kept her cows. But there is no proof that OLeary was in the barn when the re broke out or that a cow sparked the blaze. OLeary herself swore that shed been in bed early that night, and that the cows were also tucked in for the evening. But if a cow wasnt to blame for the huge re, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have oered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneak ing cigarettes. Others be lieved a neighbor may have started the re. Some people have spec ulated that a ery meteor ite may have fallen to earth on Oct. 8, starting several res that day, in Wiscon sin, as well as Chicago. While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start dur ing this fiery two-day stretch, it wasnt the biggest. at distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest re in American history. e re, which also oc curred on Oct. 8, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres. Historical accounts of the re say that the blaze began when several railroad work ers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush re. Before long, the fast-moving ames were whipping through the area like a tornado, some sur vivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed. Eight decades of re prevention ose who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo res never forgot what theyd been through. Both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the res also changed the way that reght ers and public ocials thought about re safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America, today known as the International Fire Marshals Association, decided that the anniver sary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivi ties, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of re prevention. e commemoration grew incrementally ocial over the years. In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the rst National Fire Prevention Day proclama tion, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which Oct. 9 falls. According to the Na tional Archives and Re cords Administrations Li brary Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety obser vance on record. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire and Emer gency Services, attention is focused on promoting re safety and prevention. However, re safety should be practiced all year long. Most potential hazards can be addressed with a little common sense. For example, be sure to keep ammable items like bedding, clothes and cur tains at least 3 feet away from portable heaters or lit candles, and never smoke in bed. Also, items like appliances or electric blankets should not be operated if they have frayed power cords, and electrical out lets should never be over loaded. Join the re department and help make your home and family re safe, Fire safety checklist Install and maintain interconnected battery/ electric working smoke alarms inside and outside of every sleeping area and remember check monthly and change the batteries at least once a year. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of res and injuries, Stay in the kitchen, if you leave, turn o the stove Never leave a burning candle unattended. Blow out candles when you leave a room. Designate two escape routes from each bed room and practice them regularly. Teach everyone the Stop, Drop, and Roll technique in case clothing catches on re. If you have gas appliances, install a carbon monoxide alarm; Do not let your car run in an attached garage. Avoid storing old mat tresses in the home or garage. Teach children that matches, lighters and candles are tools, not toys. If you suspect that a child is playing with re, check under beds and in clos ets for telltale signs like burned matches. Matches and lighters should be stored in a secure drawer or cabinet. If you have any ques tions, call the NSB Kings Bay Fire Prevention Oce at (912) 573-9998. Or, stop by one of the re stations on base. e re ghters there are always happy to answer your re safety questions or concerns. few days with their new babies is program is something that I would denitely recommend to anyone in MCSFB with a spouse after delivery of a newborn, families with members with critical illnesses or just going through dif cult times, she said. If you are interested in becoming a vol unteer for the MCSFB Meals on Wheels program, you may contact the MCSFB Family Readiness Ocer Lt. William L. Green at (912) 573-6748 or william. green@swant.navy.mil. Ombudsman salute Meals Fire vice, visit www.relayhealth.com. If you have any questions about RelayHealth, contact RelayHealth Customer Support at (866) 735 2963). NBHC Kings Bay, point of contact is Cdr. C.M. McNealJones and Customer Service Representative Carolyn Griggs. Online ing his naval career while thanking him for his lead ership. MCPON West, you made the Navy better through your willingness to listen and learn, Greenert said. I watched you rsthand in the Pacic Fleet, at U.S. Fleet Forces, as VCNO, and I had the honor to serve with you for one year as CNO. MCPON West had the heartbeat of the Navy. Sailors commu nicated with him. He challenged Sailors and they loved it. e ceremony marked the end of a nearly 32-year career for West, who had served as the 12th MCPON since Dec. 12, 2008. West did not discuss personal accomplishments during his retirement remarks, instead focusing on thanking family, friends, shipmates and mentors who helped shape him into a leader. ere is simply no way I can mention you all. Just know that if you are here today, you played some part in the success that I have enjoyed, West said. It has been an honor and privilege to serve our great Navy for nearly 32 years and especially to serve as MCPON for the last four. irty-two years is a long time, but when you are talking about the end of a fantastic journey, it was just a ash of time. Ive never had a bad command because I feel commands are what you make of them and how you choose to seize the opportunities. e thing Im going to miss the most is, by far, the people and the energy and innovation of our Sailors and families. e engine that truly drives our Navy is our people. Our Sailors are what makes our Navy the best thats ever sailed the worlds oceans. MCPON Mike D. Ste vens took the helm of the enlisted force as the Navys 13th MCPON after receiv ing the ceremonial cutlass from MCPON West. Stevens, a native of Montana, joined the Navy in 1983 and most recently served as Fleet Master Chief for U.S. Fleet Forces Fleet Master Chief in Nor folk. His previous Com mand Master Chief tours included U.S. 2nd Fleet, Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 14, and Naval Air Station Pensacola.MCPON Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

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Navy College educational information e hours at the Fitness Com plex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All tness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Au thorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. Movie Under the Pines Park Free admission, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 13 for Brave rated PG. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs and snacks with the family at the outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4564. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Trunk or Treat MWRs Fall Festival is 4 to 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 20 out side the Kings Bay Conference Center. Its free for kids ages 12 and under. Bring your children trick or treat ing early, and enjoy an evening of fun and games. ere will be priz es for the kids. Inatables will be up for the childrens enjoyment. Dominos will be selling pizza by the slice and drinks. MWR is accepting registration for individuals or groups to set-up and deco rate vehicles in the Conference Center parking lot to hand out goodies to the children. e best decorated vehicle will receive an MWR Gift Certicate worth $150. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its Friday, October 26 at Trident Lakes Golf Course with a 3 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for mili tary and $35 for civilians. Nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes, for each person, golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Battle of the Border At KB Finnegans Irish Pub, starting at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 join the excitement. Wear your team colors and receive $1 domestic drafts until 6 p.m. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Spooky Bowling Special From 1 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31 enjoy $1 games and $1 shoe rental at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. More information? Call (912) 573-9492. Feed Your Inner Beast Navy Adventures Unleashed has a new 5K Trail Run/2 mile walk on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Etowah Park. Start is at 7:20 a.m. All individuals and commands are encouraged to step up their physical readiness. Is your command up to the challenge? For more information, contact NAU at 573-9869 Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/fair working condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various colors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim platform No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. e sealed bids must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more information, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the suc cessful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 29 and 30 is Madagascar 3, Oct. 6 and 7 Bedtime Stories, Oct. 13 and 14 Where the Wild ings Are, Oct. 20 and 21 e Tale of Despereaux and Oct. 27 and 28 Brave. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkings bay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Fitness Complex ups hours 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR e assault on the U.S. Consulate earlier this month in Benghazi, Libya, was an attack not only on America, but also on the ideals of the United Na tions, President Barack Obama said in a speech to the U.N. General Assem bly Sept. 25. e attack that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens, was an assault on the notion that people can resolve their dierences peacefully, that diplomacy can take the place of war, and that in an interdepen dent world, all of us have a stake in working towards greater opportunity and security for our citizens, the president said. Nations must be serious about the assault on those ideals and must go to the root causes that extremists use to incite populations, Obama said. If we are serious about those ideals, he told the General Assembly, we must speak honestly about the deeper causes of this crisis, because we face a choice between the forces that would drive us apart, and the hopes we hold in common. Leaders, the president said, must decide that violence and intolerance have no place in the Unit ed Nations. America has support ed the forces of change sweeping North Africa and the Middle East, Obama said. We were inspired by the Tunisian protests that toppled a dictator, because we recognized our own beliefs in the aspira tions of men and women who took to the streets, he said. We insisted on change in Egypt, because our support for democ racy put us on the side of the people. e United States supported leadership transition in Yemen and inter vened in Libya alongside a broad coalition because we had the ability to stop the slaughter of innocents, and because we believed that the aspirations of the people were more power ful than a tyrant, he said. Obama also restated the U.S. position that the regime of Syrian dictator Bashar Assad must end. We have taken these positions because we be lieve that freedom and self-determination are not unique to one culture, he said. Freedom is a univer sal value, the president added. e events of the past two weeks in which extremists have used an Internet video that denigrates the Prophet Mu hammad to spur antiAmerican demonstrations speak to the need for nations to address the ten sions between the West and an Arab World mov ing to democracy, Obama said. e United States will not dictate the outcome of democratic transitions, the president said, nor does America expect ev ery nation to agree with U.S. positions. However, I do believe that it is the obligation of all leaders, in all coun tries, to speak out force fully against violence and extremism, he said. It is time to marginalize those who, even when not re sorting to violence, use hatred of America, or the West, or Israel, as a central principle of politics. For that only gives cover, and sometimes makes excus es, for those who resort to violence. Obama reiterated that the United States will not allow Iran to develop nu clear weapons. A nuclear-armed Iran is not a challenge that can be contained, Obama said. It would threaten the elimination of Israel, the security of [Persian] Gulf nations, and the stability of the glob al economy, he added. Iranian possession of nuclear weapons would spur an arms race in the region and unravel the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, Obama said. Benghazi attackers struck against U.N. ideals THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 7

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Air Force training met Navy training when commanders from the Air Forces Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, and Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., visited Recruit Training Command, the Navys only boot camp, Sept. 25. Gen. Edward A. Rice, Jr., commander, Air Ed ucation and Training Command, was part of the visiting group of Air Force training commanders who spent two days exchanging ideas with Navy training leadership and observing ongoing training at the Navys only boot camp and Recruit Division Commander C School aboard RTC. For a number of years, the military services have looked at ways to better operate jointly and con tinue today to look at the What boy hasnt seen a fire truck, siren screaming, race through traffic and not wanted to be a fire fighter? I did. It only took one This is not a drill experience as the No. 1 hose man on my duty section fire party to convince me that being a firefighter wasnt in my future. There are parts of the job that certainly are appeal ing. Our Kings Bay Fire Department members are a dedi cated lot. In conjunction with Fire Prevention Week, I asked them what they most enjoy about the job. T.J. Barron Firefighter Detroit Continuing to serve my country and my community. Randy Thrift Fire Inspector Kingsland Doing my job (prevention) so firefighters dont have to do theirs. Jonathan Sirmon Firefighter Rural Camden County Helping people. Victor Kirton Fire Inspector Folkston Educating the public to prevent fires. Tom Middleton Captain Kingsland Im a people person, and I enjoy working in the community. Jose Masauding Fire Inspector Iligan, Philipines Meeting people, educating them and learning new things every day. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Hawkins Air Force studies Great Lakes THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and din ner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus best practices of working together that includes boot camp and accessions training. RTC, clearly from the leadership down to the RDCs that I had contact with, even to the recruits that I saw, is a very professional operation, Rice said. I expected that, but as with most things, when you have a chance to put eyes on and talk to people, it makes a more powerful impact on you. Rice is responsible for the recruiting, training and education of all Air Force personnel. His command includes the Air Force Recruiting Service, two numbered air forces plus the Air Univer sity. AETC trains more than 340,000 students per year and consists of 12 bases, more than 70,600 activeduty, Reserve, Guard, civilians and contractors, and 1,380 trainer, ghter and mobility aircraft. During his visit, Rice, along with several other Air Force training personnel, including Maj. Gen. Leonard A. Patrick, Commander, Second Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., toured several facilities on RTC. ey were able to meet directly with ships o cers, leading chief petty ocers and RDCs, en gaging in conversation on some of the universals of basic training. We were very pleased to host General Rice, a re spected leader at the high est level of our military community, said Capt. John Dye, RTCs com manding ocer. e visit provided an excellent opportunity to gain unique insights on our shared mission of producing the next generation of Sailors and Airmen. e visit began with a tour of the USS Trayer Battle Stations-21 recruit capstone facility followed by observing a capping ceremony, where recruits exchange their Recruit ball cap for one that reads Navy. e emotional ceremo ny was followed by a com mand brieng, facilitated by Dye, and then an over view of RDC C School. Rice and the other per sonnel were presented with several live-action scenarios that C school students must respond to appropriately to continue on in their training pipeline to become RDCs. Such hands-on training is essential, according to C school instructors, because it gives students an opportunity to work through a potential sce nario and then discuss appropriate courses of ac tion. If similar instances arise while training recruits, RDCs, who have complet ed this training, have an understanding of the tools at their disposal to work through any given situa tion. e next phase of the tour took place aboard the USS Triton recruit bar racks. While inside the recruit barracks, the group had the opportunity to see how each is set up like a ship with galleys, class rooms, berthing compart ments and oces. ey also observed how the daily routine for a recruit is similar to the rou tine on board a ship or submarine in the eet. ey also toured the state-of-the-art physical tness facility, Freedom Hall, and took a tour of the Golden irteen recruit in-processing facility and the combat training pool, the USS Indianapolis. Very impressive, ev erything I saw today, Rice said. Obviously, having new world-class facili ties all of us would like to have the facilities you have here. A key part of Rices ex perience was the ability to speak with RTC personnel during his visit. It is really about the people, leadership and clearly youre doing a lot of things right here, Rice said. Weve learned a lot, and I think weve agreed that its important for us to continue to have a dialogue where we can exchange ideas about how we can do this train ing mission better as it changes over time. Were committed to that. In the future, we need to have more of these types of ex changes. Overall, I think this was a very productive visit for us. Dye said the visit pro vided a venue for candid dialogue and the occasion to explore the similarities and dierences in Navy and Air Force basic train ing pipelines At Recruit Training Command, the Sailoriza tion process is enhanced through the Navys recent recapitalization campaign, which provided state-of-the-art facilities, but the overarching principles remain the same for both services: producing basically trained, smartly disciplined, physically t service members to join the worlds nest military services, Dye said. Any time we can prot from our shared mission expe riences, we welcome the conversation and the mu tual support. Recruit Training Command graduates more than 37,000 basically trained Sailors annually. Boots 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Gear of future displayed A demonstration of gear, gadgets and gizmos at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Sept. 17 to 21 gave Marines and sailors a rst glimpse at potential energy solutions for the Corps operating forces. Fourteen dierent companies show cased their commercial technologies at the Marine Corps Experimental Forward Operating Base, or ExFOB. ExFOB is not a place. Its a group of organizations working together to get the ball rolling for the Marine Corps, said Lt. Col. Tim Parker of the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory based in Quantico, Va. Its an opportunity to show their equipment and decide if these are the systems we want to move forward with. Participants demonstrated 19 com mercial innovations, from air-condi tioned tents and personal cooling vests, to instant water-cooling systems and solar-powered generators for Humvees all boasting advanced thermal or energyecient technologies. We know that resource eciency aids in combat eectiveness and that our investments in reset and modernization will provide a force that operates lighter, faster and at reduced risk, said Gen. James F. Amos, commandant of the Ma rine Corps. Our force will be more en ergy ecient to support the type of op erations expected of us in the future. To do this, we are changing the way we think about and use energy. Fifty-seven percent of the Marine Corps power was being used for climate control, said Parker, citing recent statis tics from operating forces. He said if the Corps can reduce its power consumption in combat patrols and shelters by using these new technol ogies, the need for batteries, generators and fuel will decrease. Marines, sailors, general ocers and distinguished guests used the products and gave feedback. With help from surveys, laboratory of cials hope to identify and evaluate the technologies to strategically rebalance the Marine Corps energy consumption. A lot of these materials could poten tially save lives, said Master Gunnery Sgt. Larry Deyott, the laboratorys senior enlisted advisor. As Marines, we learn to adapt to the heat, but there are still in stances of heat casualties. ese new re sources can provide a comfortable place to return to after being out in a dusty, hot environment all day, which in turn will allow for a quicker recovery time for the Marines. Once an annual demonstration, Ex FOB now happens twice a year, given its success and innovation, said Parker. He added that the products and events are not just for the current ght but for the future ght as well. U.S. Coast Guard men and women carry out a wide variety of diverse missions every day as we protect people on the sea, protect the nation against threats from the sea and protect the sea itself. We focus on present-day operations and readiness for tomorrow, but certain days compel us and all Americans to reect back upon our heritage. Today (Sept. 27), the 70th anniversary of Sig nalman 1st Class Douglas Munros extraordinarily heroic actions at Guadalcanal, is such a day. It may surprise some that the Coast Guard had a major combat role in World War II and that a Coast Guardsman was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Coast Guard actions and those of Munro at Guadalcanal were crucial to evacuating hundreds of endangered Marines to safety that day. e Battle of Guadalca nal started in 1942, early during the war in the Pa cic and in many ways laid the groundwork for other World War II multi-service amphibious invasions such as D-Day, and for fu ture joint Coast Guard and Marine Corpsoperations. Coast Guardsmen at Guadalcanal manned many of the Higgins boats which were used to trans port Marines between ships and beaches. Often under heavy re, the two services quickly developed a deep and lasting respect for one an other. Matthew Constantino, one of the Marines evacu ated that day, embodies that mutual respect and recently said, We were in enemy-infested land, and the Coast Guard saved our lives that day. In fact one unocial Marine Corps Web site lists all of the Marines who have earned the Medal of Honor throughout his tory, and it intentionally includes Munro as a way of honoring him. Since World War II, the two services have further solidied our close ties during joint operations such as Coast Guard na val gunre support of ICorps Marine units during the Vietnam War, opera tions Able Manner and Able Vigil mass migration humanitarian response, among others. I recently had the honor of talking to retired Cmdr. Ray Evans who enlisted with Munro in 1939 and was stationed with Munro throughout Munros entire time in the Coast Guard. ey became best friends and he was in the boat with Munro when he was killed. We were good pals, Evans told me, speaking of Munro. We both joined before the war and we in tended to make the Coast Guard a career. I did, and I know he would have. I miss him. Like Munro, Evans was also a signalman, and the two of them continually practiced their signaling craft with each other. is is intense practice and pretty soon you get procient; thats how we learned. But we did do a lot of self teaching where we worked together to get more procient, Evans said, in a 1999 interview. He was the pusher per haps more than I was, he had the energy. Although we were working together on that he was really the leader. Believing the United States might enter the war, both Munro and Evans eagerly volunteered to de part their New York Citybased cutter early in order to serve aboard a Coast Guard-manned transport ship to get closer to the ac tion. Munros lasting legacy is best exemplied by his last words. Evans recalled that after Munro was shot, he asked, Did they get o? to conrm all of the Marines had been evacu ated. A true shipmate in every sense of the word, Munros seless service fully em bodies the Coast Guard Ethos. Because while we work together as a team to accomplish our mission, each Coast Guardsman is an individual who is capa ble, and expected, to make a dierence. CG remembers Munro THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 11

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depend ing on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Oct. 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Oct. 31Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 31. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving prima ry issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores with out asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the par enting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongo ing. Attendees must com plete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention Oct. 15safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A training lasting about three hours, safe TALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connected to helpers who are pre pared to provide first aid interventions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, Oct. 15. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Oct. 16Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing refer ral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 16. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, expe rience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 10. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in pri vate sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and infor mation on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Oct. 18. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 16, 23 and 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for Oct. 9A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 9. It provides an over view of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relo cating civil service per sonnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Oct. 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and ben efits. Learn how to inter pret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Oct. 24The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 24. To register, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordi nating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensur ing the mandated collec tion and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the com mand in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 9 to 12. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 to Nov. 1. For more infor mation and to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominat ed by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 22 to 26. Registration is required. For more infor mation, call 573-9783.Command Return and Reunion training sete target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after de ployment. is class will be 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 23. Registration is recom mended, call 573-4513. Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on sec ond Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a new born baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and ser vices available to expect ant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expect ant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Aug. 9. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. Plan program Oct. 11The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic informa tion on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service mem bers and their spouses in making informed deci sions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 11. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge pro gram should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be avail able for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Ending domestic violence 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 13 Sergeant Rasheem omas never thought his rst night working on Camp Bastion would turn into a gun battle with 15 insurgents. When omas was told he was transferring from 1st Platoon to 2nd Pla toon, the landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 2, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, thought nothing of it. Instead of working on Camp Leatherneck, omas would be working at the rotary wing Arrival Departure Aireld Control Group on Camp Bastion, an adjoining base ran by British Armed Forces. He would be responsible for getting coalition forces and cargo on heli copters departing Camp Bastions aireld heading for remote forward op erating bases through out Regional Command Southwests area of opera tions. omas rst night on Camp Bastion was Friday, Sept. 14. He and a fellow sergeant were driving through a checkpoint close to the aireld when they heard an explosion. At rst we didnt know if the explosion was on base or o, said omas, from Manhattan, N.Y. We decided to go check on our Marines at the cargo lot and we saw an explosion by the (cryogenics) area. ats when we knew the base was under attack. Fifteen insurgents dressed in U.S. Army uni forms armed with auto matic ries, rocket-pro pelled grenade launchers and suicide vests breached the bases perimeter fence at approximately 10 p.m. e insurgents, who were organized into three teams, began to attack xed and rotary wing air craft parked on the ight line, aircraft hangars and other buildings on Camp Bastion. When I actually saw it was happening on (Camp) Bastion, I was in a bit of shock, omas said. en rounds began to impact close to our position, and I think every ones training just imme diately kicked in. When the attack began, the landing support spe cialists were in three dif ferent locations. ree Marines were at the A/DACG, four Marines where at the cargo lot and the remaining Marines were in their living spaces. I started hearing explo sions, so I went outside to see what was going on, said Sta Sgt. Justin Pauley, the landing support detachment chief. I saw a RPG ying overhead, and I immediately told my Ma rines to get their (personal protective equipment) on. Despite small-arms re and indirect re impact ing around his position, Pauley knew he had to make contact with his higher headquarters on Camp Leatherneck to inform them of the current situation he and his Ma rines were in. I called the (Command Operations Center) and told them we were under attack and taking re, said Pauley, from Sioux Falls, S.D. I told them about the situation and what I saw. After relaying the in formation to his chain of command, Pauley en sured his three Marines and one civilian at the A/ DACG had proper cover, and then he and his Ma rines began to provide security, ensuring no insurgents made it past their position. Support from the sky When the rst explosion happened, Lt. Col. Stephen Lightfoot, the com manding ocer of Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469, thought the blast was relatively close. Occasionally, friendly forces conduct controlled detonations outside the perimeter fence; however, this explosion seemed to be a little louder and clos er. I went outside after hearing the rst explosion and within 15 seconds I heard another explosion, Lightfoot said. ats when I saw the ames on the Harrier ightline. I yelled out for everyone to get to the (indirect re) bunkers on our com pound. One of the teams of in surgents went to the AV8B Harrier ightline and began to attack the jets and personnel. By the conclusion of the assault, six Harriers were destroyed and two others were signicantly dam aged. Upon seeing the re and explosions, Lightfoot knew he needed to get his aircraft in the sky not only to provide overwatch and close-air support, but also to protect the aircraft. I had to get the aircraft airborne, said Lightfoot, from Azusa, Calif. I told the duty (operations ocer) to sound the Troops in Contact alarm and get the alert aircraft airborne immediately. Hearing the Troops in Contact alarm at the HMLA-469 compound is nothing new for the Ma rines. e AH-1W Cobras and the UH-1Y Huey helicopters are often called to provide air support to co alition forces who are engaged with enemy forces. However, responding to their own alarm is some thing the Marines had not done before. Usually we respond to TICs for other units, Lightfoot said. However, everyone acted instinc tively, got to the aircraft and got the alert aircraft launched despite taking re on the ightline. Once airborne, the alert aircraft had challenging conditions to y in. In ad dition to armed insurgents on the ground, the pilots had to overcome other obstacles. It was a very dark night. ere was no moon, Lightfoot said. However, on the ightline there were multiple aircraft on re and a couple other areas were on re as well, so it was extremely bright. ere were 50 to 100 foot ames and a lot of thick smoke. While the ying condi tions were complex, the commanding ocers biggest concern was the Ma rines and coalition forces engaging the insurgents. We knew we had a lot of friendly (forces) on the ground, Lightfoot said. We wanted to make sure we did no harm to them or to their positions. Engaging the enemy omas and his landing support specialists at the cargo lot on Camp Bastion saw four insurgents make their way down the ight line. ey knew they needed to maneuver to nd bet ter positions to engage the enemy. At the same time, a Brit ish Quick Reaction Force was arriving on scene to assist in the counterattack. I attached myself with the British QRF while some of my other Marines held and maintained security at the cargo lot and on the ightline, omas said. e British QRF along with Marines from CLB-2 and 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) began to push toward the enemy and engage their position. Additionally, the alert aircraft from HMLA-469 were able to see coalition forces engaging the insur gents. One of our Marines on the ground was using night vision goggles and engaging the enemy from the ground, Lightfoot said. Additionally, the pi lots saw the QRF engaging the same position. Once the pilots conrmed the enemy posi tion, they were able to employ their respective aircrafts weapons systems to eliminate one team of insurgents. Following their rst en gagement, the alert air craft maintained radio communication with Marine Attack Squadron 211, the Harrier squadron, on the ground. e Harrier squadron was able to re lay information about an other group of insurgents location to the helicopters providing close-air support. (VMA-211) told the pi lots where the enemy was, Lightfoot said. ey used the information to engage the enemy from approxi mately 200 feet in the air and were able to eliminate the threat. e pilots were dangerclose to friendly positions, but were able to use the information received to engage the enemy with out endangering friendly forces. Every Marine a rieman Fires continued to burn through the night, but rounds ceased being red a few hours after the rst explosion. Fourteen insurgents were killed and one was wounded and taken into custody by coalition forc es. Two Marines, Lt. Col. Christopher Raible, the commanding ocer of Marine Attack Squadron 211, and Sgt. Bradley At well, an aircraft electrical, instrument and ight con trol systems technician with Marine Aviation Lo gistics Squadron 16, were killed during the attack. Additionally, eight co alition personnel and one civilian contractor were wounded. Marines with CLB-2 and 3rd MAW (Fwd), as well as British forces with the QRF, maintained security of the aireld for the remainder of the evening. Five aircraft with HMLA-469 patrolled the skies over Camp Bastion until the sun rose, ensur ing no additional insur gents tried to gain access to the base. Looking back on the at tack, the Marines felt as if everyone knew exactly what they needed to do to ght o the insurgents. is was totally new to most of the Marines, said Thomas. But everyone listened, everyone stayed together. We had great commu nication, maintained proper sectors of re and had full accountability of our Marines. Every Marine is a rieman, Lightfoot said. Ma rines of every military occupational specialty in the squadron, to include AH-1W and UH-1Y aircraft mechanics, dropped their wrenches and grabbed their ries to defend the HMLA-469 compound from a well-armed enemy. rough the coordi nated use of ground and aerial delivered res, in danger-close proximity to friendly forces, all enemy insurgents were killed or captured. I am extremely proud to serve with such high caliber men and women. Since the attack, the Marines continue to push forward and accomplish their mission. We are back to business as usual, Pauley said. We will continue to march forward, complete our mission and nish a successful deployment.Attacking insurgents wear Army uniforms Allen discusses insider attacks, Pakistan on 60 minutes In an interview on the CBS program 60 Minutes Oct. 1, the commander of U.S. and coali tion forces in Afghanistan said he takes his mission personally and is angered by insider attacks by Afghan security forces and mili tants wearing Afghan uniforms. Im mad as hell about them, to be honest with you, Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of the NATO-led In ternational Security Assistance Force, told CBS correspondent Lara Logan. Were going to get after this. It reverberates every where across the United States. Were willing to sacrice a lot for this campaign, but were not willing to be murdered for it. e general said it is impor tant to understand the Afghan people still support ISAF troops and their mission to guide Af ghan troops as they prepare to take full responsibility for secu rity in their country. e key point is for us to un derstand that the vast majority of the Afghans, theyre with us in this, Allen said. ey under stand right now the severity of this problem and the urgency of whats happening. Afghans have been killed try ing to save coalition forces when some attacks have been under way, the general noted. [It] was the only reaction that they could have taken to try to save us at that moment of attack, he said. More than 50 coalition members have been killed by insider attacks this year. Allen said in surgents recognize the vulner ability posed as coalition forces work alongside Afghan counterparts, and they have adapted their tactics to exploit it. In Iraq, the signature weapon system that we hadnt seen before was the [improvised explo sive device], he said. We had to adjust to that. Here, I think the signature attack that were beginning to see is going to be the insider attack. Afghan President Hamid Kar zai, also interviewed in the seg ment, acknowledged the attacks and pledged to help ISAF eliminate the threat. ese attacks are sad, he said. is is something I have discussed in detail, something that I bear responsibility for to cor rect. Allen also discussed the pres ence of al-Qaida and ISAFs commitment to continuing to target and eliminate them. Al-Qaida has come back, [and] is a resilient organization, he said. But theyre not here in large numbers. But al-Qaida doesnt have to be anywhere in large numbers. e terrorist organization is not signicant in a traditional military sense, Allen said. AlQaida has signicance beyond its numbers, frankly, he added. And so for us, our 24-hour-aday objective is to seek out those al-Qaida cells. It is important to ensure alQaida doesnt feel as though it can put down roots in Afghani stan, the general said, and while security isnt perfect around the country, there has been much improvement. An awful lot of the population of this country is living in an area where there is vastly improved security from where it was just a few years ago, he said. Meanwhile, Allen said, coali tion ocials are doing a great deal to address terrorist safe havens in Pakistan, and the re lationship between ISAF forces and the Pakistani military has improved dramatically. eres a very complex rela tionship with Pakistan, and well work very hard and very closely with the Pakistani military to achieve common objectives, he said. But to some extent, the Pakistani military has been successful in cooperating with us in the last several months with regard to complementary operations on both sides of the border, but much more needs to be done. ISAF is doing everything it can within its authority to hunt down and kill Haqqani network operatives in Afghanistan who ultimately threaten my troops, threaten the Afghan troops and the Afghan society, the Afghan civilians, and ultimately the Af ghan government, Allen said. e general also described his intense commitment to the mission in Afghanistan, which he said often leads him to turn around and go back to work some nights after asking himself while hes walking home if hes done enough. I came here believing this would be the last job Id ever have, Allen said. I dont care about anything beyond this. is is whats important to me. I almost cant remember ever having been anywhere else. is is completely consum ing for me, and I am dedicated 24 hours a day to these mag nicent troops, to the Afghans, to this cause, and ultimately to successful completion, he continued. is is very personal to me. And I take it very person ally. ... aircraft mechanics dropped their wrenches and grabbed their rifles ... Lt. Col. Stephen Lightfoot Light Helicopter Attack Squadron 469

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Renew prescriptions, seek appointments at www.relayhealth.com Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is pleased to oer a new, convenient way to connect with the clinic. Using the Internet, you can now communicate online through the RelayHealth messaging service. e RelayHealth service is a safe, secure and condential way to communicate about your non-urgent healthcare needs. Its as easy to use as email, but incorporates stronger security measures that ensure your privacy. Any time you wish, you can use the RelayHealth service to request: Information regarding non-urgent health matters or symptoms P rescription renewals or lab results Request appointments Information about referrals Access valuable health information By using the RelayHealth service, youll be able to communicate with our clinic when its most convenient for you. All you need is access to a computer with an Internet connection. Interested? If so, please take a few minutes to sign up. ere is no fee to register for this service Visit www.relayhealth. com and click Register. When prompted, select your assigned provider as your doctor. To ensure security, NBHC Kings Bay must accept your application before your registration will be complete. Allow three business days following registration for the clinic to process your registration. Additionally, you must be an eligible beneciary enrolled at Kings Bay to utilize this service. To learn more about the RelayHealth serNavy has new MCPONStevens replaces West as senior enlisted Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick D. West gave his last hooyah during the change-of-of ce ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 28. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert was the guest speaker for the ceremony and highlighted MCPON Wests accomplishments durMarines join Meals on WheelsA few good people needed to volunteer for program A small group of spouses at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Marine Corps Security Force Battalion recently made deliveries throughout the St. Marys area. ey volunteered their services for the Meals on Wheels program. MCSFBs Meals on Wheels is a volunteer program organized by the battalions spouses of Marines and Sailors. e program is a service to provide relief for MCSFB families with new babies or extended illnesses. Our volunteers extend to the family members here at Kings Bay and as far away as Jacksonville, said Ginny Moody, coordinator of the Meals on Wheels program at MCSFB. We have a total of nine volunteers, but we could always use additional help. One volunteer spouse, Dawn Breckenridge, who delivered meals from Jacksonville, said she had a great time delivering to those in need. Other volunteers like Minnie Arias, Heather Fayed, Brandi Frazier, Mika Green, Cid Platner, Crystal Garrett, Kikey Gomez and Nicole McLawhorn are the reason the program was able to launch in its rst two weeks without concerns. Chaplan Boon, his family a Meals on Wheels recipient, says that it made them feel good to see the spouses out helping. It is nice to see them taking time out of their lives to help us like this, he said. We appreciate this very much. Moody said its a joy to know the group is taking a little pressure o new and seasoned parents, so they can enjoy their rst Up Periscope What do firefighters enjoy about their job? Page 9 Stop it Domestic Violence Awareness Month here Pages 2, 12 Training day Coast Guards Resolute Guardian sharpens skills Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Fire Prevention Week anchors at Kings BayCoast Guard takes aim e importance of safety stressed by Kings Bay Fire Department through station tours, info booth Have 2 Ways Out is the theme for National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 7 to 13. With Naval Submarine Base Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr. signing the Fire Prevention Week Proclamation, 2012 Fire Prevention Week activities start with banners at each entrance to the base, a childrens coloring sheet contest, bounce house fun and the Childrens Development Center visiting Fire Station 1 for tours and a chance to see Sparky the re dog. e Fire Operations and Prevention Sections will have a booth at the Navy Exchange entrance, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 9, providing re safety information and blood pressure checks,. With all the history, stories and folklore, remember the reason this is done each year is to save lives. e most recent statistics are still staggering: One civilian fire injury is reported every 30 minutesHealth clinic oers new online service

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October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. e Commander Naval Installation Command has designated this years theme Home is not a War Zone: Bringing Peace to Relationships. Wearing a purple ribbon during October brings awareness to our community to stop Domestic Violence. Domestic violence and abuse can happen to anyone, yet the problem is often overlooked, excused or denied. is is especially true when the abuse is psychological, rather than physical. Noticing and acknowledging the signs of an abusive relationship is the rst step to ending it. No one should live in fear of the person they love. If you recognize yourself or someone you know in the following warning signs and descriptions of abuse, reach out. ere is help available. Understanding domestic violence and abuse Domestic abuse/ intimate partner abuse occurs when one person in an intimate relationship or marriage tries to dominate and control the other person. Domestic abuse that includes physical violence is called domestic violence. Domestic violence and abuse are used for one purpose and one purpose only: to gain and maintain total control over you. An abuser doesnt play fair. Abusers use fear, guilt, shame and intimidation to wear you down and keep you under his or her thumb. Your abuser may also threaten you, hurt you or hurt those around you. Domestic violence and abuse does not discriminate. It happens among heterosexual couples and in same-sex partnerships. It occurs within all age ranges, ethnic backgrounds and economic levels. And while women are more commonly victimized, men are also abused, especially verbally and emotionally, even physically as well. e bottom line is that abusive behavior is never acceptable, whether its coming from a man, a woman, a teenager, or an older adult. You deserve to feel valued, respected and safe. Recognizing abuse is the rst step to getting help Domestic abuse often escalates from threats and verbal abuse to violence. And while physical injury may be the most obvious danger, the emotional and psychological consequences of domestic abuse are also severe. Emotionally abusive Active duty service members and other eligible travelers now have more opportunity to take advantage of streamlined security check-in, as Transportation Security Administration ocials have added two more airports to the program. Eligible passengers can enter a separate security lane at participating airports without removing their shoes, light outerwear and belts, and they dont need to remove their laptops and 3-1-1 compliant liquids or gels from carry-on luggage. Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Va., and Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, N.C., now participate in the initiative, which allows eligible passengers to volunteer information about themselves to expedite their airport experience through pre-screening. Since March, TSA has partnered with the Defense Department to more eciently screen active duty service members. Dulles and Charlotte Douglas join Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., and Seattle-Tacoma International in Washington state in oering the option. TSA remains committed to working with our partners across the aviation community to provide travelers the most eective security in the most ecient way, TSA Administrator John S. Pistole said. Building on the success of the pilot programs at Ronald Reagan Washington National and Seattle-Tacoma International, we look forward to expanding our [pre-check] screening process to additional airports for active duty service members. TSA ocers manning the special security lane will scan presented common access cards to determine eligibility for expedited screening, and eligible service members need not be in uniform, ocials said. Additionally at both airports, select Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and US Airways frequent travelers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Trusted Traveler program members also are eligible to receive expedited screening benets for domestic travel. TSA will always incorporate random and unpredictable security measures throughout the airport and no individual is guaranteed expedited screening, ocials said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Housing resident survey ongo inge annual Resident Satisfaction Survey runs to Nov. 1. Let the installation and the Navy know how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Un accompanied Housing is meeting your needs and provide input for changes. UH represen tatives will visit each command to provide an opportunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents. Contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manag er, at 573-8953 for more information.Vets Memorial Park sets saleKingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd.. Plans include a penta gon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water feature. Donations are taken through Oct. 26, with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3, and can be dropped at the Kingsland De pot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Concert for Wounded WarriorsVeterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day from Nov. 9 to 11, when veterans and their de pendents receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military members and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scavenger hunt. For more in formation, go to the Events Calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Airports shorten military screening Transportation Security Domestic Violence Awareness here Domestic Violence Recent changes to OPNAVINST 5100.12J will aect all motorcycle riders. e changes will be eective Oct. 9 here at Kings Bay. Beginning that day all civilian rid ers (DoD, dependents and retirees) will only have to show a motorcycle endorsement on their drivers li cense or a motorcycle permit in or der to get base decals. All motorcycle safety training requirements for DoD personnel have been eliminated. Any DoD personnel currently signed up for classes have the option of stay ing in the class or calling NSB Safety at 573-0414 to be removed from the class. Because training is no longer mandatory personnel will have to take leave in order attend. Any civilians wishing to sign up to do so by calling NSB Safety at 5730414 or through ESAMS. Active duty personnel have rst priority for all seats/trainer bikes. While trying not to bump civilians, it must be done from time to time. Training requirements for active duty riders remain the same. Riders who own motorcycles have 60 days to complete follow on train ing after nishing their BRC. A new change for BRC riders is that they will only get one 90 temporary pass after nishing the BRC. Permanent decals will not be issued until their follow on training has been completed. Riders also will see a new class be ing oered, Advanced Rider Course Sport Bike. is class will meet the training requirements for both sport bike and cruiser riders. For more in formation on the ARC give NSB Safe ty a call at 573-0414. Every base hopes to have 100 per cent of its military riders trained. Kings Bay has gone from 51 percent in June to 81 percent in September. e goal for the end of the 2012 is 95 percent. Until recently there has been no consequence for not completing fol low on or refresher training. at too is changing. Beginning January 2013 steps will be taken to revoke the base decals for riders that are behind in motorcycle training requirements. Revocation letters will be sent to respective commands directing in dividuals to report to Security with their motorcycle to have the decal scraped. Riding or driving onboard any military installation is a privilege. NSB instructions have been updat ed to incorporate the latest person nel protective equipment changes as well. e requirements for reective has been removed. It is now highly recommended vice mandatory. Until the CNRSE instructions are updated, riders headed to NAS Jack sonville or NS Mayport will still need to wear a reective upper body gar ment during hours of darkness. Parents of children with special needs know how daunting it can be to successfully navigate educational systems in order to secure the servic es and supports. In particular, writing an Individual Education Plan, or IEP, can be a challenging process lled with questions and concerns. e Child and Youth Education Services oce, with support from Georgia Parent to Parent, will host a free IEP Clinic from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27. e 16 one-hour sessions, shared by two counselors, will be assigned on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Each counseling session will include a 15 minute in-take process and 45 minutes of counseling. Exceptional parents will have an opportunity to meet with a trained counselor to review the details of their IEP details, get answers to questions and receive suggestions about how to best advocate for their children with special needs. To register for a counseling session or to nd out more information about this program, call the Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer at (912) 573-8986 or e-mail clainetta.jeerson@navy.mil or kingsbaylo@navy. mil.Special needs IEP Workshop oered Rules change for motorcycle riders Motorcycle safety 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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e Naval Legal Service Command realigned its oces Oct. 1, but its legal services to the eet did not change. Legal assistance services were previously provided by Naval Legal Service Oces. As a result of the realignment, a service member seeking legal assistance with an issue such as a will, power of attorney, family law advice or any similar personal legal matter can now nd assistance at the closest Region Legal Service Ofce. e provision of legal assistance will continue at all prior NLSO locations, but will now be delivered by RLSO commands. relationships can destroy your self-worth, lead to anxiety and depression, and make you feel helpless and alone. No one should have to endure this kind of pain, and your rst step to breaking free is recognizing that your situation is abusive. Once you acknowledge the reality of the abusive situation, then you can get the help you need. You can contact the Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, 5734512, and talk with the Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate. Next week: Signs at Youre in an Abusive Relationship Month Navy sets course to CPO e Navy announced guidance for the administration of the Cycle 218 Chief Petty Ocer Advancement Examination and the Fiscal Year 2014 Active Chief Petty Ocers Selection Board via Navy message Sept. 26. NAVADMIN 294/12 pertains to rst class petty ocers from the Full Time Support and active component communities. Navy Selected Reserve exam dates and selection board information will be announced in a separate message. e Navy will administer exams to active component and FTS Sailors Jan. 17, 2013. Exam ordering timelines, eligibility criteria, deadlines for commands to conrm eligibility lists, waiver application procedures and special requirements are contained in the NAVADMIN. e message also outlines procedures and deadlines for submitting correspondence to the selection board. Sailors should review their Ocial Military Personnel File for accuracy at www.bol.navy.mil. e message says the selection board will re view the OMPF and per formance summary record parts I, II and III of all can didates as well as any items submitted by candidates. Each eligible candidate is responsible for ensuring their OMPF is correct and up-to-date with the latest evaluations, awards and other appropriate information. Candidates may submit a letter to the board to provide any new information or missing information that is not currently in their OMPF. Letters to the selection board for FTS CPO eligible candidates must be received by the Navy Personnel Command customer service center by April 22, 2013. e FTS Selection Board is scheduled to convene May 13, 2013. Letters to the selection board for active component CPO Selection Board eligible candidates must be received at NPC customer service center by May 28, 2013. e active component selection board is scheduled to convene June 17, 2013 and is the largest selection board held at NPC. Letters to the board may be mailed or submitted electronically. Legal oce changes name THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 Resolute Guardian Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 5 Home fires killed more than 2,600 people Fire departments responded to more than 369,000 home res Candles caused more than 9,600 home res, 90 deaths, 820 injuries $370 million in damages Cooking res caused 156,400 res 410 deaths, 5,310 injuries, $993 million in damages Faulty home heating caused 57,100 res, 490 deaths, 1,540 injuries, $1.1 billion in damages Children started 6,400 res, with 90 deaths, 750 injuries, $159 million in damages Heres the re clock in the United State: A fire department responded to a fire every 24 seconds One structure re is reported every 65 seconds One civilian re injury is reported every 30 minutes One home structure re is reported every 85 seconds One civilian death occurs every 2 hours and 49 minutes One outside re is reported every 50 seconds One vehicle re is reported every 146 seconds Commemorating a conagration Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conagra tion that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. e re began on Oct. 8, but did most of its damage on Oct. 9. According to legend, the re broke out after a cow, belonging to Catherine OLeary, kicked over a lamp, setting rst the barn, then the whole city on re. People have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. OLeary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events. e Moo myth Like any good story, the case of the cow has some truth to it. e great re al most certainly started near the barn where Mrs. OLeary kept her cows. But there is no proof that OLeary was in the barn when the re broke out or that a cow sparked the blaze. OLeary herself swore that shed been in bed early that night, and that the cows were also tucked in for the evening. But if a cow wasnt to blame for the huge re, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have oered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed a neighbor may have started the re. Some people have speculated that a ery meteorite may have fallen to earth on Oct. 8, starting several res that day, in Wisconsin, as well as Chicago. While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start dur ing this fiery two-day stretch, it wasnt the biggest. at distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest re in American history. e re, which also occurred on Oct. 8, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres. Historical accounts of the re say that the blaze began when several railroad work ers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush re. Before long, the fast-moving ames were whipping through the area like a tornado, some sur vivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed. Eight decades of re prevention ose who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo res never forgot what theyd been through. Both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the res also changed the way that reghters and public ocials thought about re safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America, today known as the International Fire Marshals Association, decided that the anniver sary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivi ties, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of re prevention. e commemoration grew incrementally ocial over the years. In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the rst National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which Oct. 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administrations Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire and Emergency Services, attention is focused on promoting re safety and prevention. However, re safety should be practiced all year long. Most potential hazards can be addressed with a little common sense. For example, be sure to keep ammable items like bedding, clothes and curtains at least 3 feet away from portable heaters or lit candles, and never smoke in bed. Also, items like appliances or electric blankets should not be operated if they have frayed power cords, and electrical outlets should never be overloaded. Join the re department and help make your home and family re safe, Fire safety checklist Install and maintain interconnected battery/ electric working smoke alarms inside and outside of every sleeping area and remember check monthly and change the batteries at least once a year. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of res and injuries, Stay in the kitchen, if you leave, turn o the stove Never leave a burning candle unattended. Blow out candles when you leave a room. Designate two escape routes from each bedroom and practice them regularly. Teach everyone the Stop, Drop, and Roll technique in case clothing catches on re. If you have gas appliances, install a carbon monoxide alarm; Do not let your car run in an attached garage. Avoid storing old mattresses in the home or garage. Teach children that matches, lighters and candles are tools, not toys. If you suspect that a child is playing with re, check under beds and in closets for telltale signs like burned matches. Matches and lighters should be stored in a secure drawer or cabinet. If you have any questions, call the NSB Kings Bay Fire Prevention Oce at (912) 573-9998. Or, stop by one of the re stations on base. e re ghters there are always happy to answer your re safety questions or concerns. few days with their new babies is program is something that I would denitely recommend to anyone in MCSFB with a spouse after delivery of a newborn, families with members with critical illnesses or just going through difcult times, she said. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer for the MCSFB Meals on Wheels program, you may contact the MCSFB Family Readiness Ocer Lt. William L. Green at (912) 573-6748 or william. green@swant.navy.mil. Ombudsman salute Meals Fire vice, visit www.relayhealth.com. If you have any questions about RelayHealth, contact RelayHealth Customer Support at (866) 735 2963). NBHC Kings Bay, point of contact is Cdr. C.M. McNealJones and Customer Service Representative Carolyn Griggs. Online ing his naval career while thanking him for his leadership. MCPON West, you made the Navy better through your willingness to listen and learn, Greenert said. I watched you rsthand in the Pacic Fleet, at U.S. Fleet Forces, as VCNO, and I had the honor to serve with you for one year as CNO. MCPON West had the heartbeat of the Navy. Sailors communicated with him. He challenged Sailors and they loved it. e ceremony marked the end of a nearly 32-year career for West, who had served as the 12th MCPON since Dec. 12, 2008. West did not discuss personal accomplishments during his retirement remarks, instead focusing on thanking family, friends, shipmates and mentors who helped shape him into a leader. ere is simply no way I can mention you all. Just know that if you are here today, you played some part in the success that I have enjoyed, West said. It has been an honor and privilege to serve our great Navy for nearly 32 years and especially to serve as MCPON for the last four. irty-two years is a long time, but when you are talking about the end of a fantastic journey, it was just a ash of time. Ive never had a bad command because I feel commands are what you make of them and how you choose to seize the opportunities. e thing Im going to miss the most is, by far, the people and the energy and innovation of our Sailors and families. e engine that truly drives our Navy is our people. Our Sailors are what makes our Navy the best thats ever sailed the worlds oceans. MCPON Mike D. Stevens took the helm of the enlisted force as the Navys 13th MCPON after receiving the ceremonial cutlass from MCPON West. Stevens, a native of Montana, joined the Navy in 1983 and most recently served as Fleet Master Chief for U.S. Fleet Forces Fleet Master Chief in Norfolk. His previous Command Master Chief tours included U.S. 2nd Fleet, Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic, Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 14, and Naval Air Station Pensacola.MCPON Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

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Navy College educational information e hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All tness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. Movie Under the Pines Park Free admission, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 13 for Brave rated PG. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs and snacks with the family at the outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4564. New Pro Shop at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Check out the new Pro Shop for all your bowling needs, including a Winter Special Nov. 1 through Jan. 1 with 20 percent o all items. Order a ball and have it drilled for free. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ursdays. Saturdays are by appointment only. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. In addition to the Pro Shop, RackN-Roll also oers oil line patterns. Reserve your choice of oiled pat terns on your pair of lanes for only $30 (2-hour limit) including lin age and shoes. You must reserve 24 hours in advance. Not avail able on Monday and Wednesday league nights or Friday and Saturday nights. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Trunk or Treat MWRs Fall Festival is 4 to 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 20 out side the Kings Bay Conference Center. Its free for kids ages 12 and under. Bring your children trick or treat ing early, and enjoy an evening of fun and games. ere will be priz es for the kids. Inatables will be up for the childrens enjoyment. Dominos will be selling pizza by the slice and drinks. MWR is accepting registration for individuals or groups to set-up and deco rate vehicles in the Conference Center parking lot to hand out goodies to the children. e best decorated vehicle will receive an MWR Gift Certicate worth $150. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its Friday, October 26 at Trident Lakes Golf Course with a 3 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for mili tary and $35 for civilians. Nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes, for each person, golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Battle of the Border At KB Finnegans Irish Pub, starting at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 27 join the excitement. Wear your team colors and receive $1 domestic drafts until 6 p.m. For more info call (912) 573-9492. Spooky Bowling Special From 1 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31 enjoy $1 games and $1 shoe rental at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. More information? Call (912) 573-9492. Feed Your Inner Beast Navy Adventures Unleashed has a new 5K Trail Run/2 mile walk on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Etowah Park. Start is at 7:20 a.m. All individuals and commands are encouraged to step up their physical readiness. Is your command up to the challenge? For more information, contact NAU at 573-9869 Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/fair working condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various colors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim platform No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. e sealed bids must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more information, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the suc cessful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 29 and 30 is Madagascar 3, Oct. 6 and 7 Bedtime Stories, Oct. 13 and 14 Where the Wild ings Are, Oct. 20 and 21 e Tale of Despereaux and Oct. 27 and 28 Brave. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkings bay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Fitness Complex ups hours 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR e assault on the U.S. Consulate earlier this month in Benghazi, Libya, was an attack not only on America, but also on the ideals of the United Nations, President Barack Obama said in a speech to the U.N. General Assembly Sept. 25. e attack that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens, was an assault on the notion that people can resolve their dierences peacefully, that diplomacy can take the place of war, and that in an interdependent world, all of us have a stake in working towards greater opportunity and security for our citizens, the president said. Nations must be serious about the assault on those ideals and must go to the root causes that extremists use to incite populations, Obama said. If we are serious about those ideals, he told the General Assembly, we must speak honestly about the deeper causes of this crisis, because we face a choice between the forces that would drive us apart, and the hopes we hold in common. Leaders, the president said, must decide that violence and intolerance have no place in the United Nations. America has supported the forces of change sweeping North Africa and the Middle East, Obama said. We were inspired by the Tunisian protests that toppled a dictator, because we recognized our own beliefs in the aspirations of men and women who took to the streets, he said. We insisted on change in Egypt, because our support for democracy put us on the side of the people. e United States supported leadership transition in Yemen and intervened in Libya alongside a broad coalition because we had the ability to stop the slaughter of innocents, and because we believed that the aspirations of the people were more powerful than a tyrant, he said. Obama also restated the U.S. position that the regime of Syrian dictator Bashar Assad must end. We have taken these positions because we believe that freedom and self-determination are not unique to one culture, he said. Freedom is a universal value, the president added. e events of the past two weeks in which extremists have used an Internet video that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad to spur antiAmerican demonstrations speak to the need for nations to address the tensions between the West and an Arab World moving to democracy, Obama said. e United States will not dictate the outcome of democratic transitions, the president said, nor does America expect every nation to agree with U.S. positions. However, I do believe that it is the obligation of all leaders, in all countries, to speak out forcefully against violence and extremism, he said. It is time to marginalize those who, even when not resorting to violence, use hatred of America, or the West, or Israel, as a central principle of politics. For that only gives cover, and sometimes makes excuses, for those who resort to violence. Obama reiterated that the United States will not allow Iran to develop nuclear weapons. A nuclear-armed Iran is not a challenge that can be contained, Obama said. It would threaten the elimination of Israel, the security of [Persian] Gulf nations, and the stability of the glob al economy, he added. Iranian possession of nuclear weapons would spur an arms race in the region and unravel the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, Obama said. Benghazi attackers struck against U.N. ideals THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Air Force training met Navy training when commanders from the Air Forces Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, and Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., visited Recruit Training Command, the Navys only boot camp, Sept. 25. Gen. Edward A. Rice, Jr., commander, Air Education and Training Command, was part of the visiting group of Air Force training commanders who spent two days exchanging ideas with Navy training leadership and observing ongoing training at the Navys only boot camp and Recruit Division Commander C School aboard RTC. For a number of years, the military services have looked at ways to better operate jointly and continue today to look at the What boy hasnt seen a fire truck, siren screaming, race through traffic and not wanted to be a fire fighter? I did. It only took one This is not a drill experience as the No. 1 hose man on my duty section fire party to convince me that being a firefighter wasnt in my future. There are parts of the job that certainly are appeal ing. Our Kings Bay Fire Department members are a dedi cated lot. In conjunction with Fire Prevention Week, I asked them what they most enjoy about the job. T.J. Barron Firefighter Detroit Continuing to serve my country and my community. Randy Thrift Fire Inspector Kingsland Doing my job (prevention) so firefighters dont have to do theirs. Jonathan Sirmon Firefighter Rural Camden County Helping people. Victor Kirton Fire Inspector Folkston Educating the public to prevent fires. Tom Middleton Captain Kingsland Im a people person, and I enjoy working in the community. Jose Masauding Fire Inspector Iligan, Philipines Meeting people, educating them and learning new things every day. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Hawkins Air Force studies Great Lakes THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus best practices of working together that includes boot camp and accessions training. RTC, clearly from the leadership down to the RDCs that I had contact with, even to the recruits that I saw, is a very professional operation, Rice said. I expected that, but as with most things, when you have a chance to put eyes on and talk to people, it makes a more powerful impact on you. Rice is responsible for the recruiting, training and education of all Air Force personnel. His command includes the Air Force Recruiting Service, two numbered air forces plus the Air University. AETC trains more than 340,000 students per year and consists of 12 bases, more than 70,600 activeduty, Reserve, Guard, civilians and contractors, and 1,380 trainer, ghter and mobility aircraft. During his visit, Rice, along with several other Air Force training personnel, including Maj. Gen. Leonard A. Patrick, Commander, Second Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., toured several facilities on RTC. ey were able to meet directly with ships ocers, leading chief petty ocers and RDCs, engaging in conversation on some of the universals of basic training. We were very pleased to host General Rice, a respected leader at the highest level of our military community, said Capt. John Dye, RTCs commanding ocer. e visit provided an excellent opportunity to gain unique insights on our shared mission of producing the next generation of Sailors and Airmen. e visit began with a tour of the USS Trayer Battle Stations-21 recruit capstone facility followed by observing a capping ceremony, where recruits exchange their Recruit ball cap for one that reads Navy. e emotional ceremony was followed by a command brieng, facilitated by Dye, and then an overview of RDC C School. Rice and the other personnel were presented with several live-action scenarios that C school students must respond to appropriately to continue on in their training pipeline to become RDCs. Such hands-on training is essential, according to C school instructors, because it gives students an opportunity to work through a potential scenario and then discuss appropriate courses of action. If similar instances arise while training recruits, RDCs, who have completed this training, have an understanding of the tools at their disposal to work through any given situation. e next phase of the tour took place aboard the USS Triton recruit barracks. While inside the recruit barracks, the group had the opportunity to see how each is set up like a ship with galleys, classrooms, berthing compartments and oces. ey also observed how the daily routine for a recruit is similar to the routine on board a ship or submarine in the eet. ey also toured the state-of-the-art physical tness facility, Freedom Hall, and took a tour of the Golden irteen recruit in-processing facility and the combat training pool, the USS Indianapolis. Very impressive, everything I saw today, Rice said. Obviously, having new world-class facilities all of us would like to have the facilities you have here. A key part of Rices experience was the ability to speak with RTC personnel during his visit. It is really about the people, leadership and clearly youre doing a lot of things right here, Rice said. Weve learned a lot, and I think weve agreed that its important for us to continue to have a dialogue where we can exchange ideas about how we can do this training mission better as it changes over time. Were committed to that. In the future, we need to have more of these types of exchanges. Overall, I think this was a very productive visit for us. Dye said the visit provided a venue for candid dialogue and the occasion to explore the similarities and dierences in Navy and Air Force basic training pipelines At Recruit Training Command, the Sailorization process is enhanced through the Navys recent recapitalization campaign, which provided state-of-the-art facilities, but the overarching principles remain the same for both services: producing basically trained, smartly disciplined, physically t service members to join the worlds nest military services, Dye said. Any time we can prot from our shared mission experiences, we welcome the conversation and the mutual support. Recruit Training Command graduates more than 37,000 basically trained Sailors annually. Boots 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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Gear of future displayed A demonstration of gear, gadgets and gizmos at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Sept. 17 to 21 gave Marines and sailors a rst glimpse at potential energy solutions for the Corps operating forces. Fourteen dierent companies showcased their commercial technologies at the Marine Corps Experimental Forward Operating Base, or ExFOB. ExFOB is not a place. Its a group of organizations working together to get the ball rolling for the Marine Corps, said Lt. Col. Tim Parker of the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory based in Quantico, Va. Its an opportunity to show their equipment and decide if these are the systems we want to move forward with. Participants demonstrated 19 commercial innovations, from air-conditioned tents and personal cooling vests, to instant water-cooling systems and solar-powered generators for Humvees all boasting advanced thermal or energyecient technologies. We know that resource eciency aids in combat eectiveness and that our investments in reset and modernization will provide a force that operates lighter, faster and at reduced risk, said Gen. James F. Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps. Our force will be more energy ecient to support the type of operations expected of us in the future. To do this, we are changing the way we think about and use energy. Fifty-seven percent of the Marine Corps power was being used for climate control, said Parker, citing recent statistics from operating forces. He said if the Corps can reduce its power consumption in combat patrols and shelters by using these new technologies, the need for batteries, generators and fuel will decrease. Marines, sailors, general ocers and distinguished guests used the products and gave feedback. With help from surveys, laboratory ofcials hope to identify and evaluate the technologies to strategically rebalance the Marine Corps energy consumption. A lot of these materials could potentially save lives, said Master Gunnery Sgt. Larry Deyott, the laboratorys senior enlisted advisor. As Marines, we learn to adapt to the heat, but there are still instances of heat casualties. ese new resources can provide a comfortable place to return to after being out in a dusty, hot environment all day, which in turn will allow for a quicker recovery time for the Marines. Once an annual demonstration, ExFOB now happens twice a year, given its success and innovation, said Parker. He added that the products and events are not just for the current ght but for the future ght as well. U.S. Coast Guard men and women carry out a wide variety of diverse missions every day as we protect people on the sea, protect the nation against threats from the sea and protect the sea itself. We focus on present-day operations and readiness for tomorrow, but certain days compel us and all Americans to reect back upon our heritage. Today (Sept. 27), the 70th anniversary of Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munros extraordinarily heroic actions at Guadalcanal, is such a day. It may surprise some that the Coast Guard had a major combat role in World War II and that a Coast Guardsman was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Coast Guard actions and those of Munro at Guadalcanal were crucial to evacuating hundreds of endangered Marines to safety that day. e Battle of Guadalcanal started in 1942, early during the war in the Pacic and in many ways laid the groundwork for other World War II multi-service amphibious invasions such as D-Day, and for future joint Coast Guard and Marine Corpsoperations. Coast Guardsmen at Guadalcanal manned many of the Higgins boats which were used to transport Marines between ships and beaches. Often under heavy re, the two services quickly developed a deep and lasting respect for one another. Matthew Constantino, one of the Marines evacuated that day, embodies that mutual respect and recently said, We were in enemy-infested land, and the Coast Guard saved our lives that day. In fact one unocial Marine Corps Web site lists all of the Marines who have earned the Medal of Honor throughout history, and it intentionally includes Munro as a way of honoring him. Since World War II, the two services have further solidied our close ties during joint operations such as Coast Guard naval gunre support of ICorps Marine units during the Vietnam War, operations Able Manner and Able Vigil mass migration humanitarian response, among others. I recently had the honor of talking to retired Cmdr. Ray Evans who enlisted with Munro in 1939 and was stationed with Munro throughout Munros entire time in the Coast Guard. ey became best friends and he was in the boat with Munro when he was killed. We were good pals, Evans told me, speaking of Munro. We both joined before the war and we intended to make the Coast Guard a career. I did, and I know he would have. I miss him. Like Munro, Evans was also a signalman, and the two of them continually practiced their signaling craft with each other. is is intense practice and pretty soon you get procient; thats how we learned. But we did do a lot of self teaching where we worked together to get more procient, Evans said, in a 1999 interview. He was the pusher perhaps more than I was, he had the energy. Although we were working together on that he was really the leader. Believing the United States might enter the war, both Munro and Evans eagerly volunteered to depart their New York Citybased cutter early in order to serve aboard a Coast Guard-manned transport ship to get closer to the action. Munros lasting legacy is best exemplied by his last words. Evans recalled that after Munro was shot, he asked, Did they get o? to conrm all of the Marines had been evacuated. A true shipmate in every sense of the word, Munros seless service fully embodies the Coast Guard Ethos. Because while we work together as a team to accomplish our mission, each Coast Guardsman is an individual who is capable, and expected, to make a dierence. CG remembers Munro THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 11

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depend ing on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Oct. 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Oct. 31Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 31. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention Oct. 15safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A training lasting about three hours, safe TALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connected to helpers who are pre pared to provide first aid interventions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, Oct. 15. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Oct. 16Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 16. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, expe rience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 10. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in pri vate sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and infor mation on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Oct. 18. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 16, 23 and 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for Oct. 9A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 9. It provides an over view of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relo cating civil service per sonnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Oct. 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Oct. 24The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 24. To register, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensur ing the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the com mand in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 9 to 12. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 29 to Nov. 1. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominat ed by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 22 to 26. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Command Return and Reunion training sete target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. is class will be 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 23. Registration is recommended, call 573-4513. Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on sec ond Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a new born baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and ser vices available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Aug. 9. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. Plan program Oct. 11The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic informa tion on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service mem bers and their spouses in making informed deci sions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 11. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be avail able for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Ending domestic violence 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012 13 Sergeant Rasheem omas never thought his rst night working on Camp Bastion would turn into a gun battle with 15 insurgents. When omas was told he was transferring from 1st Platoon to 2nd Platoon, the landing support specialist with Combat Logistics Battalion 2, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, thought nothing of it. Instead of working on Camp Leatherneck, omas would be working at the rotary wing Arrival Departure Aireld Control Group on Camp Bastion, an adjoining base ran by British Armed Forces. He would be responsible for getting coalition forces and cargo on helicopters departing Camp Bastions aireld heading for remote forward operating bases throughout Regional Command Southwests area of operations. omas rst night on Camp Bastion was Friday, Sept. 14. He and a fellow sergeant were driving through a checkpoint close to the aireld when they heard an explosion. At rst we didnt know if the explosion was on base or o, said omas, from Manhattan, N.Y. We decided to go check on our Marines at the cargo lot and we saw an explosion by the (cryogenics) area. ats when we knew the base was under attack. Fifteen insurgents dressed in U.S. Army uniforms armed with automatic ries, rocket-propelled grenade launchers and suicide vests breached the bases perimeter fence at approximately 10 p.m. e insurgents, who were organized into three teams, began to attack xed and rotary wing aircraft parked on the ightline, aircraft hangars and other buildings on Camp Bastion. When I actually saw it was happening on (Camp) Bastion, I was in a bit of shock, omas said. en rounds began to impact close to our position, and I think everyones training just immediately kicked in. When the attack began, the landing support specialists were in three different locations. ree Marines were at the A/DACG, four Marines where at the cargo lot and the remaining Marines were in their living spaces. I started hearing explosions, so I went outside to see what was going on, said Sta Sgt. Justin Pauley, the landing support detachment chief. I saw a RPG ying overhead, and I immediately told my Marines to get their (personal protective equipment) on. Despite small-arms re and indirect re impacting around his position, Pauley knew he had to make contact with his higher headquarters on Camp Leatherneck to inform them of the current situation he and his Marines were in. I called the (Command Operations Center) and told them we were under attack and taking re, said Pauley, from Sioux Falls, S.D. I told them about the situation and what I saw. After relaying the information to his chain of command, Pauley ensured his three Marines and one civilian at the A/ DACG had proper cover, and then he and his Marines began to provide security, ensuring no insurgents made it past their position. Support from the sky When the rst explosion happened, Lt. Col. Stephen Lightfoot, the commanding ocer of Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469, thought the blast was relatively close. Occasionally, friendly forces conduct controlled detonations outside the perimeter fence; however, this explosion seemed to be a little louder and closer. I went outside after hearing the rst explosion and within 15 seconds I heard another explosion, Lightfoot said. ats when I saw the ames on the Harrier ightline. I yelled out for everyone to get to the (indirect re) bunkers on our compound. One of the teams of insurgents went to the AV8B Harrier ightline and began to attack the jets and personnel. By the conclusion of the assault, six Harriers were destroyed and two others were signicantly damaged. Upon seeing the re and explosions, Lightfoot knew he needed to get his aircraft in the sky not only to provide overwatch and close-air support, but also to protect the aircraft. I had to get the aircraft airborne, said Lightfoot, from Azusa, Calif. I told the duty (operations ocer) to sound the Troops in Contact alarm and get the alert aircraft airborne immediately. Hearing the Troops in Contact alarm at the HMLA-469 compound is nothing new for the Marines. e AH-1W Cobras and the UH-1Y Huey helicopters are often called to provide air support to coalition forces who are engaged with enemy forces. However, responding to their own alarm is something the Marines had not done before. Usually we respond to TICs for other units, Lightfoot said. However, everyone acted instinctively, got to the aircraft and got the alert aircraft launched despite taking re on the ightline. Once airborne, the alert aircraft had challenging conditions to y in. In addition to armed insurgents on the ground, the pilots had to overcome other obstacles. It was a very dark night. ere was no moon, Lightfoot said. However, on the ightline there were multiple aircraft on re and a couple other areas were on re as well, so it was extremely bright. ere were 50 to 100 foot ames and a lot of thick smoke. While the ying conditions were complex, the commanding ocers biggest concern was the Marines and coalition forces engaging the insurgents. We knew we had a lot of friendly (forces) on the ground, Lightfoot said. We wanted to make sure we did no harm to them or to their positions. Engaging the enemy omas and his landing support specialists at the cargo lot on Camp Bastion saw four insurgents make their way down the ightline. ey knew they needed to maneuver to nd better positions to engage the enemy. At the same time, a British Quick Reaction Force was arriving on scene to assist in the counterattack. I attached myself with the British QRF while some of my other Marines held and maintained security at the cargo lot and on the ightline, omas said. e British QRF along with Marines from CLB-2 and 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) began to push toward the enemy and engage their position. Additionally, the alert aircraft from HMLA-469 were able to see coalition forces engaging the insurgents. One of our Marines on the ground was using night vision goggles and engaging the enemy from the ground, Lightfoot said. Additionally, the pilots saw the QRF engaging the same position. Once the pilots conrmed the enemy position, they were able to employ their respective aircrafts weapons systems to eliminate one team of insurgents. Following their rst engagement, the alert aircraft maintained radio communication with Marine Attack Squadron 211, the Harrier squadron, on the ground. e Harrier squadron was able to relay information about another group of insurgents location to the helicopters providing close-air support. (VMA-211) told the pilots where the enemy was, Lightfoot said. ey used the information to engage the enemy from approximately 200 feet in the air and were able to eliminate the threat. e pilots were dangerclose to friendly positions, but were able to use the information received to engage the enemy without endangering friendly forces. Every Marine a rieman Fires continued to burn through the night, but rounds ceased being red a few hours after the rst explosion. Fourteen insurgents were killed and one was wounded and taken into custody by coalition forces. Two Marines, Lt. Col. Christopher Raible, the commanding ocer of Marine Attack Squadron 211, and Sgt. Bradley Atwell, an aircraft electrical, instrument and ight control systems technician with Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 16, were killed during the attack. Additionally, eight coalition personnel and one civilian contractor were wounded. Marines with CLB-2 and 3rd MAW (Fwd), as well as British forces with the QRF, maintained security of the aireld for the remainder of the evening. Five aircraft with HMLA-469 patrolled the skies over Camp Bastion until the sun rose, ensuring no additional insurgents tried to gain access to the base. Looking back on the attack, the Marines felt as if everyone knew exactly what they needed to do to ght o the insurgents. is was totally new to most of the Marines, said Thomas. But everyone listened, everyone stayed together. We had great commu nication, maintained proper sectors of re and had full accountability of our Marines. Every Marine is a rieman, Lightfoot said. Marines of every military occupational specialty in the squadron, to include AH-1W and UH-1Y aircraft mechanics, dropped their wrenches and grabbed their ries to defend the HMLA-469 compound from a well-armed enemy. rough the coordinated use of ground and aerial delivered res, in danger-close proximity to friendly forces, all enemy insurgents were killed or captured. I am extremely proud to serve with such high caliber men and women. Since the attack, the Marines continue to push forward and accomplish their mission. We are back to business as usual, Pauley said. We will continue to march forward, complete our mission and nish a successful deployment.Attacking insurgents wear Army uniforms Allen discusses insider attacks, Pakistan on 60 minutes In an interview on the CBS program 60 Minutes Oct. 1, the commander of U.S. and coali tion forces in Afghanistan said he takes his mission personally and is angered by insider attacks by Afghan security forces and mili tants wearing Afghan uniforms. Im mad as hell about them, to be honest with you, Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, told CBS correspondent Lara Logan. Were going to get after this. It reverberates everywhere across the United States. Were willing to sacrice a lot for this campaign, but were not willing to be murdered for it. e general said it is important to understand the Afghan people still support ISAF troops and their mission to guide Afghan troops as they prepare to take full responsibility for security in their country. e key point is for us to understand that the vast majority of the Afghans, theyre with us in this, Allen said. ey understand right now the severity of this problem and the urgency of whats happening. Afghans have been killed trying to save coalition forces when some attacks have been under way, the general noted. [It] was the only reaction that they could have taken to try to save us at that moment of attack, he said. More than 50 coalition members have been killed by insider attacks this year. Allen said insurgents recognize the vulnerability posed as coalition forces work alongside Afghan counterparts, and they have adapted their tactics to exploit it. In Iraq, the signature weapon system that we hadnt seen before was the [improvised explosive device], he said. We had to adjust to that. Here, I think the signature attack that were beginning to see is going to be the insider attack. Afghan President Hamid Karzai, also interviewed in the segment, acknowledged the attacks and pledged to help ISAF eliminate the threat. ese attacks are sad, he said. is is something I have discussed in detail, something that I bear responsibility for to correct. Allen also discussed the presence of al-Qaida and ISAFs commitment to continuing to target and eliminate them. Al-Qaida has come back, [and] is a resilient organization, he said. But theyre not here in large numbers. But al-Qaida doesnt have to be anywhere in large numbers. e terrorist organization is not signicant in a traditional military sense, Allen said. AlQaida has signicance beyond its numbers, frankly, he added. And so for us, our 24-hour-aday objective is to seek out those al-Qaida cells. It is important to ensure alQaida doesnt feel as though it can put down roots in Afghanistan, the general said, and while security isnt perfect around the country, there has been much improvement. An awful lot of the population of this country is living in an area where there is vastly improved security from where it was just a few years ago, he said. Meanwhile, Allen said, coalition ocials are doing a great deal to address terrorist safe havens in Pakistan, and the relationship between ISAF forces and the Pakistani military has improved dramatically. eres a very complex relationship with Pakistan, and well work very hard and very closely with the Pakistani military to achieve common objectives, he said. But to some extent, the Pakistani military has been successful in cooperating with us in the last several months with regard to complementary operations on both sides of the border, but much more needs to be done. ISAF is doing everything it can within its authority to hunt down and kill Haqqani network operatives in Afghanistan who ultimately threaten my troops, threaten the Afghan troops and the Afghan society, the Afghan civilians, and ultimately the Afghan government, Allen said. e general also described his intense commitment to the mission in Afghanistan, which he said often leads him to turn around and go back to work some nights after asking himself while hes walking home if hes done enough. I came here believing this would be the last job Id ever have, Allen said. I dont care about anything beyond this. is is whats important to me. I almost cant remember ever having been anywhere else. is is completely consuming for me, and I am dedicated 24 hours a day to these magnicent troops, to the Afghans, to this cause, and ultimately to successful completion, he continued. is is very personal to me. And I take it very personally. ... aircraft mechanics dropped their wrenches and grabbed their rifles ... Lt. Col. Stephen Lightfoot Light Helicopter Attack Squadron 469

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 4, 2012