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The Kings Bay periscope ( 09-06-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00268

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00268


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Afghan mission in focusObama pledges responsibility in U.S. drawdowne United States will remain focused on the mission in Af ghanistan while working toward ending the war in a responsible way that protects everything its military members have sacri ced for there, President Barack Obama said Aug. 31. Obama traveled to Fort Bliss, Texas, to honor ser vice members he credited with making a turnaround in Iraq and also helping Afghanistan chart its own new future. You left Iraq with honor, your mission complete, your heads high, the president told the as sembly of active, National Guard and reserve troops and their families. And today Iraq has a chance to forge its own destiny. Last visiting Fort Bliss two years ago, Obama recalled re minding the troops there that we had more work to do, in cluding taking the ght to alQaida. Flashing forward to today, the president cited progress. With allies and partners, weve taken out more top al-Qaida terrorists than at any time since 9/11, he said. And thanks to the courage of our forces, al-Qaida is on the road to defeat, and bin Laden will never again threaten the United States of America. Obama recognized Fort Bliss troops who have recently re turned from Afghanistan or are currently deployed there, and some scheduled to deploy soon. Ive got to tell you the truth, he said. is is still a very tough ght. e president recognized the sacrices made, noting that he met earlier today with Gold Star families who lost loved ones in the conict. Your loved ones live on in the soul of the nation. We will honor them always, he told the family members. Because of their sacrice, be cause of your service, we pushed Recent rise of insider attacks prompts situation re-vetting In light of a recent rise in insider attacks against coalition forces, U.S. Forces Afghanistan ocials have suspended the training of about 1,000 Afghan Local Police recruits, pending re-vetting of current partici pants in the program. Ocials emphasized that partnered operations with Af ghan forces will continue, and that NATO training for the Af ghan National Army and Afghan National Police are not aected by the suspen sion of the local police program, in which U.S. forc es train recruits, in cooperation with Afghani stans Interior Ministry and provincial police chiefs, to provide security in remote communities. While we have full trust and condence in our Afghan part ners, we believe this is a necessary step to validate our vetting process and ensure the quality indicative of Afghan Local Police, Army Col. Thomas Col lins, U.S. Forces Af ghanistan spokes man, said in a written statement. Special Operations Forces has a strong and trusted rela tionship with its Afghan part ners that has endured more than a decade, Collins added. Despite the recent rise in insider attacks, they are relatively rare among [special operations] partnered forces. International Security Assis tance Force ocials announced that Afghan and Australian troops on a partnered mission in Afghanistans Uruzgan province had captured a key facilitator who orches trated an Aug. 29 insider at tack that killed three Australian soldiers and wounded two. Action options eyed against author of bid Laden raid booke Defense Department has sent an advisory letter of mate rial breach and nondisclosure violation to a former Navy Seal who authored a book about his participation in the Osama bin Laden raid, Pentagon ocials said Aug. 31 in Washington. In the book No Easy Day, the author, using the pen name Mark Owen, divulges information Navy SEALs used during the raid, which Pentagon ocials said may contain classied information, putting military members at risk in future operations. e letter is intended to put on re cord our very serious concerns about what we believe was a material breach of [a] nondisclosure agreement with the Department of De fense, Pentagon Press Secre tary George Little said. We take these agreements and we take our obligation to protect classi ed information very seriously. In a letter sent to the publishing company and dated Aug. 30, DOD General Counsel Jeh Charles Johnson explained that Owen signed two separate nondisclosure agreements on Jan. 24, 2007, and that the author has an obligation to never divulge classied information. Owen also signed a Sensi tive Compartmented Information Debrieng Memorandum following his departure from the Navy in April 2012, and that commitment remains in force even upon leaving active duty, according to the DOD letter. Since Owen elected to forgo pre-publication review with the department before publishing the book, the DOD is weighing its options, in terms of what legal actions it will pursue, Little said. e Department of Defense has obtained and reviewed an advanced copy of the book ... In the judgment of the Department of Defense, you are in mate rial breach and violation of the nondisclosure agreements you signed, the letter said. Further public dissemination of your book will aggravate your breach and violation of your agreements. e Department is consider ing pursuing against you, and all those acting in concert with you, all remedies legally available to us in light of this situation, the letter added. Little said that commendable actions or current status do not indemnify Owen or any other past and present DOD employ ee from punitive action should they violate the terms of nondis closure agreements. I would applaud anyone who participated in one of the most successful military and in telligence operations in history, Little said. But even those who participated in such a mission have a serious and enduring obligation to follow the process and to help protect classied in formation. Up Periscope Coast Guard front and center in military quotes Page 9 Service dog Nathan begins training in West Virginia Page 10 No. 1 photog CHINFO names Group 10s Kimber Navys finest Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com We take these [nondisclosure] agreements ... very seriously George Little Pentagon spokesman School students need to wear helmets while riding bikes Adequate sidewalks and bicycle paths are provided in most areas onboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay and should be used when riding a bike on this installation. Helmets will be worn by all personnel while riding a bike on Kings Bay. is includes in base housing as well. Passing through housing af ter school, I saw at least 12 children riding bikes without hel mets, NSB Kings Bay Trac Safety Manager Russ Prothero said. ey need to have them on, be cause even a fall from 2-inches can be fatal. In addition, all active duty military personnel shall wear an approved bicycle helmet on or o this installation. Securely fastened hard hats may be worn for bicycle operators at indus trial work sites. When riding on sidewalks or bicycle paths, riders need to give sucient room when rid ing around pedestrians on the paths, so they dont acciden tally move into your path. At night, or in periods of reduced visibility, personnel are encouraged to wear reective clothing or other reective garments when traveling near roadways. When it is not possible to ride on the sidewalks or bi cycle paths, bicycle operators riding on Kings Bay roadways shall ride with the trac, in single le, obeying trac rules while properly wearing brightly colored reective clothing be tween sunset and sunrise and a Hands-free devices outlawed A recent change to the Navy Trac Safety Instruction OPNAVINST 5100.12 series read dresses cell phone, texting and driver distractions. It now reads All motor vehicle operators on Navy installations and operators of government-owned and leased vehicles, including rental cars while on temporary additional duty, on and o Navy installations shall not use cell phones or other hand-held elec tronic devices unless the vehicle is safely parked. e old instruction al lowed the use of handsfree devices is no longer the case. Your vehicle must be safely parked. Additionally, the wearing of any portable headphones, earphones, or other listening devices while operating a motor vehicle is prohibited. Military and civilian personnel who oper ate PMVs o base shall comply with host nation, State and local laws. All personnel are encour aged to refrain from any activity that may be a distraction while driving and lead to trac mis haps, including eating, text messaging, adjust ing the radio or compact disc player, shaving, ap plying make-up, reading maps, newspapers, magazines, books and more.Bicycle safety stressed at NSB DoD censures ex-SEAL for security breach U.S. suspends Afghan local police training Despite the recent rise ... they are relatively rare .. Col. Thomas Collins U.S. Forces Afghan spokesman

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Now hear this! e White House initiative to hire veterans and military spouses has surpassed its goals, having led to the hiring or training of more than 125,000 veterans and spouses in the past year, First Lady Michelle Obama announced Aug 22. Speaking to sailors and their families at Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla., the rst lady said 2,000 companies have hired 125,000 employees through their pledges to the Joining Forces campaign, and, of those, 140 employers have hired 28,000 military spouses. ats 125,000 people who are providing for their families, contributing to our economy and serving the country they love, Obama said. e rst lady said she has a clear message to troops, spouses and vet erans: When you nish your ser vice to your nation, youve got 2,000 great companies waiting to bring you on board. ese companies are not just making these commitments because its the right thing to do, which it is, but because its the right thing for their bottom line. Obama said she had heard a thousand times over from heads of companies who say veterans and military spouses are their best em ployees. Unemployment still is too high for veterans and military spous es, but Joining Forces has helped to push the national veteran unemploy ment rate down nearly 20 percent from a year ago, Obama said. e veteran unemployment rate in July was 6.9 percent, compared to 8.6 percent in July 2011, Joining Forces ocials said during a call with reporters Aug. 21. ough the initiative has exceed ed its goals, Obama said, the partici pating companies have pledged to hire another 250,000 veterans and spouses, with at least 50,000 of that total being spouses. It would be understandable if these companies just stopped now and patted themselves on the back and called it a day, the rst lady said. But these companies are doing just the opposite. e rst lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, started Joining Forces in April 2011 to rally Americans to actively sup port service members and their families in areas of employment, education and wellness. A year ago, President Barack Obama asked Joining Forces to chal lenge the private sector to hire or train 100,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2013. I thought this challenge was pretty ambitious, the rst lady, said, noting that the eort was launched with just two partner companies. Before long, companies all over this country had started stepping up. By April, they had hired 60,000 veterans and spouses, and by May, the number was 80,000. e federal government has made the same commitment, and veter ans and spouses made up 28 per cent of all federal hiring last year, a White House ocial told reporters. Also at the event, Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval person nel, said he supports Joining Forces because it has had a huge impact on Sailors, their spouses and veterans. eyve shined a spotlight on the unique needs and strengths of military families and veterans, he said. e Joining Forces initiative to make professional licenses por table from state to state for military spouses is near and dear to my heart, Van Buskirk said. His wife is a speech pathologist who has had to recertify multiple times, he explained. With constant transfers, our spouses face challenges that can be daunting, he added. Joining Forces Onward and upward for jobs eort All four active services and ve of the six reserve components met or exceeded their numeri cal accession goals for scal 2012 through July, Pentagon ocials reported. e only shortfall the Army Reserve was intentional as part of a force balancing plan, ocials said. Here are the numbers: Army: 47,817 accessions, 101 percent of its goal of 47,300; Navy: 28,507 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 28,483; Marine Corps: 21,462 acces sions, 100 percent of its goal of 21,416; Air Force: 23,988 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 23,974; Army National Guard: 40,127 accessions, 103 percent of its goal of 38,940; Army Reserve: 21,725 acces sions, 98 percent of its goal of 22,194; Navy Reserve: 6,652 acces sions, 100 percent of its goal of 6,652; Marine Corps Reserve: 7,925 accessions, 104 percent of its goal of 7,652; Air National Guard: 7,333 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 7,319; and Air Force Reserve: 7,121 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 7,121. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force all exhibited strong retention through the tenth month of scal 2012, ocials said, and all reserve components are on target to achieve their s cal year attrition goals. Recruiting Services meeting recruiting goals Navy Medicine headquarters an nounced a $49 million pharmacy improvement project Aug. 30 that will improve safety and eciency of its outpatient prescriptions process es and lead to shorter wait times for patients. Naval Medical Logistics Com mand awarded an indenite deliv ery indenite quantity contract this month to update and expand phar macy automation. ere are three distinct advantages to the improvements that are being made, said Capt. Edward Norton, the pharmacy specialty leader for the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. e pro gram is going to improve wait times and pharmacy processes, which is a direct benet to our patients; its go ing to provide a means of standard ization across the enterprise; and it is going to replace obsolete equip ment. Another major objective for the program is to improve the quality of dispensing. Navy Medicine phar macies currently vary from manual operations directed by paper to some limited automation processes. is new Navy pharmacy auto mation system consists of the latest automation technology, said Tim Ward, deputy director of Program Analysis and Evaluation at BUMED. Forty to 50 percent of patient pre scriptions will be lled, labeled, capped and assembled with the rel evant patient literature exclusively by the automation. e new highly automated process will be much faster and more accurate than the process it is replacing. is process also improves the ef fectiveness and safety of the phar macy systems. It is the goal of this program to improve the overall quality by re ducing the opportunities for errors, Norton said. It has been shown that extremely high levels of quality can be attained by complete automation and system controlled manual dis pensing. e program also will increase the volume capability of the pharmacies within the currently allocated space while reducing the total process ing time to less than 30 minutes for at least 90 percent of the customers during peak hours. Since our customers have a choice to wait or to utilize alterna tive commercial retail pharmacies, reducing their wait times and increasing their satisfaction is our main priority, Norton said. Other objectives of this program will reduce operating costs related to improved inventory manage ment, ecient sta utilization while maintaining protection of Personally Identiable Information and increase security. Currently many of the outpatient pharmacies also process rells. At some pharmacies, the rells are processed during the normal work ing day while at others are accom plished o-shift. e process ow software of a proposed system shall enable rells to be lled either during the normal working day, with a low priority so as to not impact customer wait time, or to be deferred to o-shift process ing, Norton said. ree sites have been identied as proof of concept locations and are expected to be completed by spring 2013. e rst sites to receive the new equipment will be Naval Medical Center San Diego, Calif., Naval Med ical Center Portsmouth, Va., and Na val Health Clinic Cherry Point, N.C. Installation of the new equipment at the rst three sites starts in Feb ruary with full operating capability anticipated at all three proof of con cept sites by May 2013. Navy Medicine is excited about this project and look forward to its full execution, Norton said. e new automation systems will pro vide the capacity to meet the chang ing and expanding needs of our beneciary population. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel who provide health care support to the Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high operational tempo environments, at expedition ary medical facilities, medical treat ment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world. Navy Medicine Navy upgrades pharmacy automationTown Hall meeting set for Sept. 19A joint Town Hall meeting will be at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Kings Bay Audito rium. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, Commander, Submarine Group Ten, and Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, invite all hands and their spouses to attend and express any concerns. Daycare services will be provided at the Child Development Center. All active duty, single and married, and spouses are highly encour aged to attend. For more information, contact Lisa Mastone at (912) 573-4513.CPO Select yard sale is Sept. 8 e Annual Kings Bay Chief Petty Ocer Se lectee Yard Sale is 6 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sept. 8 at the Advanced Collision Center on Georgia 40 in Kingsland. If you have any questions about this event or would like to donate items con tact MTC (Select) Brandon Shellenberger at (912) 674-1917.GMACC visits NSB Sept. 13, 14 e Georgia Military Aairs Coordinat ing Committee quarterly meeting is Sept. 13 and 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead (Ret.) will present a brief.Braccio guest speaker for MOAAe Military Ocers of America Associations monthly dinner-meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Sept. 11 at Osprey Coves Mor gan Grill. e guest speaker will be Dominick Braccio, assistant director of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers Glynco Training Directorate. For reservations, contact Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net by Sept. 7.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, re serve and retired military, Department of De fense and Non-appropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities compa rable to other quality hotels and fabulous des tinations worldwide. Its easy to make reserva tions. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the cen tral reservations line at (877) 628-9233.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course.Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories col lected from veterans in attendance.MOMS meet-and-greet Sept. 17Moms Oering Moms Support of Kingslands meet-and-greet is 11 a.m., Sept. 17 at How ard Peeples Park. MOMS will provide a picnic lunch. e group supports mothers who stay at home to raise children. For more information, visit momsclubofkingsland@hotmail.com.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Sept. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Sept. 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Sept. 11. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 11, 18 and 25. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 10 to 13 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be regis tered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the posi tive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 11. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Returning to Children workshop Sept. 13Children can feel the effects of deployment, too. Learn to rec ognize your childrens positive and negative behaviors in relation to the deployment, homecoming and reintegration of their military parent. This class will be 10 to 11 a.m., Sept. 13. Call 573-4512 to register and for more information.Job fair preparation covers key questionsThe job fair is next week What do I bring? How do I know who to talk to? What should I wear? What time should I arrive. What should my portfolio contain. Who should I speak to first? These and other questions will be discussed along with a brief question-and-answer period for those who are still unsure on how to shop a job fair. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 13. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpDue to the uniqueness of these deployments, Fleet and Family Support Center is com mitted to assisting with all fac ets of the pre-deployment pro cedures. This brief prepares Sailors and their family mem bers through the Individual Augmentee pre-deployment process, mid-deployment sup port, post-deployment followup, and ensures they are equipped with the proper resources. The class is 9 to 11 a.m., Sept. 19. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Credit Management workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of man aging your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center., 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Sept. 25Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distrac tions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they inter act with their spouse Build intimacy and com munication Become closer by strength ening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited. a CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 e ery Two Coast Guard Special Purpose Craft-Screening Vessels and a sea gull escort USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) en route to sea for routine operations, Jan. 18. MC1 James Kim 2011 Nvy Potojournai he Ya Sbain Grou Tens

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Two former military advisors who served with Vietnamese units during the Vietnam War spoke about their experiences in the Pentagon Aug. 28 and shared their thoughts on advi sory programs and counterinsurgency operations. Retired Marine Corps Gen. Anthony Zinni and retired Army Lt. Col. James Willbanks took part in a panel discussion on Ad visors in the Vietnam War along with Andrew Birtle, chief of the Military Operations Branch at the Army Center of Military His tory. e panel was part of the His torical Speakers Series sponsored by the Oce of the Secretary of Defense Historical Oce. Birtle opened the program with an overview of the U.S. advisory eort in Vietnam. An expert on counterinsur gency operations doctrine who authored books on the subject, Birtle outlined the development of the military advisor program from the rst U.S. advisors in 1950 until end of the war in the early 1970s. Perhaps the most common emotion advisors experienced in Vietnam was the frustration of being held responsible for something they could not con trol, Birtle said. Nothing was more frustrating than the feelings that ones eorts were falling on fallow ground. Zinni spoke after Birtle, shar ing his experiences as an advisor to a Vietnamese Marine unit in 1967. e general, who eventually rose through the ranks to lead U.S. Central Command, said his primary duties as an advisor in Vietnam were to help coordi nate re support, air capability and operations with U.S. units. Working, living and eating with the Vietnamese and op erating all over South Vietnam gave him an insight into the conict that he said he wouldnt have gotten otherwise. ose who saw that war from inside a U.S. unit despite the fact that certainly they saw plen ty of combat, as we did they saw a dierent war than I did, Zinni said. I saw the war through the eyes of the Vietnamese people. I saw the war through the eyes of villagers that I lived with. I saw the war through the eyes of Viet namese soldiers and Marines there who werent there on oneyear tours, but were there for the duration, he said. I saw the war from the Delta to the DMZ. I saw the war from Cambodia to the coastal plains in the east. And it was a totally dierent perspec tive than I was hearing from my counterparts. Zinni said he saw the most benets result from Vietnam ese units that built relation ships with U.S. units over time, in which U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers could get to know and trust each other over time. He said it worked well with relative ly small Marine Corps units, as well as with Army airborne and Ranger units. One of the strengths of the advisor unit, besides the fact that we didnt have advisory teams and we sort of immersed ourselves into their organization and culture, is that we connect ed to the Vietnamese Marines very closely, Zinni said. But Zinni said there was a price to pay for being that close to the local forces. e advisory eort, when you were totally immersed in the culture, took a toll on you. By the time my advisory tour was coming near to its end I had contracted malaria, mono nucleosis, dysentery and hepatitis, Zinni said. I was down to 123 pounds. is was not an uncommon Advisors explain what went wrong in Vietnam Lost ight rememberedNavy Information Operations Command Maryland hosted the 40th anniversary commemoration ceremo ny Aug. 30 for the Sailors of ight RG-407 that crashed during the Vietnam War. e ceremony honored 10 Sailors and their families with a 21-gun salute and ags presented to the attend ing families. I think its just a wonderful day to bring all of us to gether the other families also because it wasnt just my husband, said Betty Dickerson Tomaino. But all the rest who were here to share in this time that part was good because I always wondered who the other people were. After 40 years, the reasons behind ight RG-407s crash are still unanswered, but the sacrice and mem ory of those 10 Sailors will live on in their families and the memorial wall that was constructed in their honor. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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phenomenon for service members in advisory roles. Most of the advisors suered health issues and very few advisors nished a whole tour without a sig nicant health problem or eventually being evacu ated because of a health problem, Zinni said. Despite the physical hardships, Zinni said the experience gave him a sense of what this war was all about and made him realize that the U.S. was failing to give the South Vietnamese people a good enough reason to put their lives on the line. If we didnt capture the hearts of the people, if we couldnt give them something to ght for, if we werent willing to ensure that the government was responsible to people, and we werent willing to cut o a base of supply that was endless, we eventually could not win that con ict, despite all the victo ries on the battleeld, he said. Zinni said he felt military leaders did not pay enough attention to knowledge gained in Viet nam, as attention shifted elsewhere after the war ended. Vietnam was rich in the lessons we never learned, he said. e en emy beat us strategically; they didnt beat us tacti cally. ey didnt beat us in terms of what we were able to develop in military capability with the South Vietnamese, but they beat us psychologically, and they beat us strategically. at lesson was never car ried over. Willbanks spoke after Zinni. Now the direc tor of the Department of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Sta College, Willbanks arrived in Viet nam as an advisor in 1971, when only four U.S. Army infantry battalions and a total of fewer than 125,000 U.S. troops were left in the country. He was assigned to an advisory team supporting an Army of the Republic of Vietnam, or ARVN, divi sion. I was a captain with two and a half years in ser vice, on my rst combat tour, Willbanks said. I was being asked to advise a 40-year-old ARVN bat talion commander, a lieu tenant colonel who had been ghting most of his adult life. Because of his lower rank and relative inexpe rience, Willbanks said he sometimes had diculty in getting the battalion commanders to listen to his advice. His duties during the early part of his tour in volved assisting and train ing the Vietnamese in sta operations, acting as liai son to the remaining U.S. units in the area, helping with combat operations planning and accompanying the battalions on com bat operations in the eld. Willbanks said everything changed when the North Vietnamese launched the Easter Of fensive on March 31, 1972. He volunteered to replace a wounded advisor in pro vincial capital city of An Loc, where a battle raged day and night for the next two and a half months. At this point, the focus of my eorts shifted to coordinating U.S. combat support, Willbanks said. I spent all my time adjusting artillery at least in the beginning, and pretty soon we had no artillery to adjust air strikes, and also coordinating attack helicopters and xed-wing gunships, calling for dusto medical evacuation and coordinat ing aerial resupply. Willbanks said being in An Lac at that time was an experience dierent than anything he had ever con ceived. It was a desperate battle that seesawed back and forth as the North Vietnamese and the South Vietnamese forces fought each other, sometimes house to house, block to block, room to room, he said. e South Vietnamese forces held out, and the battle began to die down as the summer wore on, but Willbanks was wound ed for a second time and evacuated from the city.Vietnam THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 7

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I was in a pretty good storm at sea once. But on a 14,000-ton dock landing ship, it was more fun than frightening. I cant imagine being out in that on any thing smaller, though I have to imagine the Coast Guard does it all the time. I moved to Florida from Keokuk, Iowa, on the Mississippi River, which has a Coast Guard station. I asked a petty officer there where he was from, and he replied, California. So I asked him when he enlisted if he thought hed be stationed in Iowa. No, was all he said. Capt. Patrick Etheridge, Life-Saving Service The Blue Book says weve got to go out, and it doesnt say a damn thing about having to come back. U.S. Rep. Howard Coble North Carolina The Coast Guard has long been known as the armed service that gets more done for less. Unknown Great ship. Great crew. Merry Christmas. Turn to. U.S. Rep. Howard Coble North Carolina In the wake of Katrina, the Coast Guard may well have been the only entity or agency that came out of that exercise free of fault and free of blame. Sr. Chief Bernard C. Webber (Ret.) Coast Guard I reasoned that I was a Coast Guard first class boatswains mate. My job was the sea and to save those in peril upon it. Rear Adm. R. R. Waesche Coast Guard The cat with nine lives is a piker compared to the Coast Guard. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho History ONR seeks laser weapons e Oce of Naval Research continues to seek industry proposals to develop an aordable solid-state laser weapon prototype for Navy ships, part of a broad agency an nouncement Aug. 14. We are in the process of developing a laser weapon prototype for the naval surface eet to counter small unmanned aerial vehicles and small boat threats, said Chief of Na val Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder. ONR hosted an indus try day in May to provide the research and development community with information about its Sol id-State Laser Technology Maturation program. Managers incorporated feedback into the announcement, which solicits industrys invest ment in the program on a number of levels, from subcomponents to sys tems design. Were looking for an open systems solution to this warghting capability because we believe its cost eective and can provide the best value to the gov ernment, said Peter Mor rison, ONR program ocer. e SSL-TM program builds upon ONRs direct ed-energy developments in kilowatt-scale lasers. Among the programs, the Maritime Laser Dem onstration developed a proof-of-concept technology that was tested at sea in 2011 aboard a decom missioned Navy ship. e demonstrator was able to disable a small boat target. During the rst week of August o the Califor nia coast the Naval Sea Systems Command, ONR and Navy Air and Missile Defense Command spon sored a series of successful laser weapon concept de velopment tests aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer. e Navy intends to use the technical data collect ed from this test to inform potential development of a Navy laser weapon system. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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Veterans Moving For ward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the pup pies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Na thans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in our series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As a future service dog my training takes many forms. I must understand human words and exe cute them, I must possess situational awareness so I know what is appropriate and I must have exposure to many types of things and places as many as my human handler can think of so when I grow up nothing will scare me. If something does startle me I have to learn to recover quickly cause people depend on me. So when I was 4 months old I got to go to I cant say visit as that word means for me to gently put my head in a humans lap the U.S. Fish and Wildlief Services National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia. Wow! What a great place for a dog and people too. e center is tucked into the woods along the Potomac River. ere are trails to hike, lots of new smells, wildlife to see, a place to swim, new peo ple to meet and, oh, did I mention the smells! ey train all sorts of people to do all sorts of things here. ere are courses in mi gratory bird conservation, endangered species, ref uge management, habitat restoration, leadership training and even uvial geomorphology. Yeah that one puzzled me at rst too, but it is all about river behavior and I love swim ming in rivers, so I want to take that one next. My handler was at the center for her training, but I got to learn a few things too. For one thing, I had to pay attention to my han dler but be quiet during her class. Okay, so I fell asleep under the tables a few times, but that is OK for me. But maybe I should not have been snor ing and lay ing on my back with my belly ex posed? e main thing was that I not be a distraction. Come on, look at my face, how can I be a distraction? e commons is where humans eat and talk. Wow, the smells in there were nearly overwhelming. And people walking from one place to another. e rst room has all this food that humans eat and they walk from one side to another with people handing them food. It is very confusing in there for a pup. How is a pup supposed to act with all that going on? Well, I learned to stay close to my trainer. Preferably by her side and not to tug on the leash or the food on her tray might go ying. Honest, I was good and only thought about doing that once. My favorite part is lying under the table on the cool hardwood oor. People dont even know I am there. In the evening I was taken to the tavern. People sit around and talk and eat popcorn. Again I had to lie under the table and try not to eat the pop corn that fell on the oor just a tongue-length away. is training stu is tough. Probably the hardest thing for me to learn was to get used to the other animals. is is the USFWS training center, so there are grizzly bears yes, I am not kidding. ey are very big. It took me a while to be comfortable being in the same room with the grizzly. Eventually, with my hu mans help, I realized that this grizzly was not going to hurt me. ey also have caribou and wolves, which were not as scary as the grizzly. And all these are the animals on the inside. It is a whole other world outside. We walk outside to get from the classroom to where we sleep for the night and from there to where the humans eat. It is all through the woods, not like where my handlers oce is in the city. Outside there are deer I could not chase, squirrels who taunted me to chase them, crows that asked what I was doing there and bald eagles who looked down at me from their big nest in the tree. All creatures I had to try to ignore. To get my mind o all the animals my handler would give me jobs to do. Like carry her umbrella for her. I was happy to do that for her. After a few minutes the umbrella got heavier and heavier. But I did not let go until she asked me to give it to her. She praised me and gave me a big hug for car rying it for her. Between you and me, I was relieved she asked for it back. Another reason the US FWS training center feels so comfortable to me is because there are several retired Coast Guardsmen who work there and the Coast Guard has heldbusi ness meetings and other gatherings there. One retired Coast Guardsman, Capt. Bill Ashforth, is my friend. After 27 years with the Coast Guard he now ap plies the skills he honed in the Coast Guard to the USFWS. Bill was the com manding ocer of the Coast Guards Operational Systems Center located only a few miles from the training center. He said working for the USFWS felt like com ing home after the Coast Guard the sense of mission in both is doing something larger than yourself. I am starting to under stand my sense of mission; honor, respect and devo tion to duty. Even carrying my humans umbrella for a long way with the squir rels teasing me. Stay tuned for my next blog about my Canadian roots. Nathan Service dog Nathan starts training Life of a Service Dog Part 5 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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e CocoLoco Luau is 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the RackN-Roll Entertainment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, in atables, music, contests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more informa tion call (912) 5739492. Movie Under the Stars Its at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the new location at Under the Pines Park by the tennis courts. The feature presentation will Madagascar 3, rated PG. Bring your own lawn chair, blankets and settle in for a great movie on a hugh outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for this showing. For more information call (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. Kick-o begins at 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 5 For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Night of Comedy Its at 8 p.m., ursday, Sept. 13 at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Have a few laughs with comedians Adam Mamawala and Robbie Printz. For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served Beverages will be available for purchase. You can visit the come dians Web sites at www.adammamawala.com/ and www.rob bieprintz.com. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face horrors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted hous es, spine-tingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill, Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blan kets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is look ing for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on week ends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Day for Kids is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Youth Center. Sched uled are free recreational outdoor activities, refreshments available for pur chase from Chick-l-A and local youth demonstrations, including dance and martial arts. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth Programs welcome children of all abil ities. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 8 and 9 is The Sandlot, Sept. 15, 16 Dr. Suess: The Lorax Sept. 22, 23 Winnie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Officials are needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Day for Kids Sept. 15 Just for kids Luau Sept. 14 at Rack-N-Roll Liberty call bicycle helmet approved by the Consumer Prod uct Safety Commission or Snell Memorial Foun dation at all times. If hazards on sidewalks/bicycle paths are no ticed, report them to NSB Safety at 573-2525 not ing the exact location of the hazard. Required safety equipment for bicycles will in clude working brakes and reectors. For bicycles ridden between sunset and sunrise, a white light on the front with the light being vis ible from a distance of at least 500 feet, and a red reector on the rear that is visible at a distance of at least 600 feet is required. ese lights may be steady burning or blinking. Bright clothing including vests, caps, and ankle and wrist straps, with retroreective materials incorporated in them is required to make the bicy clist more noticeable. Wearing portable headphones, earphones, cel lular handsfree devices, iPods, or other listening devices while bicycling in roadways and streets impairs recognition of emergency signals, alarms, announcements and the approach of emergency vehicles. Use of these devices while performing the noted activities onboard Kings Bay is prohib ited. Gas-powered or electric mini-bikes, pocket bikes or motorcycles that do not meet Department of Transportation motor vehicle standards will not be used on Navy installation roadways.Safety THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and On ions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sand wiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley Aircrew from several Naval Air Station Jacksonville-based squadrons trained at Aviation Survival Training Center Jack sonville Aug. 27 and 28 to refresh their skills on aircraft emergen cy procedures. NAS Jacksonvilles ASTC is one of eight facilities around the country that are tasked to pro vide safe and eective survival training for aviators and aircrew. Training includes classroom lectures and simulator devices in a curriculum that emphasizes hands-on exposure to survival skills. New aviators and aircrew undergo their initial survival training at NAS Pensacola, Fla., after which they are required to attend an ASTC refresher course every four years. ASTC Jacksonville provides a modern facility and advanced training equipment to keep air crews certied in their survival skills. e detachments three train ing departments include: Avia tion Physiol ogy; Aviation Water Survival; and Bay Operations and Parachute Training. Training scenarios take place in a large swimming pool with an aircraft egress trainer for teaching basic water survival; a low-pressure chamber that simulates the eects of high alti tude; an ejection seat and virtual reality parachute trainer; and a parachute landing fall area where aircrews practice avoiding injury during a parachute landing. Water survival is an impor tant component of the refresher course, and ASTC Jacksonville strives to provide the most real istic, yet safe, training possible. One of the things we simulate in the pool is a rescue situation in a night time storm, said Lt. Matt Shipman, aerospace op erations physiologist for ASTC Jax. Students are subjected to simulated rain, fog, waves, thunder and lightning in a pitch black environment. eir goal is to make it to a life raft and wait for rescue, utilizing the skills we reviewed for them in the class room portion of this training. Also in the pool is the 9D6 underwater egress trainer com monly known as the dunker that simulates an aircraft ditching into a body of water and sinking upside-down. It allows aircrew to practice escaping from a submerged fu selage. Seats, windows and hatches are congured to actual aircraft, such as the SH-60 Seahawk he licopter. In addition, aircrews transitioning from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon will nd their spe cic refresher course changing in the near future. e P-8 is not equipped with parachutes, Shipman said. e curriculum for aircrews is cur rently being modied to reect that. Until these updates are in corporated, we will treat all P-8 aircrews as though they were training for the survival in the P-3. Leading Petty Ocer Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Edison Vargas, an instructor with ASTC Jax, said the facility provides in struction to all branches of the U.S. military while also accom modating civilian police forces, members of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA and allied foreign services. We conduct two classes a week in two-day block periods, with average class sizes from 12 to 18 students, Vargas said. He stated during scal years 2010 and 2011, roughly 2,400 students had taken the refresher course. Even those students who struggle with portions of the sur vival training have the chance to remediate. e more training we can provide to aircrews, the better. Even if its a situation where we have to remediate a student, it only means more training for them, Shipman said. Our fa cility is very accommodating. If a student is reaching their four-year mark and feel like they may struggle, especially with the swimming portion, they are more than welcome to give us a call to get extra training prior to the refresher course. ASTC Jacksonville is a detach ment of Navy Medicine Opera tional Training Center at NAS Pensacola, which serves as the training agent for aviation sur vival training and the subject matter experts on all military operational medicine and the Navy Medicine Education and Training Command in San An tonio and NMETC Detachment Jacksonville aboard NAS Jack sonville. Navy pilots take plunge at NAS Jacksonville 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Recruit Training Command was honored with the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Excellence in Workplace Eectiveness and Flexibility at an event hosted by the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce Aug. 7 at the MidAmerica Club in Chicago. is prestigious award, part of the national When Work Works project, recognizes employers of all sizes and types in Chicago and across the country. e award recognizes businesses and organizations for its use of eective workplace strategies to increase business and employee success. We are thrilled to receive this recognition for our workplace practices, said Capt. John Dye, commanding ocer, RTC. Workplace exibility such as extime, part-time work and compressed workweeks has been demon strated to help businesses remain competitive while also beneting employees. Our research consistently nds that employees in eective and exible workplaces have greater engage ment on the job and greater desire to stay with their or ganization. In addition, they report lower stress levels and better overall health, said Ellen Galinsky, president of Families and Work Institute, which administers the awards with the Society for Human Resource Manage ment. e Sloan Awards are unique for their rigorous, twostep selection process, which involves an evaluation of employers exibility programs and practices, and a condential employee survey. All applicants are measured against national norms from the National Study of Employers. As a recipient of the 2012 Sloan Award, RTC ranks in the top 20 percent of employers nationally in terms of its programs, policies and culture for creating an eec tive and exible workplace, Galinsky said. In addition, what makes this honor so special is that their employees have corroborated this, arming that it is indeed an ef fective and exible workplace. Last year, we were only a nalist, said Chief Gunners Mate Matthew Elliot, who attended the event. I looked the Command Master Chief in the eye and said, Next year, were going to win it. And this year we did win it, so it was a very big honor to go down there with Capt. Dye and the XO to receive the award. Elliot called the ceremony a very good experience because it showed the civilian companies in atten dance how we do business here in the military. ey can look at our structure here, and try to replicate it, he said. When Work Works is a national project to educate the business community on the value of workplace ex ibility by sharing research and promising practices, and conducting the annual Sloan Awards. It is an ongoing initiative of the Families and Work Institute and the Society for Human Resource Manage ment. As the Navys only boot camp, RTC on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., trains more than 37,000 volunteer civilian recruits annually, transforming them into Sailors. Navy College educational information Great Lakes gets prestigious awardOnce he was released from the hospital, he spent the rest of his time helping the ARVN recover from the Easter Oen sive. He said he left the country at the end of his tour feeling pretty good about what hed been able to accomplish in helping the South Vietnamese forces. Speaking generally about advisory eorts, Willbanks said there was less of an empha sis on the advisory eort and a shift away from it once U.S. ground troops started arriv ing in Vietnam. is eventually meant that not all advisors had the right qualications, train ing or ability for the job. e advisory tours were of ten less than 12 months, which created turbulence hampered the ability to form a bond between Vietnamese troops and their U.S. advisors. Eventually, the emphasis began to shift back to the ad visors, as combat troops left Vietnam, but Willbanks said he thought it was too late by that point. From a personal perspec tive, I found the advisory duty very dicult. e duty re quired decisiveness and aggressive pursuit of the mission, but it also called for patience and restraint a conicted mix, to say the least, he said. e reality on the ground of ten ew in the face of the need to report progress. Willbanks said advisors walked a tightrope when it came to their duties. ey had to be involved and proactive without stiing the initiative of the Vietnamese commanders. ey had to be empathetic to their counter parts and understand their cul ture while being honest about the units and their leaders. Perhaps most importantly, Willbanks said, advisors had to nd a way to build a relation ship with their counterparts without making them too de pendent on the advisor and on U.S. combat and service sup port. is proved to be a problem when the U.S. withdrew and the Vietnamese were left on their own. I have to say, even with all the diculties involved, and even knowing how it all turned out, Im proud of what I did as an advisor in Vietnam, and I only wish we could have done more, Willbanks said. e South Vietnamese were good people, and they deserved bet ter than they got. Vietnam the Taliban back, the president said. Were training forces. e transition to Afghan lead is un der way. And, as promised, more than 30,000 of our troops will have come home by next month. Obama oered assurance that just as in Iraq, we are going to end this war responsibility. e Afghans will take the lead for their own security next year, he noted, and the transition will be complete in 2014. And even as this war ends, we will stay vigilant until Afghanistan is never again a source for attacks against America -never again, Obama said, drawing cheers from the crowd. So were not just end ing these wars. Were doing it in a way that keeps America safe and makes America stronger. at, the president said, in cludes the military. Drawing down forces, he said, will mean fewer deployments, which creates more time to train, improve readiness, prepare for the future and recon nect with families. So make no mistake: ending the wars responsibly makes us saf er, and it makes our military even stronger, he said. Obama emphasized, in draw ing down the force in Afghanistan, that the United States must remain ready for the challenges ahead. In a world of serious threats, I will never hesitate to use force to de fend the United States of America or our interests, he said. At the same time, I will only send you into harms way when it is absolutely necessary, he pledged. And when we do, we will give you the equipment and the clear mission and the smart strategy and the sup port back home that you need to get the job done. We owe you that.Afghanistan THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13



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Afghan mission in focusObama pledges responsibility in U.S. drawdowne United States will remain focused on the mission in Afghanistan while working toward ending the war in a responsible way that protects everything its military members have sacriced for there, President Barack Obama said Aug. 31. Obama traveled to Fort Bliss, Texas, to honor service members he credited with making a turnaround in Iraq and also helping Afghanistan chart its own new future. You left Iraq with honor, your mission complete, your heads high, the president told the assembly of active, National Guard and reserve troops and their families. And today Iraq has a chance to forge its own destiny. Last visiting Fort Bliss two years ago, Obama recalled reminding the troops there that we had more work to do, including taking the ght to alQaida. Flashing forward to today, the president cited progress. With allies and partners, weve taken out more top al-Qaida terrorists than at any time since 9/11, he said. And thanks to the courage of our forces, al-Qaida is on the road to defeat, and bin Laden will never again threaten the United States of America. Obama recognized Fort Bliss troops who have recently returned from Afghanistan or are currently deployed there, and some scheduled to deploy soon. Ive got to tell you the truth, he said. is is still a very tough ght. e president recognized the sacrices made, noting that he met earlier today with Gold Star families who lost loved ones in the conict. Your loved ones live on in the soul of the nation. We will honor them always, he told the family members. Because of their sacrice, because of your service, we pushed Recent rise of insider attacks prompts situation re-vetting In light of a recent rise in insider attacks against coalition forces, U.S. Forces Afghanistan ocials have suspended the training of about 1,000 Afghan Local Police recruits, pending re-vetting of current participants in the program. Ocials emphasized that partnered operations with Afghan forces will continue, and that NATO training for the Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police are not aected by the suspen sion of the local police program, in which U.S. forces train recruits, in cooperation with Afghanistans Interior Ministry and provincial police chiefs, to provide security in remote communities. While we have full trust and condence in our Afghan part ners, we believe this is a necessary step to validate our vetting process and ensure the quality indicative of Afghan Local Police, Army Col. Thomas Col lins, U.S. Forces Af ghanistan spokes man, said in a written statement. Special Operations Forces has a strong and trusted relationship with its Afghan partners that has endured more than a decade, Collins added. Despite the recent rise in insider attacks, they are relatively rare among [special operations] partnered forces. International Security Assistance Force ocials announced that Afghan and Australian troops on a partnered mission in Afghanistans Uruzgan province had captured a key facilitator who orchestrated an Aug. 29 insider attack that killed three Australian soldiers and wounded two. Action options eyed against author of bid Laden raid booke Defense Department has sent an advisory letter of material breach and nondisclosure violation to a former Navy Seal who authored a book about his participation in the Osama bin Laden raid, Pentagon ocials said Aug. 31 in Washington. In the book No Easy Day, the author, using the pen name Mark Owen, divulges information Navy SEALs used during the raid, which Pentagon ocials said may contain classied information, putting military members at risk in future operations. e letter is intended to put on record our very serious concerns about what we believe was a material breach of [a] nondisclosure agreement with the Department of Defense, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. We take these agreements and we take our obligation to protect classied information very seriously. In a letter sent to the publishing company and dated Aug. 30, DOD General Counsel Jeh Charles Johnson explained that Owen signed two separate nondisclosure agreements on Jan. 24, 2007, and that the author has an obligation to never divulge classied information. Owen also signed a Sensitive Compartmented Information Debrieng Memorandum following his departure from the Navy in April 2012, and that commitment remains in force even upon leaving active duty, according to the DOD letter. Since Owen elected to forgo pre-publication review with the department before publishing the book, the DOD is weighing its options, in terms of what legal actions it will pursue, Little said. e Department of Defense has obtained and reviewed an advanced copy of the book ... In the judgment of the Department of Defense, you are in material breach and violation of the nondisclosure agreements you signed, the letter said. Further public dissemination of your book will aggravate your breach and violation of your agreements. e Department is considering pursuing against you, and all those acting in concert with you, all remedies legally available to us in light of this situation, the letter added. Little said that commendable actions or current status do not indemnify Owen or any other past and present DOD employee from punitive action should they violate the terms of nondisclosure agreements. I would applaud anyone who participated in one of the most successful military and intelligence operations in history, Little said. But even those who participated in such a mission have a serious and enduring obligation to follow the process and to help protect classied information. Up Periscope Coast Guard front and center in military quotes Page 9 Service dog Nathan begins training in West Virginia Page 10 No. 1 photog CHINFO names Group 10s Kimber Navys finest Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com We take these [nondisclosure] agreements ... very seriously George Little Pentagon spokesman School students need to wear helmets while riding bikes Adequate sidewalks and bicycle paths are provided in most areas onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and should be used when riding a bike on this installation. Helmets will be worn by all personnel while riding a bike on Kings Bay. is includes in base housing as well. Passing through housing after school, I saw at least 12 children riding bikes without helmets, NSB Kings Bay Trac Safety Manager Russ Prothero said. ey need to have them on, because even a fall from 2-inches can be fatal. In addition, all active duty military personnel shall wear an approved bicycle helmet on or o this installation. Securely fastened hard hats may be worn for bicycle operators at industrial work sites. When riding on sidewalks or bicycle paths, riders need to give sucient room when riding around pedestrians on the paths, so they dont accidentally move into your path. At night, or in periods of reduced visibility, personnel are encouraged to wear reective clothing or other reective garments when traveling near roadways. When it is not possible to ride on the sidewalks or bicycle paths, bicycle operators riding on Kings Bay roadways shall ride with the trac, in single le, obeying trac rules while properly wearing brightly colored reective clothing between sunset and sunrise and a Hands-free devices outlawed A recent change to the Navy Trac Safety Instruction OPNAVINST 5100.12 series read dresses cell phone, texting and driver distractions. It now reads All motor vehicle operators on Navy installations and operators of government-owned and leased vehicles, including rental cars while on temporary additional duty, on and o Navy installations shall not use cell phones or other hand-held electronic devices unless the vehicle is safely parked. e old instruction allowed the use of handsfree devices is no longer the case. Your vehicle must be safely parked. Additionally, the wearing of any portable headphones, earphones, or other listening devices while operating a motor vehicle is prohibited. Military and civilian personnel who operate PMVs o base shall comply with host nation, State and local laws. All personnel are encouraged to refrain from any activity that may be a distraction while driving and lead to trac mishaps, including eating, text messaging, adjusting the radio or compact disc player, shaving, applying make-up, reading maps, newspapers, magazines, books and more.Bicycle safety stressed at NSB DoD censures ex-SEAL for security breach U.S. suspends Afghan local police training Despite the recent rise ... they are relatively rare .. Col. Thomas Collins U.S. Forces Afghan spokesman

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Now hear this! e White House initiative to hire veterans and military spouses has surpassed its goals, having led to the hiring or training of more than 125,000 veterans and spouses in the past year, First Lady Michelle Obama announced Aug 22. Speaking to sailors and their families at Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla., the rst lady said 2,000 companies have hired 125,000 employees through their pledges to the Joining Forces campaign, and, of those, 140 employers have hired 28,000 military spouses. ats 125,000 people who are providing for their families, contributing to our economy and serving the country they love, Obama said. e rst lady said she has a clear message to troops, spouses and veterans: When you nish your service to your nation, youve got 2,000 great companies waiting to bring you on board. ese companies are not just making these commitments because its the right thing to do, which it is, but because its the right thing for their bottom line. Obama said she had heard a thousand times over from heads of companies who say veterans and military spouses are their best em ployees. Unemployment still is too high for veterans and military spous es, but Joining Forces has helped to push the national veteran unemploy ment rate down nearly 20 percent from a year ago, Obama said. e veteran unemployment rate in July was 6.9 percent, compared to 8.6 percent in July 2011, Joining Forces ocials said during a call with reporters Aug. 21. ough the initiative has exceeded its goals, Obama said, the participating companies have pledged to hire another 250,000 veterans and spouses, with at least 50,000 of that total being spouses. It would be understandable if these companies just stopped now and patted themselves on the back and called it a day, the rst lady said. But these companies are doing just the opposite. e rst lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, started Joining Forces in April 2011 to rally Americans to actively support service members and their families in areas of employment, education and wellness. A year ago, President Barack Obama asked Joining Forces to challenge the private sector to hire or train 100,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2013. I thought this challenge was pretty ambitious, the rst lady, said, noting that the eort was launched with just two partner companies. Before long, companies all over this country had started stepping up. By April, they had hired 60,000 veterans and spouses, and by May, the number was 80,000. e federal government has made the same commitment, and veterans and spouses made up 28 percent of all federal hiring last year, a White House ocial told reporters. Also at the event, Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval person nel, said he supports Joining Forces because it has had a huge impact on Sailors, their spouses and veterans. eyve shined a spotlight on the unique needs and strengths of military families and veterans, he said. e Joining Forces initiative to make professional licenses portable from state to state for military spouses is near and dear to my heart, Van Buskirk said. His wife is a speech pathologist who has had to recertify multiple times, he explained. With constant transfers, our spouses face challenges that can be daunting, he added. Joining Forces Onward and upward for jobs eort All four active services and ve of the six reserve components met or exceeded their numerical accession goals for scal 2012 through July, Pentagon ocials reported. e only shortfall the Army Reserve was intentional as part of a force balancing plan, ocials said. Here are the numbers: Army: 47,817 accessions, 101 percent of its goal of 47,300; Navy: 28,507 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 28,483; Marine Corps: 21,462 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 21,416; Air Force: 23,988 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 23,974; Army National Guard: 40,127 accessions, 103 percent of its goal of 38,940; Army Reserve: 21,725 accessions, 98 percent of its goal of 22,194; Navy Reserve: 6,652 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 6,652; Marine Corps Reserve: 7,925 accessions, 104 percent of its goal of 7,652; Air National Guard: 7,333 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 7,319; and Air Force Reserve: 7,121 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 7,121. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force all exhibited strong retention through the tenth month of scal 2012, ocials said, and all reserve components are on target to achieve their scal year attrition goals. Recruiting Services meeting recruiting goals Navy Medicine headquarters announced a $49 million pharmacy improvement project Aug. 30 that will improve safety and eciency of its outpatient prescriptions processes and lead to shorter wait times for patients. Naval Medical Logistics Command awarded an indenite delivery indenite quantity contract this month to update and expand pharmacy automation. ere are three distinct advantages to the improvements that are being made, said Capt. Edward Norton, the pharmacy specialty leader for the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. e program is going to improve wait times and pharmacy processes, which is a direct benet to our patients; its going to provide a means of standardization across the enterprise; and it is going to replace obsolete equipment. Another major objective for the program is to improve the quality of dispensing. Navy Medicine pharmacies currently vary from manual operations directed by paper to some limited automation processes. is new Navy pharmacy automation system consists of the latest automation technology, said Tim Ward, deputy director of Program Analysis and Evaluation at BUMED. Forty to 50 percent of patient prescriptions will be lled, labeled, capped and assembled with the relevant patient literature exclusively by the automation. e new highly automated process will be much faster and more accurate than the process it is replacing. is process also improves the effectiveness and safety of the pharmacy systems. It is the goal of this program to improve the overall quality by reducing the opportunities for errors, Norton said. It has been shown that extremely high levels of quality can be attained by complete automation and system controlled manual dispensing. e program also will increase the volume capability of the pharmacies within the currently allocated space while reducing the total processing time to less than 30 minutes for at least 90 percent of the customers during peak hours. Since our customers have a choice to wait or to utilize alternative commercial retail pharmacies, reducing their wait times and increasing their satisfaction is our main priority, Norton said. Other objectives of this program will reduce operating costs related to improved inventory management, ecient sta utilization while maintaining protection of Personally Identiable Information and increase security. Currently many of the outpatient pharmacies also process rells. At some pharmacies, the rells are processed during the normal working day while at others are accomplished o-shift. e process ow software of a proposed system shall enable rells to be lled either during the normal working day, with a low priority so as to not impact customer wait time, or to be deferred to o-shift processing, Norton said. ree sites have been identied as proof of concept locations and are expected to be completed by spring 2013. e rst sites to receive the new equipment will be Naval Medical Center San Diego, Calif., Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Va., and Naval Health Clinic Cherry Point, N.C. Installation of the new equipment at the rst three sites starts in February with full operating capability anticipated at all three proof of concept sites by May 2013. Navy Medicine is excited about this project and look forward to its full execution, Norton said. e new automation systems will provide the capacity to meet the changing and expanding needs of our beneciary population. Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel who provide health care support to the Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high operational tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world. Navy Medicine Navy upgrades pharmacy automationTown Hall meeting set for Sept. 19A joint Town Hall meeting will be at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Kings Bay Auditorium. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, Commander, Submarine Group Ten, and Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, invite all hands and their spouses to attend and express any concerns. Daycare services will be provided at the Child Development Center. All active duty, single and married, and spouses are highly encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Lisa Mastone at (912) 573-4513.CPO Select yard sale is Sept. 8 e Annual Kings Bay Chief Petty Ocer Selectee Yard Sale is 6 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sept. 8 at the Advanced Collision Center on Georgia 40 in Kingsland. If you have any questions about this event or would like to donate items contact MTC (Select) Brandon Shellenberger at (912) 674-1917.GMACC visits NSB Sept. 13, 14 e Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee quarterly meeting is Sept. 13 and 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead (Ret.) will present a brief.Braccio guest speaker for MOAAe Military Ocers of America Associations monthly dinner-meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Sept. 11 at Osprey Coves Mor gan Grill. e guest speaker will be Dominick Braccio, assistant director of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers Glynco Training Directorate. For reservations, contact Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net by Sept. 7.Heros Run Oct. 27 in Fernandinae rst A Heros Run 5K-10K Run will be Oct. 27 at Ft. Clinch in Fernandina Beach. e event, organized by Military Mothers of Amer icas Fallen and SPC Kelly J. Mixon Foundation, supports American Gold Star families and deployed military men and women. A kids fun run and 5 K walk also are scheduled. Pre-race day registration is $25. For more information, visit www.mothersofamf.com.Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, re serve and retired military, Department of De fense and Non-appropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities compa rable to other quality hotels and fabulous des tinations worldwide. Its easy to make reserva tions. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the cen tral reservations line at (877) 628-9233.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course.Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories collected from veterans in attendance.MOMS meet-and-greet Sept. 17Moms Oering Moms Support of Kingslands meet-and-greet is 11 a.m., Sept. 17 at How ard Peeples Park. MOMS will provide a picnic lunch. e group supports mothers who stay at home to raise children. For more information, visit momsclubofkingsland@hotmail.com.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Sept. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Sept. 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Sept. 11. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 10 to 13 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 24 to 27 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the posi tive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Sept. 11. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Returning to Children workshop Sept. 13Children can feel the effects of deployment, too. Learn to recognize your childrens positive and negative behaviors in relation to the deployment, homecoming and reintegration of their military parent. This class will be 10 to 11 a.m., Sept. 13. Call 573-4512 to register and for more information.Job fair preparation covers key questionsThe job fair is next week What do I bring? How do I know who to talk to? What should I wear? What time should I arrive. What should my portfolio contain. Who should I speak to first? These and other questions will be discussed along with a brief question-and-answer period for those who are still unsure on how to shop a job fair. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 13. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpDue to the uniqueness of these deployments, Fleet and Family Support Center is committed to assisting with all facets of the pre-deployment procedures. This brief prepares Sailors and their family members through the Individual Augmentee pre-deployment process, mid-deployment sup port, post-deployment followup, and ensures they are equipped with the proper resources. The class is 9 to 11 a.m., Sept. 19. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Credit Management workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center., 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Sept. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Sept. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Sept. 25Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Sept. 25. For more information, call 573-4513. Reconnect: 1-Day Marriage Enrichment WorkshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. For additional information or to register, call (912) 573-4513. Seating is limited. a CFC participantProvided as a public service healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 e ery Two Coast Guard Special Purpose Craft-Screening Vessels and a sea gull escort USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) en route to sea for routine operations, Jan. 18. MC1 James Kim 2011 Nvy Potojournai he Ya Sbain Grou Tens

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Two former military advisors who served with Vietnamese units during the Vietnam War spoke about their experiences in the Pentagon Aug. 28 and shared their thoughts on advisory programs and counterinsurgency operations. Retired Marine Corps Gen. Anthony Zinni and retired Army Lt. Col. James Willbanks took part in a panel discussion on Ad visors in the Vietnam War along with Andrew Birtle, chief of the Military Operations Branch at the Army Center of Military History. e panel was part of the Historical Speakers Series sponsored by the Oce of the Secretary of Defense Historical Oce. Birtle opened the program with an overview of the U.S. advisory eort in Vietnam. An expert on counterinsurgency operations doctrine who authored books on the subject, Birtle outlined the development of the military advisor program from the rst U.S. advisors in 1950 until end of the war in the early 1970s. Perhaps the most common emotion advisors experienced in Vietnam was the frustration of being held responsible for something they could not control, Birtle said. Nothing was more frustrating than the feelings that ones eorts were falling on fallow ground. Zinni spoke after Birtle, sharing his experiences as an advisor to a Vietnamese Marine unit in 1967. e general, who eventually rose through the ranks to lead U.S. Central Command, said his primary duties as an advisor in Vietnam were to help coordinate re support, air capability and operations with U.S. units. Working, living and eating with the Vietnamese and operating all over South Vietnam gave him an insight into the conict that he said he wouldnt have gotten otherwise. ose who saw that war from inside a U.S. unit despite the fact that certainly they saw plenty of combat, as we did they saw a dierent war than I did, Zinni said. I saw the war through the eyes of the Vietnamese people. I saw the war through the eyes of villagers that I lived with. I saw the war through the eyes of Vietnamese soldiers and Marines there who werent there on oneyear tours, but were there for the duration, he said. I saw the war from the Delta to the DMZ. I saw the war from Cambodia to the coastal plains in the east. And it was a totally dierent perspective than I was hearing from my counterparts. Zinni said he saw the most benets result from Vietnamese units that built relationships with U.S. units over time, in which U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers could get to know and trust each other over time. He said it worked well with relatively small Marine Corps units, as well as with Army airborne and Ranger units. One of the strengths of the advisor unit, besides the fact that we didnt have advisory teams and we sort of immersed ourselves into their organization and culture, is that we connected to the Vietnamese Marines very closely, Zinni said. But Zinni said there was a price to pay for being that close to the local forces. e advisory eort, when you were totally immersed in the culture, took a toll on you. By the time my advisory tour was coming near to its end I had contracted malaria, mononucleosis, dysentery and hepatitis, Zinni said. I was down to 123 pounds. is was not an uncommon Advisors explain what went wrong in Vietnam Lost ight rememberedNavy Information Operations Command Maryland hosted the 40th anniversary commemoration ceremony Aug. 30 for the Sailors of ight RG-407 that crashed during the Vietnam War. e ceremony honored 10 Sailors and their families with a 21-gun salute and ags presented to the attending families. I think its just a wonderful day to bring all of us together the other families also because it wasnt just my husband, said Betty Dickerson Tomaino. But all the rest who were here to share in this time that part was good because I always wondered who the other people were. After 40 years, the reasons behind ight RG-407s crash are still unanswered, but the sacrice and memory of those 10 Sailors will live on in their families and the memorial wall that was constructed in their honor. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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phenomenon for service members in advisory roles. Most of the advisors suered health issues and very few advisors nished a whole tour without a signicant health problem or eventually being evacuated because of a health problem, Zinni said. Despite the physical hardships, Zinni said the experience gave him a sense of what this war was all about and made him realize that the U.S. was failing to give the South Vietnamese people a good enough reason to put their lives on the line. If we didnt capture the hearts of the people, if we couldnt give them something to ght for, if we werent willing to ensure that the government was responsible to people, and we werent willing to cut o a base of supply that was endless, we eventually could not win that conict, despite all the victories on the battleeld, he said. Zinni said he felt military leaders did not pay enough attention to knowledge gained in Vietnam, as attention shifted elsewhere after the war ended. Vietnam was rich in the lessons we never learned, he said. e enemy beat us strategically; they didnt beat us tactically. ey didnt beat us in terms of what we were able to develop in military capability with the South Vietnamese, but they beat us psychologically, and they beat us strategically. at lesson was never carried over. Willbanks spoke after Zinni. Now the director of the Department of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Sta College, Willbanks arrived in Vietnam as an advisor in 1971, when only four U.S. Army infantry battalions and a total of fewer than 125,000 U.S. troops were left in the country. He was assigned to an advisory team supporting an Army of the Republic of Vietnam, or ARVN, division. I was a captain with two and a half years in service, on my rst combat tour, Willbanks said. I was being asked to advise a 40-year-old ARVN battalion commander, a lieutenant colonel who had been ghting most of his adult life. Because of his lower rank and relative inexperience, Willbanks said he sometimes had diculty in getting the battalion commanders to listen to his advice. His duties during the early part of his tour involved assisting and training the Vietnamese in sta operations, acting as liaison to the remaining U.S. units in the area, helping with combat operations planning and accompanying the battalions on combat operations in the eld. Willbanks said everything changed when the North Vietnamese launched the Easter Offensive on March 31, 1972. He volunteered to replace a wounded advisor in provincial capital city of An Loc, where a battle raged day and night for the next two and a half months. At this point, the focus of my eorts shifted to coordinating U.S. combat support, Willbanks said. I spent all my time adjusting artillery at least in the beginning, and pretty soon we had no artillery to adjust air strikes, and also coordinating attack helicopters and xed-wing gunships, calling for dusto medical evacuation and coordinating aerial resupply. Willbanks said being in An Lac at that time was an experience dierent than anything he had ever conceived. It was a desperate battle that seesawed back and forth as the North Vietnamese and the South Vietnamese forces fought each other, sometimes house to house, block to block, room to room, he said. e South Vietnamese forces held out, and the battle began to die down as the summer wore on, but Willbanks was wounded for a second time and evacuated from the city.Vietnam THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 7

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I was in a pretty good storm at sea once. But on a 14,000-ton dock landing ship, it was more fun than frightening. I cant imagine being out in that on anything smaller, though I have to imagine the Coast Guard does it all the time. I moved to Florida from Keokuk, Iowa, on the Mississippi River, which has a Coast Guard station. I asked a petty officer there where he was from, and he replied, California. So I asked him when he enlisted if he thought hed be stationed in Iowa. No, was all he said. Capt. Patrick Etheridge, Life-Saving Service The Blue Book says weve got to go out, and it doesnt say a damn thing about having to come back. U.S. Rep. Howard Coble North Carolina The Coast Guard has long been known as the armed service that gets more done for less. Unknown Great ship. Great crew. Merry Christmas. Turn to. U.S. Rep. Howard Coble North Carolina In the wake of Katrina, the Coast Guard may well have been the only entity or agency that came out of that exercise free of fault and free of blame. Sr. Chief Bernard C. Webber (Ret.) Coast Guard I reasoned that I was a Coast Guard first class boatswains mate. My job was the sea and to save those in peril upon it. Rear Adm. R. R. Waesche Coast Guard The cat with nine lives is a piker compared to the Coast Guard. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho History ONR seeks laser weapons e Oce of Naval Research continues to seek industry proposals to develop an aordable solid-state laser weapon prototype for Navy ships, part of a broad agency announcement Aug. 14. We are in the process of developing a laser weapon prototype for the naval surface eet to counter small unmanned aerial vehicles and small boat threats, said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder. ONR hosted an industry day in May to provide the research and development community with information about its Solid-State Laser Technology Maturation program. Managers incorporated feedback into the announcement, which solicits industrys investment in the program on a number of levels, from subcomponents to systems design. Were looking for an open systems solution to this warghting capability because we believe its cost eective and can provide the best value to the gov ernment, said Peter Mor rison, ONR program ocer. e SSL-TM program builds upon ONRs directed-energy developments in kilowatt-scale lasers. Among the programs, the Maritime Laser Demonstration developed a proof-of-concept technology that was tested at sea in 2011 aboard a decommissioned Navy ship. e demonstrator was able to disable a small boat target. During the rst week of August o the California coast the Naval Sea Systems Command, ONR and Navy Air and Missile Defense Command sponsored a series of successful laser weapon concept development tests aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer. e Navy intends to use the technical data collect ed from this test to inform potential development of a Navy laser weapon system. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 9

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Veterans Moving Forward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in our series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As a future service dog my training takes many forms. I must understand human words and execute them, I must possess situational awareness so I know what is appropriate and I must have exposure to many types of things and places as many as my human handler can think of so when I grow up nothing will scare me. If something does startle me I have to learn to recover quickly cause people depend on me. So when I was 4 months old I got to go to I cant say visit as that word means for me to gently put my head in a humans lap the U.S. Fish and Wildlief Services National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia. Wow! What a great place for a dog and people too. e center is tucked into the woods along the Potomac River. ere are trails to hike, lots of new smells, wildlife to see, a place to swim, new people to meet and, oh, did I mention the smells! ey train all sorts of people to do all sorts of things here. ere are courses in migratory bird conservation, endangered species, refuge management, habitat restoration, leadership training and even uvial geomorphology. Yeah that one puzzled me at rst too, but it is all about river behavior and I love swimming in rivers, so I want to take that one next. My handler was at the center for her training, but I got to learn a few things too. For one thing, I had to pay attention to my handler but be quiet during her class. Okay, so I fell asleep under the tables a few times, but that is OK for me. But maybe I should not have been snoring and laying on my back with my belly exposed? e main thing was that I not be a distraction. Come on, look at my face, how can I be a distraction? e commons is where humans eat and talk. Wow, the smells in there were nearly overwhelming. And people walking from one place to another. e rst room has all this food that humans eat and they walk from one side to another with people handing them food. It is very confusing in there for a pup. How is a pup supposed to act with all that going on? Well, I learned to stay close to my trainer. Preferably by her side and not to tug on the leash or the food on her tray might go ying. Honest, I was good and only thought about doing that once. My favorite part is lying under the table on the cool hardwood oor. People dont even know I am there. In the evening I was taken to the tavern. People sit around and talk and eat popcorn. Again I had to lie under the table and try not to eat the popcorn that fell on the oor just a tongue-length away. is training stu is tough. Probably the hardest thing for me to learn was to get used to the other animals. is is the USFWS training center, so there are grizzly bears yes, I am not kidding. ey are very big. It took me a while to be comfortable being in the same room with the grizzly. Eventually, with my humans help, I realized that this grizzly was not going to hurt me. ey also have caribou and wolves, which were not as scary as the grizzly. And all these are the animals on the inside. It is a whole other world outside. We walk outside to get from the classroom to where we sleep for the night and from there to where the humans eat. It is all through the woods, not like where my handlers oce is in the city. Outside there are deer I could not chase, squirrels who taunted me to chase them, crows that asked what I was doing there and bald eagles who looked down at me from their big nest in the tree. All creatures I had to try to ignore. To get my mind o all the animals my handler would give me jobs to do. Like carry her umbrella for her. I was happy to do that for her. After a few minutes the umbrella got heavier and heavier. But I did not let go until she asked me to give it to her. She praised me and gave me a big hug for carrying it for her. Between you and me, I was relieved she asked for it back. Another reason the US FWS training center feels so comfortable to me is because there are several retired Coast Guardsmen who work there and the Coast Guard has heldbusi ness meetings and other gatherings there. One retired Coast Guardsman, Capt. Bill Ashforth, is my friend. After 27 years with the Coast Guard he now applies the skills he honed in the Coast Guard to the USFWS. Bill was the commanding ocer of the Coast Guards Operational Systems Center located only a few miles from the training center. He said working for the USFWS felt like coming home after the Coast Guard the sense of mission in both is doing something larger than yourself. I am starting to understand my sense of mission; honor, respect and devotion to duty. Even carrying my humans umbrella for a long way with the squirrels teasing me. Stay tuned for my next blog about my Canadian roots. Nathan Service dog Nathan starts training Life of a Service Dog Part 5 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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e CocoLoco Luau is 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the RackN-Roll Entertainment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, in atables, music, contests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more informa tion call (912) 5739492. Movie Under the Stars Its at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the new location at Under the Pines Park by the tennis courts. The feature presentation will Madagascar 3, rated PG. Bring your own lawn chair, blankets and settle in for a great movie on a hugh outdoor theater. No snacks will be available for this showing. For more information call (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. Kick-o begins at 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 5 For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Night of Comedy Its at 8 p.m., ursday, Sept. 13 at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Have a few laughs with comedians Adam Mamawala and Robbie Printz. For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served Beverages will be available for purchase. You can visit the come dians Web sites at www.adammamawala.com/ and www.rob bieprintz.com. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Parents Freedom Friday Its 6 to 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 21, brought to you by e Kings Bay Teen Center. Sign-ups begin Sept. 10 at the Youth Center, and are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Also sign up at the CDC, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except weekends and holidays. e cost is $10 per child and $5 for each additional child. A late fee of $1 per min. will be charged for late child pick-up. A $2 pizza box is available for purchase. Sign-up early. Space is limited. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380 or CDC at (912) 573-3888. Universals Halloween Horror Nights On select nights from Sept. 21 to Oct. 31, face horrors most terrifying creatures in the esh at Universal Orlando Resort. Explore the depths of all-new haunted hous es, spine-tingling scare zones, live shows and more. features AMCs e Walking Dead, Silent Hill, Alice Cooper, and Penn and Teller. Tickets are available at the ITT oce. For more information, call (912) 573-8888. Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Fall Fest 2012 Its Friday, Sept. 21 at the Allegheny Softball Field. Free admission and kids zone. Performers include Chris Cagle, Jana Kramer and Evan Wright. Bring your own chairs and blankets. Food and beverages on sale. A valid military or DoD ID is required for base access. No pets, coolers or outside food/ beverages permitted. For more information call (904) 542-3491. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548 for details. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/ Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., ursday, Sept. 20 inside KB Finnegans, Big Show Entertainment is looking for some Karaoke fanatics. Stop by and enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing yourself. Its all about the fun of it. See you there. Call (912) 5739492 for more information. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Day for Kids is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15 at the Youth Center. Scheduled are free recreational outdoor activities, refreshments available for purchase from Chick-l-A and local youth demonstrations, including dance and martial arts. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 8 and 9 is The Sandlot, Sept. 15, 16 Dr. Suess: The Lorax Sept. 22, 23 Winnie the Pooh and Sept. 29, 30 Madagascar 3. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Officials are needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Day for Kids Sept. 15 Just for kids Luau Sept. 14 at Rack-N-Roll Liberty call bicycle helmet approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission or Snell Memorial Foundation at all times. If hazards on sidewalks/bicycle paths are noticed, report them to NSB Safety at 573-2525 noting the exact location of the hazard. Required safety equipment for bicycles will include working brakes and reectors. For bicycles ridden between sunset and sunrise, a white light on the front with the light being visible from a distance of at least 500 feet, and a red reector on the rear that is visible at a distance of at least 600 feet is required. ese lights may be steady burning or blinking. Bright clothing including vests, caps, and ankle and wrist straps, with retroreective materials incorporated in them is required to make the bicyclist more noticeable. Wearing portable headphones, earphones, cellular handsfree devices, iPods, or other listening devices while bicycling in roadways and streets impairs recognition of emergency signals, alarms, announcements and the approach of emergency vehicles. Use of these devices while performing the noted activities onboard Kings Bay is prohibited. Gas-powered or electric mini-bikes, pocket bikes or motorcycles that do not meet Department of Transportation motor vehicle standards will not be used on Navy installation roadways.Safety THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 11

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley Aircrew from several Naval Air Station Jacksonville-based squadrons trained at Aviation Survival Training Center Jacksonville Aug. 27 and 28 to refresh their skills on aircraft emergency procedures. NAS Jacksonvilles ASTC is one of eight facilities around the country that are tasked to provide safe and eective survival training for aviators and aircrew. Training includes classroom lectures and simulator devices in a curriculum that emphasizes hands-on exposure to survival skills. New aviators and aircrew undergo their initial survival training at NAS Pensacola, Fla., after which they are required to attend an ASTC refresher course every four years. ASTC Jacksonville provides a modern facility and advanced training equipment to keep aircrews certied in their survival skills. e detachments three training departments include: Aviation Physiol ogy; Aviation Water Survival; and Bay Operations and Parachute Training. Training scenarios take place in a large swimming pool with an aircraft egress trainer for teaching basic water survival; a low-pressure chamber that simulates the eects of high altitude; an ejection seat and virtual reality parachute trainer; and a parachute landing fall area where aircrews practice avoiding injury during a parachute landing. Water survival is an important component of the refresher course, and ASTC Jacksonville strives to provide the most realistic, yet safe, training possible. One of the things we simulate in the pool is a rescue situation in a night time storm, said Lt. Matt Shipman, aerospace operations physiologist for ASTC Jax. Students are subjected to simulated rain, fog, waves, thunder and lightning in a pitch black environment. eir goal is to make it to a life raft and wait for rescue, utilizing the skills we reviewed for them in the classroom portion of this training. Also in the pool is the 9D6 underwater egress trainer commonly known as the dunker that simulates an aircraft ditching into a body of water and sinking upside-down. It allows aircrew to practice escaping from a submerged fuselage. Seats, windows and hatches are congured to actual aircraft, such as the SH-60 Seahawk helicopter. In addition, aircrews transitioning from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon will nd their specic refresher course changing in the near future. e P-8 is not equipped with parachutes, Shipman said. e curriculum for aircrews is currently being modied to reect that. Until these updates are incorporated, we will treat all P-8 aircrews as though they were training for the survival in the P-3. Leading Petty Ocer Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Edison Vargas, an instructor with ASTC Jax, said the facility provides instruction to all branches of the U.S. military while also accommodating civilian police forces, members of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA and allied foreign services. We conduct two classes a week in two-day block periods, with average class sizes from 12 to 18 students, Vargas said. He stated during scal years 2010 and 2011, roughly 2,400 students had taken the refresher course. Even those students who struggle with portions of the survival training have the chance to remediate. e more training we can provide to aircrews, the better. Even if its a situation where we have to remediate a student, it only means more training for them, Shipman said. Our facility is very accommodating. If a student is reaching their four-year mark and feel like they may struggle, especially with the swimming portion, they are more than welcome to give us a call to get extra training prior to the refresher course. ASTC Jacksonville is a detachment of Navy Medicine Operational Training Center at NAS Pensacola, which serves as the training agent for aviation survival training and the subject matter experts on all military operational medicine and the Navy Medicine Education and Training Command in San Antonio and NMETC Detachment Jacksonville aboard NAS Jacksonville. Navy pilots take plunge at NAS Jacksonville 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Recruit Training Command was honored with the 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Award for Excellence in Workplace Eectiveness and Flexibility at an event hosted by the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce Aug. 7 at the MidAmerica Club in Chicago. is prestigious award, part of the national When Work Works project, recognizes employers of all sizes and types in Chicago and across the country. e award recognizes businesses and organizations for its use of eective workplace strategies to increase business and employee success. We are thrilled to receive this recognition for our workplace practices, said Capt. John Dye, commanding ocer, RTC. Workplace exibility such as extime, part-time work and compressed workweeks has been demonstrated to help businesses remain competitive while also beneting employees. Our research consistently nds that employees in eective and exible workplaces have greater engagement on the job and greater desire to stay with their organization. In addition, they report lower stress levels and better overall health, said Ellen Galinsky, president of Families and Work Institute, which administers the awards with the Society for Human Resource Management. e Sloan Awards are unique for their rigorous, twostep selection process, which involves an evaluation of employers exibility programs and practices, and a condential employee survey. All applicants are measured against national norms from the National Study of Employers. As a recipient of the 2012 Sloan Award, RTC ranks in the top 20 percent of employers nationally in terms of its programs, policies and culture for creating an eective and exible workplace, Galinsky said. In addition, what makes this honor so special is that their employees have corroborated this, arming that it is indeed an effective and exible workplace. Last year, we were only a nalist, said Chief Gunners Mate Matthew Elliot, who attended the event. I looked the Command Master Chief in the eye and said, Next year, were going to win it. And this year we did win it, so it was a very big honor to go down there with Capt. Dye and the XO to receive the award. Elliot called the ceremony a very good experience because it showed the civilian companies in attendance how we do business here in the military. ey can look at our structure here, and try to replicate it, he said. When Work Works is a national project to educate the business community on the value of workplace exibility by sharing research and promising practices, and conducting the annual Sloan Awards. It is an ongoing initiative of the Families and Work Institute and the Society for Human Resource Management. As the Navys only boot camp, RTC on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., trains more than 37,000 volunteer civilian recruits annually, transforming them into Sailors. Navy College educational information Great Lakes gets prestigious awardOnce he was released from the hospital, he spent the rest of his time helping the ARVN recover from the Easter Oensive. He said he left the country at the end of his tour feeling pretty good about what hed been able to accomplish in helping the South Vietnamese forces. Speaking generally about advisory eorts, Willbanks said there was less of an emphasis on the advisory eort and a shift away from it once U.S. ground troops started arriving in Vietnam. is eventually meant that not all advisors had the right qualications, training or ability for the job. e advisory tours were often less than 12 months, which created turbulence hampered the ability to form a bond between Vietnamese troops and their U.S. advisors. Eventually, the emphasis began to shift back to the advisors, as combat troops left Vietnam, but Willbanks said he thought it was too late by that point. From a personal perspective, I found the advisory duty very dicult. e duty required decisiveness and aggressive pursuit of the mission, but it also called for patience and restraint a conicted mix, to say the least, he said. e reality on the ground often ew in the face of the need to report progress. Willbanks said advisors walked a tightrope when it came to their duties. ey had to be involved and proactive without stiing the initiative of the Vietnamese commanders. ey had to be empathetic to their counterparts and understand their culture while being honest about the units and their leaders. Perhaps most importantly, Willbanks said, advisors had to nd a way to build a relationship with their counterparts without making them too dependent on the advisor and on U.S. combat and service support. is proved to be a problem when the U.S. withdrew and the Vietnamese were left on their own. I have to say, even with all the diculties involved, and even knowing how it all turned out, Im proud of what I did as an advisor in Vietnam, and I only wish we could have done more, Willbanks said. e South Vietnamese were good people, and they deserved better than they got. Vietnam the Taliban back, the president said. Were training forces. e transition to Afghan lead is under way. And, as promised, more than 30,000 of our troops will have come home by next month. Obama oered assurance that just as in Iraq, we are going to end this war responsibility. e Afghans will take the lead for their own security next year, he noted, and the transition will be complete in 2014. And even as this war ends, we will stay vigilant until Afghanistan is never again a source for attacks against America -never again, Obama said, drawing cheers from the crowd. So were not just ending these wars. Were doing it in a way that keeps America safe and makes America stronger. at, the president said, includes the military. Drawing down forces, he said, will mean fewer deployments, which creates more time to train, improve readiness, prepare for the future and reconnect with families. So make no mistake: ending the wars responsibly makes us safer, and it makes our military even stronger, he said. Obama emphasized, in drawing down the force in Afghanistan, that the United States must remain ready for the challenges ahead. In a world of serious threats, I will never hesitate to use force to defend the United States of America or our interests, he said. At the same time, I will only send you into harms way when it is absolutely necessary, he pledged. And when we do, we will give you the equipment and the clear mission and the smart strategy and the sup port back home that you need to get the job done. We owe you that.Afghanistan THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, September 6, 2012 13