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The Kings Bay periscope ( 09-20-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00270

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00270


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PAGE 1

Dempsey: U.S. must remain active with Muslim worlde recent anti-American demonstrations that have oc curred in many Muslim coun tries demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said Sept. 16 during an air craft ight from Sibiu, Romania, to Ankara, Turkey. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said the situation is the most complex he has seen since be coming chairman. In Libya, a coordinated attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi resulted in the deaths of four Americans including the U.S. ambassador to the country. ere have been anti-American demonstrations in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia, Pakistan and many others. While the spark that ignited the demonstrations was a crude video that denigrated Islam, there are several factors that have contributed to rage against the United States, the chairman said. e chairman wants to learn from the situation. At some level, I think what we are see ing are societies that have been suppressed, he said. ey have not had anything like freedom of speech or even the ability to congregate. Security forces in these coun tries are for the rst time under civilian rule, and are less likely to intervene unless directed by political leaders, the chairman said. And, he said, there are of ten power struggles within the countries. Some of those groups are truly anti-American and radi cal and violent, Dempsey said. Certainly you have these groups that are anti-American, who are extreme, who are com peting for power in the country. ese extremist groups often did not accumulate the num ber of votes theyd thought they would get in free elections, Dempsey said. Such groups that experienced failure at the ballot box, he add ed, could now try to gain some traction around the idea of being anti-American in order to gain inuence for themselves. ese groups are trying to ma nipulate the population. Now is not the time for the Unit ed States to withdraw from these countries, the chairman said. It demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, he said, so that we can counter that message of extremism that is being propagated by these violent, extreme organizations. Up Periscope Our picks for the National Champ of college football Page 9 Sub Vets Annual convention held in Norfolk Page 5 Pinned Chiefs get their anchors at NSB Kings Bay Page 4Staying engaged in a dangerous world It demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, so that we can counter that message of extremism Gen. Martin Dempsey Joint Chiefs Chairman Commands throughout the Navy recognized their Ombudsmen and the 42 years of service support ing the Navy and Navy families, Sept. 14. On that day, the Navy recognized the thousands of individuals who volun teer their time, talents and energy to making a dier ence in the lives of Navy families. ese volunteers help them during all phases of deployment, disasters or crisis. ey also are there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. I am Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick D. West and his wife, Bobbi, Ombudsman-at-Large, released the following Ombudsman Appreciation Day message to the Fleet Sept. 13. Navy Ombudsmen, Bobbi and I would like to take the time to say thank you for all your hard work, dedication and steadfast support that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. Without you, we would not have that vi tal communication link between our commands and families. For the past 42 years, Ombudsmen have been an invaluable resource for our families when it mattered most, whether providing support and guidance to a new spouse enduring a rst deployment or to a family facing a crisis the job that you do is immeasurable. Your time as an Ombudsman is hon ored and valued. e outstanding eort that you put forth in this im portant role leaves a lasting, posi tive impact on Sailors and families across the Fleet every day, and we cant thank you enough. Bobbi and I have enjoyed working with you these last several years and though we are moving on, we know that you will continue to carry the torch for our Navy fami lies. As we all know, family readi ness is tied to mission readiness and having a strong family support structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to ac complish its missions. ank you, Ombudsmen, for 42 years of tre mendous service and for your continued support and seless dedication. Bravo Zulu and HOOYAH! Very Respectfully, MCPON and Bobbi WestMCPON, wife say thanksOmbudsmen saluted for 42 years of serviceCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Energy award for NSBNavy secretary recognizes Kings Bay for eciencySeveral installations across the Navy Southeast Region have recently been named winners of the Secretary of the Navy Energy and Wa ter Management Awards in recognition of their energy and water conservation pro grams. Naval Support Ac tivity Panama City was awarded a top honor by being named a Platinum level award winner. Gold level winners were Naval Air Station Pen sacola, NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay, NS Guantanamo Bay, NAS Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, NSA Orlando, NAS As a Boys & Girls Club of America affiliate, the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Youth Center participated in a nationwide celebration of children by hosting a Day for Kids Saturday, Sept. 15.Parents and their children were able to enjoy outdoor games, face-painting, and artistic exhibitions from local studios such as NSX Dance Academy, Lisa Allen Dance Studios, I Live! Center for the Performing Arts, Camden Gymnastics and more. Created as a day to foster relationships between adults and children, a Day for Kids was es tablished to celebrate and honor American children through the gift of meaningful time. Research has shown that when adults spend meaningful time with kids, it helps them develop a positive self-image and a sense of belonging, usefulness and purpose. Now, more than ever, Boys & Girls Clubs of Americas Day for Kids provides adults and children an opportunity to take a break from their busy lives and celebrate the wonder of life and the fulllment of spending time together. Boys & Girls Clubs of America, along with the support of other leading youth-serving organizations, is working to establish a Sat urday in September as the Boys & Girls Clubs Day for Kids. BGCA hopes to make Day for Kids a permanent part of our national culture. Perhaps one day the month of September will not only usher in the fall and back-to-school season, but also Day for Kids, the day our nation devotes itself to the hearts and minds of its children. For more information about other quality programs available for school age children contact the NSB Kings Bay Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Kings Bay celebrates BGCA Day for Kids

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Another rst for the Kings Bay chapter of the Military Ocers As sociation of America was made pos sible by the eorts of its members. e chapter was awarded the cov eted Level of Excellence by the National Headquarters of the Mili tary Ocers Association of America. is is the second consecutive year Kings Bay has received the award. Only two other Georgia MOAA chapters Atlanta and Savannah and less than 10 percent of 416 MOAA chapters nationally and in ternationally have this distinction. e LOE award is determined by meeting or exceeding criteria estab lished by the National Headquarters of MOAA. Same of the quantitative criteria include informative monthly programs, newsletters and active liaison with a local military installation. Qualitative criteria include a pro active legislative aairs program in support of local, state and national objectives of MOAA, an active mem ber recruiting and retentian program, personal aairs program to acquaint members and others with nancial and insurance services from MOAA National, scholarship assistance to JROTC and activity as a member of the Military Aairs Committee of the local Chamber supporting area military personnel. Oct. 29 to 30, Kings Bay chapter President Major Neal Moore, USA (Ret.) and his, wife Linda, will at tend MOAAs National Convention in Washington, D.C. In a formal awards ceremony, Moore will be presented the chap ter award and banner by Adm. Steve Abbot, USN (Ret.), chair of MOAAs board of directors. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will be gin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more in formation, call (904) 225-9355. Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, re serve and retired military, Department of De fense and Non-appropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities compa rable to other quality hotels and fabulous des tinations worldwide. Its easy to make reserva tions. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the cen tral reservations line at (877) 628-9233.e rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Each year the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation presents awards honoring the outstanding, creative work of individuals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians alike may submit their own entries or the distin guished work of others for award consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submis sions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards as well as the submission requirements, please visit: http://www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Veterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day with a special promotion. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their dependents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. And from Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military mem bers and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scav enger hunt highlighting golfs relationship with the military in the museum. For more informa tion, go to the Events Calendar at www.World GolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Military Ocers Kings Bay MOAA chapter earns award e Navy Exchange Service Command announced, Sept. 10, that NEX customers who make a pur chase for $25 or less using a credit card will no longer need to sign a sales receipt. is option is available to custom ers who make a purchase using a Visa, MasterCard, Discover or Mili tary Star Card. For those customers using an American Express card to pay for purchases, a signature will still be required. is change [makes] it easier and more ecient for customers to complete their NEX purchase, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Ser vice Command senior vice president, Store Operations. We know our customers, often times, run into their NEX to make a small purchase such as a cold beverage, snack or other convenience item, especially in our mini marts. is new proce dure will make shopping at your NEX even more convenient. Customers will still receive a printed receipt for all purchases.Signature not needed for small buys To assist Sailors, families and the Navy community with getting ahead of stress and fostering readiness before a crisis occurs, Navy Suicide Prevention and Operational Stress Control Programs, Navy Behavioral Health, have introduced Stress Navigation Plans. Sometimes nding a way to destress can be stressful itself if we dont know what to do or where to go. Readiness doesnt begin at the time of a crisis. Readiness starts by having the tools to help us respond to unfore seen circumstances swiftly and with clarity-and knowing where those tools are, according to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health Program. We cant always plan for lifes challenges, Scott said. But we can be ready for the stress from these challenges by identifying our re sources and practices for navigat ing these challenges while were still healthy. By personalizing a stress navigation plan, youll know where your life jackets are in case of an emergency. It only took me fteen minutes, and Ive got my stress plan here in my oce for quick access. Stress is a part of everyday life, especially in the Navy, according to Scott. Having a plan ahead of time will help stop stress issues from be coming stress problems. Stress navigation plans are simple templates that can be personalized with practices for navigating stress while were still emotionally healthy, which be a life-saving drill if a crisis arises. e template is available on Navy Personnel Command Web site and includes elds to personalize with names, contact numbers and per sonal practices for dealing with a va riety of challenges in life, from work stress to relationship issues. Taking a moment to personalize a Stress Navigation Plan now may have a signicant impact later by helping to prevent future obstacles from compounding and leading to negative stress reactions. According to instructions on the Suicide Prevention Web site, Stress Navigation Plans do not have to be shared or revealed to anyone, but should be in a readily accessible place for personal use in times of crisis. Anyone can use a Stress Navi gation Plan. Encourage your shipmates, peers, family and community members to personalize theirs and take the stress out of navigating stress. Naval Personnel Stress Navigation Plans prove helpful Navy Exchange proud to be associated with the extraordinary people volunteering as ombudsmen and prouder still of their service at this critical time in our na tions history, said Monika French, Chief of Naval Operations ombudsmanat-large. We owe it to all our Navy families to con tinue supporting the Om budsman Program. e Ombudsman Pro gram was introduced to the Navy on Sept. 14, 1970, by then-CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, in Z-gram 24, as a means to address is sues and concerns that are unique to Sailors and their Navy families. While the date is signi cant to the history of the program, commands are encouraged to celebrate the event at any time deemed appropriate dur ing the month of Septem ber. Most ombudsmen are the spouses of active duty or selected reserve mem bers of the command. e Navy family ombudsman is a highlytrained volunteer who is able to oer support and guidance to command families and to act as an ocial liaison between the command and its fam ilies. e Navy Ombudsman plays an important role in the success of a commands mission. Ombuds men are the rst step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy families to the prop er resources they need. at, in turn, helps their Sailors with assurance that their families are be ing taken care of at home. When command members know that their family has a resource to go to for assistance, they can concentrate on the mis sion at hand, French said. It is the Navys goal to en sure that every Sailor and family member has access to the services of a com mand ombudsman. Family readiness is a primary factor to a Sail ors personal and mission readiness. Ombudsmen continuously demonstrate just how vital they are to helping our Navy families maintain a state of con stant readiness. Whether it is for deployments, di sasters or crisis response, they keep the information moving. According to Lisa Johnson, Commander, Navy Installations Command Ombudsman program manager, the Ombuds man Program is in place to assist the Navy family member and give them an avenue to receive the support they may need in tough times. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the fam ily member to the people who can help them solve their problems, Johnson said. Ombudsmen are not meant to be the help, but to connect the family member to the help. Connecting Navy families to help is what the Ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years. ey volunteer their personal time to ensure the Navy is ready 100 percent of the time. It is a pleasure to serve along-side a group of dedicated, caring volunteers, French said. I want to thank the past, present and future Navy Ombuds men and wish them a very happy anniversary. I look forward to working with you all.Service

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e attack in Benghazi, Libya, that resulted in the deaths of four Americans should shock the con science of people of all faiths around the world, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in Washington, D.C., Sept. 12. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens and Sean Smith, a Foreign Service information ocer and Air Force veteran, were killed in the attack. e State Department was withholding the identities of the other Americans, pending next-of-kin notication. All over the world every day, Americas diplomats and development experts risk their lives in the ser vice of our country and our values because they believe that the United States must be a force for peace and progress in the world, Clinton said. Along side our men and women in uniform, they rep resent the best traditions of a bold and generous nation. Stevens risked his life to stop former Libyan dic tator Moammar Gadha and then gave his life try ing to help in building a better Libya, Clinton said. e world needs more Chris Stevenses, she add ed. Although this happened in a country the United States helped to liberate and in a city it helped to save from destruction, Clinton said Americans must remain clear-eyed, even in our grief. is was an attack by a small and savage group, not the people or government of Libya, she added. Libyans stood and fought to protect Ameri cans during the attack, and Libyans carried Ste vens body to the hospital, Clinton noted. e United States will not waver in its mission in Libya, the secretary pledged. e mission that drew Chris and Sean and their colleagues to Libya is both noble and necessary, she said. A free and stable Libya is still in Americas interest and security, and we will not turn our back on that. Clinton said the United States is working closely with Libyan authorities to bring those responsible for the attacks to justice. Some have sought to justify this vicious behav ior, along with the protests that took place at our embassy in Cairo yesterday, as a response to inammatory material posted on the In ternet, Clinton said, refer ring to a video that is pur ported to blaspheme Islam. Let me be clear, there is no justication for this, she said. Violence like this is no way to honor re ligion or faith. And as long as there are those who would take innocent life in the name of God, the world will never know a true and lasting peace. Clinton noted that the attack took place as Americans observed the anniver sary of the 2001 terrorist at tacks on the United States. Its an anniversary that means a great deal to all Americans, she said. Every year on that day, we are reminded that our work is not yet nished that the job of putting an end to violent extremism and building a safe and stable world continues. Marines deployed to Libya Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has authorized deployment of a Marine Corps eet antiterrorism security team to Libya to protect U.S. citizens there and to secure the U.S. Em bassy in Tripoli, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Sept. 13 in Washington D.C. During a Pentagon news conference, Little said Panetta strongly condemns the recent attacks on U.S. diplomatic facilities in the Middle East. Little said the Defense Department supported the evacuation of American personnel and casu alties out of Libya and is supporting the repatria tion of the remains of the four State Department personnel, including Am bassador J. Christopher Stevens, who were killed in the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. Panetta and Chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey have worked with combatant com manders throughout the region to conduct reviews of their force postures, he said. ey also are work ing to ensure that we have the exibility to respond to requests for assistance or orders as directed by the president, he added. Little said the focus of the Defense Department is now on supporting wholeof-government eorts to provide security to American personnel in Libya and elsewhere, working closely with the State Department, and then supporting any eorts that we may be called upon to assist in the eort to, as the president said, deliver justice. Clinton condemns attack that killed ambassador THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 NSB Kings Bay 2012 Chiefs pinning Photos by Kelly Wirfel and MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5 On a warm, blue sunny September morn ing in the heart and soul of Navy country, hundreds of submariners from yesterday and today gathered for the 2012 United States Submarine Veterans Incorporated/Submarine Veterans of World War Two Convention. Past and present undersea warriors from around the world came together to honor the memories of their shipmates who gave their lives while serving their country, and to celebrate the more than ve decades of service that many of the organizations current members have to date. is years convention in the Mermaid City Norfolk, Va., honored several veterans whose date of qualifying on submarines reaches back before many of our nations earliest submarine battles. World War II veteran Lt. Cmdr. (Ret.) Walter Anderson recalled his days aboard Gato-Class Submarine USS Dace (SS 247), during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, which began in December 1941. e camaraderie on the submarines is great, he said. One of my fondest memories comes from the Battle of Leyte Gulf. I was involved in that. A sister ship, USS Darter (SS 227), went out at night and Darter got one of its heavy cruisers damaged and one sunk and the next night Darter ran aground. We picked up the whole crew and had a double crew until we got back to Darwin, Australia, eating peanut butter and some kind of soup. Anderson explained that although Darter was destroyed and space on board Dace was limited, the crews spirits were still high, reveling in the subs success against the enemy. e Web site Hazegray.org explains the incident Anderson reminisced about, citing that Darter and Dace made contact with the Japanese Center Force approaching Palawan Passage Oct. 23, 1944. Immediately, Darter ashed the contact report, one of the most important of the war, since the location of this Japanese task force had been unknown for some days. e two submarines closed the task force, and with attacks on the cruisers of Center Force, initiated the Battle of Surigao Strait phase of the decisive Battle for Leyte Gulf. Darter sank the heavy cruiser Atago and seriously damaged the cruiser Takao. With Dace, she tracked the damaged cruiser through the tortuous channels of Palawan Passage until just after midnight of Oct. 24 to 25 when Darter grounded on Bombay Shoal. As eorts to get the submarine o the shoal began, a Japanese destroyer closed, but then sailed on. With the tide receding, all Daces and Darters eorts to get her o failed. All condential papers and equipment were destroyed, and the entire crew taken o to Dace. Andersons adventurous and rewarding experience serving in the submarine community was not the only one retold during the week, but rather echoed as other seasoned submariners shared their memories from the depths. My last ocial act in the Navy in October 1971 was to take the Deep Submer gence Res cue Vehicle 1 Mystic down o San Clemente Island and certify her for test depth where we opened the hatch at 3,000 feet in a simulated sub hull, said Lt. Cmdr. Richard McPher son (Ret.) with a look of certainty on his face. We opened the hatch and pulled the Sailors out in a simulated hatch and simulated hull. McPherson explained that Mystic is one of two classes of DSRV in the eet. He also added that while working with the Navys DSRVs was an excit ing and memorable time in his career, he always likes to talk with sub vets from World War II to learn about their experiences and how things have changed. My highlight of this years convention was meet ing the World War II guys, he said. Im partial to them. My father was in the Navy from 1939 to 1966, so I grew up in a Navy family. I am looking forward to meeting all of the World War II vets, talking about them and what they have accomplished and doing what we can to support the Navy, especially submarines, in the future. One person with insight into the present and future of the submarine force is COMSUBLANT Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders. While visionary, Saunders expressed his honor and excitement to speak before the group of submariners at the Holland Club Induction Breakfast. Sub Vets in Norfolk Yesterday meets today at national convention ... if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them ... Rear Adm. John Richardson Outgoing Sub Forces commander Navy Submarine Force veterans gath er outside of USS Montpelier (SSN 765). Photo by MC1 Kim Williams

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At a Block Party Tuesday Kings Bay Style you can take a trip around the block from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2 outside the Fleet and Family Support Center Courtyard. Enjoy door prizes, free food, bouncy house, participate in free cholesterol screenings and blood pressure checks and visit dierent vendors including FFSC, COMPASS, Child and Youth Programs, the Fitness Center, Women Infants and Children, Kingsland Welcome Center, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation, St. Marys Submarine Museum, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange, Navy College Oce and many others. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/ fair work ing condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various colors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim platform No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid writ ten on the bottom of the enve lope. e sealed bid process will begin at 9 a.m. Sept. 21 and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more informa tion, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids process will begin on 09/25/12 at 9 a.m., Sept. 25, and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blan kets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is look Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 22 and 23 is Win nie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes af ter start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Face book under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Block Party Oct. 2 at FFSC Kingsville and Naval Con struction Battalion Center Gulfport. Blue level winners included NAS Corpus Christi, NAS JRB New Or leans, NAS Key West, NAS Whiting Field and NAS Meridian. e annual awards are presented to commands that have made notable progress toward the De partment of the Navy goals to reduce energy and wa ter consumption, increase use of renewable energy sources, and construct sustainable facilities. e DON Energy Pro gram evaluates and clas sies the overall energy and water management performance of each installation. Being recognized as a leader in supporting SECNAVs goal of shrink ing the Navys energy and water consumption foot print is a great honor and a testament to the base personnels commitment to being a green team, said Evelyn Baskin, the In stallation Energy Manager for Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast at NSA Panama City. Baskin said their installa tion has become an energy champion through eorts such as mechanics prac ticing preventive maintenance to keep facilities tuned-up and building energy monitors staying vigilant in reporting energy leaks and displaying ener gy awareness materials in their buildings. She added that purchas ing Energy Star products and implementing energy reduction measures like installing programmable thermostats and high eciency HVAC systems have also helped the base meet its energy reduction goals. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus will present the Platinum award to NSA Panama City ocials during a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial & Naval Heritage Center Oct. 3. e remainder of Navy Region Southeast installations is working hard to achieve similar results as a culture of conservation has taken root and contin ues to grow. Doug Mercer, Director of Infrastructure Assess ment for CNRSE, said that seeing every installation in the Southeast Region earn a SECNAV award for energy and water conser vation shows that meeting energy reduction goals is a team eort. We have come a long way in spreading the cul ture of energy conserva tion, Mercer said. More people are realizing they can make an individual contribution to our energy independence, and that the funding we reduce in our utility bills goes di rectly to the training and equipment needed to maintain the U.S. Navy as the preeminent force in the world. ose contributions have added up in the past several years as accolades for CNRSE installations have increased, said Andrew Rubio, an energy projects engineer with the Energy Management Branch of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast. In 2007, less than 30 percent of Region Southeast installations received any level of rec ognition. Since then, con certed eorts across the Region Southeast at the installation and Region level emphasized the importance of the pro gram piece, and shored up its key components at each installation. Fiscal Year 2010 was the rst year that all Region Southeast installations were recognized for their eorts with a SECNAV energy award level of blue or higher. is trend has continued and improves today. Energy 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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ing for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 573-9492 for more infor mation. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR I realize as much as anyone does how impor tant it is to come out and speak with some of the true heroes of the Sub marine Force and I am truly honored to be in the presence of such a proud group of submariners this morning, said Saunders, addressing the crowd of modest submariners who listened intently to each word spoken by the Atlantic submarine eets top enlisted advisor. Vice Adm. John Richard son, who was commander, Submarine Forces until he turned over his duties to Vice Adm. Mike Connor, Sept. 7, echoed Saunders sentiment about the vets in a statement earlier this year. Submarine veterans from the World War II era and beyond say they have high hopes for the future of the force. I look forward to as sociating with the young people who are carrying the torch for the sub force, said Alan Shane Foraker who started his Navy ca reer as a machinists mate in 1960 and retired as a commander. e young people who are continuing in todays Navy are fully capable of doing great things with these in credible machines and I am cautiously optimistic about the Navy opening up the force to women. Weve got a complete change of sea [coming], but we are able. e world has changed and our mis sion has taken on a new character, but that mission remains the same. Retired Vice Adm. Al bert Al Konetzni, a re nowned submariner and former deputy of what is now commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, echoed the same senti ments during his national convention speech. I know that being a submariner means much to every individual here who has served this nation, Konetzni said. I feel the same way and can truthfully say that earning my coveted dolphins was one of the most impor tant moments in my pro fessional career. Lately, Ive given considerable thought to what makes us such a strong fraternity, and perhaps more impor tantly, why do our subma rines, manned by young Americans averaging 22 years old, perform so well under the most arduous of conditions for very long periods of time during deployments. What caught my interest was a research hy pothesis characterized by personnel authenticity and community connec tion dening great lead ership. e submarine environment, in the past and today, is made of of cers, chiefs, and Sailors who are forced to be au thentic because there is no personal or psycholog ical privacy on a subma rine. Submarines make a person authentic or they fail and leave. Regarding community connection; all of us are taught on day number one that sub marining is a team sport. We all understand early on that the newest crew member is as important as the skipper or chief of the boat when it comes to op erating the boat or sewer pipe safely in times of war or peace; at great depths; far from home, for months on end. is connection or community spirit has always driven our crews to be close knit teams. COMSUBLANTs cur rent Inspector General Pat Urello, who is also a vet eran limited duty ocer of the submarine force, agrees that todays sub mariners, and those of the future, are more than t to carry the torch. Todays submariners are doing an outstanding job. ey are intelligent, they are bright and tech nologically savvy and they are honoring our service with their service. I think it is outstanding that the Navy will integrate women into the submarine force, said Urello who spent 30 years in the submarine force. As force master chief mentioned during todays breakfast, these women [that the Navy are integrating into the sub marine force] are the best of the best and have al ready proven that they are where they belong and I am sure that we will inte grate women into all of our subs in the near future. Sub Vets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7

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The BCS National Championship Game has been won by a Southeastern Conference team for the last six seasons. Kinda makes you think an SEC team has a good shot to win again, right? Im buying in. Southern Cal started the season No. 1 in the polls, but after Alabama hammered Michigan, the Crimson Tide jumped past USC into the top spot. Ill take those two in the title game. For a winner, I dont think Lane Kiffin can out-coach Nick Sabin, so make it my pick Bama. Pfc. Kyle Phillips Security Force Battalion Morris, Ala. Alabama and USC. Alabama, theyve got a good team, a good coach and are really good on defense. ET3 Bethany Winter NSB Kings Bay Ida, Mich. Michigan and Ohio State. Michigan. Ohio State sucks. CS2 Kenneth James Pirates Cove Galley New Orleans LSU and Alabama. But this time, LSU wins. They have to make up for last time. MASN Boston Black Security Force Battalion Elberton, Ga. Georgia and South Carolina. Georgia, because they have Aaron Murray. ET3 Jon Guebert USS Georgia Blue St. Louis LSU and Mizzou. Mizzou, they have an offense that can put it on the board. YN1 Terrell Jones Submarine Group 10 Sumpter, S.C. USC and LSU. LSU, because theyve always had a good team, but theyve got a better quarterback. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Caught being safe Timothy Roberts, inset and left, of Kings Bay Support Services, uses a tractor-trailer truck for loading and unloading man-lifts, forklifts, dock mules, bomb carts, bobcats and other heavy equipment. He serves customers throughout Kings Bay, moving equipment from site to site as needed and turning in equipment in need of preventative maintenance, all while putting safety first. Roberts always is outfitted with the proper safety equipment and moves each piece of equipment with preci sion, to ensure he is doing his job in the safest way possible. NSB Kings Bay Safety is commending him for his efforts. Courtesy photos 8th Army on guard in KoreaMaintaining a high state of military readiness is imperative to deterring North Korean threats in the region, the 8th U.S. Armys deputy commander said recently in Seoul, South Korea. North Korea continues to threaten the peninsula and the region with its provocative ac tions and rhetoric as well as its pursuit of weapons of mass de struction, Army Maj. Gen. Walter M. Golden Jr. said during his wel coming ceremony on Yongsan THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chow der Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sand wiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus e Naval Academy ranked as the No. 1 pub lic liberal arts school in the country in U.S. News & World Reports college rankings released Sept. 12. e Naval Academy re mained No. 14 in the na tion for Best Liberal Arts Colleges and No. 1 in the nation among high school guidance counselors. e Naval Academy also moved up to the No. 4 spot for overall Best Undergraduate Engineer ing Programs, and in engineering specialties, the academy ranked No. 3 in both mechanical engi neering and aerospace, aeronautical, and astro nautical engineering. In the News rankings, the Naval Academy is considered a liberal arts col lege because it is solely an undergraduate institu tion. e announcement fol lows the Naval Academys earlier selections this year as the No. 3 best value and No. 5 best public college by Forbes Magazine. Im proud that the Naval Academy continues to be recognized as one of the top institutions in the country, said Naval Academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael M. Miller. With a world-class education, superb facilities, and the opportunity to serve their country upon graduation, the Naval Academy is an excellent choice for the brightest young men and women in the nation. According to U.S. News, the student-faculty ratio at the Naval Academy is 9:1, and 60.7 percent of the schools classes have fewer than 20 students. Seventeen of its 23 majors are in science, tech nology, engineering and math elds. e average freshman retention rate, an indicator of student satisfaction, is 96.8 per cent. e academy has also produced 10 Rhodes Scholars in the past eight years. e Naval Academys four-year graduation rate is 88.1 percent, according to the Chronicle for Higher Education. Naval Academy ranked No. 1 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Parenting classes Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513. workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 26. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation call 573-4513. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retire ment and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrich ment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activi ties are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and commu nicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they inter act with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited.Garrison. e 8th U.S. Army has partnered with South Korea to deter threats from Pyongyang for more than 60 years, the two-star general said. As the U.S. military shifts its focus to the Pacic, this mission remains as important as ever, said Golden, who hails from Salida, Colo. Deterring ag gression requires a very high state of readiness and that is why it is im perative that we train together with our ROK allies as often as pos sible to maintain that level of readiness. Golden reported to 8th Army following his assignment as the deputy commander for police with the NATO training mission in Af ghanistan. Senior ocials at tended Goldens welcoming ceremony, including the ROK Minister of Patriots and Veterans Aairs Park Sung-choon, Dongducheon Mayor Oh Se-chang and Army Gen. James D. ur man, commander of United Nations Com mand, Combined Forc es Command and U.S. Forces Korea. e Dongducheon mayor had named Golden an honorary citizen of his city, which is adjacent to Camp Casey, during Goldens previous tour of duty when he was the as sistant commander for maneuver with the 2nd Infantry Division. Golden will play a crucial role on the 8th Army command team as we continue to de fend liberty here with our ROK allies, said Lt. Gen. John D. Johnson, 8th Armys commanding general. An Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter pilot and Harvard graduate, Golden said he jumped at the oppor tunity to serve in South Korea again. Korea 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Army Sta Sgt. Mark Pheabus puts on his uni form every month to train with the Maryland Nation al Guards 29th Military Police Company in West minster, Md. Last weekend, however, he was be wearing a very dierent uniform, portray ing a Confederate soldier at re-enactments marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. Days after Americans observed the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 at tacks on the United States, Pheabus was among thousands gathering in Sharpsburg, Md., to commemorate the bloodiest single day in U.S. history. e rst major Civil War battle to take place on Northern soil, the Battle of Antietam pitted Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia against George B. McClellans Army of the Potomac at Antietam Creek. e 12-hour battle on Sept. 17, 1862, claimed a mind-boggling 23,000 casualties among Union and Confederate forces. ats more troops killed, wounded and missing than during the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Mexican War combined. e 150th commemora tion at Antietam National Battleeld included reenactments and a wide variety of forums, tours and lectures to help edu cate the public about the battle. It also included a can dle-lit remembrance cer emony. e names of all 2,108 Union and 1,546 Confederate soldiers that were killed or mortally wounded in the battle were read aloud, followed by an artillery salute. For Pheabus and his fel low re-enactors, participating in the battles 150th anniversary is a very big deal, he said. is is a once-in-a-life time thing for us, Pheabus said. A history bu since childhood who grew up fascinated by the Civil War, Pheabus participated in his rst re-enactment in the mid-1970s. After a hiatus due to conicts with his military drill week ends, he returned to the hobby several years ago. Pheabus has portrayed both Union and Confed erate soldiers, as well as civilians on the battleeld. I have all the uniforms, equipment and camping gear, he said. Last weekend he was a member of Lees army, which some historians say technically won the battle. However, McClellan had halted Lees invasion of the North. And though Lees troops had held their ground at the end of the bloody day, the Confederates were so depleted that they had to limp back to Virginia, making it a less-thanoverwhelming victory. e outcome could have been markedly dier ent, Pheabus recognizes. Many of Lees forces were under-equipped, the re sult of an uneven distribu tion system that left some Confederate states with packed warehouses and others with nothing. In addition, Lee lost about one-third of his army at the Potomac River crossing. Many of the Con federates were focused only on defending their homes and saw no reason to press into Maryland and points further north. McClellan had a big advantage going into the battle. One of his soldiers, a corporal from the 27th Indiana troop, had found Lees battle plan in a eld, wrapped around three ci gars. McClellans army also outnumbered the Confederates almost two-to-one, but the Union general kept many of his soldiers in re serve rather than commit ting them to the battle. Lees army could have been destroyed right there if McClellan hadnt been so timid, Pheabus said. Historians are mixed on that point. In a recent presentation for the Defense Depart ments historical speakers series, retired history professor Tom Clemens said McClellan, considered by many historians to be an ineectual commander, was in fact hamstrung by political and military jeal ousies that ultimately led to his removal from com mand. Although the 150th an niversary commemoration will focus on the bat tle and its impact on the Civil Wars outcome, Phe abus said hes looking for ward to bringing alive the stories of the soldiers who fought it. In many cases, he said theyre just like to days men and women in uniform. ey have so much in common, he said. ey were all away from home, missing their families. Its everything that our sol diers experience now. Although the Battle of Antietam is remembered for its human toll, histori ans note that it proved to be transformational for the United States and the U.S. military. A week after the battle, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation that freed slaves held in Confederate territory, but ironically, not those in Maryland. at order took eect Jan. 1, 1863. Lesser recognized by many are the new doors the Battle of Antietam helped open for the armed forces. It laid the founda tion for todays military medical system and its logistics network and led to the founding of the Ameri can Red Cross, the Chris tian Commission and oth er nonprot organizations supporting the military. e tactics of the battle continue to be studied today and analyses of them will not only ll volumes, but libraries. Historians attribute the heavy human toll at Antietam to Napoleonic doctrine and tactics, with concentrated forces, rankand-le battle forma tions and close-quarters combat, along with artil lery, improved ries and Minie ball ammunition that caused massive inter nal damage. e magnitude of the carnage proved to be a test bed for the newly organized Union Ambulance Corps that evacuated ca sualties from the battle eld. Troops too wounded to be moved were treated for the rst time in new, semipermanent eld hospitals. And despite their dier ences, Union and Confed erate soldiers were treated side by side, receiving the same level of care from the Union Medical Depart ment. Humanity teaches us that a wounded and prostrate foe is not then our enemy, remarked Dr. (Maj.) Jonathan Letter man, medical director for McClellans army. Letterman was a visionary in other ways as well, and is remembered today as the Father of Modern Battleeld Medicine. He took lessons from Antietam and other Civil War engagements to de velop a medical evacu ation system that trans ported casualties to a eld dressing station, then a eld hospital, then to a large eld hospital away from the battleeld. And frustrated by delays in getting medical supplies where and when they were needed, Letterman came up with an ecient distribution system that ensured regiments had ready access to basic medical supplies and a reliable source of replacements. Meanwhile, another Civil War luminary, Clara Barton, provides surgeons with critical medical sup plies, fed and comforted the wounded, and even helped surgeons during operations. Remembered as the Angel of the Battleeld, Barton took her experi ences at Antietam and elsewhere during the Civil War to found the American Association of the Red Cross in 1881. She also established what became the Miss ing Soldiers Oce, which helped to locate more than 22,000 missing sol diers after the war. Another nongovernmental organization, the U.S. Christian Commis sion, gained a strong fol lowing after the battle. Created by leaders of the Young Mens Christian As sociation and Protestant ministers, it rallied to provide medical, recreational and religious support for Union troops. Antietam also introduced the horror of war to many Americans through the combat photography of Matthew Brady, Alexander Gardner and his assis tant, James Gibson. If he has not brought bodies and laid them in our dooryards and along streets, he has done some thing very like it, e New York Times wrote of Bradys e Dead of Antietam exhibit. Guard helps re-enact Americas bloodiest day Union Army Gen. George McClellan is a vic tim of history, a leading Civil War scholar told a Pentagon audience Sept. 4 on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Mary land campaign of 1862. In a presentation for the Defense Departments his torical speakers series, re tired history professor Tom Clemens said McClellan, considered by many his torians to be an ineectual commander, was in fact hamstrung by political and military jealousies that ul timately led to his removal from command. In describing the events leading up to the battle of Antietam, Clemens outlined eorts by the military and political es tablishment to prevent McClellan from being perceived as a hero of the Civil War. His orders were often confusing and contradic tory, Clemens said. For example, on Aug. 3, 1862, at the same time he was ordering McClellan to retreat back to Washing ton, Gen. Henry Halleck wrote McClellan to tell him he soon would be put in command of the Army of Virginia. Instead, President Abraham Lincoln and Halleck give McClel lan command only of the troops within the perimeter of the nations capital. On Sept. 3, 1862, Mc Clellan was ordered to form a eld army, but the order didnt say who would command it, Clem ens said. Hes got two missions hes got to defend the capital, but he also has to create this eld army, Cle mens said. Its clear the Confederates are crossing the river [into Maryland], and he begins to push troops out towards Rock ville as an advance guard to essentially see where the Confederates are going. In response to this, Cle mens said, Halleck reminded McClellan that he was not in command of any troops outside of Washington. McClellan also was crit icized by many, including Halleck, for moving his troops too slowly, averag ing six miles a day in the Maryland campaign, Cle mens said. Halleck, Mc Clellans replacement as Union general in chief, was even slower. Hallecks major claim to fame at this point in the war is that after Shiloh he had led the advance on Corinth, Clemens said, noting that Corinth was 20 miles away, and it took Hal leck 30 days to march there. In addition, McClellan, a Democrat, was seen as a threat to the Republican presidency, Clemens said. Youve got radical Re publicans in the capital, and to them, McClellan is the symbol of everything they dont agree with, Clemens said. What are [the Repub licans] afraid of? Losing power, he added. What happens to McClellans successor? What hap pens to victorious gener als? George Washington, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, they become presidents. And these radical Republicans got into oce on a very narrow margin. So, do you really want to take a popu lar Democratic general and give him the opportu nity to end the war? You cannot separate politics and military operations, Clemens said. On Sept. 5, 1862, Lincoln and Halleck issued verbal orders for McClellan to take command of the eld army and accomplish two things, Clemens said. No. 1: protect the capital and Baltimore, he said. By this point on the 5th, they know that Lees ad vance guard is at Fredrick there are direct roads from Frederick to both Baltimore and Washing ton and so, protect the capital. e second mis sion is to drive the Con federates out of Maryland. Unlike the order on the 2nd of September, Clemens said, this order is never put in writing. Ever. And at dierent times in dierent places, Halleck will say he had no idea Lincoln was going to put McClellan in command of the eld army. And Lincoln will say, I didnt know Halleck was going to do it. What does this tell you? Youve got plausible deniability, Clemens said, from the commander of all the armies and the president [is] saying, I didnt tell him to do that. How bold would you be? Clemens said that in many ways, McClellans army would be an army in name only. It was cobbled together with divisions from several corps and largely composed of soldiers with no experience in battle. When you look at whats in the capital, Cle mens said, sure, theres 140,000 men to select from, but youre literally assembling an army on the y, and a signicant portion of that army 30,000 men have been in the army two months or less, some of them as little as three weeks. And theyre going to get stuck into commands and sent out to ght in Maryland when they have never red a weapon or performed any drill whatsoever. But this is a crisis, Clemens continued. e nations capital is threat ened, this has to be done. So McClellan departed Washington on Sept. 7, 1862, with about 74,000 men, Clemens said, and by the time he reached Antietam, hed gained an other 13,000. Brigades [and] regi ments are drifting in on a regular basis as he marches westward. e 12th Corps, for example, on the morning of the battle of Antietam will [consist of] 7,500 men, [and] of those 7,500 men, 4,500 are brand-new troops. e majority of the corps has been in the army less than two weeks. Lt. Col. Ezra Carman commanded the 13th New Jersey Infantry, one of the new regiments, in that battle. He talks about com ing down the Smoketown Road to the East Woods and seeing a fence along the tree line, Clemens said. [He] uses that as a straight line to show his command how to deploy from column of march into line of battle. During an interview with American Forces Press Service after his pre sentation, Clemens said that after Antietam, Lin coln pushed McClellan to pursue the Confederate army into Virginia. McClellan disagreed, wanting to rest and resup ply his troops, but Lincoln eventually ordered the ad vance. When McClellan didnt advance as quickly as expected, he was relieved of duty. He spent the remainder of the war in New Jersey awaiting orders. When we impart his tory for the masses, we tend to generalize, Cle mens said. We tend to create heroes and villains and things become more black and white, good and bad, right and wrong. We know that two of the great icons of American history are Abraham Lincoln, the martyred president, and Robert E. Lee, the noble soldier. So when George Mc Clellan argues with one and defeats the other, it doesnt t into the mold. We have to somehow reduce Mc Clellan and minimalize his achievements so that the icons remain icons. Revisionist portrays McClellan as Civil War fall guy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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Dempsey: U.S. must remain active with Muslim worlde recent anti-American demonstrations that have occurred in many Muslim countries demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said Sept. 16 during an aircraft ight from Sibiu, Romania, to Ankara, Turkey. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said the situation is the most complex he has seen since becoming chairman. In Libya, a coordinated attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi resulted in the deaths of four Americans including the U.S. ambassador to the country. ere have been anti-American demonstrations in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia, Pakistan and many others. While the spark that ignited the demonstrations was a crude video that denigrated Islam, there are several factors that have contributed to rage against the United States, the chairman said. e chairman wants to learn from the situation. At some level, I think what we are seeing are societies that have been suppressed, he said. ey have not had anything like freedom of speech or even the ability to congregate. Security forces in these countries are for the rst time under civilian rule, and are less likely to intervene unless directed by political leaders, the chairman said. And, he said, there are often power struggles within the countries. Some of those groups are truly anti-American and radical and violent, Dempsey said. Certainly you have these groups that are anti-American, who are extreme, who are competing for power in the country. ese extremist groups often did not accumulate the number of votes theyd thought they would get in free elections, Dempsey said. Such groups that experienced failure at the ballot box, he added, could now try to gain some traction around the idea of being anti-American in order to gain inuence for themselves. ese groups are trying to manipulate the population. Now is not the time for the Unit ed States to withdraw from these countries, the chairman said. It demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, he said, so that we can counter that message of extremism that is being propagated by these violent, extreme organizations. Up Periscope Our picks for the National Champ of college football Page 9 Sub Vets Annual convention held in Norfolk Page 5 Pinned Chiefs get their anchors at NSB Kings Bay Page 4Staying engaged in a dangerous world It demands for us to be more engaged, not less engaged, so that we can counter that message of extremism Gen. Martin Dempsey Joint Chiefs Chairman Commands throughout the Navy recognized their Ombudsmen and the 42 years of service supporting the Navy and Navy families, Sept. 14. On that day, the Navy recognized the thousands of individuals who volunteer their time, talents and energy to making a dierence in the lives of Navy families. ese volunteers help them during all phases of deployment, disasters or crisis. ey also are there to assist with the everyday questions and challenges facing Navy families. I am Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick D. West and his wife, Bobbi, Ombudsman-at-Large, released the following Ombudsman Appreciation Day message to the Fleet Sept. 13. Navy Ombudsmen, Bobbi and I would like to take the time to say thank you for all your hard work, dedication and steadfast support that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. Without you, we would not have that vital communication link between our commands and families. For the past 42 years, Ombudsmen have been an invaluable resource for our families when it mattered most, whether providing support and guidance to a new spouse enduring a rst deployment or to a family facing a crisis the job that you do is immeasurable. Your time as an Ombudsman is honored and valued. e outstanding eort that you put forth in this important role leaves a lasting, positive impact on Sailors and families across the Fleet every day, and we cant thank you enough. Bobbi and I have enjoyed working with you these last several years and though we are moving on, we know that you will continue to carry the torch for our Navy families. As we all know, family readiness is tied to mission readiness and having a strong family support structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to accomplish its missions. ank you, Ombudsmen, for 42 years of tremendous service and for your continued support and seless dedication. Bravo Zulu and HOOYAH! Very Respectfully, MCPON and Bobbi WestMCPON, wife say thanksOmbudsmen saluted for 42 years of serviceCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Energy award for NSBNavy secretary recognizes Kings Bay for eciencySeveral installations across the Navy Southeast Region have recently been named winners of the Secretary of the Navy Energy and Water Management Awards in recognition of their energy and water conservation programs. Naval Support Activity Panama City was awarded a top honor by being named a Platinum level award winner. Gold level winners were Naval Air Station Pensacola, NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, NS Guantanamo Bay, NAS Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, NSA Orlando, NAS As a Boys & Girls Club of America affiliate, the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Youth Center participated in a nationwide celebration of children by hosting a Day for Kids Saturday, Sept. 15.Parents and their children were able to enjoy outdoor games, face-painting, and artistic exhibitions from local studios such as NSX Dance Academy, Lisa Allen Dance Studios, I Live! Center for the Performing Arts, Camden Gymnastics and more. Created as a day to foster relationships between adults and children, a Day for Kids was established to celebrate and honor American children through the gift of meaningful time. Research has shown that when adults spend meaningful time with kids, it helps them develop a positive self-image and a sense of belonging, usefulness and purpose. Now, more than ever, Boys & Girls Clubs of Americas Day for Kids provides adults and children an opportunity to take a break from their busy lives and celebrate the wonder of life and the fulllment of spending time together. Boys & Girls Clubs of America, along with the support of other leading youth-serving organizations, is working to establish a Saturday in September as the Boys & Girls Clubs Day for Kids. BGCA hopes to make Day for Kids a permanent part of our national culture. Perhaps one day the month of September will not only usher in the fall and back-to-school season, but also Day for Kids, the day our nation devotes itself to the hearts and minds of its children. For more information about other quality programs available for school age children contact the NSB Kings Bay Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Kings Bay celebrates BGCA Day for Kids

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Another rst for the Kings Bay chapter of the Military Ocers Association of America was made possible by the eorts of its members. e chapter was awarded the coveted Level of Excellence by the National Headquarters of the Military Ocers Association of America. is is the second consecutive year Kings Bay has received the award. Only two other Georgia MOAA chapters Atlanta and Savannah and less than 10 percent of 416 MOAA chapters nationally and internationally have this distinction. e LOE award is determined by meeting or exceeding criteria established by the National Headquarters of MOAA. Same of the quantitative criteria include informative monthly programs, newsletters and active liaison with a local military installation. Qualitative criteria include a pro active legislative aairs program in support of local, state and national objectives of MOAA, an active member recruiting and retentian program, personal aairs program to acquaint members and others with nancial and insurance services from MOAA National, scholarship assistance to JROTC and activity as a member of the Military Aairs Committee of the local Chamber supporting area military personnel. Oct. 29 to 30, Kings Bay chapter President Major Neal Moore, USA (Ret.) and his, wife Linda, will attend MOAAs National Convention in Washington, D.C. In a formal awards ceremony, Moore will be presented the chapter award and banner by Adm. Steve Abbot, USN (Ret.), chair of MOAAs board of directors. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.Navy-Marine Corps Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will begin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more information, call (904) 225-9355. Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, re serve and retired military, Department of De fense and Non-appropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities compa rable to other quality hotels and fabulous des tinations worldwide. Its easy to make reserva tions. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the cen tral reservations line at (877) 628-9233.e rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Each year the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation presents awards honoring the outstanding, creative work of individuals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians alike may submit their own entries or the distin guished work of others for award consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submis sions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards as well as the submission requirements, please visit: http://www.marine heritage.org/Awards.asp.Veterans Day, Nov. 11, the St. Augustine Mar ketplace will have Craig Morgan, Gloriana, e Charlie Daniels Band and .38 Special in concert to benet the Wounded Warriors Project. e Marketplace will open at 10 a.m., the Festival arena at noon. Tickets are available at the Festi vals Web site at oldcitymusicfest.com. Reduced purchase rates are available through Sept. 29. Military discount tickets are available. For more information contact Natalie Dunlap at ndun lap@mediamixjax.com or (904) 294-6962.Golf Hall has Vets Day specialse World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum near St. Augustine, Fla., will celebrate Veterans Day with a special promotion. From Nov. 9 to 11, veterans and their dependents will receive free admission to the World Golf Hall of Fame. And from Nov. 9 to 30, all active-duty military mem bers and their dependents will also receive free admission. All guests to the Hall of Fame from Nov. 9 to 11 will be able to enjoy a special scav enger hunt highlighting golfs relationship with the military in the museum. For more informa tion, go to the Events Calendar at www.World GolfHallofFame.org. Now hear this! Military Ocers Kings Bay MOAA chapter earns award e Navy Exchange Service Command announced, Sept. 10, that NEX customers who make a purchase for $25 or less using a credit card will no longer need to sign a sales receipt. is option is available to customers who make a purchase using a Visa, MasterCard, Discover or Military Star Card. For those customers using an American Express card to pay for purchases, a signature will still be required. is change [makes] it easier and more ecient for customers to complete their NEX purchase, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command senior vice president, Store Operations. We know our customers, often times, run into their NEX to make a small purchase such as a cold beverage, snack or other convenience item, especially in our mini marts. is new procedure will make shopping at your NEX even more convenient. Customers will still receive a printed receipt for all purchases.Signature not needed for small buys To assist Sailors, families and the Navy community with getting ahead of stress and fostering readiness before a crisis occurs, Navy Suicide Prevention and Operational Stress Control Programs, Navy Behavioral Health, have introduced Stress Navigation Plans. Sometimes nding a way to destress can be stressful itself if we dont know what to do or where to go. Readiness doesnt begin at the time of a crisis. Readiness starts by having the tools to help us respond to unforeseen circumstances swiftly and with clarity-and knowing where those tools are, according to Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Navy Behavioral Health Program. We cant always plan for lifes challenges, Scott said. But we can be ready for the stress from these challenges by identifying our resources and practices for navigating these challenges while were still healthy. By personalizing a stress navigation plan, youll know where your life jackets are in case of an emergency. It only took me fteen minutes, and Ive got my stress plan here in my oce for quick access. Stress is a part of everyday life, especially in the Navy, according to Scott. Having a plan ahead of time will help stop stress issues from becoming stress problems. Stress navigation plans are simple templates that can be personalized with practices for navigating stress while were still emotionally healthy, which be a life-saving drill if a crisis arises. e template is available on Navy Personnel Command Web site and includes elds to personalize with names, contact numbers and personal practices for dealing with a variety of challenges in life, from work stress to relationship issues. Taking a moment to personalize a Stress Navigation Plan now may have a signicant impact later by helping to prevent future obstacles from compounding and leading to negative stress reactions. According to instructions on the Suicide Prevention Web site, Stress Navigation Plans do not have to be shared or revealed to anyone, but should be in a readily accessible place for personal use in times of crisis. Anyone can use a Stress Navigation Plan. Encourage your shipmates, peers, family and community members to personalize theirs and take the stress out of navigating stress. Naval Personnel Stress Navigation Plans prove helpful Navy Exchange proud to be associated with the extraordinary people volunteering as ombudsmen and prouder still of their service at this critical time in our nations history, said Monika French, Chief of Naval Operations ombudsmanat-large. We owe it to all our Navy families to continue supporting the Ombudsman Program. e Ombudsman Program was introduced to the Navy on Sept. 14, 1970, by then-CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, in Z-gram 24, as a means to address issues and concerns that are unique to Sailors and their Navy families. While the date is signicant to the history of the program, commands are encouraged to celebrate the event at any time deemed appropriate during the month of September. Most ombudsmen are the spouses of active duty or selected reserve members of the command. e Navy family ombudsman is a highlytrained volunteer who is able to oer support and guidance to command families and to act as an ocial liaison between the command and its families. e Navy Ombudsman plays an important role in the success of a commands mission. Ombudsmen are the rst step for family members to turn to during a crisis, guiding Navy families to the proper resources they need. at, in turn, helps their Sailors with assurance that their families are being taken care of at home. When command members know that their family has a resource to go to for assistance, they can concentrate on the mission at hand, French said. It is the Navys goal to ensure that every Sailor and family member has access to the services of a command ombudsman. Family readiness is a primary factor to a Sailors personal and mission readiness. Ombudsmen continuously demonstrate just how vital they are to helping our Navy families maintain a state of constant readiness. Whether it is for deployments, disasters or crisis response, they keep the information moving. According to Lisa Johnson, Commander, Navy Installations Command Ombudsman program manager, the Ombudsman Program is in place to assist the Navy family member and give them an avenue to receive the support they may need in tough times. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the family member to the people who can help them solve their problems, Johnson said. Ombudsmen are not meant to be the help, but to connect the family member to the help. Connecting Navy families to help is what the Ombudsmen have been doing for 42 years. ey volunteer their personal time to ensure the Navy is ready 100 percent of the time. It is a pleasure to serve along-side a group of dedicated, caring volunteers, French said. I want to thank the past, present and future Navy Ombudsmen and wish them a very happy anniversary. I look forward to working with you all.Service

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e attack in Benghazi, Libya, that resulted in the deaths of four Americans should shock the con science of people of all faiths around the world, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in Washington, D.C., Sept. 12. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens and Sean Smith, a Foreign Service information ocer and Air Force veteran, were killed in the attack. e State Department was withholding the identities of the other Americans, pending next-of-kin notication. All over the world every day, Americas diplomats and development experts risk their lives in the service of our country and our values because they believe that the United States must be a force for peace and progress in the world, Clinton said. Along side our men and women in uniform, they rep resent the best traditions of a bold and generous nation. Stevens risked his life to stop former Libyan dictator Moammar Gadha and then gave his life trying to help in building a better Libya, Clinton said. e world needs more Chris Stevenses, she added. Although this happened in a country the United States helped to liberate and in a city it helped to save from destruction, Clinton said Americans must remain clear-eyed, even in our grief. is was an attack by a small and savage group, not the people or government of Libya, she added. Libyans stood and fought to protect Americans during the attack, and Libyans carried Stevens body to the hospital, Clinton noted. e United States will not waver in its mission in Libya, the secretary pledged. e mission that drew Chris and Sean and their colleagues to Libya is both noble and necessary, she said. A free and stable Libya is still in Americas interest and security, and we will not turn our back on that. Clinton said the United States is working closely with Libyan authorities to bring those responsible for the attacks to justice. Some have sought to justify this vicious behav ior, along with the protests that took place at our embassy in Cairo yesterday, as a response to inammatory material posted on the In ternet, Clinton said, refer ring to a video that is pur ported to blaspheme Islam. Let me be clear, there is no justication for this, she said. Violence like this is no way to honor religion or faith. And as long as there are those who would take innocent life in the name of God, the world will never know a true and lasting peace. Clinton noted that the attack took place as Americans observed the anniver sary of the 2001 terrorist at tacks on the United States. Its an anniversary that means a great deal to all Americans, she said. Every year on that day, we are reminded that our work is not yet nished that the job of putting an end to violent extremism and building a safe and stable world continues. Marines deployed to Libya Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has authorized deployment of a Marine Corps eet antiterrorism security team to Libya to protect U.S. citizens there and to secure the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Sept. 13 in Washington D.C. During a Pentagon news conference, Little said Panetta strongly condemns the recent attacks on U.S. diplomatic facilities in the Middle East. Little said the Defense Department supported the evacuation of American personnel and casualties out of Libya and is supporting the repatriation of the remains of the four State Department personnel, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, who were killed in the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey have worked with combatant commanders throughout the region to conduct reviews of their force postures, he said. ey also are working to ensure that we have the exibility to respond to requests for assistance or orders as directed by the president, he added. Little said the focus of the Defense Department is now on supporting wholeof-government eorts to provide security to American personnel in Libya and elsewhere, working closely with the State Department, and then supporting any eorts that we may be called upon to assist in the eort to, as the president said, deliver justice. Clinton condemns attack that killed ambassador THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 NSB Kings Bay 2012 Chiefs pinning Photos by Kelly Wirfel and MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 5 On a warm, blue sunny September morning in the heart and soul of Navy country, hundreds of submariners from yesterday and today gathered for the 2012 United States Submarine Veterans Incorporated/Submarine Veterans of World War Two Convention. Past and present undersea warriors from around the world came together to honor the memories of their shipmates who gave their lives while serving their country, and to celebrate the more than ve decades of service that many of the organizations current members have to date. is years convention in the Mermaid City Norfolk, Va., honored several veterans whose date of qualifying on submarines reaches back before many of our nations earliest submarine battles. World War II veteran Lt. Cmdr. (Ret.) Walter Anderson recalled his days aboard Gato-Class Submarine USS Dace (SS 247), during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, which began in December 1941. e camaraderie on the submarines is great, he said. One of my fondest memories comes from the Battle of Leyte Gulf. I was involved in that. A sister ship, USS Darter (SS 227), went out at night and Darter got one of its heavy cruisers damaged and one sunk and the next night Darter ran aground. We picked up the whole crew and had a double crew until we got back to Darwin, Australia, eating peanut butter and some kind of soup. Anderson explained that although Darter was destroyed and space on board Dace was limited, the crews spirits were still high, reveling in the subs success against the enemy. e Web site Hazegray.org explains the incident Anderson reminisced about, citing that Darter and Dace made contact with the Japanese Center Force approaching Palawan Passage Oct. 23, 1944. Immediately, Darter ashed the contact report, one of the most important of the war, since the location of this Japanese task force had been unknown for some days. e two submarines closed the task force, and with attacks on the cruisers of Center Force, initiated the Battle of Surigao Strait phase of the decisive Battle for Leyte Gulf. Darter sank the heavy cruiser Atago and seriously damaged the cruiser Takao. With Dace, she tracked the damaged cruiser through the tortuous channels of Palawan Passage until just after midnight of Oct. 24 to 25 when Darter grounded on Bombay Shoal. As eorts to get the submarine o the shoal began, a Japanese destroyer closed, but then sailed on. With the tide receding, all Daces and Darters eorts to get her o failed. All condential papers and equipment were destroyed, and the entire crew taken o to Dace. Andersons adventurous and rewarding experience serving in the submarine community was not the only one retold during the week, but rather echoed as other seasoned submariners shared their memories from the depths. My last ocial act in the Navy in October 1971 was to take the Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle 1 Mystic down o San Clemente Island and certify her for test depth where we opened the hatch at 3,000 feet in a simulated sub hull, said Lt. Cmdr. Richard McPherson (Ret.) with a look of certainty on his face. We opened the hatch and pulled the Sailors out in a simulated hatch and simulated hull. McPherson explained that Mystic is one of two classes of DSRV in the eet. He also added that while working with the Navys DSRVs was an exciting and memorable time in his career, he always likes to talk with sub vets from World War II to learn about their experiences and how things have changed. My highlight of this years convention was meeting the World War II guys, he said. Im partial to them. My father was in the Navy from 1939 to 1966, so I grew up in a Navy family. I am looking forward to meeting all of the World War II vets, talking about them and what they have accomplished and doing what we can to support the Navy, especially submarines, in the future. One person with insight into the present and future of the submarine force is COMSUBLANT Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders. While visionary, Saunders expressed his honor and excitement to speak before the group of submariners at the Holland Club Induction Breakfast. Sub Vets in Norfolk Yesterday meets today at national convention ... if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them ... Rear Adm. John Richardson Outgoing Sub Forces commander Navy Submarine Force veterans gath er outside of USS Montpelier (SSN 765). Photo by MC1 Kim Williams

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At a Block Party Tuesday Kings Bay Style you can take a trip around the block from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2 outside the Fleet and Family Support Center Courtyard. Enjoy door prizes, free food, bouncy house, participate in free cholesterol screenings and blood pressure checks and visit dierent vendors including FFSC, COMPASS, Child and Youth Programs, the Fitness Center, Women Infants and Children, Kingsland Welcome Center, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation, St. Marys Submarine Museum, Navy Federal Credit Union, Navy Exchange, Navy College Oce and many others. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Sealed bids MWR Navy Lake Site Allatoona Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment in good/ fair work ing condition: one lot of vinyl boat seats, various colors and various sizes; one swim platform No. 1375; one swim platform No. 1262. All the equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville GA 30120 or Outdoor Adventure Center Kings Bay. Sealed bids must be mailed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation at 950 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid writ ten on the bottom of the enve lope. e sealed bid process will begin at 9 a.m. Sept. 21 and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 22. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Oct. 25. For more informa tion, contact the Navy lake site manager at (770) 974 6309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Sealed bids MWR Kings Bay Bowling Center has the following equipment all items are in good working condition: one Jayhawk Drill Press, Tri-Oval system No. N98-0763; one Lane Walker no. N92-0564; one Bowling mask ing unit single tier. All the above equipment can be seen at Kings Bay Bowling Center. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Bowling Center, 1216 USS Daniel Boone Ave., Building 1033, Kings Bay, GA 31547. Please make sure the envelope is marked with sealed bid written on the bottom of the envelope. Sealed bids can be dropped o at the Bowling Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. e sealed bids process will begin on 09/25/12 at 9 a.m., Sept. 25, and they must be received or postmarked by Oct. 25. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m., Oct. 29. For more infor mation, call the Bowling Center Manager at (912) 573-9492 If you are the successful Bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick-up your equipment. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blankets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is lookMorale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 22 and 23 is Win nie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. e movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Free weekend movies Just for kids Liberty call Block Party Oct. 2 at FFSC Kingsville and Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport. Blue level winners included NAS Corpus Christi, NAS JRB New Orleans, NAS Key West, NAS Whiting Field and NAS Meridian. e annual awards are presented to commands that have made notable progress toward the Department of the Navy goals to reduce energy and water consumption, increase use of renewable energy sources, and construct sustainable facilities. e DON Energy Program evaluates and classies the overall energy and water management performance of each installation. Being recognized as a leader in supporting SECNAVs goal of shrinking the Navys energy and water consumption footprint is a great honor and a testament to the base personnels commitment to being a green team, said Evelyn Baskin, the Installation Energy Manager for Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast at NSA Panama City. Baskin said their installa tion has become an energy champion through eorts such as mechanics prac ticing preventive maintenance to keep facilities tuned-up and building energy monitors staying vigilant in reporting energy leaks and displaying ener gy awareness materials in their buildings. She added that purchas ing Energy Star products and implementing energy reduction measures like installing programmable thermostats and high eciency HVAC systems have also helped the base meet its energy reduction goals. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus will present the Platinum award to NSA Panama City ocials during a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial & Naval Heritage Center Oct. 3. e remainder of Navy Region Southeast installations is working hard to achieve similar results as a culture of conservation has taken root and continues to grow. Doug Mercer, Director of Infrastructure Assessment for CNRSE, said that seeing every installation in the Southeast Region earn a SECNAV award for energy and water conservation shows that meeting energy reduction goals is a team eort. We have come a long way in spreading the culture of energy conservation, Mercer said. More people are realizing they can make an individual contribution to our energy independence, and that the funding we reduce in our utility bills goes directly to the training and equipment needed to maintain the U.S. Navy as the preeminent force in the world. ose contributions have added up in the past several years as accolades for CNRSE installations have increased, said Andrew Rubio, an energy projects engineer with the Energy Management Branch of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast. In 2007, less than 30 percent of Region Southeast installations received any level of recognition. Since then, concerted eorts across the Region Southeast at the installation and Region level emphasized the importance of the program piece, and shored up its key components at each installation. Fiscal Year 2010 was the rst year that all Region Southeast installations were recognized for their eorts with a SECNAV energy award level of blue or higher. is trend has continued and improves today. Energy 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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ing for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. The grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR I realize as much as anyone does how important it is to come out and speak with some of the true heroes of the Submarine Force and I am truly honored to be in the presence of such a proud group of submariners this morning, said Saunders, addressing the crowd of modest submariners who listened intently to each word spoken by the Atlantic submarine eets top enlisted advisor. Vice Adm. John Richardson, who was commander, Submarine Forces until he turned over his duties to Vice Adm. Mike Connor, Sept. 7, echoed Saunders sentiment about the vets in a statement earlier this year. Submarine veterans from the World War II era and beyond say they have high hopes for the future of the force. I look forward to associating with the young people who are carrying the torch for the sub force, said Alan Shane Foraker who started his Navy career as a machinists mate in 1960 and retired as a commander. e young people who are continuing in todays Navy are fully capable of doing great things with these incredible machines and I am cautiously optimistic about the Navy opening up the force to women. Weve got a complete change of sea [coming], but we are able. e world has changed and our mission has taken on a new character, but that mission remains the same. Retired Vice Adm. Albert Al Konetzni, a renowned submariner and former deputy of what is now commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, echoed the same sentiments during his national convention speech. I know that being a submariner means much to every individual here who has served this nation, Konetzni said. I feel the same way and can truthfully say that earning my coveted dolphins was one of the most important moments in my professional career. Lately, Ive given considerable thought to what makes us such a strong fraternity, and perhaps more importantly, why do our submarines, manned by young Americans averaging 22 years old, perform so well under the most arduous of conditions for very long periods of time during deployments. What caught my interest was a research hypothesis characterized by personnel authenticity and community connection dening great leadership. e submarine environment, in the past and today, is made of ofcers, chiefs, and Sailors who are forced to be authentic because there is no personal or psychological privacy on a submarine. Submarines make a person authentic or they fail and leave. Regarding community connection; all of us are taught on day number one that submarining is a team sport. We all understand early on that the newest crewmember is as important as the skipper or chief of the boat when it comes to operating the boat or sewer pipe safely in times of war or peace; at great depths; far from home, for months on end. is connection or community spirit has always driven our crews to be close knit teams. COMSUBLANTs current Inspector General Pat Urello, who is also a veteran limited duty ocer of the submarine force, agrees that todays submariners, and those of the future, are more than t to carry the torch. Todays submariners are doing an outstanding job. ey are intelligent, they are bright and technologically savvy and they are honoring our service with their service. I think it is outstanding that the Navy will integrate women into the submarine force, said Urello who spent 30 years in the submarine force. As force master chief mentioned during todays breakfast, these women [that the Navy are integrating into the submarine force] are the best of the best and have already proven that they are where they belong and I am sure that we will integrate women into all of our subs in the near future. Sub Vets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 7

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The BCS National Championship Game has been won by a Southeastern Conference team for the last six seasons. Kinda makes you think an SEC team has a good shot to win again, right? Im buying in. Southern Cal started the season No. 1 in the polls, but after Alabama hammered Michigan, the Crimson Tide jumped past USC into the top spot. Ill take those two in the title game. For a winner, I dont think Lane Kiffin can out-coach Nick Sabin, so make it my pick Bama. Pfc. Kyle Phillips Security Force Battalion Morris, Ala. Alabama and USC. Alabama, theyve got a good team, a good coach and are really good on defense. ET3 Bethany Winter NSB Kings Bay Ida, Mich. Michigan and Ohio State. Michigan. Ohio State sucks. CS2 Kenneth James Pirates Cove Galley New Orleans LSU and Alabama. But this time, LSU wins. They have to make up for last time. MASN Boston Black Security Force Battalion Elberton, Ga. Georgia and South Carolina. Georgia, because they have Aaron Murray. ET3 Jon Guebert USS Georgia Blue St. Louis LSU and Mizzou. Mizzou, they have an offense that can put it on the board. YN1 Terrell Jones Submarine Group 10 Sumpter, S.C. USC and LSU. LSU, because theyve always had a good team, but theyve got a better quarterback. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Caught being safe Timothy Roberts, inset and left, of Kings Bay Support Services, uses a tractor-trailer truck for loading and unloading man-lifts, forklifts, dock mules, bomb carts, bobcats and other heavy equipment. He serves customers throughout Kings Bay, moving equipment from site to site as needed and turning in equipment in need of preventative maintenance, all while putting safety first. Roberts always is outfitted with the proper safety equipment and moves each piece of equipment with preci sion, to ensure he is doing his job in the safest way possible. NSB Kings Bay Safety is commending him for his efforts. Courtesy photos 8th Army on guard in KoreaMaintaining a high state of military readiness is imperative to deterring North Korean threats in the region, the 8th U.S. Armys deputy commander said recently in Seoul, South Korea. North Korea continues to threaten the peninsula and the region with its provocative actions and rhetoric as well as its pursuit of weapons of mass destruction, Army Maj. Gen. Walter M. Golden Jr. said during his welcoming ceremony on Yongsan THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus e Naval Academy ranked as the No. 1 public liberal arts school in the country in U.S. News & World Reports college rankings released Sept. 12. e Naval Academy remained No. 14 in the nation for Best Liberal Arts Colleges and No. 1 in the nation among high school guidance counselors. e Naval Academy also moved up to the No. 4 spot for overall Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs, and in engineering specialties, the academy ranked No. 3 in both mechanical engineering and aerospace, aeronautical, and astronautical engineering. In the News rankings, the Naval Academy is considered a liberal arts college because it is solely an undergraduate institution. e announcement follows the Naval Academys earlier selections this year as the No. 3 best value and No. 5 best public college by Forbes Magazine. Im proud that the Naval Academy continues to be recognized as one of the top institutions in the country, said Naval Academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael M. Miller. With a world-class education, superb facilities, and the opportunity to serve their country upon graduation, the Naval Academy is an excellent choice for the brightest young men and women in the nation. According to U.S. News, the student-faculty ratio at the Naval Academy is 9:1, and 60.7 percent of the schools classes have fewer than 20 students. Seventeen of its 23 majors are in science, technology, engineering and math elds. e average freshman retention rate, an indicator of student satisfaction, is 96.8 percent. e academy has also produced 10 Rhodes Scholars in the past eight years. e Naval Academys four-year graduation rate is 88.1 percent, according to the Chronicle for Higher Education. Naval Academy ranked No. 1 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 11

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Parenting classes Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513. workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrich ment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited.Garrison. e 8th U.S. Army has partnered with South Korea to deter threats from Pyongyang for more than 60 years, the two-star general said. As the U.S. military shifts its focus to the Pacic, this mission remains as important as ever, said Golden, who hails from Salida, Colo. Deterring aggression requires a very high state of readiness and that is why it is imperative that we train together with our ROK allies as often as possible to maintain that level of readiness. Golden reported to 8th Army following his assignment as the deputy commander for police with the NATO training mission in Afghanistan. Senior ocials attended Goldens welcoming ceremony, including the ROK Minister of Patriots and Veterans Aairs Park Sung-choon, Dongducheon Mayor Oh Se-chang and Army Gen. James D. urman, commander of United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea. e Dongducheon mayor had named Golden an honorary citizen of his city, which is adjacent to Camp Casey, during Goldens previous tour of duty when he was the assistant commander for maneuver with the 2nd Infantry Division. Golden will play a crucial role on the 8th Army command team as we continue to defend liberty here with our ROK allies, said Lt. Gen. John D. Johnson, 8th Armys commanding general. An Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter pilot and Harvard graduate, Golden said he jumped at the opportunity to serve in South Korea again. Korea 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012

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Army Sta Sgt. Mark Pheabus puts on his uniform every month to train with the Maryland National Guards 29th Military Police Company in Westminster, Md. Last weekend, however, he was be wearing a very dierent uniform, portraying a Confederate soldier at re-enactments marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. Days after Americans observed the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the United States, Pheabus was among thousands gathering in Sharpsburg, Md., to commemorate the bloodiest single day in U.S. history. e rst major Civil War battle to take place on Northern soil, the Battle of Antietam pitted Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia against George B. McClellans Army of the Potomac at Antietam Creek. e 12-hour battle on Sept. 17, 1862, claimed a mind-boggling 23,000 casualties among Union and Confederate forces. ats more troops killed, wounded and missing than during the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Mexican War combined. e 150th commemoration at Antietam National Battleeld included reenactments and a wide variety of forums, tours and lectures to help educate the public about the battle. It also included a candle-lit remembrance ceremony. e names of all 2,108 Union and 1,546 Confederate soldiers that were killed or mortally wounded in the battle were read aloud, followed by an artillery salute. For Pheabus and his fellow re-enactors, participating in the battles 150th anniversary is a very big deal, he said. is is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for us, Pheabus said. A history bu since childhood who grew up fascinated by the Civil War, Pheabus participated in his rst re-enactment in the mid-1970s. After a hiatus due to conicts with his military drill weekends, he returned to the hobby several years ago. Pheabus has portrayed both Union and Confederate soldiers, as well as civilians on the battleeld. I have all the uniforms, equipment and camping gear, he said. Last weekend he was a member of Lees army, which some historians say technically won the battle. However, McClellan had halted Lees invasion of the North. And though Lees troops had held their ground at the end of the bloody day, the Confederates were so depleted that they had to limp back to Virginia, making it a less-thanoverwhelming victory. e outcome could have been markedly dierent, Pheabus recognizes. Many of Lees forces were under-equipped, the result of an uneven distribution system that left some Confederate states with packed warehouses and others with nothing. In addition, Lee lost about one-third of his army at the Potomac River crossing. Many of the Confederates were focused only on defending their homes and saw no reason to press into Maryland and points further north. McClellan had a big advantage going into the battle. One of his soldiers, a corporal from the 27th Indiana troop, had found Lees battle plan in a eld, wrapped around three cigars. McClellans army also outnumbered the Confederates almost two-to-one, but the Union general kept many of his soldiers in reserve rather than committing them to the battle. Lees army could have been destroyed right there if McClellan hadnt been so timid, Pheabus said. Historians are mixed on that point. In a recent presentation for the Defense Departments historical speakers series, retired history professor Tom Clemens said McClellan, considered by many historians to be an ineectual commander, was in fact hamstrung by political and military jealousies that ultimately led to his removal from command. Although the 150th anniversary commemoration will focus on the battle and its impact on the Civil Wars outcome, Pheabus said hes looking forward to bringing alive the stories of the soldiers who fought it. In many cases, he said theyre just like todays men and women in uniform. ey have so much in common, he said. ey were all away from home, missing their families. Its everything that our soldiers experience now. Although the Battle of Antietam is remembered for its human toll, historians note that it proved to be transformational for the United States and the U.S. military. A week after the battle, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation that freed slaves held in Confederate territory, but ironically, not those in Maryland. at order took eect Jan. 1, 1863. Lesser recognized by many are the new doors the Battle of Antietam helped open for the armed forces. It laid the foundation for todays military medical system and its logistics network and led to the founding of the American Red Cross, the Christian Commission and other nonprot organizations supporting the military. e tactics of the battle continue to be studied today and analyses of them will not only ll volumes, but libraries. Historians attribute the heavy human toll at Antietam to Napoleonic doctrine and tactics, with concentrated forces, rankand-le battle formations and close-quarters combat, along with artillery, improved ries and Minie ball ammunition that caused massive internal damage. e magnitude of the carnage proved to be a test bed for the newly organized Union Ambulance Corps that evacuated casualties from the battleeld. Troops too wounded to be moved were treated for the rst time in new, semipermanent eld hospitals. And despite their dierences, Union and Confederate soldiers were treated side by side, receiving the same level of care from the Union Medical Department. Humanity teaches us that a wounded and prostrate foe is not then our enemy, remarked Dr. (Maj.) Jonathan Letterman, medical director for McClellans army. Letterman was a visionary in other ways as well, and is remembered today as the Father of Modern Battleeld Medicine. He took lessons from Antietam and other Civil War engagements to develop a medical evacuation system that transported casualties to a eld dressing station, then a eld hospital, then to a large eld hospital away from the battleeld. And frustrated by delays in getting medical supplies where and when they were needed, Letterman came up with an ecient distribution system that ensured regiments had ready access to basic medical supplies and a reliable source of replacements. Meanwhile, another Civil War luminary, Clara Barton, provides surgeons with critical medical supplies, fed and comforted the wounded, and even helped surgeons during operations. Remembered as the Angel of the Battleeld, Barton took her experiences at Antietam and elsewhere during the Civil War to found the American Association of the Red Cross in 1881. She also established what became the Missing Soldiers Oce, which helped to locate more than 22,000 missing soldiers after the war. Another nongovernmental organization, the U.S. Christian Commission, gained a strong following after the battle. Created by leaders of the Young Mens Christian Association and Protestant ministers, it rallied to provide medical, recreational and religious support for Union troops. Antietam also introduced the horror of war to many Americans through the combat photography of Matthew Brady, Alexander Gardner and his assistant, James Gibson. If he has not brought bodies and laid them in our dooryards and along streets, he has done something very like it, e New York Times wrote of Bradys e Dead of Antietam exhibit. Guard helps re-enact Americas bloodiest day Union Army Gen. George McClellan is a victim of history, a leading Civil War scholar told a Pentagon audience Sept. 4 on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Maryland campaign of 1862. In a presentation for the Defense Departments his torical speakers series, re tired history professor Tom Clemens said McClellan, considered by many his torians to be an ineectual commander, was in fact hamstrung by political and military jealousies that ul timately led to his removal from command. In describing the events leading up to the battle of Antietam, Clemens outlined eorts by the military and political establishment to prevent McClellan from being perceived as a hero of the Civil War. His orders were often confusing and contradictory, Clemens said. For example, on Aug. 3, 1862, at the same time he was ordering McClellan to retreat back to Washington, Gen. Henry Halleck wrote McClellan to tell him he soon would be put in command of the Army of Virginia. Instead, President Abraham Lincoln and Halleck give McClellan command only of the troops within the perimeter of the nations capital. On Sept. 3, 1862, McClellan was ordered to form a eld army, but the order didnt say who would command it, Clemens said. Hes got two missions hes got to defend the capital, but he also has to create this eld army, Cle mens said. Its clear the Confederates are crossing the river [into Maryland], and he begins to push troops out towards Rock ville as an advance guard to essentially see where the Confederates are going. In response to this, Clemens said, Halleck reminded McClellan that he was not in command of any troops outside of Washington. McClellan also was criticized by many, including Halleck, for moving his troops too slowly, averaging six miles a day in the Maryland campaign, Clemens said. Halleck, McClellans replacement as Union general in chief, was even slower. Hallecks major claim to fame at this point in the war is that after Shiloh he had led the advance on Corinth, Clemens said, noting that Corinth was 20 miles away, and it took Hal leck 30 days to march there. In addition, McClellan, a Democrat, was seen as a threat to the Republican presidency, Clemens said. Youve got radical Republicans in the capital, and to them, McClellan is the symbol of everything they dont agree with, Clemens said. What are [the Republicans] afraid of? Losing power, he added. What happens to McClellans successor? What happens to victorious generals? George Washington, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, they become presidents. And these radical Republicans got into oce on a very narrow margin. So, do you really want to take a popular Democratic general and give him the opportunity to end the war? You cannot separate politics and military operations, Clemens said. On Sept. 5, 1862, Lincoln and Halleck issued verbal orders for McClellan to take command of the eld army and accomplish two things, Clemens said. No. 1: protect the capital and Baltimore, he said. By this point on the 5th, they know that Lees advance guard is at Fredrick there are direct roads from Frederick to both Baltimore and Washington and so, protect the capital. e second mission is to drive the Confederates out of Maryland. Unlike the order on the 2nd of September, Clemens said, this order is never put in writing. Ever. And at dierent times in dierent places, Halleck will say he had no idea Lincoln was going to put McClellan in command of the eld army. And Lincoln will say, I didnt know Halleck was going to do it. What does this tell you? Youve got plausible deniability, Clemens said, from the commander of all the armies and the president [is] saying, I didnt tell him to do that. How bold would you be? Clemens said that in many ways, McClellans army would be an army in name only. It was cobbled together with divisions from several corps and largely composed of soldiers with no experience in battle. When you look at whats in the capital, Clemens said, sure, theres 140,000 men to select from, but youre literally assembling an army on the y, and a signicant portion of that army 30,000 men have been in the army two months or less, some of them as little as three weeks. And theyre going to get stuck into commands and sent out to ght in Maryland when they have never red a weapon or performed any drill whatsoever. But this is a crisis, Clemens continued. e nations capital is threatened, this has to be done. So McClellan departed Washington on Sept. 7, 1862, with about 74,000 men, Clemens said, and by the time he reached Antietam, hed gained another 13,000. Brigades [and] regiments are drifting in on a regular basis as he marches westward. e 12th Corps, for example, on the morning of the battle of Antietam will [consist of] 7,500 men, [and] of those 7,500 men, 4,500 are brand-new troops. e majority of the corps has been in the army less than two weeks. Lt. Col. Ezra Carman commanded the 13th New Jersey Infantry, one of the new regiments, in that battle. He talks about coming down the Smoketown Road to the East Woods and seeing a fence along the tree line, Clemens said. [He] uses that as a straight line to show his command how to deploy from column of march into line of battle. During an interview with American Forces Press Service after his presentation, Clemens said that after Antietam, Lincoln pushed McClellan to pursue the Confederate army into Virginia. McClellan disagreed, wanting to rest and resup ply his troops, but Lincoln eventually ordered the ad vance. When McClellan didnt advance as quickly as expected, he was relieved of duty. He spent the remainder of the war in New Jersey awaiting orders. When we impart history for the masses, we tend to generalize, Clemens said. We tend to create heroes and villains and things become more black and white, good and bad, right and wrong. We know that two of the great icons of American history are Abraham Lincoln, the martyred president, and Robert E. Lee, the noble soldier. So when George Mc Clellan argues with one and defeats the other, it doesnt t into the mold. We have to somehow reduce Mc Clellan and minimalize his achievements so that the icons remain icons. Revisionist portrays McClellan as Civil War fall guy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 20, 2012 13

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