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The Kings Bay periscope ( 09-13-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00269

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00269


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NAVFAC celebrates birthdayCommand marks 170 years of service On August 31, the Naval Fa cilities Engineering Command celebrated 170 years of naval history. e 13th Secretary of the Navy, Abel P. Upshur, ocially estab lished NAVFACs predecessor, the Bureau of Naval Yards and Docks in 1842, to execute the design, construction and main tenance of Navy yards and a few other shore stations around the eastern seaboard of the United States. Eventu ally the Bureau and its responsi bilities would grow into the global enter prise known as NAVFAC, which was ocially established in May 1966. Our team of Civil Engineer Corps ocers, civilian person nel and Seabees are testament to the remarkable contributions of those who have given their all to this organization in the past 170 years, said Capt. Christo pher Kiwus, NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Ocer. I could not be more proud of what our NAVFAC team is doing for our Child Development Home program relaunched by CDC e Kings Bay Child Development Centers primary goal is to oer quality childcare to the ac tive-duty service members and civilian employees attached to this installation. In order the support the weekend and late night duty as signments of many active duty families, the Child Development Center relaunched its Child De velopment Home program ear lier this year. Child Development Homes are independently owned business enterprises operated in the homes of Navy certied military family members. Child Development Homes are monitored and managed under the guidance of the Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay. In addition to being held to the same rigorous care standards as Child Development Center classrooms, CDH providers are required to complete a 25-hour orientation course including CPR/First Aid, Sanitation and Child Abuse training. Child Development Homes oer an excellent alternative for parents who need childcare outside the traditional center hours of 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. is past week, two new Child Development Home providers, one on base and one in the com munity, were certied by the Child Development Center to open their homes for care. With four additional homes currently seeking Child Develop ment Home certication, active duty and civilian members will soon have even more choices when selecting a quality child care setting to meet their familys needs. e Child Development Home in many cases may Vice Adm. Richardson relieved by Vice Adm. Connor in NorfolkVice Adm. Michael J. Connor relieved Vice Adm. John M. Richardson as Commander, Submarine Forces/Sub marine Force Atlantic/Allied Submarine Command during a change of command, Sept. 7, onboard the Virginia-class at tack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 779), Pier 12, Naval Sta tion Norfolk. Richardson will be promoted to admiral later this year and take command as Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion. Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., Commander, U.S. Fleet Forc es Command, was the featured speaker. Quite a turnout, a turnout that reects great respect for the change of command, which is the foundation on which our Navy is based command and command at sea, command of our Sailors and our forces, Harvey said. But it also shows the respect for the individuals in volved, Vice Adm. Richardson and Vice Adm. Connor. It is a demonstration of great respect to the national trea sure called our submarine force, vital to our Navy and our nation. Our submarine force remains an elite force today, one true to its heritage and one who truly has delivered extraordinary results for the nation. A force which takes the most complex technology our nation can develop, takes it to sea and delivers results. Our submarine force operates well forward around the globe, ev erywhere they need to be. ese Sailors and ships give our Navy the asymmetric advantage it has in the mari time domain. No nations Navy can touch our subma rine force and every nations Navy knows it. Up Periscope Our expert panel picks the Super Bowl winner Page 9 Ultra runner Soldier competes in long-distance races Page 11 On duty Sea Cadets man stations at Kingsland Catfish Fest Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Sub Forces holds change of commandTwo homes open at Kings Bay Kings Bay has 9/11 remembrance Tribute paid to reghters, police, others who gave their lives helping others On the anniversary of the infamous terrorist attack, on Sept. 11th, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays commanding ocer took the time to honor those rst responders who sacriced their lives to save others 11 years ago. Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., commanding ocer of the base, personally thanked the re departments, police and Emergency Medical Services of Camden County, St. Marys, Kingsland and Kings Bay, for their continued service and sac rice. Kings Bay Submarine Base and all its tenant commands were in at tendance. Guey compared the sacrice of 412 reman, police and EMS lost in the terror at tacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., to the sacrices made by service members in battle, selessly putting their lives on the line to save others. ousands ran out of the World Trade Center a few hundred ran in. And to day, we take this time to remem ber those few hundred, he said during his speech. Trooper Christopher Young of the Georgia State Police said 9/11 symbolizes a moment in history Ameri Today, we take this time to remember those few hundred Capt. Harvey Guffey Jr. NSB Kings Bay commanding officer You will win decisively if called to act Vice Adm. John Richardson outgoing Sub Forces commander

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Town Hall meeting set for Sept. 19A joint Town Hall meeting will be at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Kings Bay Audito rium. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, Commander, Submarine Group Ten, and Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, invite all hands and their spouses to attend and express any concerns. Daycare services will be provided at the Child Development Center. All active duty, single and married, and spouses are highly encour aged to attend. For more information, contact Lisa Mastone at (912) 573-4513.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contribu tions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of or ganization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Busi ness After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.SBA program Sept. 17, 18 at FFSCe Small Business Administrations Operation Boots to Business is 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sept. 17 and 18 at NSB Kings Bays Fleet and Family Support Center, Classroom C. Transi tioning service members, veterans, military spouses and retirees are invited. For more in formation, call (912) 573-4513.Navy-Marine Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Now at Pirates Cove: paper platese Pirates Cove Galley will be having its scullery upgraded through Sept. 17. During this time will be serving on paper. Pardon this inconvenience while the construction is being completed. Questions? Contact CSC Wilson or Lt. Mahoney at ext. 9638.GMACC visits NSB Sept. 13, 14 e Georgia Military Aairs Coordinat ing Committee quarterly meeting is Sept. 13 and 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead (Ret.) will present a brief.Predator awareness class Sept. 16A predator awareness class will be at 1:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 16 at Southeast Commu nity Church. e class is for adults. ere is no child care available. All parents who have chil dren or businesses that deal with children are invited to attend this 45-minute class. Ques tions? Contact Lisa Allen at (912) 673-9161.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will be gin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more in formation, call (904) 225-9355. Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories col lected from veterans in attendance.MOMS meet-and-greet Sept. 17Moms Oering Moms Support of Kingslands meet-and-greet is 11 a.m., Sept. 17 at How ard Peeples Park. MOMS will provide a picnic lunch. e group supports mothers who stay at home to raise children. For more information, visit momsclubofkingsland@hotmail.com. Now hear this! e Army, along with the other military services and the Depart ment of Veterans Aairs, is stan dardizing the diagnosis and treat ment of post-traumatic stress disorder, known as PTSD. No matter where Soldiers are getting care or seeking help for PTSD or any other medical issue, we want to ensure we are doing it the same way, said Lt. Col. Christopher Warner, the Army Surgeon Generals psychiatric consultant and deputy commander, Clinical Services, Bas sett Army Community Hospital, Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Warner said standardization in creases a Soldiers level of trust and fairness in the system. e Army medical community is now being trained on guidelines spelled out in Army Medical Com mand Policy Memo 12-035 (Apr. 10, 2012), Policy Guidance on the Assessment and Treatment of PostTraumatic Stress Disorder, Warner said. e memo emphasizes the urgen cy of the issue. e majority of service members with PTSD do not seek treatment, and many who do seek treatment drop out before they can benet, the memo reads. ere are many reasons for this, including stigma, other barriers to care, and negative perceptions of mental health care. Lack of trust in military behavioral health professionals has been iden tied as one important predictor of service members not utilizing services. erefore, it is critical that Army behavioral health profes sionals do everything they can to advocate for and provide care in a patient-centered manner that reas sures patients that they will not be judged and that their primary con cerns will be addressed. PTSD is a widespread problem. It occurs in three to six percent of ser vice members with no deployment experience and in ve to 25 percent of service members who have been deployed to combat zones. Combat frequency and intensity are the strongest predictor of the condition, according to the policy memo. An example of standardiza tion is using the patient-centered care approach. Patient-centered care within a culture of trust requires that care providers focus on patients pri mary concerns, and these diagnoses, when inappropriately used, can damage therapeutic rapport and interfere with successful care, the memo reads. In the past, some medical com mands have supplemented this approach with forensic psychiatry, which, according to Warner, incorporates the medical practice of psychiatry with the legal eld to conduct administrative reviews for medical boards. Warner said the approach is similar to the work mans compensation model that, while not utilized inappropriately, did not provide a standardized process across the Army. at model is no longer in use in the Army, Warner said. Lt. Gen. Robert B. Brown, I Corps commander, speaking at an Aug. 2 press conference at Madigan Army Medical Center, Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash., agreed that the patient-centered care approach and standardization is best. Our number one concern is tak ing care of Soldiers and their fami lies, he said. Cost doesnt play a part in military medicine. We want them to have world-class medical care. For that reason, we are going to stop using the forensic psychiatry system with the disability evaluation system here at Madigan. Brown explained that forensic psychiatry adds, an extra layer of supervision really not needed for PTSD medical board examinations. He said that while forensic psychiatry is a good tool to use in specic situations, the Army needs a more consistent and equitable method of fairness in PTSD diagnosis. e forensic psychiatry model has been criticized for placing too much emphasis on malingering. e policy memo claries the reason for dis continuing that model. Although there has been debate on the role of symptom exaggera tion or malingering for secondary gain in DOD and VA PTSD Disability Evaluation System processes, there is considerable evidence that this is rare and unlikely to be a major fac tor in the vast majority of disability determinations, the memo reads. Other aspects of standardization for PTSD care are being addressed. For example, some medications used in the past were found to not be the best choices for PTSD, said Warner. Another example he cited is standardization of new treatment meth ods based on research, not only from military medicine, but from rst re sponders remen, police ocers and paramedics who routinely handle very traumatic situations. A cutting-edge development within the Army for the prevention of PTSD Army Surgeon General Army standardizes PTSD diagnosis Hello, my faithful followers at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This will be my final submission as your sports coordinator. I have returned to my duties as the recreation assistant. e new coordinator, Tyler Cole has arrived on base and currently is running the programs. I really enjoyed my time as your sports coordinator. I have gotten to know most of you through our programs, as well as outside of work, and I want to thank you all for making me feel welcome. You have all made my life much easier and more enjoyable since my arrival to Kings Bay. I have learned a great deal from my time here, and I am grateful for the opportunity to run the sports programs for the base. ere were some bumps along the way in the beginning, as I learned the process and routines of the job, but I did my best, and I feel much more prepared for any sports coordinator job that I receive in the future. I hope that you all enjoyed par ticipating in the programs that I ran, because I certainly enjoyed running them. As I return to my position as recreation assistant, I hope that you all continue to participate in our programs and show Tyler the same amount of support that you have shown me. I look forward to seeing you all in upcoming seasons, as well as outside of the base. anks again for making this a great all-around experience for me. Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinatoranks for the memories, Kings Bay e Navy announced updates to the Selective Reenlistment Bonus award plan, Sept. 8, in NAVADMIN 273/12. e intent of the Selective Re enlistment Bonus is to incentivize Sailors with critical skills and experi ence to stay Navy. SRB rewards Sailors who attain special training in skills most need ed in the eet, and helps meet critical skill re-enlistment benchmarks and enhance Navys ability to size, shape and stabilize manning. Award levels are strategically adjusted as reenlistment requirements for specic ratings and skill sets are met. From the 100 skill/zone combina tions detailed in NAVADMIN 143/12, this update includes reductions for three skills, one skill elimination, ten skills award level increases and 11 skills added to the list. e SRB program provides a re tention incentive to our top-per forming Sailors with critical skills needed in the eet, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, military per sonnel plans and policy. We will continue to monitor our bonus pro grams to maximize retention behav ior in our most critical skills within the constraints of our budget. Sailors should consult NAVAD MIN 273/12 to determine their SRB eligibility and award level. e in creased award levels are eective immediately and decreased levels are eective 30 days from the release of the NAVADMIN. is update also announces the upcoming change to annual SRB in stallment payments from October to the anniversary month of re-enlist ment date. is policy change will take eect for all Sailors reenlisting for SRB on, or after, Oct. 1. For example, Sailors re-enlisting in December 2012 will receive their initial SRB payment upon reenlistment, and all subse quent installment payments annu ally in December until the full bonus amount has been reached. Sailors under current SRB con tracts, as well as those re-enlisting prior to Oct. 1 will continue to re ceive anniversary payments annually in October until the full bonus amount has been reached. Additionally, NAVADMIN 273/12 temporarily lifts the restriction preventing Sailors with FY13 end of ac tive obligated service dates from re enlisting for SRB in FY12. With this change, all FY13 EAOS Sailors, regardless of SRB tier, are encouraged to apply for SRB and re-enlist on, or before, Sept. 30. Sailors electing this temporary early reenlistment option must be otherwise eligible for SRB and have a valid PTS quota prior to their selected reenlistment date. As with Perform to Serve, eligible Sailors desiring SRB re-enlistment are encouraged to work with their command career counselors, com mand master chiefs, and chain of command to discuss timing of reenlistment and procedures well before their EAOS. Naval Personnel Navy adjusts re-enlistment bonuses 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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that the committee is look ing at, for example, would be Comprehensive Soldier Fitness, which increases a Soldiers resiliency, he said. Standardization is not limited to Army Medical Command Policy Memo 12-035. e Army, VA and other services are stan dardizing the administration of treatment, using the Integrated Disability Evaluation System, or IDES. Warner said the IDES, in conjunction with the Army Physical Evaluation Board, determines whether or not a service member should stay in service or transition to the VA system as a medical retiree. If the latter, the ser vice member is guided through the process of transitioning from Army to VA care, while he or she is still on active duty, to ensure no loss of cover age or break in treatment, he explained. e Armys success at standardization and innovation are a source of pride within the medical community. Combat has been our greatest catalyst to medi cal innovation, said Maj. Gen. Richard W. omas, commander, Western Regional Medical Command. e general also spoke at the press confer ence. omas said that the best minds are work ing to improve diagnosis and treatment of PTSD. He said that besides the VA and other services, the Army is working with universities across the country and even the Na tional Football League to improve the quality of PTSD care. He added that the Army has developed a collaborative relationship across the medical spectrum in its eort to nd the best treatment possible. For example, he said, sur geons are seeing patients, alongside psychologists, and even practitioners trained in yoga, massage and acupuncture. Treating PTSD is a chal lenge, omas said, because it is not as obvious as treating something like a bullet wound. He explained that diagnosis is further complicat ed because Soldiers often have more than one in jury for instance, PTSD combined with traumatic brain injury. Addition ally, Soldiers often have delayed reactions to trau matic events that may take years to manifest, he said. One problem still facing the Army is the stigma as sociated with mental dis orders. It is critical as leaders to get rid of the stigma involved, omas said. ere is still a stigma in society and in the Army, but Ive seen an improve ment over the years. We want Soldiers to reach out and seek help from the Army or even outside the base if they so desire. omas said that today, the Army is seeing more Soldiers come forward for treatment, but the gains are still not enough. We need everyones help in educating Soldiers, omas said. Its not a normal thing asking Soldiers to seek help. We need to get across that its normal. New Moms and Dads e City of Kingsland is accepting donations for a fund-raising yard sale to benet Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park, located at the corner of Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. in downtown Kingsland. Phase One of the park was com pleted in 2010 and includes ve full-color panels, one honoring each branch of the military. In 2011, Phase Two was completed and includes a statue honoring each branch of the military, a memorial walkway and professional landscaping. Plans for Phase ree of the park include a pentagon shaped pavil ion, which will be dedicated to the families of the military, and a water feature. In an eort to raise funds to com plete Phase ree, the city will be receiving donations through Oct. 12 and will plan the fund-raising yard sale shortly thereafter. Donations can be dropped o at the Kingsland Depot, located at 200 E. King Ave., in downtown Kingsland, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided for your donation upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, King sland Dowtown Development Au thority, City of Kingsland, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeor gia.com. Vets Memorial Park seeks yard sale items provide families with a more convenient location, smaller class size, and ex tended hours. We have a phenomenal group of professionally trained, dedicated military spouses who are eager to open their homes and hearts to assist military families who need care outside the regular hours of operation at the center, Leslie Faulkner said. As a former CDH provider my self, I cannot think of a bet ter way to say thank you to our military than to ensure the safety and care of their children. If you are interested in becoming a CDH Provider or if you are a parent who would like to learn more about the program, contact the Child Development Home Representative, Les lie Faulkner, at (912) 5739918. PTSDCDH THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Kings Bay Sea Cadets work the Kingsland Catfish Festival photos courtesy of Kings Bay Sea Cadets

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5 is is the force we entrusted to Vice Adm. Richardson the last two years. He took a great force and made it better the most advanced, most powerful, most responsive and most ready submarine force in the world. He has continued to improve performance of the force in ev ery measure we got. He brings a laser focus to every aspect in every operation of the submarine force in maintaining our current and substantial under sea dominance. He prepared the force for the future, develop ing technology in making sure our warghting edge remained sharp, the integration of women in the submarine force to en sure we have access to the talent we will need to ght and win in the future. John Richardson has made this high performance work better, for he realized that all these technological marvels are just expensive junk without the highly-skilled and well-lead Sailors to take them to sea. Harvey presented Richardson with the Distinguished Service Medal, recognizing exceptional meritorious service to the gov ernment of the United States in supporting National Defense objectives vital to security by providing Combatant Commanders with a continuous worldwide submarine presence. First, we stand on the shoul ders of giants the submari ners who have come before us, many of whom are here you heard their names at the start of the cer emony, Richardson said. ey are visionaries and leaders who have brought us through ex istential challenges, when the world was literally in the bal ance. But the truly amazing thing is that, while yes they are global leaders, they are very personal and passionate men tors, and I have beneted greatly from their advice and counsel in my tour here. As commander, Submarine Forces, Richardson focused on ensuring the Navy maintains undersea superiority today and into the future. As commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, he had operational command of all submarines homeported on the Atlantic coast, as well as supporting shore activities. As commander, Allied Submarine Command, he acted as the prin cipal advisor to the North Atlan tic Treaty Organization on sub marine plans, operations, and doctrine. When he assumed com mand of the submarine forces in November 2010, Richardson charged his undersea leaders to conceive and develop a doctrine dening the warghting objec tives of the diverse submarine force. e Design for Undersea Warfare resulted, and it empow ered all major commanders, fa cility commanders, submarine commanding ocers, and each ocer and enlisted Sailor, to align their energies along three lines of eorts: Ready Forces, an emphasis ensuring our un dersea forces are ready for operations and warghting; Ef fective Employment, an eort which means undersea forces will conduct eective forward operations and warghting; and Future Force Capabilities, an emphasis on preparing under sea forces for future operations and warghting. We have an awesome team, so were set up for success, kind of raises expecta tions, Richard son said. What exactly did we do? Well I cant tell you. I wish I could. It is truly awe some, but it would take us about four days to debrief you here on the pier, and I know youre get ting hungry. Truly, our activity is highly classied. But Ill push the limits as far as I can. First, we issued the Design for Undersea Warfare, as our roadmap, and we got busy moving out. Our business is warghting and preparing for war. Our hope is that by doing our business in a very convincing way, by be coming masters of the undersea domain, we will deter anybody from taking us on. And if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them swiftly and deci sively. To that end, we increased our warghting readiness by 20 percent. We have more boats certied for combat operations, ready now to respond to a crisis if called. We did that by giving more time to the COs and their crews to get themselves ready 50 percent more discretionary time; we eliminated mandatory squadron workups for inspec tions and exams putting that responsibility on the COs to get their teams ready to meet the standards for wartime certica tion and they did terric, meet ing all milestone ahead of sched ule; and just to make it harder, we increased the number of surprise exams, the no-notice tests that everybody loves so much. And again, the team responded again and performed superbly. To clear the way for more CO ex ibility, we eliminated more than 50 man-years of unnecessary and duplicate requirements from the plate, more time to improve read iness; we improved manning by 5 percent. ats a harsh world, and the manpower team scraped and clawed to get both the right numbers and the right level of experi ence on the boats. And we also developed a solid program to help new and veteran Sailors be more successful returning to sea, providing a good sense of what they were getting in to, and some skills to manage the stresses of subma rine life. So in short, we decentral ized authority. We provided solid commanders guidance, increased CO span of control, and the team took it from there, achieving higher levels of readi ness, with more eciency and predictability. is is the way that Navies are supposed to operate. Its what we do. Addressing an audience of more than 800 attendees, in cluding more than 340 active duty and retired ag and general ocers, Richardson further reected on his tenure as the sub marine force commander, while thanking all who supported the mission of the submarine force. You are solace and security for our nation, our Allies and our partners, a bright jewel in the nations strategic crown. You are a fearsome defender against those who contemplate violence against us or threaten the principles for which we stand. You stay their hand by haunt ing their worst nightmares and you will win decisively if called to act. And I hope that all of you listening will remember to include in your rst prayers in the morning, and your last prayer at night, the Sailors and families of the U.S. Submarine Force, the U.S. Navy, and the United States of America. Connor assumes command of the submarine force after serving as the Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Systems. Bravo Zulu, chiefs! Supported Commanders and the Sailors and Marines who live on the installations we sup port, along with their families. NAVFAC is the naval systems command that delivers and maintains high-quality, sus tainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, enables energy security and environmental steward ship, and provides humanitar ian and contingency engineer ing response. NAVFACs signature is vis ible on every Navy and Marine Corps installation around the globe. Nearly every pier, run way, building, gymnasium, bar racks, road, utility plant, and other facilities on shore has been constructed or acquired by NAVFAC. NAVFAC Southeast employs 1,800 people at 22 installations throughout the Southeastern United States and Cuba and delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humanitarian and contingency engineering response. In scal year 2011, NAVFAC Southeast delivered more than $1.3 billion in products and services to supported Navy and Marine Corps commanders, as well as other federal agencies. e commands regional team of planning, construction, fa cilities services, environmental and acquisition subject matter experts executed approximately 5,700 separate contract ac tions during the year. NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Departments answered more than 40,000 in-house ser vice calls in a demanding 24/7 environment. With half of the NAVFAC Southeast bases on a base oper ating service contract answer ing over 60,000 service calls. is critical work is a vital enabler for what takes place daily on bases around the world. NAVFAC experts provide engineering reach-back support to war ghters as well as response and recovery support for disasters like the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. Recently, in response to Hur ricane Isaac, NAVFAC Southeast sent a Contingency Engineer ing Response Team composed of 15 military and civilian per sonnel to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base New Orleans. Delivering sustainable and cost-eective solutions is increasingly important in the aus tere scal environment our na tion is facing. Last year in support of the Secretary of the Navys ambi tious goals to achieve energy security and eciency, NAVFAC helped Supported Command ers reduce energy consump tion by 15 percent from a 2003 baseline. NAVFACs contributions to the Navys shore en ergy program during the last 10 years has resulted in the Navy being awarded 24 percent of all Presidential and 29 percent of all federal energy awards. NAVFAC also provides Sup ported Commanders with environmental expertise, such as installation restoration, environmental compliance, and National Environmental Policy Act planning and coordination. In 2011, NAVFAC exceeded all government-wide program goals and targets, with more than 55 percent of the total dol lars awarded and more than 25,000 contracts going to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeasts small business program was the only one in NAVFAC to achieve every individual program goal. Consequently, the Navys Of ce of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to NAVFAC for promot ing acquisition opportunities for small businesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. NAVFAC has a proud history of delivering excellent prod ucts and services for supported commands since 1842. Building on 170 years of ex perience, NAVFAC continues to manage the planning, design, construction, contingency engineering, real estate, environ mental and public works sup port for Navy shore facilities all over the world. NAVFACForces ... if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them ... Rear Adm. John Richardson Outgoing Sub Forces commander

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e CocoLoco Luau is 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the RackN-Roll Entertainment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, in atables, music, contests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more informa tion call (912) 5739492. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Starting Saturday, Sept. 15 and running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 5738475. Movie Under the Stars Its at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the new location at Under the Pines Park by the tennis courts. The feature presentation will Madagascar 3, rated PG. Bring your own lawn chair, blankets and settle in for a great movie on a hugh outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for this showing. For more information call (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Night of Comedy Its at 8 p.m., ursday, Sept. 13 at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Have a few laughs with comedians Adam Mamawala and Robbie Printz. For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served Beverages will be available for purchase. You can visit the come dians Web sites at www.adammamawala.com/ and www.rob bieprintz.com. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blan kets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is look ing for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Day for Kids is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Youth Center. Sched uled are free recreational outdoor activities, refreshments available for pur chase from Chick-l-A and local youth demonstrations, including dance and martial arts. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth Programs welcome children of all abil ities. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 15, 16 Dr. Suess: The Lorax Sept. 22, 23 Winnie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Officials are needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Day for Kids Sept. 15 Just for kids Liberty call Luau Sept. 14 at Rack-N-Roll To understand the environment in 1812, its worth looking at what was happening in our nations brown water ports and harbors as well as on the high seas. Its been said that the War of 1812 was the sec ond phase of the American Revolution. In part, thats because Britain nev er treated our indepen dent nation with respect. A quote from e Wash ingtonian, published in Windsor, Vt. on Aug. 16, 1813, underscores the outrage felt by some American citizens about Britains persistent ha rassment and blockades. Whether there is any thing less frightful and alarming now, In Commercial Restrictions In Oppressive Taxation In Revenue Ocers and In a Military Despotism than there was in ? During the six-year pe riod between 1806 and 1812, the administra tions of presidents Jeer son and Madison worked with Congress to establish American neutrality on the high seas, through eco nomic restraints. Several unpopular laws were enacted, often impeding our own trade capabilities. e Revenue Cutter Service, precursor of the modern-day U.S. Coast Guard enforced these laws. Yet Britain persisted in antagonizing our edgling nation with blockades at home and abroad. Impressment of sailors e impressment of sailors was a thorny stick ing point that irritated our citizens and particularly, some members of Con gress. For decades, diplo matic eorts had failed. Britain had about 600 ships in her eet, translat ing to a need for close to 100,000 sailors. Engaging in conicts across the globe meant the Royal Navy was busy. Because of this high tempo, British sailors desert ed to U.S. merchant ships, where the conditions were Revenue cutter nabs privateer 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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better and the pay a bit higher. In contrast, Amer ica had a slew of welltrained merchant captains who had garnered a good deal of experience dur ing the American Revolution and the Quasi War with France. Since Britain needed sharp sailors, she felt no qualms about im pressing both known and so-called deserters. is intensied American outrage. Further, British support of Native Americans out west aggravated a growing mistrust of Britain. Native Ameri can leaders Tenskwatawa and Tecumseh formed a confederation of tribes to block westward expansion by the United States. Cleverly, the British seized the opportunity to provide the tribes with arms to thwart American expansion eorts west ward and protect their interests in Canada. is move only fueled hostili ties. Privateers As if hostilities werent complicated enough, privateering was common practice on the open seas. Privateers helped move armed ships and crews without delays caused by debates over government funding. e practice wrought havoc on a nation in its infancy, as goods were seized by privateers. Dependent upon tar is, imports and exported goods, British privateers interfered with our eco nomic viability. Privateers were a blend of selfappointed pirates and government-sanctioned ships in and around our harbors and coasts. e legitimate ones operated under a Letter of Marque and Reprisal, issued by the American president, or by foreign governments. In those hectic spring days of 1812, it may have been challenging to dis cern who was legitimate. Yet in the background, cries for war by some members of Congress were growing louder, as ir ritation over British naval blockades, illegal vessel boardings, and impress ment of our sailors con tinued. Diplomatic maneuvers had also proven unsuccessful. Dart is captured American privateers proved successful. ey captured or sank roughly 1,700 British merchant ves sels during the war. ough diminutive in size, the Revenue Cutter Service proved its mettle during the War of 1812, though the ships were out manned and outgunned by the British. e capture of the Brit ish privateer Dart, on Oct. 4, 1813, by the Revenue Cutter Vigilant, was im pressive, said William H. iesen, Coast Guard Atlantic Area historian. To keep regional waters secure for American com merce also meant ghting British privateers that pa trolled o East Coast ports and preyed on American merchantmen. In hot pursuit out of Newport, R.I., Master John Cahoone led his 17 crewmembers to the his toric capture. Coming alongside the sloop Dart in the waters o Block Is land, R.I., they mounted a decisive surprise attack including canons, driving Darts crew below deck. An armed boarding of Dart ensued, ending a vi cious ght that included the capture of 20 American merchantmen. Dart had been a former American ship that a British privateer captured. ats why the capture was im mortalized in the Columbian Patriot, 16 days later. Captain Cahoone, with the volunteers under his command, deserve the highest credit for the spirit and promptitude with which this aair was conducted; and it is of the utmost importance, as it is probable she [Dart] would, but for this, have been almost a constant visitor during the ensuing season, when the mischief she would have done is in calculable. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 5739492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more informa tion call (912) 573-9492.MWR1813 cans should never forget. /11 should be symbol of what happened that day in 2001, Young said. Our grandkids needs to know how the country came together volunteers, mili tary, civilians everyone was there to support each other. It was really a turn ing point in our countrys history to see how vul nerable we really are and how we, as Americans, can overcome that and pull the strength out from within. 9/11s fallen were hon ored with a 21-gun salute. At the conclusion of the ceremony, Sailors broke ranks and each person ally shook the hand of and thanked a local rst re sponder.9/11 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 7

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Last year I picked the Packers to go all the way. Oops. Well, Ill stick with the Pack as NFC champs, despite improved threats in the Bears, 49ers, Cowboys and the defending champion Giants. In the AFC, Im leaning toward the Patriots. Coach Bill Belichick always seems to find an edge. The Ravens, Broncos and Steelers are ready too, if the Pats stumble. After losing the last Super Bowl to the Giants, it seems to me like the Pats are due to win it all, again. Next week: College footballs BCS MTSN Bradley Hufford Trident Training Facility Georgetown, Texas Lions and Pats. Probably the Pats, theyre a veteran team. MM3 Paul Ouma Trident Training Facility Framingham, Mass. The Ravens and Falcons. The Ravens. This is the year Joe Flacco knows if he doesnt win it hell get cut like Billy Cundiff. CS3 Dantreal Casey Pirates Cove Galley Shreveport, La. New Orleans and the Ravens. The Saints, because they have a better offense than any defense in the NFL. MM2 Karlos Horn USS Georgia Blue Miami The Patriots and Green Bay. The Patriots, because of Bill Belichick. Pfc. Joseph Sizell Security Force Battalion Mesa, Colo. The Packers and Broncos. The Broncos. Theyve got a good running game, a good defense and Peyton Manning. MASN John Hernandez Security Force Battalion El Paso, Texas Green Bay and the Texans. Green Bay, because theyve got a lot of guys returning with Aaron Rogers. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Riders for Relief THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft Cooked Eggs Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Sept. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Sept. 17 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpDue to the uniqueness of these deployments, Fleet and Family Support Center is assisting with all facets of the pre-deployment procedures. This brief prepares Sailors and their family mem bers through the Individual Augmentee pre-deployment process, mid-deployment sup port, post-deployment followup, and ensures they are equipped with the proper resources. The class is 9 to 11 a.m., Sept. 19. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Sept. 25Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 26. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retire ment and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrich ment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activi ties are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and commu nicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they inter act with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited. Pirates Cove Galley menus 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Standing at 5 feet 4 inch es, and weighing in at 130 pounds, Army Master Sgt. Mike Morton is a giant in the ultramarathon com munity. Morton, an Army Spe cial Operations Command liaison ocer at Special Operations command, won the Badwater Ultra marathon a 135-mile race from Death Valley to Mt. Whitney in California. is was his rst Bad water, and he completed the course in 22 hours, 52 minutes, 55 seconds, a time that was just shy of the 22:51:29 course re cord. e Badwater Ultramarathon starts o at 280 feet below sea level, and ends at an approximate altitude of 8,300 feet. Its a very competitive race. You had two former winners and two guys who are on the U.S. 24-hour team with me a hand ful of guys that I consider serious competition, but I knew I had the potential (to win), said Morton, who is on the U.S. 24hour team that competes in races that see how far competitors can run in one day. I was elated to win, just to nish it. In order to even enter the race, runners must submit an application that is reviewed by a panel of ve race sta members, and a total of 90 runners are selected, according to the Badwater Web site. Applicants must meet one of three other criteria: nished a prior Badwater and another ultra event in the past year; nished three 100-mile races, at least one in the last year; or have nished the Brazil 135 in less than 48 hours, completed one 100-mile race, and completed one signicant ultra event in the last year. Morton had nished and won three 100-mile races so far this year, all in under 14 hours. When asked if he was trying to break the course record, Morton said he and a friend, Eric Clifton, who had won the race in 1999, had talked about it. In January, I ran a 100 in 13 hours, 18 minutes, in March I ran a 13:11 100, and then in May I ran a 13:42, and those were all relatively at courses, Morton said. Eric laid out a plan and he was ex pecting around a 21 hour nishing time, but I dont speculate like that. I said using those splits is a good tool, but you cant account for the variables of the heat and the three sub stantial climbs. So in my mind, the course record was a strong record. I had a supersmart runner telling me 21 hours, but in my mind I was content even being near Valmirs (Nunez) re cord because I knew those variables were going to play a role, even with the wind during the day its a strong wind, its some thing I didnt account for. Badwater allows en trants to have a pacer run with them after the rst 17 miles, and that comes in handy as the pacer can mule, carry food and wa ter for the runner. Morton had Clifton run ning with him for the last 20 miles of the race and Morton said he was doing the math and letting him know he could break the record. He was spitting out times, but it got to the point where I wasnt talk ing, I didnt want to hear him, I was just like, Hey man, you can tell me all I have to do is run 15 min He runs ultramarathons THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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ute miles, Im going as fast as I can go, Morton said. At some point, theres no more eort available, youre running at max ca pacity. One of the hardest points of the race came at mile 42 for Morton a 14mile climb that he powerwalked most of the way. He had a 19-minute lead when he started the climb, but by the time he reached the peak, the second place runner had caught him. Temperatures throughout the race reached 119 degrees during the day, and dropped to mid-50s in the night. Morton said he changed out of his singlet into a T-shirt at night, but didnt realize how cold it got until he saw photos of his support crew wearing hats and jackets. Due to the extreme heat, Morton said he went through four gallons of Gatorade, one gallon of water, and the occasional Coke to take in some sugar. Badwater is a race where there are no provided sup plies, so traveling with him was a small support crew and two minivans full of supplies. Im more of a minimal ist runner. A lot of people have this big layout of food and take everything they may desire, Morton said. I usually nd one thing in a race that I like and I stick with it. I dont require any thing fancy. Morton, who has won between 25 and 30 races, began competing in ul tramarathons, which can vary from 50 miles, 100 miles and 24and 48-hour competitions, in 1994. He served 11 years in the Navy before doing an inter-service transfer to the Army, and began run ning marathons when sta tioned on Diego Garcia. When training for a race, Morton said he puts in 140 miles a week running twice a day during the week, and once a day on the weekends, and goes through a pair of shoes in about 10 days. He runs nearly every day, even about 8 miles the day before a race to stay loose. He completed the 135-mile Badwater race on the morning of July 17 and went out for a run on the evening of July 18. Up next for Morton are the 24-hour World Championships this month in Poland where he will compete on the U.S. team. Navy College educational information Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change.MenusRuns 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13 Armory Technician, Criminal Investigator specialties to starte Center for Security Forces announced Aug. 17 that two new apprenticeship trade opportunities are in the works for Navy Se curity Force personnel. e apprenticeship will be open to all E-4 and above in select rates or those with select Navy Enlisted Classication codes. It will also be open to Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialty personnel as well as U.S. Coast Guard personnel. e Armory Technician Ap prenticeship will be the rst to emerge in the near future once Department of Labor approval is received, said Jose Bautista, CENSECFOR Master-At-Arms program manager. e ATA will focus on person nel who are responsible for as signed arms, ammunition and explosives. is includes the skill areas of maintenance, in ventory, safety, security, issuing and receiving of these items. e Criminal Investigator Ap prenticeship is CENSECFORs newest project with the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program. is is a coordinated eort by CENSECFOR with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service; the MA/NSF Community Spon sor; Type Commanders; and eet subject matter experts, Bautista said. e apprenticeship is designed for MA personnel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appropri ate personnel in the USMC and USCG. We are in the process of solic iting industry sponsors, which could take between 4-6 months, Bautista said. at means we are looking at the CIA becoming available sometime in 2013. e forerunners to these two new apprenticeships have been highly successful since their de but. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Ocer I (Government Service) appren ticeships have some 1600 active enrollments each to date. Sailors who earn these nationally recognized certications will have had the opportu nity to perform duties and gain experiences they may not other wise have had, Bautista said. e USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide na tionally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeyman-level certicates of completion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. e Center for Security Forces provides specialized training to more than 22,000 students each year and has 14 training loca tions throughout the U.S. and around the world. Change ahead for Master At Arms Selectees to man U-boat Forty-nine volunteer chief selectees completed training to serve, for the second year in a row, as tour guides at the Museum of Science and Industry for the USO U-505 Naval His tory Program, presented along with the Pritzker Military Library and the museum, Sept. 4 to 8. e selectees received training Aug. 9 and 10, about the history and arti facts relating to the U-505, the only German U-boat captured during World War II. U.S. submariner veterans also provided their knowledge and ex perience during the twoday training. e selectees volun teered at the exhibit to an swer questions and discuss submarine-related artifacts with museum guests. Located in a 35,000square-foot exhibit at the museum, the U-boat serves as a national war memorial for those who lost their lives in the two battles of the Atlantic dur ing World War I and II. is is an outstanding program on many fronts, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Roger Buck, senior enlisted leader, director Fleet Medicine, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center. e new selects learn about the heroic capture and transport of the U-505 and get to work alongside submarine veterans and share their new knowl edge with museum guests. is program has expand ed Navy/CPO presence in Chicago and educated thousands of civilians on naval history and the role/ history of CPOs. Command Master Chief Leon Walker, Naval Sta tion Great Lakes, said the volunteers are an exam ple of, chief selects giv ing back what has been given to them. Having an opportunity to be even a small part of the career development path for Navy chief selects is truly an honor for the USO of Illinois, said USO President and Chief Operat ing Ocer Alison Ruble. We are thrilled to oer this program, now in its second year, and to con tinue to support our Navy chief petty ocers while fostering connections to naval heritage through the legacy of the U-505 sub marine. Chief selectees said they look forward to serving as museum guides. I am personally very excited to represent the U-505 and share its ex perience with the pub lic, said Chief Machinery Repairman (select) Kelly Morrow, Machinery Repairman Strand School course supervisor, a Los Angeles, Calif. native who has been in the Navy 19 years. Heritage is every thing to me, and being able to actually relive the stories is an honor. Volunteering at the U-505 exhibit in the Mu seum of Science and In dustry is an honor that I take very seriously, said Chief Hull Technician (select) Nolan Nichols, from Monroe City, Mo., who has been in the Navy for almost eight years. Representing the Navy and chiefs mess, in front of thousands of people at one of the most important naval heritage exhibits in the area, is going to be one of the highlights of my in duction that I will remember for the rest of my life. Now that I have learned about what happened with the capture of the U-505, I will take the lessons of honor, courage, and com mitment that those U.S. Sailors showed and instill those same core values in Sailors in todays Navy. Overall, the U-505 has been a great experience. I would recommend that anyone who gets the chance make a trip down to Chicago to see the ex hibit and learn the story behind the exhibit for themselves. In my lifetime, I can recall going to museums and wishing I had a guide, said Chief Hospital Corpsman (select) Shante Morris. Having someone to explain the artifacts or the signicance of a time period, in laymans terms, would have made my experience more enlightening. So when the opportunity arose to be a volunteer at the museum I was elated. e museum was captivating; the at mosphere was exciting for kids and adults alike. ey were genuine about their interactions with the visitors and were excited the entire time I visited. I ex pect to be infected by that excitement and help carry out the museums mission and vision. I love interacting with people, so this is going to be an awesome experience, said the Atlanta, Ga. native who has served in the Navy for close to 15 years. Not many people are aorded the opportu nity to make a dierence in a young persons life and I am honored that they are entrusting me to do so.



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NAVFAC celebrates birthdayCommand marks 170 years of service On August 31, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command celebrated 170 years of naval history. e 13th Secretary of the Navy, Abel P. Upshur, ocially established NAVFACs predecessor, the Bureau of Naval Yards and Docks in 1842, to execute the design, construction and maintenance of Navy yards and a few other shore stations around the eastern seaboard of the United States. Eventu ally the Bureau and its responsi bilities would grow into the global enterprise known as NAVFAC, which was ocially established in May 1966. Our team of Civil Engineer Corps ocers, civilian personnel and Seabees are testament to the remarkable contributions of those who have given their all to this organization in the past 170 years, said Capt. Christopher Kiwus, NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Ocer. I could not be more proud of what our NAVFAC team is doing for our Child Development Home program relaunched by CDC e Kings Bay Child Development Centers primary goal is to oer quality childcare to the ac tive-duty service members and civilian employees attached to this installation. In order the support the weekend and late night duty as signments of many active duty families, the Child Development Center relaunched its Child De velopment Home program ear lier this year. Child Development Homes are independently owned business enterprises operated in the homes of Navy certied military family members. Child Development Homes are monitored and managed under the guidance of the Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay. In addition to being held to the same rigorous care standards as Child Development Center classrooms, CDH providers are required to complete a 25-hour orientation course including CPR/First Aid, Sanitation and Child Abuse training. Child Development Homes oer an excellent alternative for parents who need childcare outside the traditional center hours of 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. is past week, two new Child Development Home providers, one on base and one in the com munity, were certied by the Child Development Center to open their homes for care. With four additional homes currently seeking Child Develop ment Home certication, active duty and civilian members will soon have even more choices when selecting a quality child care setting to meet their familys needs. e Child Development Home in many cases may Vice Adm. Richardson relieved by Vice Adm. Connor in NorfolkVice Adm. Michael J. Connor relieved Vice Adm. John M. Richardson as Commander, Submarine Forces/Submarine Force Atlantic/Allied Submarine Command during a change of command, Sept. 7, onboard the Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 779), Pier 12, Naval Station Norfolk. Richardson will be promoted to admiral later this year and take command as Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion. Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, was the featured speaker. Quite a turnout, a turnout that reects great respect for the change of command, which is the foundation on which our Navy is based command and command at sea, command of our Sailors and our forces, Harvey said. But it also shows the respect for the individuals involved, Vice Adm. Richardson and Vice Adm. Connor. It is a demonstration of great respect to the national treasure called our submarine force, vital to our Navy and our nation. Our submarine force remains an elite force today, one true to its heritage and one who truly has delivered extraordinary results for the nation. A force which takes the most complex technology our nation can develop, takes it to sea and delivers results. Our submarine force operates well forward around the globe, everywhere they need to be. ese Sailors and ships give our Navy the asymmetric advantage it has in the maritime domain. No nations Navy can touch our submarine force and every nations Navy knows it. Up Periscope Our expert panel picks the Super Bowl winner Page 9 Ultra runner Soldier competes in long-distance races Page 11 On duty Sea Cadets man stations at Kingsland Catfish Fest Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Sub Forces holds change of commandTwo homes open at Kings Bay Kings Bay has 9/11 remembrance Tribute paid to reghters, police, others who gave their lives helping others On the anniversary of the infamous terrorist attack, on Sept. 11th, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays commanding ocer took the time to honor those rst responders who sacriced their lives to save others 11 years ago. Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., commanding ocer of the base, personally thanked the re departments, police and Emergency Medical Services of Camden County, St. Marys, Kingsland and Kings Bay, for their continued service and sacrice. Kings Bay Submarine Base and all its tenant commands were in attendance. Guey compared the sacrice of 412 reman, police and EMS lost in the terror attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., to the sacrices made by servicemembers in battle, selessly putting their lives on the line to save others. ousands ran out of the World Trade Center a few hundred ran in. And today, we take this time to remember those few hundred, he said during his speech. Trooper Christopher Young of the Georgia State Police said 9/11 symbolizes a moment in history Ameri Today, we take this time to remember those few hundred Capt. Harvey Guffey Jr. NSB Kings Bay commanding officer You will win decisively if called to act Vice Adm. John Richardson outgoing Sub Forces commander

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Town Hall meeting set for Sept. 19A joint Town Hall meeting will be at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Kings Bay Auditorium. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, Commander, Submarine Group Ten, and Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, invite all hands and their spouses to attend and express any concerns. Daycare services will be provided at the Child Development Center. All active duty, single and married, and spouses are highly encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Lisa Mastone at (912) 573-4513.Chamber seeks service nomineese Camden County Chamber of Commerce monthly recognizes service members who have gone above and beyond in their civic relations while at Kings Bay. What their contributions mean locally is important and deserves recognition. Nominations for Service Member of the Month should include the name of organization, amount of time involved and any recognition received. Each months service member is recognized at the Chambers Business After Hours. Contact Janice Cook at (912) 729-5840 for more information. Forms can be found at www.camdenchamber.com/militarycommunity-aairs.SBA program Sept. 17, 18 at FFSCe Small Business Administrations Operation Boots to Business is 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sept. 17 and 18 at NSB Kings Bays Fleet and Family Support Center, Classroom C. Transitioning service members, veterans, military spouses and retirees are invited. For more information, call (912) 573-4513.Navy-Marine Relief movesNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay has been temporarily relocated to the base Library, Bldg. 1066. Utilize the left entrance of the building for all NMCRS business between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information regarding NMCRS or to schedule an appointment, call 573-3928 or go to www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Now at Pirates Cove: paper platese Pirates Cove Galley will be having its scullery upgraded through Sept. 17. During this time will be serving on paper. Pardon this inconvenience while the construction is being completed. Questions? Contact CSC Wilson or Lt. Mahoney at ext. 9638.GMACC visits NSB Sept. 13, 14 e Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee quarterly meeting is Sept. 13 and 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead (Ret.) will present a brief.Predator awareness class Sept. 16A predator awareness class will be at 1:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 16 at Southeast Community Church. e class is for adults. ere is no child care available. All parents who have children or businesses that deal with children are invited to attend this 45-minute class. Questions? Contact Lisa Allen at (912) 673-9161.Poker Run for Ark of Nassau Sept. 29 will begin with a 10:30 a.m. registration at Sun Gallery Vision Center, 1480 Sadler Road and begin at noon. Registration is $25 per driver and $5 per passenger. Dinner is included. Ark of Nassau supports adults with disabilities. For more information, call (904) 225-9355. Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories collected from veterans in attendance.MOMS meet-and-greet Sept. 17Moms Oering Moms Support of Kingslands meet-and-greet is 11 a.m., Sept. 17 at How ard Peeples Park. MOMS will provide a picnic lunch. e group supports mothers who stay at home to raise children. For more information, visit momsclubofkingsland@hotmail.com. Now hear this! e Army, along with the other military services and the Department of Veterans Aairs, is standardizing the diagnosis and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, known as PTSD. No matter where Soldiers are getting care or seeking help for PTSD or any other medical issue, we want to ensure we are doing it the same way, said Lt. Col. Christopher Warner, the Army Surgeon Generals psychiatric consultant and deputy commander, Clinical Services, Bassett Army Community Hospital, Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Warner said standardization increases a Soldiers level of trust and fairness in the system. e Army medical community is now being trained on guidelines spelled out in Army Medical Command Policy Memo 12-035 (Apr. 10, 2012), Policy Guidance on the Assessment and Treatment of PostTraumatic Stress Disorder, Warner said. e memo emphasizes the urgency of the issue. e majority of service members with PTSD do not seek treatment, and many who do seek treatment drop out before they can benet, the memo reads. ere are many reasons for this, including stigma, other barriers to care, and negative perceptions of mental health care. Lack of trust in military behavioral health professionals has been identied as one important predictor of service members not utilizing services. erefore, it is critical that Army behavioral health professionals do everything they can to advocate for and provide care in a patient-centered manner that reassures patients that they will not be judged and that their primary concerns will be addressed. PTSD is a widespread problem. It occurs in three to six percent of service members with no deployment experience and in ve to 25 percent of service members who have been deployed to combat zones. Combat frequency and intensity are the strongest predictor of the condition, according to the policy memo. An example of standardization is using the patient-centered care approach. Patient-centered care within a culture of trust requires that care providers focus on patients primary concerns, and these diagnoses, when inappropriately used, can damage therapeutic rapport and interfere with successful care, the memo reads. In the past, some medical commands have supplemented this approach with forensic psychiatry, which, according to Warner, incorporates the medical practice of psychiatry with the legal eld to conduct administrative reviews for medical boards. Warner said the approach is similar to the workmans compensation model that, while not utilized inappropriately, did not provide a standardized process across the Army. at model is no longer in use in the Army, Warner said. Lt. Gen. Robert B. Brown, I Corps commander, speaking at an Aug. 2 press conference at Madigan Army Medical Center, Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash., agreed that the patient-centered care approach and standardization is best. Our number one concern is taking care of Soldiers and their families, he said. Cost doesnt play a part in military medicine. We want them to have world-class medical care. For that reason, we are going to stop using the forensic psychiatry system with the disability evaluation system here at Madigan. Brown explained that forensic psychiatry adds, an extra layer of supervision really not needed for PTSD medical board examinations. He said that while forensic psychiatry is a good tool to use in specic situations, the Army needs a more consistent and equitable method of fairness in PTSD diagnosis. e forensic psychiatry model has been criticized for placing too much emphasis on malingering. e policy memo claries the reason for discontinuing that model. Although there has been debate on the role of symptom exaggeration or malingering for secondary gain in DOD and VA PTSD Disability Evaluation System processes, there is considerable evidence that this is rare and unlikely to be a major factor in the vast majority of disability determinations, the memo reads. Other aspects of standardization for PTSD care are being addressed. For example, some medications used in the past were found to not be the best choices for PTSD, said Warner. Another example he cited is standardization of new treatment methods based on research, not only from military medicine, but from rst responders remen, police ocers and paramedics who routinely handle very traumatic situations. A cutting-edge development within the Army for the prevention of PTSD Army Surgeon General Army standardizes PTSD diagnosis Hello, my faithful followers at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This will be my final submission as your sports coordinator. I have returned to my duties as the recreation assistant. e new coordinator, Tyler Cole has arrived on base and currently is running the programs. I really enjoyed my time as your sports coordinator. I have gotten to know most of you through our programs, as well as outside of work, and I want to thank you all for making me feel welcome. You have all made my life much easier and more enjoyable since my arrival to Kings Bay. I have learned a great deal from my time here, and I am grateful for the opportunity to run the sports programs for the base. ere were some bumps along the way in the beginning, as I learned the process and routines of the job, but I did my best, and I feel much more prepared for any sports coordinator job that I receive in the future. I hope that you all enjoyed participating in the programs that I ran, because I certainly enjoyed running them. As I return to my position as recreation assistant, I hope that you all continue to participate in our programs and show Tyler the same amount of support that you have shown me. I look forward to seeing you all in upcoming seasons, as well as outside of the base. anks again for making this a great all-around experience for me. Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinatoranks for the memories, Kings Bay e Navy announced updates to the Selective Reenlistment Bonus award plan, Sept. 8, in NAVADMIN 273/12. e intent of the Selective Reenlistment Bonus is to incentivize Sailors with critical skills and experience to stay Navy. SRB rewards Sailors who attain special training in skills most needed in the eet, and helps meet critical skill re-enlistment benchmarks and enhance Navys ability to size, shape and stabilize manning. Award levels are strategically adjusted as reenlistment requirements for specic ratings and skill sets are met. From the 100 skill/zone combinations detailed in NAVADMIN 143/12, this update includes reductions for three skills, one skill elimination, ten skills award level increases and 11 skills added to the list. e SRB program provides a retention incentive to our top-performing Sailors with critical skills needed in the eet, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, military personnel plans and policy. We will continue to monitor our bonus programs to maximize retention behavior in our most critical skills within the constraints of our budget. Sailors should consult NAVADMIN 273/12 to determine their SRB eligibility and award level. e increased award levels are eective immediately and decreased levels are eective 30 days from the release of the NAVADMIN. is update also announces the upcoming change to annual SRB installment payments from October to the anniversary month of re-enlistment date. is policy change will take eect for all Sailors reenlisting for SRB on, or after, Oct. 1. For example, Sailors re-enlisting in December 2012 will receive their initial SRB payment upon reenlistment, and all subsequent installment payments annually in December until the full bonus amount has been reached. Sailors under current SRB contracts, as well as those re-enlisting prior to Oct. 1 will continue to receive anniversary payments annually in October until the full bonus amount has been reached. Additionally, NAVADMIN 273/12 temporarily lifts the restriction preventing Sailors with FY13 end of active obligated service dates from reenlisting for SRB in FY12. With this change, all FY13 EAOS Sailors, regardless of SRB tier, are encouraged to apply for SRB and re-enlist on, or before, Sept. 30. Sailors electing this temporary early reenlistment option must be otherwise eligible for SRB and have a valid PTS quota prior to their selected reenlistment date. As with Perform to Serve, eligible Sailors desiring SRB re-enlistment are encouraged to work with their command career counselors, command master chiefs, and chain of command to discuss timing of reenlistment and procedures well before their EAOS. Naval Personnel Navy adjusts re-enlistment bonuses 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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that the committee is looking at, for example, would be Comprehensive Soldier Fitness, which increases a Soldiers resiliency, he said. Standardization is not limited to Army Medical Command Policy Memo 12-035. e Army, VA and other services are standardizing the administration of treatment, using the Integrated Disability Evaluation System, or IDES. Warner said the IDES, in conjunction with the Army Physical Evaluation Board, determines whether or not a service member should stay in service or transition to the VA system as a medical retiree. If the latter, the service member is guided through the process of transitioning from Army to VA care, while he or she is still on active duty, to ensure no loss of coverage or break in treatment, he explained. e Armys success at standardization and innovation are a source of pride within the medical community. Combat has been our greatest catalyst to medical innovation, said Maj. Gen. Richard W. omas, commander, Western Regional Medical Command. e general also spoke at the press conference. omas said that the best minds are working to improve diagnosis and treatment of PTSD. He said that besides the VA and other services, the Army is working with universities across the country and even the National Football League to improve the quality of PTSD care. He added that the Army has developed a collaborative relationship across the medical spectrum in its eort to nd the best treatment possible. For example, he said, surgeons are seeing patients, alongside psychologists, and even practitioners trained in yoga, massage and acupuncture. Treating PTSD is a challenge, omas said, because it is not as obvious as treating something like a bullet wound. He explained that diagnosis is further complicated because Soldiers often have more than one injury for instance, PTSD combined with traumatic brain injury. Additionally, Soldiers often have delayed reactions to traumatic events that may take years to manifest, he said. One problem still facing the Army is the stigma associated with mental disorders. It is critical as leaders to get rid of the stigma involved, omas said. ere is still a stigma in society and in the Army, but Ive seen an improvement over the years. We want Soldiers to reach out and seek help from the Army or even outside the base if they so desire. omas said that today, the Army is seeing more Soldiers come forward for treatment, but the gains are still not enough. We need everyones help in educating Soldiers, omas said. Its not a normal thing asking Soldiers to seek help. We need to get across that its normal. New Moms and Dads e City of Kingsland is accepting donations for a fund-raising yard sale to benet Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park, located at the corner of Route 40 and S. Orange Edwards Blvd. in downtown Kingsland. Phase One of the park was completed in 2010 and includes ve full-color panels, one honoring each branch of the military. In 2011, Phase Two was completed and includes a statue honoring each branch of the military, a memorial walkway and professional landscaping. Plans for Phase ree of the park include a pentagon shaped pavilion, which will be dedicated to the families of the military, and a water feature. In an eort to raise funds to complete Phase ree, the city will be receiving donations through Oct. 12 and will plan the fund-raising yard sale shortly thereafter. Donations can be dropped o at the Kingsland Depot, located at 200 E. King Ave., in downtown Kingsland, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A tax receipt will be provided for your donation upon request. For more information, contact Trish Jared, executive director, Kingsland Dowtown Development Authority, City of Kingsland, at (912) 673-1891 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com. Vets Memorial Park seeks yard sale items provide families with a more convenient location, smaller class size, and ex tended hours. We have a phenomenal group of professionally trained, dedicated military spouses who are eager to open their homes and hearts to assist military families who need care outside the regular hours of operation at the center, Leslie Faulkner said. As a former CDH provider my self, I cannot think of a bet ter way to say thank you to our military than to ensure the safety and care of their children. If you are interested in becoming a CDH Provider or if you are a parent who would like to learn more about the program, contact the Child Development Home Representative, Les lie Faulkner, at (912) 5739918. PTSDCDH THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Kings Bay Sea Cadets work the Kingsland Catfish Festival photos courtesy of Kings Bay Sea Cadets

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 5 is is the force we entrusted to Vice Adm. Richardson the last two years. He took a great force and made it better the most advanced, most powerful, most responsive and most ready submarine force in the world. He has continued to improve performance of the force in every measure we got. He brings a laser focus to every aspect in every operation of the submarine force in maintaining our current and substantial undersea dominance. He prepared the force for the future, developing technology in making sure our warghting edge remained sharp, the integration of women in the submarine force to ensure we have access to the talent we will need to ght and win in the future. John Richardson has made this high performance work better, for he realized that all these technological marvels are just expensive junk without the highly-skilled and well-lead Sailors to take them to sea. Harvey presented Richardson with the Distinguished Service Medal, recognizing exceptional meritorious service to the government of the United States in supporting National Defense objectives vital to security by providing Combatant Commanders with a continuous worldwide submarine presence. First, we stand on the shoulders of giants the submariners who have come before us, many of whom are here you heard their names at the start of the ceremony, Richardson said. ey are visionaries and leaders who have brought us through existential challenges, when the world was literally in the balance. But the truly amazing thing is that, while yes they are global leaders, they are very personal and passionate mentors, and I have beneted greatly from their advice and counsel in my tour here. As commander, Submarine Forces, Richardson focused on ensuring the Navy maintains undersea superiority today and into the future. As commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, he had operational command of all submarines homeported on the Atlantic coast, as well as supporting shore activities. As commander, Allied Submarine Command, he acted as the principal advisor to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on submarine plans, operations, and doctrine. When he assumed command of the submarine forces in November 2010, Richardson charged his undersea leaders to conceive and develop a doctrine dening the warghting objectives of the diverse submarine force. e Design for Undersea Warfare resulted, and it empowered all major commanders, facility commanders, submarine commanding ocers, and each ocer and enlisted Sailor, to align their energies along three lines of eorts: Ready Forces, an emphasis ensuring our undersea forces are ready for operations and warghting; Effective Employment, an eort which means undersea forces will conduct eective forward operations and warghting; and Future Force Capabilities, an emphasis on preparing undersea forces for future operations and warghting. We have an awesome team, so were set up for success, kind of raises expecta tions, Richard son said. What exactly did we do? Well I cant tell you. I wish I could. It is truly awe some, but it would take us about four days to debrief you here on the pier, and I know youre get ting hungry. Truly, our activity is highly classied. But Ill push the limits as far as I can. First, we issued the Design for Undersea Warfare, as our roadmap, and we got busy moving out. Our business is warghting and preparing for war. Our hope is that by doing our business in a very convincing way, by be coming masters of the undersea domain, we will deter anybody from taking us on. And if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them swiftly and deci sively. To that end, we increased our warghting readiness by 20 percent. We have more boats certied for combat operations, ready now to respond to a crisis if called. We did that by giving more time to the COs and their crews to get themselves ready 50 percent more discretionary time; we eliminated mandatory squadron workups for inspec tions and exams putting that responsibility on the COs to get their teams ready to meet the standards for wartime certica tion and they did terric, meet ing all milestone ahead of sched ule; and just to make it harder, we increased the number of surprise exams, the no-notice tests that everybody loves so much. And again, the team responded again and performed superbly. To clear the way for more CO ex ibility, we eliminated more than 50 man-years of unnecessary and duplicate requirements from the plate, more time to improve read iness; we improved manning by 5 percent. ats a harsh world, and the manpower team scraped and clawed to get both the right numbers and the right level of experi ence on the boats. And we also developed a solid program to help new and veteran Sailors be more successful returning to sea, providing a good sense of what they were getting in to, and some skills to manage the stresses of subma rine life. So in short, we decentralized authority. We provided solid commanders guidance, increased CO span of control, and the team took it from there, achieving higher levels of readiness, with more eciency and predictability. is is the way that Navies are supposed to operate. Its what we do. Addressing an audience of more than 800 attendees, including more than 340 active duty and retired ag and general ocers, Richardson further reected on his tenure as the submarine force commander, while thanking all who supported the mission of the submarine force. You are solace and security for our nation, our Allies and our partners, a bright jewel in the nations strategic crown. You are a fearsome defender against those who contemplate violence against us or threaten the principles for which we stand. You stay their hand by haunting their worst nightmares and you will win decisively if called to act. And I hope that all of you listening will remember to include in your rst prayers in the morning, and your last prayer at night, the Sailors and families of the U.S. Submarine Force, the U.S. Navy, and the United States of America. Connor assumes command of the submarine force after serving as the Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Systems. Bravo Zulu, chiefs! Supported Commanders and the Sailors and Marines who live on the installations we support, along with their families. NAVFAC is the naval systems command that delivers and maintains high-quality, sustainable facilities, acquires and manages capabilities for the Navys expeditionary combat forces, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humanitarian and contingency engineering response. NAVFACs signature is visible on every Navy and Marine Corps installation around the globe. Nearly every pier, runway, building, gymnasium, barracks, road, utility plant, and other facilities on shore has been constructed or acquired by NAVFAC. NAVFAC Southeast employs 1,800 people at 22 installations throughout the Southeastern United States and Cuba and delivers and maintains highquality, sustainable facilities, enables energy security and environmental stewardship, and provides humanitarian and contingency engineering response. In scal year 2011, NAVFAC Southeast delivered more than $1.3 billion in products and services to supported Navy and Marine Corps commanders, as well as other federal agencies. e commands regional team of planning, construction, facilities services, environmental and acquisition subject matter experts executed approximately 5,700 separate contract actions during the year. NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Departments answered more than 40,000 in-house service calls in a demanding 24/7 environment. With half of the NAVFAC Southeast bases on a base operating service contract answering over 60,000 service calls. is critical work is a vital enabler for what takes place daily on bases around the world. NAVFAC experts provide engineering reach-back support to war ghters as well as response and recovery support for disasters like the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. Recently, in response to Hurricane Isaac, NAVFAC Southeast sent a Contingency Engineering Response Team composed of 15 military and civilian personnel to Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base New Orleans. Delivering sustainable and cost-eective solutions is increasingly important in the austere scal environment our nation is facing. Last year in support of the Secretary of the Navys ambitious goals to achieve energy security and eciency, NAVFAC helped Supported Commanders reduce energy consumption by 15 percent from a 2003 baseline. NAVFACs contributions to the Navys shore energy program during the last 10 years has resulted in the Navy being awarded 24 percent of all Presidential and 29 percent of all federal energy awards. NAVFAC also provides Supported Commanders with environmental expertise, such as installation restoration, environmental compliance, and National Environmental Policy Act planning and coordination. In 2011, NAVFAC exceeded all government-wide program goals and targets, with more than 55 percent of the total dollars awarded and more than 25,000 contracts going to small businesses. NAVFAC Southeasts small business program was the only one in NAVFAC to achieve every individual program goal. Consequently, the Navys Ofce of Small Business Programs awarded the Secretarys Cup award to NAVFAC for promoting acquisition opportunities for small businesses during a ceremony held at the Pentagon June 15. NAVFAC has a proud history of delivering excellent products and services for supported commands since 1842. Building on 170 years of experience, NAVFAC continues to manage the planning, design, construction, contingency engineering, real estate, environmental and public works support for Navy shore facilities all over the world. NAVFACForces ... if they do choose to make a move, we will defeat them ... Rear Adm. John Richardson Outgoing Sub Forces commander

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e CocoLoco Luau is 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the RackN-Roll Entertainment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, in atables, music, contests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more informa tion call (912) 5739492. Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Starting Saturday, Sept. 15 and running through to Sunday, Sept. 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is offering punch cards for discounted prices on golf. For military E1 to E5 12 play s of 18 holes is $115, military E6 and up 12 plays of 18 holes is $140 and all others 12 plays of 18 holes is $165. This is green fees only. You can save even more when you buy your cart too, Just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 5738475. Movie Under the Stars Its at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the new location at Under the Pines Park by the tennis courts. The feature presentation will Madagascar 3, rated PG. Bring your own lawn chair, blankets and settle in for a great movie on a hugh outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for this showing. For more information call (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Night of Comedy Its at 8 p.m., ursday, Sept. 13 at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Have a few laughs with comedians Adam Mamawala and Robbie Printz. For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served Beverages will be available for purchase. You can visit the come dians Web sites at www.adammamawala.com/ and www.rob bieprintz.com. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face hor rors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted houses, spinetingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blankets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is looking for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Day for Kids is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Youth Center. Scheduled are free recreational outdoor activities, refreshments available for purchase from Chick-l-A and local youth demonstrations, including dance and martial arts. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 15, 16 Dr. Suess: The Lorax Sept. 22, 23 Winnie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Officials are needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Day for Kids Sept. 15 Just for kids Liberty call Luau Sept. 14 at Rack-N-Roll To understand the environment in 1812, its worth looking at what was happening in our nations brown water ports and harbors as well as on the high seas. Its been said that the War of 1812 was the second phase of the American Revolution. In part, thats because Britain never treated our independent nation with respect. A quote from e Washingtonian, published in Windsor, Vt. on Aug. 16, 1813, underscores the outrage felt by some American citizens about Britains persistent harassment and blockades. Whether there is any thing less frightful and alarming now, In Commercial Restrictions In Oppressive Taxation In Revenue Ocers and In a Military Despotism than there was in ? During the six-year pe riod between 1806 and 1812, the administra tions of presidents Jeer son and Madison worked with Congress to establish American neutrality on the high seas, through eco nomic restraints. Several unpopular laws were enacted, often impeding our own trade capabilities. e Revenue Cutter Service, precursor of the modern-day U.S. Coast Guard enforced these laws. Yet Britain persisted in antagonizing our edgling nation with blockades at home and abroad. Impressment of sailors e impressment of sailors was a thorny sticking point that irritated our citizens and particularly, some members of Congress. For decades, diplomatic eorts had failed. Britain had about 600 ships in her eet, translating to a need for close to 100,000 sailors. Engaging in conicts across the globe meant the Royal Navy was busy. Because of this high tempo, British sailors deserted to U.S. merchant ships, where the conditions were Revenue cutter nabs privateer 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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better and the pay a bit higher. In contrast, America had a slew of welltrained merchant captains who had garnered a good deal of experience during the American Revolution and the Quasi War with France. Since Britain needed sharp sailors, she felt no qualms about impressing both known and so-called deserters. is intensied American outrage. Further, British support of Native Americans out west aggravated a growing mistrust of Britain. Native American leaders Tenskwatawa and Tecumseh formed a confederation of tribes to block westward expansion by the United States. Cleverly, the British seized the opportunity to provide the tribes with arms to thwart American expansion eorts westward and protect their interests in Canada. is move only fueled hostilities. Privateers As if hostilities werent complicated enough, privateering was common practice on the open seas. Privateers helped move armed ships and crews without delays caused by debates over government funding. e practice wrought havoc on a nation in its infancy, as goods were seized by privateers. Dependent upon taris, imports and exported goods, British privateers interfered with our economic viability. Privateers were a blend of selfappointed pirates and government-sanctioned ships in and around our harbors and coasts. e legitimate ones operated under a Letter of Marque and Reprisal, issued by the American president, or by foreign governments. In those hectic spring days of 1812, it may have been challenging to discern who was legitimate. Yet in the background, cries for war by some members of Congress were growing louder, as irritation over British naval blockades, illegal vessel boardings, and impressment of our sailors continued. Diplomatic maneuvers had also proven unsuccessful. Dart is captured American privateers proved successful. ey captured or sank roughly 1,700 British merchant ves sels during the war. ough diminutive in size, the Revenue Cutter Service proved its mettle during the War of 1812, though the ships were outmanned and outgunned by the British. e capture of the British privateer Dart, on Oct. 4, 1813, by the Revenue Cutter Vigilant, was impressive, said William H. iesen, Coast Guard Atlantic Area historian. To keep regional waters secure for American commerce also meant ghting British privateers that patrolled o East Coast ports and preyed on American merchantmen. In hot pursuit out of Newport, R.I., Master John Cahoone led his 17 crewmembers to the historic capture. Coming alongside the sloop Dart in the waters o Block Island, R.I., they mounted a decisive surprise attack including canons, driving Darts crew below deck. An armed boarding of Dart ensued, ending a vicious ght that included the capture of 20 American merchantmen. Dart had been a former American ship that a British privateer captured. ats why the capture was immortalized in the Columbian Patriot, 16 days later. Captain Cahoone, with the volunteers under his command, deserve the highest credit for the spirit and promptitude with which this aair was conducted; and it is of the utmost importance, as it is probable she [Dart] would, but for this, have been almost a constant visitor during the ensuing season, when the mischief she would have done is incalculable. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 5739492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492.MWR1813 cans should never forget. /11 should be symbol of what happened that day in 2001, Young said. Our grandkids needs to know how the country came together volunteers, military, civilians everyone was there to support each other. It was really a turning point in our countrys history to see how vulnerable we really are and how we, as Americans, can overcome that and pull the strength out from within. 9/11s fallen were honored with a 21-gun salute. At the conclusion of the ceremony, Sailors broke ranks and each personally shook the hand of and thanked a local rst responder.9/11 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 7

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Last year I picked the Packers to go all the way. Oops. Well, Ill stick with the Pack as NFC champs, despite improved threats in the Bears, 49ers, Cowboys and the defending champion Giants. In the AFC, Im leaning toward the Patriots. Coach Bill Belichick always seems to find an edge. The Ravens, Broncos and Steelers are ready too, if the Pats stumble. After losing the last Super Bowl to the Giants, it seems to me like the Pats are due to win it all, again. Next week: College footballs BCS MTSN Bradley Hufford Trident Training Facility Georgetown, Texas Lions and Pats. Probably the Pats, theyre a veteran team. MM3 Paul Ouma Trident Training Facility Framingham, Mass. The Ravens and Falcons. The Ravens. This is the year Joe Flacco knows if he doesnt win it hell get cut like Billy Cundiff. CS3 Dantreal Casey Pirates Cove Galley Shreveport, La. New Orleans and the Ravens. The Saints, because they have a better offense than any defense in the NFL. MM2 Karlos Horn USS Georgia Blue Miami The Patriots and Green Bay. The Patriots, because of Bill Belichick. Pfc. Joseph Sizell Security Force Battalion Mesa, Colo. The Packers and Broncos. The Broncos. Theyve got a good running game, a good defense and Peyton Manning. MASN John Hernandez Security Force Battalion El Paso, Texas Green Bay and the Texans. Green Bay, because theyve got a lot of guys returning with Aaron Rogers. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Riders for Relief THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft Cooked Eggs Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Sept. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Sept. 17 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpDue to the uniqueness of these deployments, Fleet and Family Support Center is assisting with all facets of the pre-deployment procedures. This brief prepares Sailors and their family members through the Individual Augmentee pre-deployment process, mid-deployment sup port, post-deployment followup, and ensures they are equipped with the proper resources. The class is 9 to 11 a.m., Sept. 19. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Sept. 25Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Sept. 27. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrich ment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited. Pirates Cove Galley menus 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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Standing at 5 feet 4 inches, and weighing in at 130 pounds, Army Master Sgt. Mike Morton is a giant in the ultramarathon community. Morton, an Army Special Operations Command liaison ocer at Special Operations command, won the Badwater Ultramarathon a 135-mile race from Death Valley to Mt. Whitney in California. is was his rst Badwater, and he completed the course in 22 hours, 52 minutes, 55 seconds, a time that was just shy of the 22:51:29 course record. e Badwater Ultramarathon starts o at 280 feet below sea level, and ends at an approximate altitude of 8,300 feet. Its a very competitive race. You had two former winners and two guys who are on the U.S. 24-hour team with me a handful of guys that I consider serious competition, but I knew I had the potential (to win), said Morton, who is on the U.S. 24hour team that competes in races that see how far competitors can run in one day. I was elated to win, just to nish it. In order to even enter the race, runners must submit an application that is reviewed by a panel of ve race sta members, and a total of 90 runners are selected, according to the Badwater Web site. Applicants must meet one of three other criteria: nished a prior Badwater and another ultra event in the past year; nished three 100-mile races, at least one in the last year; or have nished the Brazil 135 in less than 48 hours, completed one 100-mile race, and completed one signicant ultra event in the last year. Morton had nished and won three 100-mile races so far this year, all in under 14 hours. When asked if he was trying to break the course record, Morton said he and a friend, Eric Clifton, who had won the race in 1999, had talked about it. In January, I ran a 100 in 13 hours, 18 minutes, in March I ran a 13:11 100, and then in May I ran a 13:42, and those were all relatively at courses, Morton said. Eric laid out a plan and he was expecting around a 21 hour nishing time, but I dont speculate like that. I said using those splits is a good tool, but you cant account for the variables of the heat and the three substantial climbs. So in my mind, the course record was a strong record. I had a supersmart runner telling me 21 hours, but in my mind I was content even being near Valmirs (Nunez) record because I knew those variables were going to play a role, even with the wind during the day its a strong wind, its something I didnt account for. Badwater allows entrants to have a pacer run with them after the rst 17 miles, and that comes in handy as the pacer can mule, carry food and water for the runner. Morton had Clifton running with him for the last 20 miles of the race and Morton said he was doing the math and letting him know he could break the record. He was spitting out times, but it got to the point where I wasnt talking, I didnt want to hear him, I was just like, Hey man, you can tell me all I have to do is run 15 minHe runs ultramarathons THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 11

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ute miles, Im going as fast as I can go, Morton said. At some point, theres no more eort available, youre running at max capacity. One of the hardest points of the race came at mile 42 for Morton a 14mile climb that he powerwalked most of the way. He had a 19-minute lead when he started the climb, but by the time he reached the peak, the second place runner had caught him. Temperatures throughout the race reached 119 degrees during the day, and dropped to mid-50s in the night. Morton said he changed out of his singlet into a T-shirt at night, but didnt realize how cold it got until he saw photos of his support crew wearing hats and jackets. Due to the extreme heat, Morton said he went through four gallons of Gatorade, one gallon of water, and the occasional Coke to take in some sugar. Badwater is a race where there are no provided supplies, so traveling with him was a small support crew and two minivans full of supplies. Im more of a minimalist runner. A lot of people have this big layout of food and take everything they may desire, Morton said. I usually nd one thing in a race that I like and I stick with it. I dont require anything fancy. Morton, who has won between 25 and 30 races, began competing in ultramarathons, which can vary from 50 miles, 100 miles and 24and 48-hour competitions, in 1994. He served 11 years in the Navy before doing an inter-service transfer to the Army, and began running marathons when stationed on Diego Garcia. When training for a race, Morton said he puts in 140 miles a week running twice a day during the week, and once a day on the weekends, and goes through a pair of shoes in about 10 days. He runs nearly every day, even about 8 miles the day before a race to stay loose. He completed the 135-mile Badwater race on the morning of July 17 and went out for a run on the evening of July 18. Up next for Morton are the 24-hour World Championships this month in Poland where he will compete on the U.S. team. Navy College educational information Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change.MenusRuns 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 13, 2012 13 Armory Technician, Criminal Investigator specialties to starte Center for Security Forces announced Aug. 17 that two new apprenticeship trade opportunities are in the works for Navy Security Force personnel. e apprenticeship will be open to all E-4 and above in select rates or those with select Navy Enlisted Classication codes. It will also be open to Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialty personnel as well as U.S. Coast Guard personnel. e Armory Technician Apprenticeship will be the rst to emerge in the near future once Department of Labor approval is received, said Jose Bautista, CENSECFOR Master-At-Arms program manager. e ATA will focus on personnel who are responsible for assigned arms, ammunition and explosives. is includes the skill areas of maintenance, inventory, safety, security, issuing and receiving of these items. e Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship is CENSECFORs newest project with the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program. is is a coordinated eort by CENSECFOR with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service; the MA/NSF Community Sponsor; Type Commanders; and eet subject matter experts, Bautista said. e apprenticeship is designed for MA personnel having the military police investigator NEC 2002, as well as appropriate personnel in the USMC and USCG. We are in the process of soliciting industry sponsors, which could take between 4-6 months, Bautista said. at means we are looking at the CIA becoming available sometime in 2013. e forerunners to these two new apprenticeships have been highly successful since their debut. For example, the Security Specialist and the Police Ocer I (Government Service) apprenticeships have some 1600 active enrollments each to date. Sailors who earn these nationally recognized certications will have had the opportunity to perform duties and gain experiences they may not otherwise have had, Bautista said. e USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeyman-level certicates of completion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. e Center for Security Forces provides specialized training to more than 22,000 students each year and has 14 training locations throughout the U.S. and around the world. Change ahead for Master At Arms Selectees to man U-boat Forty-nine volunteer chief selectees completed training to serve, for the second year in a row, as tour guides at the Museum of Science and Industry for the USO U-505 Naval His tory Program, presented along with the Pritzker Military Library and the museum, Sept. 4 to 8. e selectees received training Aug. 9 and 10, about the history and artifacts relating to the U-505, the only German U-boat captured during World War II. U.S. submariner veterans also provided their knowledge and experience during the twoday training. e selectees volun teered at the exhibit to an swer questions and discuss submarine-related artifacts with museum guests. Located in a 35,000square-foot exhibit at the museum, the U-boat serves as a national war memorial for those who lost their lives in the two battles of the Atlantic during World War I and II. is is an outstanding program on many fronts, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Roger Buck, senior enlisted leader, director Fleet Medicine, Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center. e new selects learn about the heroic capture and transport of the U-505 and get to work alongside submarine veterans and share their new knowledge with museum guests. is program has expanded Navy/CPO presence in Chicago and educated thousands of civilians on naval history and the role/ history of CPOs. Command Master Chief Leon Walker, Naval Station Great Lakes, said the volunteers are an example of, chief selects giving back what has been given to them. Having an opportunity to be even a small part of the career development path for Navy chief selects is truly an honor for the USO of Illinois, said USO President and Chief Operating Ocer Alison Ruble. We are thrilled to oer this program, now in its second year, and to continue to support our Navy chief petty ocers while fostering connections to naval heritage through the legacy of the U-505 submarine. Chief selectees said they look forward to serving as museum guides. I am personally very excited to represent the U-505 and share its experience with the public, said Chief Machinery Repairman (select) Kelly Morrow, Machinery Repairman Strand School course supervisor, a Los Angeles, Calif. native who has been in the Navy 19 years. Heritage is everything to me, and being able to actually relive the stories is an honor. Volunteering at the U-505 exhibit in the Museum of Science and Industry is an honor that I take very seriously, said Chief Hull Technician (select) Nolan Nichols, from Monroe City, Mo., who has been in the Navy for almost eight years. Representing the Navy and chiefs mess, in front of thousands of people at one of the most important naval heritage exhibits in the area, is going to be one of the highlights of my induction that I will remember for the rest of my life. Now that I have learned about what happened with the capture of the U-505, I will take the lessons of honor, courage, and com mitment that those U.S. Sailors showed and instill those same core values in Sailors in todays Navy. Overall, the U-505 has been a great experience. I would recommend that anyone who gets the chance make a trip down to Chicago to see the exhibit and learn the story behind the exhibit for themselves. In my lifetime, I can recall going to museums and wishing I had a guide, said Chief Hospital Corpsman (select) Shante Morris. Having someone to explain the artifacts or the signicance of a time period, in laymans terms, would have made my experience more enlightening. So when the opportunity arose to be a volunteer at the museum I was elated. e museum was captivating; the atmosphere was exciting for kids and adults alike. ey were genuine about their interactions with the visitors and were excited the entire time I visited. I expect to be infected by that excitement and help carry out the museums mission and vision. I love interacting with people, so this is going to be an awesome experience, said the Atlanta, Ga. native who has served in the Navy for close to 15 years. Not many people are aorded the opportu nity to make a dierence in a young persons life and I am honored that they are entrusting me to do so.