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The Kings Bay periscope ( 09-27-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00271

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00271


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Until they are home, they will not be forgotten Active duty, Reserve, and retired service members, military family members, and civilians at tended a ceremony to commemorate Prisoner of War/Missing In Ac tion Recognition Day at the Naval Undersea War fare Museum in Keyport, Wash., Sept. 21. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Keyport and the Naval Undersea Museum partnered in sponsoring the ceremony, which was open to the public. e national theme for 2012 was Until ey Are Home. e theme pays tribute to the families of POW/MIA service members who sacriced and endured on behalf of their loved ones. [Naval Undersea War fare Center Division] Keyport began hosting a POW/MIA Recognition Day ceremony four years ago because we believe that we should remember those who must not be for gotten, Capt. Dave Kohnke, commander, NUWC Keyport. Each prisoner of war and Soldier, Sailor, Airman, or Marine who is still missing in action has a common bond with ev ery other veteran, reserv ist, and active duty mili tary person. We all took a solemn oath when we put on our nations uniform, an oath to support and defend the Constitution against all enemies, for eign and domestic. Kohnke said that every service member who was either a POW or is cur rently MIA made extreme sacrices, with some even making the supreme sac rice. To day, we honor those Youth Soccer beginsMore than 1,300 players, parents attend openeris years fall season youth soccer league had its kicko Saturday, Aug. 15. On that bright sunny day 370 players, ages 3 to 15, had their rst games of the season Its not to be better than the other team that brought players to the elds. Its not to win. ese players turned out for the love of the game. My favorite part is watching those kids run with a big smile on their face to the game or prac tice, even if they have never won a game, Weslie Steele said. Youth Sports focuses on sportsmanship, teamwork, fair play and giving your best eort. With more than 1,000 spectators during the course of the day, its safe to say that these young play ers families love to support their MVPs. Everyone was sure to load up on their sun block and get their cheering on for the rst goals of the soccer season. Likewise, everyone walk edaway with something, satisfaction on a job well done even for those whose teams did not win. Patricia Angleheart, ci vilian administrator of Kings Bay Youth Sports, said volunteers are always needed for programs. Youth Sports is always in need of volunteers to coach teams or ociate games, she said. Whether you are a parent with a child enrolled in the sports program or a single, active-duty member with a sports background come join our Kings Bay Youth Sports team. Upcoming in the Kings Bay Youth Sports program, along with more games for the Soccer League teams, is the sign-up for Youth Basketball. Registration for players ages 5 to 10 will be 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Satur days, Oct. 26 and Nov. 10. Up Periscope You pick the president, who will you select? Page 11 Day For Kids 4H, Youth Center team to provide fun for all Page 4 Re: China Defense visits, countries team to fight pirates Pages 14, 15 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Afghan surge completeDefense secretary says drawdown endede drawdown of U.S. surge forces in Afghanistan is complete as scheduled, Defense Secre tary Leon E. Panetta announced in Auckland, New Zealand, Sept. 21, dur ing a news conference with New Zealand Defense Minister Dr. Jonathan Coleman. Panetta said the return of 33,000 troops Presi dent Barack Obama committed to the war in Afghanistan in 2009 is an important milestone.Flu shot time NSB Branch Clinic puts out word on this years immunizationsQuestion: What should I do to prepare for u season? Answer: e Centers for Disease Control recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a u vac cine each year. Getting a u vaccine is the rst and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. (CDC.gov/u) Q: Who should get vaccinated this season? A: Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a u vaccine this season. (CDC.gov/u) Q: Where can I get a u vaccine? A: Flu vaccines are oered at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay for eligible Tricare beneciaries. USS Maryland Change of Command Missing, POWs on mind

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will be gin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more in formation, call (904) 225-9355. Vets Memorial Park sets salee City of Kingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Ed wards Blvd., Kingsland. Plans for Phase ree include a pentagon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water fea ture. Donations are taken through Oct. 26 with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3. Donations can be dropped at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided for your dona tion upon request. For more information, con tact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.e rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Each year the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation presents awards honoring the outstanding, creative work of individuals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians alike may submit their own entries or the distin guished work of others for award consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submis sions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards as well as the submission requirements, please visit: http://www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Veterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day from Nov. 9 to 11, when veterans and their de pendents receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military members and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scavenger hunt. For more in formation, go to the Events Calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Parts of a new transition assis tance program were tested this summer and the revamped Transition Assistance Program will be ready to support departing service members in November, ocials told lawmak ers in Washington, D.C., Sept. 21. Leaders of an interagency team testied to the House Veterans Af fairs Committees subcommittee on Economic Opportunity about the revamped TAP, which includes a ve-day workshop for troops leaving military service. Army Adjutant General Brig. Gen. Jason T. Evans and his counterparts from the other military services also testied at the hearing. e rst day of the TAP workshop will be led by defense or service of cials, the next three days will be an employment workshop developed by the Department of Labor and the last day will consist primarily of Vet erans Aairs briengs, according to John Moran, deputy assistant sec retary for Operations and Manage ment, Veterans Employment and Training Service, U.S. Department of Labor. Troops attending TAP will be able to select a path, depending upon if they plan to pursue education after the military, search for a job or start their own business, said Dr. Susan Kelly, deputy director, Transition to Veterans Program Oce, Oce of the Undersecretary of Defense for personnel and readiness. We are all in agreement that one size does not t all, Kelly said of transition assistance for an es timated 300,000 service members expected to separate annually from the military during each of the next four years. After the initial mandatory veday workshop, additional days of training will be available depending upon the path that service mem bers select and their ability to meet career readiness standards, Kelly said. For instance, a retiring lieu tenant colonel with two graduate degrees would probably be more comfortable in his pursuit of further education, she said, than a young rst-term soldier unfamiliar with university entrance requirements. TAP can prepare departing ser vice members for technical training or trade schools, as well as college, Kelly said. TAP can help them pre pare resumes for a job search and help them determine how their mil itary schooling could translate into career credentials. It can help them develop a nancial plan, she said, and it can help them prepare to start their own business. Boots to Business is a pilot program that will begin at Fort Sill, Okla., in October, said Rhett Jeppson of the Small Business Administration. Pilots already have been launched with the Navy and Marine Corps, he said. Nearly one in 10 small busi nesses is veteran-owned, Jeppson said. Boots to Business will expose troops to entrepreneurship. A two-day program will help troops develop a business plan, he said. Syracuse University was in volved in helping design the pro gram, he added. e Army has a life-long commit ment to soldiers, said its adjutant general. Evans discussed the rede signed Army Career and Alumni Program which he said has already been tested at a number of pilot sites and stressed the new command em phasis that the program has been given. e United States Army is com mitted to ensuring a life-long suc cess of our soldiers, preparing our soldiers for transition by enhanc ing the training and service mod els, Evans said, and beginning the transition process early provides the greatest opportunity for post-mili tary success. Transition is no longer an end-ofservice event, he said. Under our new military life-cycle model, all new soldiers will receive counseling pertaining to their educational and career goals within 30 days of reporting to their new duty station, Evans said. New soldiers will also be required to prepare an individual develop ment plan that Evans said will be used throughout their military ca reer and then can be morphed into a transition plan. Kelly also discussed how the mili tary services will migrate by 2014 to an integrated life-cycle model where transition assistance will be gin not at end of career, but at the beginning. Evans laid out the Army six-phase plan for transitioning to that inte grated life-cycle model. e rst phase was strategic plan ning which he said was accom plished between January and April of this year. e second phase involved modi cations to support contracts and funding and he said that was accom plished in May and June. e recruit, train and pilot pro gram phase is ongoing now, he said, and involves forward mobile sup port teams at installations. Phase four will begin in November and all soldiers will then receive preseparation counseling a year before they leave the service, he said. ey will then go on to attend the Depart ment of Labor employment work shop and the Veterans Aairs ben ets briengs. Phase ve will include a number of new courses; a pilot will begin in 2013 and conclude no later than Oc tober 2014 in nancial planning and individual transition planning Phase six will be full conversion to the military life-cycle transition and it will also be implemented in 2014, Evans said. He said soldiers will be able to select a track to focus on employment, technical training, education or entrepreneurial op portunities. Were committed to ensuring sol diers who have sacriced so much in service of Americas defense are taken care of as they begin the next chapter of their lives, Evans said.New TAP Assistance ready to launch Transition Assistance e Defense Departments direc tor of Diversity Management joined other senior government ocials to discuss federal eorts to encourage young people of Hispanic descent to obtain the education and knowl edge necessary to enter technical occupations. Stephanie Miller took part in a panel discussion entitled Filling the STEM Pipeline during an education conference at the Ronald Reagan Building Sept. 20 in Washington, D.C., hosted by Latino Magazine. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. e conference was among events held to mark National Hispanic Her itage Month, which began Sept. 15 and runs to Oct. 15. e Defense Department views education as a vital component of national security, since todays stu dents are potentially tomorrows service members and the U.S. mili tarys equipment and weaponry are becoming ever more sophisticated, Miller said. e cyber realm, robotics and nuclear engineering, Miller said, are some of the high technology-inten sive occupational elds that will be an important part of DODs future. We do have true [STEM] pipelines, Miller said. We have pro grams that focus on K[indergarten] through 12[th grade students] in terms of exposing them to science, engineering, math, technology, and we include the medical eld in that, because a lot of our opportunities both on the uniformed side and the non-uniformed side are actually in the medical profession, as well. One example of DOD youth out reach is the STARBASE Program, which is managed by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Af fairs and operated by the military services. STARBASE is an acronym for Science and Technology Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration. STARBASE was created in 1989 through a grant from the Kellogg Foundation and rst began at Sel fridge Air National Guard Base in Michigan, according to the programs Web site. STARBASE is designed to raise the interest and improve the knowledge and skills of students in kindergar ten through twelfth grade in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. e program targets minority students and uses instruction modules specically designed to meet specic STEM objectives. e elementary school program is cur rently designed to reach students at the fth grade level who are under represented in the STEM areas of study and careers, according to the website. e U.S. Department of Labor estimates that nearly 50 percent of new jobs in the next decade will be in the elds of science, technology, engineering or mathematics. Yet few Hispanic students, who constitute a quarter of the student body in U.S. public schools, are choosing those career elds. Hispanics currently make up about 16 percent of the U.S. popula tion, with approximately 25 million of them participating in Americas workforce, said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, the keynote speaker at todays event. Americas investment in education and job training is essential to the nations future, Solis said, es pecially today when we know that there are so many young people that still continue to drop out of high school, and those are our children. e Labor Department has several programs to help at-risk youth stay in school and continue their educa tions to achieve good jobs, she said. My dream is that were going to see more Latinos and Latinas occu pying more seats at every level of our society, whether its at the Congres sional level, the CEO level, the For tune 500, and also in public policymaking arenas, Solis said. We still have not done a good job of making sure that we put all of our voices and our technology and our wherewithal together to increase the [Hispanic] representation across the board. And that remains a job that we still have to get done. e Labor Department also is working to assist veterans to nd employment after they depart the military, she said. We need to help them make that transition, Solis said. Education of the nations youth is important to the U.S. economy, she said, because the world is rely ing more and more on technology to keep the wheels of commerce, in dustry and government turning.Ed outreach recruits Hispanic youth Diversity Management

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Golfs e King recalls the Guard To golfers around the world he is known simply as e King. To those who know him best he goes by Arnie. But, from 1951 to 1953 Arnold Daniel Palmer an swered to recruit and yeoman. Long before Arnold Palmer was the rst millionaire in the his tory of professional golf, he was a member of the Coast Guard. As Palmer celebrated his 83rd birthday, he shared the story of his three years of Coast Guard service. Palmer joined the Coast Guard at a crossroads in his life. I was at Wake Forest for three-and-a-half years and my roommate got killed in an automobile accident, and I was pretty distraught over that and decided that I needed to get away, recalls Palmer in an interview with Coast Guard Auxiliary historian Richard A. Stephenson. I joined the Coast Guard. Palmer credits his ser vice with helping him at a time when his life needed some direction and has been vocal about wishing more young Americans would join the military. e knowledge that I gained, the maturity that I gained in the Coast Guard was unbelievable. It matured me, Palmer said. It made me a better person for the world, and I believe that. e military isnt just restrictions and military duties. Its learning and its very important that young people have that opportu nity to learn and to know themselves a little better and I think the military helps put that in the right perspective. Following recruit train ing at Cape May, Palmer transferred to Cleveland, Ohio, where he was a yeo man for the commander of the 9th Coast Guard District Auxiliary (now the U.S. Coast Guard Re serve)and ultimately for Rear Adm. Roy L. Raney, 9th District commander. I became a photogra pher and I did the identi cations for all the Coast Guardsmen in the 9th Coast Guard District, Palmer said. I traveled to all the stations and did photos and then took those all back to head quarters and did the iden tications cards for all the Coast Guard personnel in the 9th district. Palmer enjoyed the dis cipline of military life but particularly enjoyed hav ing many of his weekends o to continue to compete in golf tournaments with the blessing of Raney who received regular golf les sons from Palmer while they served together. Raney was so taken with Palmer that he recommended the young man pursue a career as a Coast Guard ocer. My intentions were to eventually get out and play golf and of course my boss, the admiral, had suggested I go to training at the [Coast Guard] Acad emy and that was ne and I was attered he wanted me to do that but at the same time that meant an additional enlistment for me and I was primarily ready to get out and get my shot at the PGA Tour. e Coast Guards loss was the golf worlds gain but Palmer never forgot about his opportunity to serve and continues to follow the exploits of Americas Coast Guard to this day. All the things that the Coast Guard did I thought were very exciting and [if I had] stayed longer I prob ably would have gone into the ying end of the Coast Guard, said Palmer, a wellknown aviation bu who ew himself to tourna ments for decades. And, what theyre doing now if you watch some of the shows that are on television I think thats specically one of the reasons I like the Coast Guard so much. Cost is $60 for active duty and reservists, and $65 for retired military, Depart ment of Defense civilians and NSB Kings Bay con tractors. is cost includes uniforms.Soccer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 5 who made that very oath and were tragically lost in bat tle, their nal resting place known only to God, and also to honor those who were captured and held by the enemy, Kohnke said. Kohnke said that some service members were held in captivity for years, suf fering greatly, uncertain of their future, and powerless to change it. But through all that ad versity, they comported themselves with honor, did what they could to keep their dignity and follow the Code of Conduct, Kohnke said. ey never forgot who they were: defenders of our freedom, and we, the United States of America, the great est nation on earth, never forgot them. During the ceremony, Navy divers assigned to NUWC Keyports dive locker passed the national ensign prior to raising it for morning colors and Navy Band Northwest performed the national anthem. Chief Gunners Mate Tamra Timmons participated in the passing of the ag and assisted in hoisting the na tional ensign. I was honored, it actu ally made me think about the people that are missing and all the people that died and the families that never really got closure, never got to bury their family members, Timmons said. It was somber, but I felt proud to stand up there and participate in re membering them. e museum also dis played the missing man table, and Kohnke shared the story of the Johnnie Johnson list that was created by Army Pfc. Wayne Johnson, an 18-yearold POW during the Korean War. Johnson, using a pencil stub, recorded information of 496 service members who died on bits of paper, dis carded cigarette packages, and scraps of wallpaper. National POW/MIA Recognition Day is a day of national observance for Americans to remember, honor, and re spect the service members who were prisoners of war, and who remain missing in action along with their family members who wait for their return home. As this years message states, Until ey Are Home, let us continue to hope and pray that one day soon, ev eryone will be home, Kohn ke said. Congress authorized National POW/MIA Recogni tion Day to be observed July 18, 1979. In 1986, the national remembrance date moved to the third Friday in September. is observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the ying of the National League of Families POW/ MIA ag, the ve others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. More than 33,000 Sailors from World War II through the Persian Gulf War are still missing in action. Today, there are more than 70,000 American military personnel who remain miss ing in action from World War II, nearly 8,000 from the Ko rean War, and 1,657 from the Vietnam War. Navy League Town Hall meeting e growing number of adversaries able to build and operate quiet diesel electric submarines is a national security threat that aects U.S. and friendly naval operations around the world. To address this emerging threat, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency recently awarded a contract for Phases 2-4 of its Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel program to Science Applica tions International Corp., McLean, Va. During Phases 2-4 the ACTUV program will at tempt to design, construct and demonstrate an un manned vessel that tracks quiet diesel electric sub marines for months at a time spanning thousands of kilometers of ocean with minimal human input. Key features and tech nology for the vessel in clude advanced software, robust autonomy for safe operations in accordance with maritime laws, and innovative sensors to con tinuously track the quiet est of submarine targets, said Scott Littleeld, DAR PA program manager. If successful, ACTUV would create a techno logical strategic advantage against the burgeoning quiet submarine threat and reduce manpower and other costs associated with current ASW trail op erations. Our goal is to transi tion an operational gamechanger to the Navy, said Littleeld. is should create an asymmetry to our advantage, negating a challenging submarine threat at one-tenth their cost of building subs. e program also establishes foundational technologies for future unmanned na val systems. During Phase 1 the program rened and vali dated the system concept, completing risk reduc tion testing associated with submarine tracking sensors and maritime au tonomy. Operational pro totype at-sea testing is ex pected in mid-2015. Sub hunter under designMissing

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At a Block Party Tuesday Kings Bay Style you can take a trip around the block from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2 outside the Fleet and Family Support Center Courtyard. Enjoy door prizes, free food, bouncy house, participate in free cholesterol screenings and blood pressure checks and visit dierent vendors including FFSC, COMPASS, Child and Youth Programs, the Fitness Center, Women Infants and Children, Kingsland Welcome Center, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation, St. Marys Submarine Museum, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange, Navy College Oce and many others. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 5738475. Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/ fair working condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various col ors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim plat form No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applica tions may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid writ ten on the bottom of the enve lope. e sealed bid process will begin at 9 a.m. Sept. 21 and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more informa tion, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids process will begin on 09/25/12 at 9 a.m., Sept. 25, and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is look ing for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appe tizers, delicious lunch items and Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 22 and 23 is Win nie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes af ter start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Face book under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Block Party Oct. 2 at FFSC 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR Divers inspect memorial Underwater Construc tion Team 2, from Port Hue neme, Calif., conducted an assessment of the chains holding the dock next to the USS Arizona Memorial on Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam Sept. 11. Today, were taking a look at the dock sup ports, said Billy Crowe, Park Service diver for the World War II Valor in the Pacic museum. Basi cally cleaning, inspect ing and mapping out the dock supports. Our dock is listing a little bit, and I believe at some point here the dock is going to be replaced, and this is basi cally preparation for that. is is the rst time this unit has been able to dive the memorial, a moment they shared on the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 at tacks. Ive never dove the Ari zona, so its kind of a once in a lifetime thing, said Steelworker 1st Class Nathan Terrazas. September 11th has signicance ... so its awesome to be a part of this and help the park service out and be able to be there for them when they need us. e divers also got a chance to take a guided tour with the park service divers to see the wreck age of the Arizona under water. It was mostly a work dive, Crowe said. But we did what we call a re source orientation, which basically means we swam around the wreck and then let them have a look at it. UCT 2 was established as an independent unit of the Naval Construction Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. e teams mission is to provide a responsive military capability for un derwater and waterfront engineering, construction and repair in support of Navy and Marine Corps operations. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 7

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As we reect on this moment, it is an oppor tunity to recognize that the surge accomplished its objectives of reversing Taliban momentum on the battleeld and dra matically increased the size and capability of the Afghan national security forces, he said. e surge of forces al lowed the United States and its coalition partners in NATOs International Security Assistance Force to begin transitioning to Afghan security lead, he said, noting that Afghan forces soon will be re sponsible for leading their countrys defense in areas of every province, and for more than 75 percent of the Afghan population. At the same time, we have struck enormous blows against al-Qaidas leadership, consistent with our core goal of dis rupting, dismantling and defeating al-Qaida and denying it a safe haven, the secretary said. e 68,000 U.S. service members who remain in Afghanistan combine with other nations forc es to make ISAF around 100,000 troops strong, Panetta said. ose forces will keep working to reduce the lev el of violence in Afghanistan, ensure the Taliban do not regain any of their previously held areas, and strengthen the Afghan army, he added. Panetta said Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of U.S. and ISAF forces in Afghanistan, is condent he can accomplish his campaign with the current force level. I have always had tremendous condence in General Allens ability to say to me, is is what I need in order to accom plish the mission, the secretary said. Right now, he is saying the force he has in place is sucient to accomplish that mission. Panetta is in New Zea land for the nal stop on his third Asian tour, which also included visits to Ja pan and China. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when they deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors can create a presen tation for a units area of special concerns.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retire ment and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Feeding families Afghan Norfolk dry dock contract awarded Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantics Hampton Road Integrated Product Team awarded a $19 million contract for replacement of the Dry Dock 3 cais son to the W.F. Magann Corporation of Portsmouth, Va., Aug. 31. e contract calls for the replace ment of the existing caisson, which is the closure gate to the dry dock, replacing the original structure which was built in 1946. e caisson is a steel-hulled, steelframed oating structure that sits inside a slotted seat to isolate the dry dock basin from the water outside. It has on-board pumping systems that ood or dewater the dry dock. Jonathan Johnson from NAVFAC Mid-Atlantics Public Works Department Portsmouth said that the project is unique, due to the limited number of caissons of this nature that exist and the fact that structures like this typically last more than 50 years. is new caisson will benet from modern technology developed since the original structure was built. e new caisson will not appear much dierent from the old one, the strength and stiness of the structure have been signicantly upgraded, and much of the on-board mechanical systems are vastly dierent from the original in order to improve safe ty and operational capability, John son said. Johnson said that Dry Dock 3 is used for docking destroyers and submarines and the is expected to be completed in April 2014. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Duty at Lake Tahoe no vacation Call Coast Guard Station Lake Tahoe Station Vaca tion and the 18-mem ber crew will quickly tell you that its not all fun and games working on the largest alpine lake in North America. Summertime is abuzz with boaters, swimmers and sunbathers enjoying the lake ringed by the tow ering Sierra Nevada. e crystal blue waters can lure water-goers into a false sense of security. Unpredictable mountain weather patterns can change rapidly, turning a calm outing on the lake into a rough day on the sea. High winds and eightfoot waves are not uncom mon on Lake Tahoe. I dont think people realize how dangerous this lake can get in a few minutes, said Petty O cer 2nd Class Kauakea Co lon. Its dangerous. You just dont know what lies beneath the surface. Depending on the weather, it can kill you. Stretching 22 miles long and 12 miles wide, the crew has a lot of water to cover. e station responds to about 150 search and res cue cases each summer. Were non-stop when the busy season gets here. Memorial Day through Labor Day, you dont sit down at all, said Petty Of cer 2nd Class Megan Ar cher. Were up fromsunrise until midnight, then we go to bed to get our eight hours of rest and were up the next day do ing the same exact thing again. With just two 25-foot response boats to cover the 72 miles of shoreline, the station depends heav ily on four nearby Coast Guard Auxiliary otillas and other federal, state and local law enforcement and emergency response agencies to fulll its many missions. e Coast Guard has maritime jurisdiction over the lake because it extends across two states Cali fornia and Nevada. Located at more than 6,000 feet above sea level, Lake Tahoe is the highest lake of its size in the Unit ed States. Working at such altitude poses some challenges boat engines lose about 1,000 rpm and maintain ing physical tness is more dicult in the thin air. Once winter hits, activity on the lake drops dramati cally. e crew may wel come this well-deserved break, but enduring a long period of inactivity can be dicult, too. Crewmembers spend their time studying and training to maintain their prociencies and qualications. Snow removal becomes part of daily life. Winter is very long. e weather is extreme and it snows quite frequently, said Chief Petty Ocer Bruce E. Helterbridle, the stations ocer-in-charge. If a heavy storm is mov ing through, a typical snow day means that the duty section is waking up every four hours and shoveling snow all through the night and maintaining snow re moval all through the day. Still, despite its challenges, crewmembers say they wouldnt want to be anywhere else. Lake Tahoe is one of the most beautiful places Ive ever been stationed or visited, says Colon. Its like a good movie you hit pause and no matter what scene its on, it looks like a good, quality photo. Q: When can I get a u vaccine? A: All local Tricare beneciaries non-ac tive duty: Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012, 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, 2 to 6 p.m. For Active Duty Per sonnel: See your com mand representative for dates and times when the influenza vaccine will be admin istered at your com mands siteFlu YOUR AD HERE! CONT AC T LEANN HIRSHCH MAN CALL 904 655-1200 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Cmdr. Brian Sittlow, commanding ocer of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764), was se lected as the U.S. Fleet Forces Command winner of the 2012 Vice Admiral James Bond Stock dale Leadership award, Sept. 17, 2012. Boise is home ported at Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. Sittlows recognition was announced via a Chief of Naval Opera tions Naval Administration message released by Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk, Chief of Naval Personnel who also serves concurrent ly as the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Personnel, Training and Educa tion) (N1). e 2012 winners were chosen from among 10 outstanding nalists in a review process that included screening at the Fleet Commander level and nal selection by a board of senior ocers, Van Buskirk. Cmdr. Sittlow, as well as all of the nominees, should be justiably proud of his achievements. He demonstrated the highest level of leadership reecting the legacy of Vice Adm. Stockdale. Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces, echoed Van Buskirks sentiment. e most important characteristic of a great leader is one that unies I asked this question with one caveat: You could not pick Barak Obama or Mitt Romney. You could say Justin Bieber. Or Tim Tebow. Or Charlie Sheen. Well, maybe not him. Eli Shane? Hed never make it with the voting age at 18. Kim Kardashian? I dont think so! How about Hillary Clinton or Colin Powell? Both have experi ence as secretary of state. I think either would do a good job. Colin is 10 years older, so Id say him this time and Hillary further on down the road. Joe Mantilla Retired Air Force Gayaquit, Ecuador Paul Ryan, the guy whos running for vice president. Lily Gushen Family member Glasgow, Scotland Mark Richt. Hes an honest, Christian man. Jessica Scott Family member Ewa Beach, Hawaii My dad. Hes the smartest man I know. MA2 Thugvy Hulett Marine Corps Security Force Battalion High Point, N.C. Adm. (Jonathan) Greenert. Hes a wise leader. Hannah Johnson Family member Saratoga Springs, N.Y. My dad. Hes retired Navy, hes up to date on issues, hes smart and I like everything he says. MM2 Jason Watkins USS Rhode Island Gold Wellborn, Fla. Christopher Walken The reason? We need more cow bell. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Boise skipper earns Stockdale UH taking base survey e annual Resident Satisfaction Survey is in progress and runs to Nov. 1. is is your opportunity to let not only the installation but the Navy how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Unaccompanied Housing is meeting your needs and to provide input as to changes for the future. UH representatives will visit each tenant command to provide an op portunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents to complete. If there are questions or concerns regarding this or Unaccompanied Housing, contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manager, at 573-8953. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information a diverse set of skills and personalities into a single cohesive unit, said Con nor. I would say Cmdr. Sittlow does this every moment of the day. He is one who transforms him self to what is required for a mission and empow ers his crew to perform as one. e Stockdale Leader ship is an annual award established by the Navy more than three decades ago in honor of Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale, a Medal of Honor recipient who epitomized the very essence of leadership dur ing his nearly eight years as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam. During that time, Stockdale relied upon his ve, self-dened roles of leadership mor alist, jurist, teacher, stew ard and philosopher to help himself and a group of about 11 others, survive the camp. Stockdales distinguished naval career symbolizes the highest standards of excellence in both personal character, example and leadership. e award is presented to two commissioned of cers, one each from the Atlantic and Pacic Fleets, who are on active duty be low the grade of captain who are in command of a single ship, submarine, aviation squadron, or operational warfare unit, and who best exemplies the ve criteria of inspirational leadership. A native of Roberts, Wis., Sittlow became the Boises ninth commanding ocer when assumed command, Jan.22, 2010. He gradu ated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1993, earning a Bachelor of Science in Marine Engineering. He earned a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies in 2009 from the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. Previous sea assign ments have been onboard the Sturgeon-class attack submarine USS Archersh (SSN 678), home ported in Groton, Conn., where he served in various divi sion ocer positions in completing two Mediter ranean Sea deployments and an Arctic Ocean de ployment. He served as the Operations Ocer for several military and civilian sponsored mis sions assigned from 1997 to 1999 onboard the Deep Submergence Vessel NR1, which was a unique U. S. Navy nuclear-powered ocean engineering and re search submarine, home ported in Groton, Conn. While assigned on NR-1 he completed a North At lantic deployment. Brian served under me aboard Submarine NR-1, at the time the nations only nuclear deep submergence asset, said Capt. William Merz, SUB FOR Chief of Sta. He ran the operations on the support ship and was my voice for all of the commands activities while I was on the sea oor in es sence, he was often more the commanding ocer more than I was! His un appable demeanor, tac tical brilliance, combined with tremendous compas sion for his sailors, epitomized the much sought after qualities of our most valued leaders his men immediately rally around his leadership, his superiors immediately listen to his advice. Cmdr. Sittlow has these characteristics naturally and I would have been surprised if he was not selected. He is and has always been one of our best and I could not be more proud of his accom plishments. Stockdale 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Except for a few days of leave, twin brothers Marine Corps Sgt. David Haines and Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class Michael Haines hadnt been together for ve years until they were reunited at Camp Leather neck, Afghanistan, where both are deployed. ey dont necessarily compete against one another, but the 24-yearold siblings often wrangle back and forth as if they are teenagers ghting for a video game controller. Whether they are trash-talking about the others military branch or arguing about dates of events, the brothers playfully interact like adolescents still living together on a daily basis. Growing up, the Haines brothers had dierent interests. Michael ran track, worked and even spent the better part of a year living in Italy with his sister. David spent his free time practic ing the piano, playing in a jazz band and taking drama classes at the local college. However, the brothers said, they have remained close. e two graduated from Moscow Senior High School in Moscow, Ida ho, in June 2006. After spending a few months out of school, David said, he knew he wanted something dierent. I needed a change of pace, he said. My brother-in-law was try ing to talk me into the Navy, but the Navy didnt really interest me. e Marine recruiter was right next door and totally sold me. During January 2007, David left Idaho to become a Marine, and his twin brother was thinking about do ing the same. I always wanted to join, Michael said. I had gotten married right out of high school. When we found out that my wife at the time was preg nant, I knew I needed to take care of my family, and I could nally do what I wanted. For the past ve years, Michael and David have shared two duty sta tions. However, they have not been stationed together at the same time. e brothers have both been as signed to units in Okinawa, Japan, and are both now assigned to units at Camp Pendleton, Calif. David, the Afghan National Army development chief for 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, deployed in February. His brother, a corpsman, checked into 1st Battalion, 1st Ma rine Regiment, in April and de ployed to Afghanistan this summer. Its the rst time the brothers have deployed to a combat zone, and the rst time they have been together in ve years, except for a few days dur ing Christmas leave. Its pretty interesting, Michael said. We always kept missing one another at our previous duty sta tions. Its pretty cool that we are here together, though. Although being deployed in the same area is nice for the brothers, David said, he has found himself on the edge of his seat the past few months. I was really looking forward to [Michael] getting here, but to be honest, it has made me a bit anx ious, he said. Being a part of the [Marine expeditionary force] and knowing about the kinetics in the area and seeing casualty reports, I was always making sure it wasnt my brother or his unit that was getting hit. It makes it a bit dierent tracking those things, especially having your twin brother out there. Michael is wrapping up his 90day deployment and will be head ed back to Camp Pendleton in the coming days. Until he redeploys, the brothers said, they look forward to spending some time together. e brothers said they enjoy be ing a part of the armed forces. Both are thinking about seeking commis sions. With 15 or more years remaining in the military, they added, it may mean many long waits before unit ing again. But they said theyll take whatever opportunity they have to talk to one another, even if it is on the other side of the world in a combat zone.Marine, Sailor twins brothers Fire in enclosed mili tary environments such as ship holds, aircraft cock pits and ground vehicles is a major cause of material destruction and jeopar dizes the lives of warght ers. For example, a ship board re on the air craft carrier USS George Washington in May 2008 burned for 12 hours and caused an estimated $70 million in damage. For nearly 50 years, de spite the severity of the threat from re, no new methods for extinguishing or manipulating re were developed. In 2008, DARPA launched the Instant Fire Suppression program to develop a fundamental understanding of re with the aim of transforming approaches to reghting. Traditional re-suppression technologies focus largely on disrupting the chemical reactions involved in combustion. However, from a phys ics perspective, ames are cold plasmas. DARPA theorized that by using physics techniques rather than combustion chem istry, it might be possible to manipulate and extinguish ames. To achieve this, new research was re quired to understand and quantify the interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves with the plasma in a ame. e IFS program was ex ecuted in two phases. In Phase I, performers studied the fundamental science behind ame suppression and control, exploring a range of ap proaches before down-se lecting to electromagnet ics and acoustics. In Phase II, performers determined the mechanisms behind electric and acoustic suppression and evaluated the scalability of these approaches for defense applications. One of the technologies explored was a novel ame-suppression system that used a handheld elec trode to suppress small methane gas and liquid fuel res. Performers swept the electrode over the ignited burner array and progres sively extinguish the 10cm gas ame. Since the electrode is sheathed in ceramic glass, no current is established between the electrode and its surroundings. A visualization of gas ows during the suppres sion would show that the oscillating eld induces a rapid series of jets that displace the combustion zone from the fuel source, leading to extinguishment of the re. Put simply, the electric eld creates an ionic wind that blows out the ame. is same approach was not able to suppress a small heptane pool ame. Performers also evaluated the use of acoustic elds to suppress ames. A ame was extin guished by an acoustic eld generated by speak ers on either side of the pool of fuel. Two dynam ics are at play in this ap proach. First, the acoustic eld increases the air velocity. As the velocity goes up, the ame boundary layer, where combustion occurs, thins, making it easier to disrupt the ame. Second, by disturb ing the pool surface, the acoustic eld leads to higher fuel vaporization, which widens the ame, but also drops the overall ame temperature. Combustion is disrupt ed as the same amount of heat is spread over a larger area. Essentially, in this dem onstration the perform ers used speakers to blast sound at specic frequen cies that extinguish the ame. IFS Phase II was com pleted in December 2011. IFS performers suc ceeded in demonstrating the ability to suppress, ex tinguish and manipulate small ames locally us ing electric and acoustic suppression techniques. However, it was not clear from the research how to eectively scale these approaches to the levels re quired for defense appli cations. Remarking on the over all impact of the IFS program, Matthew Goodman, DARPA program manager, said, We have shown that the physics of combustion still has surprises in store for us. Perhaps these re sults will spur new ideas and applications in com bustion research. For example, the data collected by the IFS pro gram could potentially be applied to the inverse challenge of re extinguishment, namely increasing the eciency of combustion. Such technology could be especially benecial to defense technologies that employ small engines. Agency researches cold plasma THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sand wiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and On ions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Pirates bond Navy, China Guided-missile de stroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and other U.S. Navy assets participated in a coun ter-piracy exercise with elements of the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army (Navy) PLA(N) near the Horn of Africa, Sept. 17. e exercise, the rst bilateral counter-piracy exercise ever conducted between the U.S. and China, paired Winston S. Churchill with PLA(N) frigate Yi Yang (FF 548) to conduct a combined visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) boarding. e focus was on bi lateral interoperability in detecting, boarding and searching suspected ves sels as well as the ability of both Chinese and American naval assets to respond to pirated vessels. Piracy is a threat to the freedom of the seas, eco nomic security, and the safety of mariners from all nations. Bilateral exercises such as this demonstrate the cooperative will of the international community and increases prociency of multinational forces in confronting the threat, said Cmdr. Chris D. Stone, Winston S. Churchills commanding ocer. We have common regional and global security chal lenges, and we are able to jointly address those by training together. VBSS teams from both ships performed the boarding on Winston S. Churchill, which was sim ulating a pirated vessel. Executing the boarding side-by-side as a com bined U.S.-Chinese team, the team successfully searched the vessel and provided assistance to the role-playing mariners. Participants felt that the training was meaningful, providing a unique oppor tunity to operate along side one another. It was exciting to in teract with the Chinese Sailors and cooperate in a critical environment, said Lt. j.g. Edward R. Kellum, boarding ocer for Winston S. Churchills VBSS team. Anytime we work with a foreign military, it adds a dierent perspec tive to how we operate. However, to collaborate with the Chinese in an anti-piracy framework is a rare opportunity and a real achievement for mar itime security. Following the exercise, leaders from both navies discussed the elements of the boarding in order to learn how to better oper ate together in the future. U.S and Chinese leaders expressed how important and benecial the train ing was, both in terms of building cooperative ties and development of tech niques to counter piracy. Were appreciative of the opportunity to train with other nations to es tablish ties that will allow us to work together to face the piracy threat, Stone said. As fellow mariners we have great admiration for our Chinese coun terparts who are sailing alongside us and other coalition partners to keep the sea lanes safe. Winston S. Churchill is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conduct ing maritime security op erations, theater security cooperation eorts, and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Defense bosss China meetings productive Visiting China at what he called a very important mo ment for the U.S.-China re lationship, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Sept. 20 his meeting with key Chinese lead ers in Beijing have been both substantive and productive. In a discussion with Chinese reporters and media represen tatives traveling with him, Panetta reviewed his meetings over two days with Chinese leaders including Vice President Xi Jinping, State Councilor Dai Bingguo, Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission Xu Caihou and Defense Minister Gen. Liang Guanglie. Key discussion points throughout the meetings, the secretary said, included terri torial disputes, ballistic missile defense and North Korea, and cyber attack and intrusions. e overarching topic, he added, was the U.S.China re lationship in the context of the U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacic region. Panetta drew a parallel in de scribing his advice to Chinese leaders over a territorial dispute simmering between China and Japan which, he noted, he also tendered to Japanese senior government ocials when he visited there earlier this week and Chinese advice to him over North Korea. Each side urged the other to seek peaceful, diplomatic solutions to their dierences, he noted. e secretary said he has some understanding of the deep feelings and long-standing dif ferences between China and Ja pan over disputed islands in the East China Sea. But, he added, its really im portant that we not be trapped by the past and that we move forward. Panetta said his message on the topic is consistent to any country claiming disputed ter ritory in the East China Sea or South China Sea: while the Unit ed States doesnt take sides in territorial disputes, we strongly urge the parties to exercise re straint and to work together to nd a peaceful resolution to these issues. e secretary added that he also strongly urges the AsiaPacic nations to form a multi lateral forum to resolve regional conicts according to agreedupon principles. Panetta said his meetings here gave him the impression that the Chinese are looking for a good format in which to try to resolve these issues for the future. ey, too, have a concern that these issues cant just be resolved on the y that theres got to be a process to try to deal with them, he added. Both Japanese and Chinese leaders signaled this week that they recognize that its impor tant not to let this kind of dispute get out of hand, Panetta said. Chinas leaders similarly urged that the United States ex ercise restraint in its approach to North Korea, Panetta acknowl edged. China, along with Rus sia, is one of North Koreas prin cipal allies. U.S.-North Korea dierences came to the fore this week when, during his stay in Japan, the sec retary announced the United States and Japan are discussing expansion of Japan-based ballis tic missile defense radar systems. Panetta emphasized the Xband radar, which detects ballistic missiles early in their ight and provides precise tracking information for targeting sys tems, is intended solely for defense against North Korea. e secretary told reporters that North Korea threatens the United States, its forward-de ployed forces and its allied and partner nations as it continues to test nuclear weapons and delivery systems and to enrich uranium in deance of interna tional law. During his meetings with Chinas leaders, Panetta said, he urged Chinese ocials to try to persuade North Korea to en gage with the United States to work on resolving these issues through diplomacy. In turn, he added, the Chinese leaders strongly recommended that the United States try to re solve its issues with North Korea peacefully. Both sides noted that the re cent change in North Korean leadership has produced some signs of softening in Pyong yangs stance, he noted. We agreed that there are changes that are taking place and that we have to keep track of those changes, the secretary said. Panetta said he also raised concerns about threats in the cyber domain, which he called the potential battleeld for the future. Cyber technology has the potential to cripple a coun try, paralyze a country [and is] being used in order to exploit information -important eco nomic information -from one country to the next, he said. Panetta said the United States has concerns about what China has been doing, in terms of ex ploiting information, and that during his meetings here he stressed the importance of the United States and China having a dialogue regarding cyber. I think we do have to make the eort to try to sit down with China and with other countries to discuss how we can approach cyber, the secretary said. He added that cyber is a grow ing threat in China as well, and that there was concurrence during meetings that the topic is worthy of strategic discussion. ere was a sense that there has to be an eort to look at the larger picture here and whether or not we can develop interna tional rules and standards. I thought that was a very good step to at least beginning the discussion about dealing with this issue, Panetta said. e secretary has maintained throughout his comments to reporters this week that the chief focus of his visit to China was to strengthen military relations between the two countries and to seek Chinese response to the U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacic region. What I hope this visit has made clear is that engagement with China is a critical part of [the rebalance], he said. And I believe were making real progress towards building a militaryto-military relationship with China that is, in fact, healthy, stable, reliable, and continuous. China and the United States will not always agree, Panetta acknowledged. But he said the key to the rela tionship, as to any relationship, is open communications and the ability to express views can didly. at, almost more than any thing else, is what can lead to improved relations between the United States and China, he said. e candid and frank dis cussions he has had here bode well for the future, he added. Concerning the U.S. rebalance in the Asia-Pacic region, Panetta said, Chinese leaders ac knowledged that they dont view it as a threat. ey viewed it as important to the future prosper ity and security of the Pacic region, he told reporters. eir key concerns, he added, are that the United States devel ops and strengthens its presence in conjunction with developing a strong U.S.-China relationship, and that both nations work to gether to develop the capabili ties of other countries and de velop security for the region. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 15

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e Defense Advanced Re search Projects Agency research and development in stealth technology during the 1970s and 1980s led to the worlds most advanced radar-evading aircraft, providing strategic national security advantage to the United States. Today, that strategic advantage is threatened as other na tions abilities in stealth and counter-stealth improve. Restoring that battle space advantage requires advanced speed, reach and range. Hy personic technologies have the potential to provide the domi nance once aorded by stealth to support a range of varied fu ture national security missions. Extreme hypersonic ight at Mach 20 20 times the speed of sound which would en able DoD to get anywhere in the world in under an hour, is an area of research where signi cant scientic advancements have eluded researchers for de cades. anks to programs by DAR PA, the Army, and the Air Force in recent years, however, more information has been obtained about this challenging subject. DoDs hypersonic technolo gy eorts have made signicant advancements in our technical understanding of several critical areas including aerodynamics; aerothermal eects; and guid ance, navigation and control, said Acting DARPA Director, Kaigham J. Gabriel. but addi tional unknowns exist. Tackling remaining unknowns for DoD hypersonics eorts is the focus of the new DARPA In tegrated Hypersonics program. History is rife with examples of dierent designs for ying vehicles and approaches to the traditional commercial ight we all take for granted today, Gabriel said. For an entirely new type of ight extreme hypersonic diverse solutions, approaches and perspectives informed by the knowledge gained from DoDs previous ef forts are critical to achieving our goals. To encourage this diversity, DARPA will host a Proposers Day Aug. 14, to detail the tech nical areas for which proposals are sought through an upcom ing competitive broad agency announcement. We do not yet have a com plete hypersonic system solu tion, said Gregory Hulcher, director of Strategic Warfare, Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. Programs like Integrated Hypersonics will leverage previous investments in this eld and continue to re duce risk, inform development, and advance capabilities. e IH program expands hy personic technology research to include ve primary technical areas: thermal protection sys tem and hot structures; aerody namics; guidance, navigation, and control; range/instrumentation; and propulsion. At Mach 20, vehicles ying inside the atmosphere experience intense heat, exceeding 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit, which is hotter than a blast furnace ca pable of melting steel, as well as extreme pressure on the aero shell. e thermal protection materials and hot structures technol ogy area aims to advance under standing of high-temperature material characteristics to withstand both high thermal and structural loads. Another goal is to optimize structural designs and manu facturing processes to enable faster production of high-mach aeroshells. e aerodynamics technology area focuses on future vehicle designs for dierent missions and addresses the eects of adding vertical and horizontal stabilizers or other control sur faces for enhanced aero-control of the vehicle. Aerodynamics seeks technology solutions to ensure the ve hicle eectively manages energy to be able to glide to its destination. Desired technical advances in the GNC technology area in clude advances in software to enable the vehicle to make realtime, in-ight adjustments to changing parameters, such as high-altitude wind gusts, to stay on an optimal ight trajectory. e range/instrumentation area seeks advanced technologies to embed data measurement sensors into the structure that can withstand the thermal and structural loads to provide real-time thermal and structural parameters, such as tempera ture, heat transfer, and how the aeroshell skin recedes due to heat. Embedding instrumentation that can provide real-time air data measurements on the vehi cle during ight is also desired. Unlike subsonic aircraft that have external probes measur ing air density, temperature and pressure of surrounding air, ve hicles traveling Mach 20 cant take external probe measure ments. Vehicle concepts that make use of new collection and measurement assets are also being sought. e propulsion technology area is developing a single, integrated launch vehicle designed to precisely insert a hypersonic glide vehicle into its desired tra jectory, rather than adapting a booster designed for space mis sions. e propulsion area also ad dresses integrated rocket pro pulsion technology onboard ve hicles to enable a vehicle to give itself an in-ight rocket boost to extend its glide range. By broadening the scope of research and engaging a larger community in our eorts, we have the opportunity to usher in a new area of ight more rap idly and, in doing so, develop a new national security capability far beyond previous initiatives, said Air Force Major Christo pher Schulz, DARPA program manager, who holds a doctorate in aerospace engineering. e IH program is designed to address technical challenges and improve understanding of long-range hypersonic ight through an initial full-scale baseline test of an existing hy personic test vehicle, followed by a series of subscale ight tests, innovative ground-based testing, expanded modeling and simulation, and advanced ana lytic methods, culminating in a test ight of a full-scale hyper sonic X-plane (HX) in 2016. HX is envisioned as a recover able next-generation conguration augmented with a rocketbased propulsion capability that will enable and reduce risk for highly maneuverable, longrange hypersonic platforms. DARPA studies extreme hypersonic ight A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Until they are home, they will not be forgotten Active duty, Reserve, and retired service members, military family members, and civilians attended a ceremony to commemorate Prisoner of War/Missing In Action Recognition Day at the Naval Undersea Warfare Museum in Keyport, Wash., Sept. 21. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Keyport and the Naval Undersea Museum partnered in sponsoring the ceremony, which was open to the public. e national theme for 2012 was Until ey Are Home. e theme pays tribute to the families of POW/MIA service members who sacriced and endured on behalf of their loved ones. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division] Keyport began hosting a POW/MIA Recognition Day ceremony four years ago because we believe that we should remember those who must not be forgotten, Capt. Dave Kohnke, commander, NUWC Keyport. Each prisoner of war and Soldier, Sailor, Airman, or Marine who is still missing in action has a common bond with every other veteran, reservist, and active duty military person. We all took a solemn oath when we put on our nations uniform, an oath to support and defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. Kohnke said that every service member who was either a POW or is currently MIA made extreme sacrices, with some even making the supreme sacrice. To day, we honor those Youth Soccer beginsMore than 1,300 players, parents attend openeris years fall season youth soccer league had its kicko Saturday, Aug. 15. On that bright sunny day 370 players, ages 3 to 15, had their rst games of the season Its not to be better than the other team that brought players to the elds. Its not to win. ese players turned out for the love of the game. My favorite part is watching those kids run with a big smile on their face to the game or practice, even if they have never won a game, Weslie Steele said. Youth Sports focuses on sportsmanship, teamwork, fair play and giving your best eort. With more than 1,000 spectators during the course of the day, its safe to say that these young play ers families love to support their MVPs. Everyone was sure to load up on their sun block and get their cheering on for the rst goals of the soccer season. Likewise, everyone walk edaway with something, satisfaction on a job well done even for those whose teams did not win. Patricia Angleheart, civilian administrator of Kings Bay Youth Sports, said volunteers are always needed for programs. Youth Sports is always in need of volunteers to coach teams or ociate games, she said. Whether you are a parent with a child enrolled in the sports program or a single, active-duty member with a sports background come join our Kings Bay Youth Sports team. Upcoming in the Kings Bay Youth Sports program, along with more games for the Soccer League teams, is the sign-up for Youth Basketball. Registration for players ages 5 to 10 will be 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturdays, Oct. 26 and Nov. 10. Up Periscope You pick the president, who will you select? Page 11 Day For Kids 4H, Youth Center team to provide fun for all Page 4 Re: China Defense visits, countries team to fight pirates Pages 14, 15 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Afghan surge completeDefense secretary says drawdown endede drawdown of U.S. surge forces in Afghanistan is complete as scheduled, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced in Auckland, New Zealand, Sept. 21, during a news conference with New Zealand Defense Minister Dr. Jonathan Coleman. Panetta said the return of 33,000 troops President Barack Obama committed to the war in Afghanistan in 2009 is an important milestone.Flu shot time NSB Branch Clinic puts out word on this years immunizationsQuestion: What should I do to prepare for u season? Answer: e Centers for Disease Control recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a u vaccine each year. Getting a u vaccine is the rst and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. (CDC.gov/u) Q: Who should get vaccinated this season? A: Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a u vaccine this season. (CDC.gov/u) Q: Where can I get a u vaccine? A: Flu vaccines are oered at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay for eligible Tricare beneciaries. USS Maryland Change of Command Missing, POWs on mind

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will begin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more information, call (904) 225-9355. Vets Memorial Park sets salee City of Kingsland is taking donations for a yard sale to benet Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park, Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd., Kingsland. Plans for Phase ree include a pentagon-shaped pavilion dedicated to the families of the military and a water feature. Donations are taken through Oct. 26 with the sale Saturday, Nov. 3. Donations can be dropped at the Kingsland Depot, 200 E. King Ave., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided for your donation upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Downtown Developement Authority, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.e rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Each year the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation presents awards honoring the outstanding, creative work of individuals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians alike may submit their own entries or the distin guished work of others for award consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submis sions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards as well as the submission requirements, please visit: http://www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Veterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day from Nov. 9 to 11, when veterans and their de pendents receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military members and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scavenger hunt. For more in formation, go to the Events Calendar at www. WorldGolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Parts of a new transition assistance program were tested this summer and the revamped Transition Assistance Program will be ready to support departing service members in November, ocials told lawmakers in Washington, D.C., Sept. 21. Leaders of an interagency team testied to the House Veterans Affairs Committees subcommittee on Economic Opportunity about the revamped TAP, which includes a ve-day workshop for troops leaving military service. Army Adjutant General Brig. Gen. Jason T. Evans and his counterparts from the other military services also testied at the hearing. e rst day of the TAP workshop will be led by defense or service ofcials, the next three days will be an employment workshop developed by the Department of Labor and the last day will consist primarily of Veterans Aairs briengs, according to John Moran, deputy assistant secretary for Operations and Management, Veterans Employment and Training Service, U.S. Department of Labor. Troops attending TAP will be able to select a path, depending upon if they plan to pursue education after the military, search for a job or start their own business, said Dr. Susan Kelly, deputy director, Transition to Veterans Program Oce, Oce of the Undersecretary of Defense for personnel and readiness. We are all in agreement that one size does not t all, Kelly said of transition assistance for an estimated 300,000 service members expected to separate annually from the military during each of the next four years. After the initial mandatory veday workshop, additional days of training will be available depending upon the path that service members select and their ability to meet career readiness standards, Kelly said. For instance, a retiring lieutenant colonel with two graduate degrees would probably be more comfortable in his pursuit of further education, she said, than a young rst-term soldier unfamiliar with university entrance requirements. TAP can prepare departing service members for technical training or trade schools, as well as college, Kelly said. TAP can help them prepare resumes for a job search and help them determine how their military schooling could translate into career credentials. It can help them develop a nancial plan, she said, and it can help them prepare to start their own business. Boots to Business is a pilot program that will begin at Fort Sill, Okla., in October, said Rhett Jeppson of the Small Business Administration. Pilots already have been launched with the Navy and Marine Corps, he said. Nearly one in 10 small businesses is veteran-owned, Jeppson said. Boots to Business will expose troops to entrepreneurship. A two-day program will help troops develop a business plan, he said. Syracuse University was involved in helping design the program, he added. e Army has a life-long commitment to soldiers, said its adjutant general. Evans discussed the redesigned Army Career and Alumni Program which he said has already been tested at a number of pilot sites and stressed the new command emphasis that the program has been given. e United States Army is committed to ensuring a life-long success of our soldiers, preparing our soldiers for transition by enhancing the training and service models, Evans said, and beginning the transition process early provides the greatest opportunity for post-military success. Transition is no longer an end-ofservice event, he said. Under our new military life-cycle model, all new soldiers will receive counseling pertaining to their educational and career goals within 30 days of reporting to their new duty station, Evans said. New soldiers will also be required to prepare an individual development plan that Evans said will be used throughout their military career and then can be morphed into a transition plan. Kelly also discussed how the military services will migrate by 2014 to an integrated life-cycle model where transition assistance will begin not at end of career, but at the beginning. Evans laid out the Army six-phase plan for transitioning to that integrated life-cycle model. e rst phase was strategic planning which he said was accomplished between January and April of this year. e second phase involved modications to support contracts and funding and he said that was accomplished in May and June. e recruit, train and pilot program phase is ongoing now, he said, and involves forward mobile support teams at installations. Phase four will begin in November and all soldiers will then receive preseparation counseling a year before they leave the service, he said. ey will then go on to attend the Department of Labor employment workshop and the Veterans Aairs benets briengs. Phase ve will include a number of new courses; a pilot will begin in 2013 and conclude no later than October 2014 in nancial planning and individual transition planning Phase six will be full conversion to the military life-cycle transition and it will also be implemented in 2014, Evans said. He said soldiers will be able to select a track to focus on employment, technical training, education or entrepreneurial opportunities. Were committed to ensuring soldiers who have sacriced so much in service of Americas defense are taken care of as they begin the next chapter of their lives, Evans said.New TAP Assistance ready to launch Transition Assistance e Defense Departments director of Diversity Management joined other senior government ocials to discuss federal eorts to encourage young people of Hispanic descent to obtain the education and knowledge necessary to enter technical occupations. Stephanie Miller took part in a panel discussion entitled Filling the STEM Pipeline during an education conference at the Ronald Reagan Building Sept. 20 in Washington, D.C., hosted by Latino Magazine. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. e conference was among events held to mark National Hispanic Heritage Month, which began Sept. 15 and runs to Oct. 15. e Defense Department views education as a vital component of national security, since todays students are potentially tomorrows service members and the U.S. militarys equipment and weaponry are becoming ever more sophisticated, Miller said. e cyber realm, robotics and nuclear engineering, Miller said, are some of the high technology-intensive occupational elds that will be an important part of DODs future. We do have true [STEM] pipelines, Miller said. We have programs that focus on K[indergarten] through 12[th grade students] in terms of exposing them to science, engineering, math, technology, and we include the medical eld in that, because a lot of our opportunities both on the uniformed side and the non-uniformed side are actually in the medical profession, as well. One example of DOD youth outreach is the STARBASE Program, which is managed by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs and operated by the military services. STARBASE is an acronym for Science and Technology Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration. STARBASE was created in 1989 through a grant from the Kellogg Foundation and rst began at Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Michigan, according to the programs Web site. STARBASE is designed to raise the interest and improve the knowledge and skills of students in kindergarten through twelfth grade in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. e program targets minority students and uses instruction modules specically designed to meet specic STEM objectives. e elementary school program is currently designed to reach students at the fth grade level who are underrepresented in the STEM areas of study and careers, according to the website. e U.S. Department of Labor estimates that nearly 50 percent of new jobs in the next decade will be in the elds of science, technology, engineering or mathematics. Yet few Hispanic students, who constitute a quarter of the student body in U.S. public schools, are choosing those career elds. Hispanics currently make up about 16 percent of the U.S. population, with approximately 25 million of them participating in Americas workforce, said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, the keynote speaker at todays event. Americas investment in education and job training is essential to the nations future, Solis said, especially today when we know that there are so many young people that still continue to drop out of high school, and those are our children. e Labor Department has several programs to help at-risk youth stay in school and continue their educations to achieve good jobs, she said. My dream is that were going to see more Latinos and Latinas occupying more seats at every level of our society, whether its at the Congressional level, the CEO level, the Fortune 500, and also in public policymaking arenas, Solis said. We still have not done a good job of making sure that we put all of our voices and our technology and our wherewithal together to increase the [Hispanic] representation across the board. And that remains a job that we still have to get done. e Labor Department also is working to assist veterans to nd employment after they depart the military, she said. We need to help them make that transition, Solis said. Education of the nations youth is important to the U.S. economy, she said, because the world is relying more and more on technology to keep the wheels of commerce, industry and government turning.Ed outreach recruits Hispanic youth Diversity Management

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Golfs e King recalls the Guard To golfers around the world he is known simply as e King. To those who know him best he goes by Arnie. But, from 1951 to 1953 Arnold Daniel Palmer answered to recruit and yeoman. Long before Arnold Palmer was the rst millionaire in the history of professional golf, he was a member of the Coast Guard. As Palmer celebrated his 83rd birthday, he shared the story of his three years of Coast Guard service. Palmer joined the Coast Guard at a crossroads in his life. I was at Wake Forest for three-and-a-half years and my roommate got killed in an automobile accident, and I was pretty distraught over that and decided that I needed to get away, recalls Palmer in an interview with Coast Guard Auxiliary historian Richard A. Stephenson. I joined the Coast Guard. Palmer credits his service with helping him at a time when his life needed some direction and has been vocal about wishing more young Americans would join the military. e knowledge that I gained, the maturity that I gained in the Coast Guard was unbelievable. It matured me, Palmer said. It made me a better person for the world, and I believe that. e military isnt just restrictions and military duties. Its learning and its very important that young people have that opportunity to learn and to know themselves a little better and I think the military helps put that in the right perspective. Following recruit training at Cape May, Palmer transferred to Cleveland, Ohio, where he was a yeoman for the commander of the 9th Coast Guard District Auxiliary (now the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve)and ultimately for Rear Adm. Roy L. Raney, 9th District commander. I became a photographer and I did the identications for all the Coast Guardsmen in the 9th Coast Guard District, Palmer said. I traveled to all the stations and did photos and then took those all back to headquarters and did the identications cards for all the Coast Guard personnel in the 9th district. Palmer enjoyed the discipline of military life but particularly enjoyed having many of his weekends o to continue to compete in golf tournaments with the blessing of Raney who received regular golf lessons from Palmer while they served together. Raney was so taken with Palmer that he recommended the young man pursue a career as a Coast Guard ocer. My intentions were to eventually get out and play golf and of course my boss, the admiral, had suggested I go to training at the [Coast Guard] Academy and that was ne and I was attered he wanted me to do that but at the same time that meant an additional enlistment for me and I was primarily ready to get out and get my shot at the PGA Tour. e Coast Guards loss was the golf worlds gain but Palmer never forgot about his opportunity to serve and continues to follow the exploits of Americas Coast Guard to this day. All the things that the Coast Guard did I thought were very exciting and [if I had] stayed longer I prob ably would have gone into the ying end of the Coast Guard, said Palmer, a wellknown aviation bu who ew himself to tourna ments for decades. And, what theyre doing now if you watch some of the shows that are on television I think thats specically one of the reasons I like the Coast Guard so much. Cost is $60 for active duty and reservists, and $65 for retired military, Department of Defense civilians and NSB Kings Bay contractors. is cost includes uniforms.Soccer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 5 who made that very oath and were tragically lost in battle, their nal resting place known only to God, and also to honor those who were captured and held by the enemy, Kohnke said. Kohnke said that some service members were held in captivity for years, suffering greatly, uncertain of their future, and powerless to change it. But through all that adversity, they comported themselves with honor, did what they could to keep their dignity and follow the Code of Conduct, Kohnke said. ey never forgot who they were: defenders of our freedom, and we, the United States of America, the greatest nation on earth, never forgot them. During the ceremony, Navy divers assigned to NUWC Keyports dive locker passed the national ensign prior to raising it for morning colors and Navy Band Northwest performed the national anthem. Chief Gunners Mate Tamra Timmons participated in the passing of the ag and assisted in hoisting the national ensign. I was honored, it actually made me think about the people that are missing and all the people that died and the families that never really got closure, never got to bury their family members, Timmons said. It was somber, but I felt proud to stand up there and participate in remembering them. e museum also displayed the missing man table, and Kohnke shared the story of the Johnnie Johnson list that was created by Army Pfc. Wayne Johnson, an 18-yearold POW during the Korean War. Johnson, using a pencil stub, recorded information of 496 service members who died on bits of paper, discarded cigarette packages, and scraps of wallpaper. National POW/MIA Recognition Day is a day of national observance for Americans to remember, honor, and respect the service members who were prisoners of war, and who remain missing in action along with their family members who wait for their return home. As this years message states, Until ey Are Home, let us continue to hope and pray that one day soon, everyone will be home, Kohnke said. Congress authorized National POW/MIA Recogni tion Day to be observed July 18, 1979. In 1986, the national remembrance date moved to the third Friday in September. is observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the ying of the National League of Families POW/ MIA ag, the ve others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. More than 33,000 Sailors from World War II through the Persian Gulf War are still missing in action. Today, there are more than 70,000 American military personnel who remain missing in action from World War II, nearly 8,000 from the Korean War, and 1,657 from the Vietnam War. Navy League Town Hall meeting e growing number of adversaries able to build and operate quiet diesel electric submarines is a national security threat that aects U.S. and friendly naval operations around the world. To address this emerging threat, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency recently awarded a contract for Phases 2-4 of its Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel program to Science Applications International Corp., McLean, Va. During Phases 2-4 the ACTUV program will attempt to design, construct and demonstrate an unmanned vessel that tracks quiet diesel electric submarines for months at a time spanning thousands of kilometers of ocean with minimal human input. Key features and technology for the vessel include advanced software, robust autonomy for safe operations in accordance with maritime laws, and innovative sensors to continuously track the quietest of submarine targets, said Scott Littleeld, DARPA program manager. If successful, ACTUV would create a technological strategic advantage against the burgeoning quiet submarine threat and reduce manpower and other costs associated with current ASW trail operations. Our goal is to transition an operational gamechanger to the Navy, said Littleeld. is should create an asymmetry to our advantage, negating a challenging submarine threat at one-tenth their cost of building subs. e program also establishes foundational technologies for future unmanned naval systems. During Phase 1 the program rened and validated the system concept, completing risk reduction testing associated with submarine tracking sensors and maritime autonomy. Operational prototype at-sea testing is expected in mid-2015. Sub hunter under designMissing

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At a Block Party Tuesday Kings Bay Style you can take a trip around the block from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2 outside the Fleet and Family Support Center Courtyard. Enjoy door prizes, free food, bouncy house, participate in free cholesterol screenings and blood pressure checks and visit dierent vendors including FFSC, COMPASS, Child and Youth Programs, the Fitness Center, Women Infants and Children, Kingsland Welcome Center, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation, St. Marys Submarine Museum, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange, Navy College Oce and many others. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 5738475. Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/ fair working condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various col ors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim plat form No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applica tions may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid writ ten on the bottom of the enve lope. e sealed bid process will begin at 9 a.m. Sept. 21 and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more informa tion, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids process will begin on 09/25/12 at 9 a.m., Sept. 25, and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is looking for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 22 and 23 is Win nie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Block Party Oct. 2 at FFSC 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR Divers inspect memorial Underwater Construc tion Team 2, from Port Hue neme, Calif., conducted an assessment of the chains holding the dock next to the USS Arizona Memorial on Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam Sept. 11. Today, were taking a look at the dock supports, said Billy Crowe, Park Service diver for the World War II Valor in the Pacic museum. Basically cleaning, inspecting and mapping out the dock supports. Our dock is listing a little bit, and I believe at some point here the dock is going to be replaced, and this is basically preparation for that. is is the rst time this unit has been able to dive the memorial, a moment they shared on the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Ive never dove the Arizona, so its kind of a once in a lifetime thing, said Steelworker 1st Class Nathan Terrazas. September 11th has signicance ... so its awesome to be a part of this and help the park service out and be able to be there for them when they need us. e divers also got a chance to take a guided tour with the park service divers to see the wreckage of the Arizona under water. It was mostly a work dive, Crowe said. But we did what we call a re source orientation, which basically means we swam around the wreck and then let them have a look at it. UCT 2 was established as an independent unit of the Naval Construction Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. e teams mission is to provide a responsive military capability for underwater and waterfront engineering, construction and repair in support of Navy and Marine Corps operations. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 7

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As we reect on this moment, it is an opportunity to recognize that the surge accomplished its objectives of reversing Taliban momentum on the battleeld and dramatically increased the size and capability of the Afghan national security forces, he said. e surge of forces allowed the United States and its coalition partners in NATOs International Security Assistance Force to begin transitioning to Afghan security lead, he said, noting that Afghan forces soon will be responsible for leading their countrys defense in areas of every province, and for more than 75 percent of the Afghan population. At the same time, we have struck enormous blows against al-Qaidas leadership, consistent with our core goal of disrupting, dismantling and defeating al-Qaida and denying it a safe haven, the secretary said. e 68,000 U.S. service members who remain in Afghanistan combine with other nations forces to make ISAF around 100,000 troops strong, Panetta said. ose forces will keep working to reduce the level of violence in Afghanistan, ensure the Taliban do not regain any of their previously held areas, and strengthen the Afghan army, he added. Panetta said Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of U.S. and ISAF forces in Afghanistan, is condent he can accomplish his campaign with the current force level. I have always had tremendous condence in General Allens ability to say to me, is is what I need in order to accomplish the mission, the secretary said. Right now, he is saying the force he has in place is sucient to accomplish that mission. Panetta is in New Zealand for the nal stop on his third Asian tour, which also included visits to Japan and China. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when they deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors can create a presentation for a units area of special concerns.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Feeding families Afghan Norfolk dry dock contract awarded Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantics Hampton Road Integrated Product Team awarded a $19 million contract for replacement of the Dry Dock 3 caisson to the W.F. Magann Corporation of Portsmouth, Va., Aug. 31. e contract calls for the replacement of the existing caisson, which is the closure gate to the dry dock, replacing the original structure which was built in 1946. e caisson is a steel-hulled, steelframed oating structure that sits inside a slotted seat to isolate the dry dock basin from the water outside. It has on-board pumping systems that ood or dewater the dry dock. Jonathan Johnson from NAVFAC Mid-Atlantics Public Works Department Portsmouth said that the project is unique, due to the limited number of caissons of this nature that exist and the fact that structures like this typically last more than 50 years. is new caisson will benet from modern technology developed since the original structure was built. e new caisson will not appear much dierent from the old one, the strength and stiness of the structure have been signicantly upgraded, and much of the on-board mechanical systems are vastly dierent from the original in order to improve safe ty and operational capability, John son said. Johnson said that Dry Dock 3 is used for docking destroyers and submarines and the is expected to be completed in April 2014. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Duty at Lake Tahoe no vacation Call Coast Guard Station Lake Tahoe Station Vacation and the 18-member crew will quickly tell you that its not all fun and games working on the largest alpine lake in North America. Summertime is abuzz with boaters, swimmers and sunbathers enjoying the lake ringed by the towering Sierra Nevada. e crystal blue waters can lure water-goers into a false sense of security. Unpredictable mountain weather patterns can change rapidly, turning a calm outing on the lake into a rough day on the sea. High winds and eightfoot waves are not uncommon on Lake Tahoe. I dont think people realize how dangerous this lake can get in a few minutes, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Kauakea Colon. Its dangerous. You just dont know what lies beneath the surface. Depending on the weather, it can kill you. Stretching 22 miles long and 12 miles wide, the crew has a lot of water to cover. e station responds to about 150 search and rescue cases each summer. Were non-stop when the busy season gets here. Memorial Day through Labor Day, you dont sit down at all, said Petty Ofcer 2nd Class Megan Archer. Were up fromsunrise until midnight, then we go to bed to get our eight hours of rest and were up the next day doing the same exact thing again. With just two 25-foot response boats to cover the 72 miles of shoreline, the station depends heavily on four nearby Coast Guard Auxiliary otillas and other federal, state and local law enforcement and emergency response agencies to fulll its many missions. e Coast Guard has maritime jurisdiction over the lake because it extends across two states California and Nevada. Located at more than 6,000 feet above sea level, Lake Tahoe is the highest lake of its size in the United States. Working at such altitude poses some challenges boat engines lose about 1,000 rpm and maintaining physical tness is more dicult in the thin air. Once winter hits, activity on the lake drops dramatically. e crew may welcome this well-deserved break, but enduring a long period of inactivity can be dicult, too. Crewmembers spend their time studying and training to maintain their prociencies and qualications. Snow removal becomes part of daily life. Winter is very long. e weather is extreme and it snows quite frequently, said Chief Petty Ocer Bruce E. Helterbridle, the stations ocer-in-charge. If a heavy storm is moving through, a typical snow day means that the duty section is waking up every four hours and shoveling snow all through the night and maintaining snow removal all through the day. Still, despite its challenges, crewmembers say they wouldnt want to be anywhere else. Lake Tahoe is one of the most beautiful places Ive ever been stationed or visited, says Colon. Its like a good movie you hit pause and no matter what scene its on, it looks like a good, quality photo. Q: When can I get a u vaccine? A: All local Tricare beneciaries non-active duty: Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012, 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, 2 to 6 p.m. For Active Duty Personnel: See your com mand representative for dates and times when the influenza vaccine will be administered at your com mands siteFlu YOUR AD HERE! CONT AC T LEANN HIRSHCH MAN CALL 904 655-1200 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 9

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Cmdr. Brian Sittlow, commanding ocer of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764), was selected as the U.S. Fleet Forces Command winner of the 2012 Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale Leadership award, Sept. 17, 2012. Boise is home ported at Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. Sittlows recognition was announced via a Chief of Naval Operations Naval Administration message released by Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk, Chief of Naval Personnel who also serves concurrently as the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education) (N1). e 2012 winners were chosen from among 10 outstanding nalists in a review process that included screening at the Fleet Commander level and nal selection by a board of senior ocers, Van Buskirk. Cmdr. Sittlow, as well as all of the nominees, should be justiably proud of his achievements. He demonstrated the highest level of leadership reecting the legacy of Vice Adm. Stockdale. Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces, echoed Van Buskirks sentiment. e most important characteristic of a great leader is one that unies I asked this question with one caveat: You could not pick Barak Obama or Mitt Romney. You could say Justin Bieber. Or Tim Tebow. Or Charlie Sheen. Well, maybe not him. Eli Shane? Hed never make it with the voting age at 18. Kim Kardashian? I dont think so! How about Hillary Clinton or Colin Powell? Both have experi ence as secretary of state. I think either would do a good job. Colin is 10 years older, so Id say him this time and Hillary further on down the road. Joe Mantilla Retired Air Force Gayaquit, Ecuador Paul Ryan, the guy whos running for vice president. Lily Gushen Family member Glasgow, Scotland Mark Richt. Hes an honest, Christian man. Jessica Scott Family member Ewa Beach, Hawaii My dad. Hes the smartest man I know. MA2 Thugvy Hulett Marine Corps Security Force Battalion High Point, N.C. Adm. (Jonathan) Greenert. Hes a wise leader. Hannah Johnson Family member Saratoga Springs, N.Y. My dad. Hes retired Navy, hes up to date on issues, hes smart and I like everything he says. MM2 Jason Watkins USS Rhode Island Gold Wellborn, Fla. Christopher Walken The reason? We need more cow bell. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Boise skipper earns Stockdale UH taking base survey e annual Resident Satisfaction Survey is in progress and runs to Nov. 1. is is your opportunity to let not only the installation but the Navy how well Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Unaccompanied Housing is meeting your needs and to provide input as to changes for the future. UH representatives will visit each tenant command to provide an opportunity for all residents to participate. e front desk also will have copies of the survey for residents to complete. If there are questions or concerns regarding this or Unaccompanied Housing, contact Mike Gebhardt, UH manager, at 573-8953. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information a diverse set of skills and personalities into a single cohesive unit, said Connor. I would say Cmdr. Sittlow does this every moment of the day. He is one who transforms himself to what is required for a mission and empowers his crew to perform as one. e Stockdale Leadership is an annual award established by the Navy more than three decades ago in honor of Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale, a Medal of Honor recipient who epitomized the very essence of leadership during his nearly eight years as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam. During that time, Stockdale relied upon his ve, self-dened roles of leadership moralist, jurist, teacher, steward and philosopher to help himself and a group of about 11 others, survive the camp. Stockdales distinguished naval career symbolizes the highest standards of excellence in both personal character, example and leadership. e award is presented to two commissioned ofcers, one each from the Atlantic and Pacic Fleets, who are on active duty below the grade of captain who are in command of a single ship, submarine, aviation squadron, or operational warfare unit, and who best exemplies the ve criteria of inspirational leadership. A native of Roberts, Wis., Sittlow became the Boises ninth commanding ocer when assumed command, Jan.22, 2010. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1993, earning a Bachelor of Science in Marine Engineering. He earned a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies in 2009 from the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. Previous sea assignments have been onboard the Sturgeon-class attack submarine USS Archersh (SSN 678), home ported in Groton, Conn., where he served in various division ocer positions in completing two Mediterranean Sea deployments and an Arctic Ocean deployment. He served as the Operations Ocer for several military and civilian sponsored missions assigned from 1997 to 1999 onboard the Deep Submergence Vessel NR1, which was a unique U. S. Navy nuclear-powered ocean engineering and research submarine, homeported in Groton, Conn. While assigned on NR-1 he completed a North Atlantic deployment. Brian served under me aboard Submarine NR-1, at the time the nations only nuclear deep submergence asset, said Capt. William Merz, SUBFOR Chief of Sta. He ran the operations on the support ship and was my voice for all of the commands activities while I was on the sea oor in essence, he was often more the commanding ocer more than I was! His unappable demeanor, tactical brilliance, combined with tremendous compassion for his sailors, epitomized the much sought after qualities of our most valued leaders his men immediately rally around his leadership, his superiors immediately listen to his advice. Cmdr. Sittlow has these characteristics naturally and I would have been surprised if he was not selected. He is and has always been one of our best and I could not be more proud of his accomplishments. Stockdale 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Except for a few days of leave, twin brothers Marine Corps Sgt. David Haines and Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class Michael Haines hadnt been together for ve years until they were reunited at Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, where both are deployed. ey dont necessarily compete against one another, but the 24-yearold siblings often wrangle back and forth as if they are teenagers ghting for a video game controller. Whether they are trash-talking about the others military branch or arguing about dates of events, the brothers playfully interact like adolescents still living together on a daily basis. Growing up, the Haines brothers had dierent interests. Michael ran track, worked and even spent the better part of a year living in Italy with his sister. David spent his free time practicing the piano, playing in a jazz band and taking drama classes at the local college. However, the brothers said, they have remained close. e two graduated from Moscow Senior High School in Moscow, Idaho, in June 2006. After spending a few months out of school, David said, he knew he wanted something dierent. I needed a change of pace, he said. My brother-in-law was trying to talk me into the Navy, but the Navy didnt really interest me. e Marine recruiter was right next door and totally sold me. During January 2007, David left Idaho to become a Marine, and his twin brother was thinking about doing the same. I always wanted to join, Michael said. I had gotten married right out of high school. When we found out that my wife at the time was pregnant, I knew I needed to take care of my family, and I could nally do what I wanted. For the past ve years, Michael and David have shared two duty stations. However, they have not been stationed together at the same time. e brothers have both been assigned to units in Okinawa, Japan, and are both now assigned to units at Camp Pendleton, Calif. David, the Afghan National Army development chief for 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, deployed in February. His brother, a corpsman, checked into 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, in April and deployed to Afghanistan this summer. Its the rst time the brothers have deployed to a combat zone, and the rst time they have been together in ve years, except for a few days during Christmas leave. Its pretty interesting, Michael said. We always kept missing one another at our previous duty stations. Its pretty cool that we are here together, though. Although being deployed in the same area is nice for the brothers, David said, he has found himself on the edge of his seat the past few months. I was really looking forward to [Michael] getting here, but to be honest, it has made me a bit anxious, he said. Being a part of the [Marine expeditionary force] and knowing about the kinetics in the area and seeing casualty reports, I was always making sure it wasnt my brother or his unit that was getting hit. It makes it a bit dierent tracking those things, especially having your twin brother out there. Michael is wrapping up his 90day deployment and will be headed back to Camp Pendleton in the coming days. Until he redeploys, the brothers said, they look forward to spending some time together. e brothers said they enjoy being a part of the armed forces. Both are thinking about seeking commissions. With 15 or more years remaining in the military, they added, it may mean many long waits before uniting again. But they said theyll take whatever opportunity they have to talk to one another, even if it is on the other side of the world in a combat zone.Marine, Sailor twins brothers Fire in enclosed military environments such as ship holds, aircraft cockpits and ground vehicles is a major cause of material destruction and jeopardizes the lives of warghters. For example, a shipboard re on the aircraft carrier USS George Washington in May 2008 burned for 12 hours and caused an estimated $70 million in damage. For nearly 50 years, despite the severity of the threat from re, no new methods for extinguishing or manipulating re were developed. In 2008, DARPA launched the Instant Fire Suppression program to develop a fundamental understanding of re with the aim of transforming approaches to reghting. Traditional re-suppression technologies focus largely on disrupting the chemical reactions involved in combustion. However, from a physics perspective, ames are cold plasmas. DARPA theorized that by using physics techniques rather than combustion chemistry, it might be possible to manipulate and extinguish ames. To achieve this, new research was required to understand and quantify the interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves with the plasma in a ame. e IFS program was executed in two phases. In Phase I, performers studied the fundamental science behind ame suppression and control, exploring a range of approaches before down-selecting to electromagnetics and acoustics. In Phase II, performers determined the mechanisms behind electric and acoustic suppression and evaluated the scalability of these approaches for defense applications. One of the technologies explored was a novel ame-suppression system that used a handheld electrode to suppress small methane gas and liquid fuel res. Performers swept the electrode over the ignited burner array and progressively extinguish the 10cm gas ame. Since the electrode is sheathed in ceramic glass, no current is established between the electrode and its surroundings. A visualization of gas ows during the suppression would show that the oscillating eld induces a rapid series of jets that displace the combustion zone from the fuel source, leading to extinguishment of the re. Put simply, the electric eld creates an ionic wind that blows out the ame. is same approach was not able to suppress a small heptane pool ame. Performers also evaluated the use of acoustic elds to suppress ames. A ame was extinguished by an acoustic eld generated by speakers on either side of the pool of fuel. Two dynamics are at play in this approach. First, the acoustic eld increases the air velocity. As the velocity goes up, the ame boundary layer, where combustion occurs, thins, making it easier to disrupt the ame. Second, by disturbing the pool surface, the acoustic eld leads to higher fuel vaporization, which widens the ame, but also drops the overall ame temperature. Combustion is disrupted as the same amount of heat is spread over a larger area. Essentially, in this demonstration the performers used speakers to blast sound at specic frequencies that extinguish the ame. IFS Phase II was completed in December 2011. IFS performers succeeded in demonstrating the ability to suppress, extinguish and manipulate small ames locally using electric and acoustic suppression techniques. However, it was not clear from the research how to eectively scale these approaches to the levels required for defense applications. Remarking on the overall impact of the IFS program, Matthew Goodman, DARPA program manager, said, We have shown that the physics of combustion still has surprises in store for us. Perhaps these results will spur new ideas and applications in combustion research. For example, the data collected by the IFS program could potentially be applied to the inverse challenge of re extinguishment, namely increasing the eciency of combustion. Such technology could be especially benecial to defense technologies that employ small engines. Agency researches cold plasma THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Pirates bond Navy, China Guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and other U.S. Navy assets participated in a counter-piracy exercise with elements of the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army (Navy) PLA(N) near the Horn of Africa, Sept. 17. e exercise, the rst bilateral counter-piracy exercise ever conducted between the U.S. and China, paired Winston S. Churchill with PLA(N) frigate Yi Yang (FF 548) to conduct a combined visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS) boarding. e focus was on bilateral interoperability in detecting, boarding and searching suspected vessels as well as the ability of both Chinese and American naval assets to respond to pirated vessels. Piracy is a threat to the freedom of the seas, economic security, and the safety of mariners from all nations. Bilateral exercises such as this demonstrate the cooperative will of the international community and increases prociency of multinational forces in confronting the threat, said Cmdr. Chris D. Stone, Winston S. Churchills commanding ocer. We have common regional and global security challenges, and we are able to jointly address those by training together. VBSS teams from both ships performed the boarding on Winston S. Churchill, which was simulating a pirated vessel. Executing the boarding side-by-side as a combined U.S.-Chinese team, the team successfully searched the vessel and provided assistance to the role-playing mariners. Participants felt that the training was meaningful, providing a unique opportunity to operate alongside one another. It was exciting to interact with the Chinese Sailors and cooperate in a critical environment, said Lt. j.g. Edward R. Kellum, boarding ocer for Winston S. Churchills VBSS team. Anytime we work with a foreign military, it adds a dierent perspective to how we operate. However, to collaborate with the Chinese in an anti-piracy framework is a rare opportunity and a real achievement for maritime security. Following the exercise, leaders from both navies discussed the elements of the boarding in order to learn how to better operate together in the future. U.S and Chinese leaders expressed how important and benecial the training was, both in terms of building cooperative ties and development of techniques to counter piracy. Were appreciative of the opportunity to train with other nations to establish ties that will allow us to work together to face the piracy threat, Stone said. As fellow mariners we have great admiration for our Chinese counterparts who are sailing alongside us and other coalition partners to keep the sea lanes safe. Winston S. Churchill is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation eorts, and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Defense bosss China meetings productive Visiting China at what he called a very important moment for the U.S.-China relationship, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Sept. 20 his meeting with key Chinese leaders in Beijing have been both substantive and productive. In a discussion with Chinese reporters and media representatives traveling with him, Panetta reviewed his meetings over two days with Chinese leaders including Vice President Xi Jinping, State Councilor Dai Bingguo, Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission Xu Caihou and Defense Minister Gen. Liang Guanglie. Key discussion points throughout the meetings, the secretary said, included territorial disputes, ballistic missile defense and North Korea, and cyber attack and intrusions. e overarching topic, he added, was the U.S.China relationship in the context of the U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacic region. Panetta drew a parallel in describing his advice to Chinese leaders over a territorial dispute simmering between China and Japan which, he noted, he also tendered to Japanese senior government ocials when he visited there earlier this week and Chinese advice to him over North Korea. Each side urged the other to seek peaceful, diplomatic solutions to their dierences, he noted. e secretary said he has some understanding of the deep feelings and long-standing differences between China and Japan over disputed islands in the East China Sea. But, he added, its really important that we not be trapped by the past and that we move forward. Panetta said his message on the topic is consistent to any country claiming disputed territory in the East China Sea or South China Sea: while the United States doesnt take sides in territorial disputes, we strongly urge the parties to exercise restraint and to work together to nd a peaceful resolution to these issues. e secretary added that he also strongly urges the AsiaPacic nations to form a multilateral forum to resolve regional conicts according to agreedupon principles. Panetta said his meetings here gave him the impression that the Chinese are looking for a good format in which to try to resolve these issues for the future. ey, too, have a concern that these issues cant just be resolved on the y that theres got to be a process to try to deal with them, he added. Both Japanese and Chinese leaders signaled this week that they recognize that its important not to let this kind of dispute get out of hand, Panetta said. Chinas leaders similarly urged that the United States exercise restraint in its approach to North Korea, Panetta acknowledged. China, along with Russia, is one of North Koreas principal allies. U.S.-North Korea dierences came to the fore this week when, during his stay in Japan, the sec retary announced the United States and Japan are discussing expansion of Japan-based ballis tic missile defense radar systems. Panetta emphasized the Xband radar, which detects ballistic missiles early in their ight and provides precise tracking information for targeting systems, is intended solely for defense against North Korea. e secretary told reporters that North Korea threatens the United States, its forward-deployed forces and its allied and partner nations as it continues to test nuclear weapons and delivery systems and to enrich uranium in deance of international law. During his meetings with Chinas leaders, Panetta said, he urged Chinese ocials to try to persuade North Korea to engage with the United States to work on resolving these issues through diplomacy. In turn, he added, the Chinese leaders strongly recommended that the United States try to resolve its issues with North Korea peacefully. Both sides noted that the recent change in North Korean leadership has produced some signs of softening in Pyongyangs stance, he noted. We agreed that there are changes that are taking place and that we have to keep track of those changes, the secretary said. Panetta said he also raised concerns about threats in the cyber domain, which he called the potential battleeld for the future. Cyber technology has the potential to cripple a country, paralyze a country [and is] being used in order to exploit information -important economic information -from one country to the next, he said. Panetta said the United States has concerns about what China has been doing, in terms of exploiting information, and that during his meetings here he stressed the importance of the United States and China having a dialogue regarding cyber. I think we do have to make the eort to try to sit down with China and with other countries to discuss how we can approach cyber, the secretary said. He added that cyber is a growing threat in China as well, and that there was concurrence during meetings that the topic is worthy of strategic discussion. ere was a sense that there has to be an eort to look at the larger picture here and whether or not we can develop international rules and standards. I thought that was a very good step to at least beginning the discussion about dealing with this issue, Panetta said. e secretary has maintained throughout his comments to reporters this week that the chief focus of his visit to China was to strengthen military relations between the two countries and to seek Chinese response to the U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacic region. What I hope this visit has made clear is that engagement with China is a critical part of [the rebalance], he said. And I believe were making real progress towards building a militaryto-military relationship with China that is, in fact, healthy, stable, reliable, and continuous. China and the United States will not always agree, Panetta acknowledged. But he said the key to the relationship, as to any relationship, is open communications and the ability to express views candidly. at, almost more than anything else, is what can lead to improved relations between the United States and China, he said. e candid and frank discussions he has had here bode well for the future, he added. Concerning the U.S. rebalance in the Asia-Pacic region, Panetta said, Chinese leaders acknowledged that they dont view it as a threat. ey viewed it as important to the future prosperity and security of the Pacic region, he told reporters. eir key concerns, he added, are that the United States develops and strengthens its presence in conjunction with developing a strong U.S.-China relationship, and that both nations work together to develop the capabilities of other countries and develop security for the region. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012 15

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e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency research and development in stealth technology during the 1970s and 1980s led to the worlds most advanced radar-evading aircraft, providing strategic national security advantage to the United States. Today, that strategic advantage is threatened as other nations abilities in stealth and counter-stealth improve. Restoring that battle space advantage requires advanced speed, reach and range. Hypersonic technologies have the potential to provide the dominance once aorded by stealth to support a range of varied future national security missions. Extreme hypersonic ight at Mach 20 20 times the speed of sound which would enable DoD to get anywhere in the world in under an hour, is an area of research where signicant scientic advancements have eluded researchers for decades. anks to programs by DARPA, the Army, and the Air Force in recent years, however, more information has been obtained about this challenging subject. DoDs hypersonic technology eorts have made signicant advancements in our technical understanding of several critical areas including aerodynamics; aerothermal eects; and guidance, navigation and control, said Acting DARPA Director, Kaigham J. Gabriel. but additional unknowns exist. Tackling remaining unknowns for DoD hypersonics eorts is the focus of the new DARPA Integrated Hypersonics program. History is rife with examples of dierent designs for ying vehicles and approaches to the traditional commercial ight we all take for granted today, Gabriel said. For an entirely new type of ight extreme hypersonic diverse solutions, approaches and perspectives informed by the knowledge gained from DoDs previous efforts are critical to achieving our goals. To encourage this diversity, DARPA will host a Proposers Day Aug. 14, to detail the technical areas for which proposals are sought through an upcoming competitive broad agency announcement. We do not yet have a complete hypersonic system solution, said Gregory Hulcher, director of Strategic Warfare, Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. Programs like Integrated Hypersonics will leverage previous investments in this eld and continue to reduce risk, inform development, and advance capabilities. e IH program expands hypersonic technology research to include ve primary technical areas: thermal protection system and hot structures; aerodynamics; guidance, navigation, and control; range/instrumentation; and propulsion. At Mach 20, vehicles ying inside the atmosphere experience intense heat, exceeding 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit, which is hotter than a blast furnace capable of melting steel, as well as extreme pressure on the aeroshell. e thermal protection materials and hot structures technology area aims to advance understanding of high-temperature material characteristics to withstand both high thermal and structural loads. Another goal is to optimize structural designs and manufacturing processes to enable faster production of high-mach aeroshells. e aerodynamics technology area focuses on future vehicle designs for dierent missions and addresses the eects of adding vertical and horizontal stabilizers or other control surfaces for enhanced aero-control of the vehicle. Aerodynamics seeks technology solutions to ensure the vehicle eectively manages energy to be able to glide to its destination. Desired technical advances in the GNC technology area include advances in software to enable the vehicle to make realtime, in-ight adjustments to changing parameters, such as high-altitude wind gusts, to stay on an optimal ight trajectory. e range/instrumentation area seeks advanced technologies to embed data measurement sensors into the structure that can withstand the thermal and structural loads to provide real-time thermal and structural parameters, such as temperature, heat transfer, and how the aeroshell skin recedes due to heat. Embedding instrumentation that can provide real-time air data measurements on the vehicle during ight is also desired. Unlike subsonic aircraft that have external probes measuring air density, temperature and pressure of surrounding air, vehicles traveling Mach 20 cant take external probe measurements. Vehicle concepts that make use of new collection and measurement assets are also being sought. e propulsion technology area is developing a single, integrated launch vehicle designed to precisely insert a hypersonic glide vehicle into its desired trajectory, rather than adapting a booster designed for space missions. e propulsion area also addresses integrated rocket propulsion technology onboard vehicles to enable a vehicle to give itself an in-ight rocket boost to extend its glide range. By broadening the scope of research and engaging a larger community in our eorts, we have the opportunity to usher in a new area of ight more rapidly and, in doing so, develop a new national security capability far beyond previous initiatives, said Air Force Major Christopher Schulz, DARPA program manager, who holds a doctorate in aerospace engineering. e IH program is designed to address technical challenges and improve understanding of long-range hypersonic ight through an initial full-scale baseline test of an existing hypersonic test vehicle, followed by a series of subscale ight tests, innovative ground-based testing, expanded modeling and simulation, and advanced analytic methods, culminating in a test ight of a full-scale hypersonic X-plane (HX) in 2016. HX is envisioned as a recoverable next-generation conguration augmented with a rocketbased propulsion capability that will enable and reduce risk for highly maneuverable, longrange hypersonic platforms. DARPA studies extreme hypersonic ight 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012

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20 THE PERISCOPE NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 27, 2012