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The Kings Bay periscope ( 08-16-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00265

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00265


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PAGE 1

Kings Bay Fireghters extract heat victim from submarine sail For the second time in less than three weeks, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department person nel faced the tactical challenges of patient access, restricted work space and a complex extrication. On Aug. 9, the KBFD responded to a 911 call for a woman down in the sail of the nuclear submarine U.S.S. Georgia. Clearly understanding the urgency of the call and degree of dif culty they would face in extricating a person from the sail, KBFD per sonnel wasted no time and put the rst re apparatus on-scene within 10 minutes. With heat stress injuries, time is of the es sence; and restricted Military adds to USAs winning medal countAir Force family member Janay DeLoach leaped 6.89 meters last night at Olympic Stadium here to take the bronze medal in womens long jump at the Summer Olympics. USA teammate Brittney Reese won the gold with a jump of 7.12 meters, and Russias Elena Sokolova earned the silver with a jump of 7.07. DeLoach said Reese motivates her to improve and provides advice. She helps me get on the board, De Loach said of her rst-place team mate. Reese isnt her only supporter, though. My dads here with me, cheering me on, DeLoach said. Hes been there the whole way through. Hes always supported me in all my en deavors. Her father is retired Air Force Chief Master Sgt. William DeLoach, whose last assignment was at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. He now works as a contractor there with the 416th Flight Test Squadron. His daughter began competing in long jump at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, at age 13. I didnt get too many meets in, but you know, it set the stage for where I am now, DeLoach said of competing in track and eld at Ben Eielson High School. She went on to compete in track and eld at Colorado State Univer sity, but said she didnt really get se rious about long jumping until last year. at was the year that I won in doors, said the 26-year-old, 5-foot5-inch athlete. DeLoach won the World Indoor Championship last year with a jump of 6.99 meters. At the Olympic track and eld triChildrens safety program Aug. 18Girl Scout, Kings Bay commands team up for presentationCamden County parents and children are invited to attend the Keeping All Kids Safe program from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. e event will be at the Youth Center, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, inside the children and is free. Mika Searles of Girl Scout Troop 30365 is organizing the program as her project to earn a Girl Scout Silver Award. Searles chose this project to bring awareness to the community on keeping all kids safe. So many bad things are happening to kids, and they need to know how to protect themselves and handle the situ ation, she said. Some activities that will be presented to help keep all kids safe include the Drug Educa tion for Youth, a Self Defense Demonstration, Fire Prevention, Hurricane and Severe Weather, Healthy Food Choices, Bullying, Latch Key Safety, Demonstration from Safekids Organization of Kingsland, Internet Safety, and Fingerprinting and ID cards for kids. Some activities will be infor Up Periscope Its August, so what would you celebrate? Page 9 Brain trauma Army study takes new approach at solution Page 10 Guadalcanal First Pacific Island battle remembered in service Page 3Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Summer vacation ends with Bash Middle School Mania, High School Hype at NSB Kings Bay Fitness Center pool e Camden County School systems 2012-13 school year began Tuesday, Aug. 14. As part of the Youth Sponsorship Pro gram, two Back-to-School Bash events were hosted to oer military children new to the area a casual environment in which to make new friends before the start of the school year. Last weekends rst Back-to-School Bash, Middle School Mania, was on Sat urday at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex pool. e middle school students in at tendance enjoyed music, games, trivia questions, food and prize drawings. Guidance counselors from both St. Marys Middle School and Camden Mid dle School, along with a representative from the St. Marys Middle School PTO, also were available to share information with students and parents. High school students came out later that same night from to attend High School Hype. e high school students enjoyed games, prizes, food and spending time with each other. With the disk jockey blasting the latest tunes, students danced the night away as the sun set on this last weekend of the 2012 sum mer. e high school students were greet ed by the Camden County High School Ninth Grade Academy principal and a guidance counselor. e school administrators said they were pleased to have the opportunity to welcome new and re turning students to Camden County High School. Sta from NSB Kings Bay Child and Youth Program, Navy Federal Credit Union and the Fleet and Family Support Cen ter worked together with volunteers from the Branch Medical Clinic to make both of these events spe cial for the nearly 185 military students and parents who at tended these Backto-School events. e success of these activities, oered at no cost to fami lies, is a tribute to the partnership be tween command organizations and local schools. Its a fantastic way for military children to mark the end of summer and the start the 20122013 school year.Another daunting rescue Anything involving a submarine fire or rescue will be extremely complex Firefighter Jason Ackerman NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Londons Olympic Games close Up next Fun In The Sun 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18 at NSB Kings Bay Youth Center

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Mosquito spraying Aug. 18 or 19An aerial spray to control nuisance biting midges and mosquitoes is planned for Aug. 18, with rain day of the Aug. 19. is will reduce the negative impact of insect bites on outdoor training at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. An Air Force unit from Youngstown, Ohio, will perform this function. Times are uncertain de pending upon weather. An in-brief is planned for Friday, Aug. 17, with more information, time and place to follow. Call Rachel Manning at 573-8311, if there are any questions.ShipShape weight loss Aug. 16If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an 8-week actionoriented weight management program fo cusing on nutrition education, increasing ex ercise, and behavior modication skills that support a healthy lifestyle. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information program or to sign up. Classes start 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., August 16 in the Fitness Complex classroom.Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, re serve and retired military, Department of De fense and Nonappropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities com parable to other quality hotels and fabulous destinations worldwide. Its easy to make res ervations. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the central reservations line at (877) 628-9233.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course. e Armed Forces of America Motorcycle Club will have a poker run Saturday, Aug. 18, to benet Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Registration is 4 to 5 p.m. at the USS Bancroft Memorial, outside the Franklin Gate at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Cost is $15 per hand, with $100 for best hand. For more infor mation phone (912) 510-8494.Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories col lected from veterans in attendance.There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Need a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Editors note: e Camden Part nership is an example of a highly successful cooperative eort between the Camden County com munity and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.Leaders from each of the services shared their perspectives on how to maintain community ties in an era of eciencies, stewardship and renewable energy pursuits at a confer ence in Monterey, Calif., Aug. 7. Craig College, deputy assistant chief of sta, installation manage ment; Rear Adm. Dixon Smith, Navy southwest region commander; Jim Holland, deputy for Air Force instal lation policy; and Dave Clifton, Marine Corps Installation Command deputy spoke at the installation leadership forum during the 2012 Association of Defense Communi ties Annual Conference. College lauded initiatives such as e Community Covenant, an Army program designed to foster and sus tain eective state and community partnerships with all services to im prove the quality of life for soldiers and their families at both current and future duty stations. Its this partnering relationship without the exchange of cash, with out the exchange of contracts, that gives me some optimism as we look to things like municipal services that we have already (a) framework of cooperation that will permit us to gure out how to bring (more) of those kinds of support groups, Col lege said. Holland spoke about the commu nity support the Air Force received through a partnership regarding the services recent decision to base the F-35 at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. e partnership is important not only to the aircraft arrival in scal 2015, but also in December 2014 when the Air Force will make its next F-35 basing decision. Air Force bases throughout the nation have seen local community partnership surges in ventures rang ing from resorts to hotels and even to hyperbaric chambers, Holland said, but the aviation aspect is one of the larger pieces of the budget puzzle. For every dollar that a barrel of crude goes up, the aviation fuel bill goes up $600 million so you can see why we watch this, he said. e volatility of the market is huge, Holland explained, stressing the ur gency of the service looking to the commercial sector to help carry the load for alternative fuels. Clifton shared Hollands senti ment regarding budgetary tides. e pace and volume of change is enormous right now, he said. For leadership to have clear priorities, we need to have a good idea about what we can do dierently. Clifton said the Marine Corps has pushed eciencies, paring where feasible and adding where needed, specically with the addition of 22,000 Marines for war, land acquisitions at 29 Palms, Calif., and the insourcing of information technology and security forces assets. Smith, whose command is headquartered in San Diego, acknowledged the vitality of the job market for military, contractors and retirees in his domain. One in four jobs in San Diego ex ists either because the individual is in the military, or a civilian employ ee of the Department of Defense or a contractor, he said. We cannot do anything within a stovepipe; we have to work with the community. With just six months in the region, Dixon said, he already has been asked to join the board for Cleantech Group, a San Diego-based organiza tion that works in collaboration with about 200 eco-centric companies to develop green solutions for business leaders in the military and private sectors. Our military forces and installa tions are phenomenal stewards of the environment, Dixon said. Defense Communities Military leaders back partnerships One of the many relocation chal lenges faced by military families is that of managing the diering educational requirements or standards between the sending and the receiv ing school systems. Did you know that the standards by which most students will be evaluated are about to change? e Georgia Performance Standards, formerly known as GPS, are being rewritten to conform to Common Core Standards. e State of Georgia, along with 46 other states, e District of Columbia and other U.S. territories adopted the Common Core Stan dards which denes educational performance goals for kindergarten through high school senior year stu dents across various content areas. e new Common Core Georgia Performance Standards provide a revised framework to prepare stu dents for success in college and/or the 21st century workplace. Whether you plan to remain in Georgia or relocate to another state you will want to know how these common core standards will impact your military childs education. Come and hear as Camden County professionals share this important information at 6 p.m., ursday, Aug. 30 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. For more information about this workshop or to register your inter est in attending, e-mail Clainetta. Jeerson@navy.mil or phone (912) 573-8986. Student standards meeting Aug. 30mational presentations regarding the Drug Education For Youth program, re prevention, hurricanes and severe weather, healthy food choices, bullying, latch key safety and Internet safety. Demonstrations include self defense and a presentation by the Safekids Organization of Kingsland. NSB Kings Bay Security and Fire Departments will participate. Fin gerprinting and identication cards for children will be available. is program gives the public a chance to see what their community has to oer and get education in ar eas that are not normally addressed in schools or the workplace, said Sgt. Kyle Rust of NSB Kings Bay Se curity, who is helping Searles coor dinate the event. To attend, enter through the Jack son Gate for base housing. A base ID is not required, however you must have a valid drivers license, car in surance and car registration. Outside the Youth Center on the same day is Morale, Welfare and Recreations Fun In e Sun, featur ing a hot dog lunch, cotton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. is event is $3 and open to the pub lic. A Camden County High School freshman, Searles, 14, has been working on preparing and meet ing the requirements for her Silver Award Project since the Spring 2010. Shes active in DEFY as a volunteer Junior Mentor and is an honor roll student. Mika is amazing, Rust said. To take on a project of this magnitude at her age is a true display of her character. I believe she will have an amazing and successful future. e Girl Scout Silver Award is the highest award a Cadette Girl Scout, in 6th, 7th or 8th grade, can earn. It represents a girls accomplishments in Girl Scouting and in her com munity as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of oth ers. e rst four requirements of the Girl Scout Silver Award help girls build skills, explore careers, gain leadership skills and make a com mitment to self-improvement. For more information on the Keep All Kids Safe program, contact Mika Searles at (912) 322-7217. als in Eugene, Ore. ve weeks ago, DeLoach earned the No. 3 spot on the USA team with a jump of 7.03 meters. At the long-jump nals here, De Loach was in third place early with her rst attempt of 6.77 meters. en the second jump for Brittney Reese of the United States put her in rst place with a 7.12-meter leap. is dropped DeLoach to fourth place. After three jumps, DeLoach re mained in fourth place, with her longest jump still the initial 6.77 meters. But it was enough to put her in the top eight and give her an op portunity for three more attempts. On her fourth jump, DeLoach leaped 6.74 meters, still just short of her rst attempt and still in fourth place. On her fth attempt, howev er, DeLoach soared through the air for a jump of 6.89 meters. She got up out of the sand pit with a smile. After judges registered the dis tance, DeLoach realized she was one centimeter in front of Latvias Ineta Radevica for the bronze. e Latvian had jumped 6.88 meters on her rst try in the nals. On her nal attempt, Redevica ew across the sand and planted her feet close to DeLoachs best of the day. But judges measured it at 6.79 meters, 10 centimeters short of the bronze. Oh I was crumbling, DeLoach said. I was like, Please God, let me have this bronze medal. I knew she could do it, but it just didnt happen at this point. I inched her out by just a centimeter. en Russias Anna Nazorova made her last attempt, again looking close to the mark DeLoach set. But the jump was measured at 6.62 and DeLoach threw her hands up in joy, realizing she had the bronze medal. Kids Olympics 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Seventy years after the Aug. 7, 1942 start to what would be a brutal, six-month-long battle over an island in the South Pacic, veterans of Guadalcanal gathered at Arling ton National Cemetery to pay respects to their fellow Marines, Soldiers, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. Fifteen members of the Guadalcanal Campaign Veter ans Association, or GCVA, gathered in the cemeterys am phitheater for a roll call of those known and to recognize the unknown battle buddies who had passed away over the last year. In their 80s and 90s now, the veterans were accompanied to the event by wives, sons, daughters, grandchildren and friends. We want to honor all participants of Guadalcanal, those who perished in the air, sea and land and those who came home, raised families, started careers and have since passed, said GCVAs national secretary, Gerald Mohn Jr., whose father had served with the 1st Marine Division on Guadalcanal. We think its important that these men be honored for their sacrice, they are the greatest generation. Nicholas Schlosser, of the Marine Corps History Division, discussed the signicance of the Guadalcanal Cam paign to the eventual Allied victory over Imperial Japanese forces in the Pacic. I would say Guadalcanal was no less than the turn ing point of the war in the Pacic theater, Schlosser said. ere were very few battles in the war that were fought equally on air, land and sea that hang in the balance for so long. e battle was six months, and up until mid-No vember, if not December, there were still concerns that the Allies might not win. Schlosser said it was the determination of Allied forces that made Guadalcanal a decisive battle in the Allies favor. It was really through the fortitude and courage of all those ghting on the island, at sea and in the air around the island, that enabled the Allies to achieve victory and advance, he added. It no longer was a question of will the Allies win the war; it became a matter of when will Japan lose the war and how long until surrender. e invasion force to hit the beaches on Aug. 7, 1942, was made up of about 16,000 Marines which would later swell to a force of 60,000 joint service personnel, including Soldiers from the 164th Infantry Regiment of the Americal Division. e participating Allied forces there included forces from Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the British Solomon Islands, Tonga and Fiji. One of those Americal Soldiers at Guadalcanal was Wil liam J. Hanusek, of Mt. Pleasant, Pa. When he turned 21, Hanusek found himself drafted while in the process of enlisting. He wanted to be a bulldozer or crane operator, but dur ing processing into the Army, Hanusek was asked if hed had any special training under his belt. Hanusek told the captain processing him that hed taken a rst-aid course when he was with the Civilian Conserva tion Corps for Youth in 1936. at was enough to get him sent o to medic school af ter boot camp. Hanusek eventually found himself caring for wounded Soldiers in Guadalcanal ... while carrying a carbine. Hanusek said that in the Pacic theater, unlike in the European theater, Allied medical personnel were routinely shot. I had some great friends in Guadalcanal, he recalled. In the position youre in, the guy next to you in the foxhole is your best friend in the world, hes more than a brother to you. Vets gather to mark Guadalcanal A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Child and Youth staff member Anna Chapman supervises a competitive game of Quarterback Toss. Students enjoyed a lunch of pizza, chips, cookies and juice. Middle school students line up to play a game of poolside Spelling Bee.Branch Medical Clinics HN3 Demonterio Tisdale, left, helps Child and Youth staff serve lunch. e fun is not over. Stu dents of all ages are invited to attend Fun in the Sun 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Aug. 18, being oered by the Kings Bay Youth Center in conjunction with the 4-H Engaging Teens Serving Communities initiative. For $3 per person, $10 maximum for a family of four or more, students of all ages can participate in exciting games, enjoy delicious food and win prizes. For information about other educational support services contact NSB Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson at 5738986 or write Clainetta.Jef ferson@navy.mil. For more information about the Child and Youth Teen Program, call the Youth Center at 573-2380. Bash

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 5 e Oce of Naval Re search is looking at birds perceptual and maneu vering abilities as inspiration for small unmanned aerial vehicle autonomy, and Popular Science is fea turing this eort in its Au gust issue, posted online July 25. An ONR-funded, veyear Multidisciplinary University Research Ini tiative program is examining the control and be havioral processes of birds and other small animals when ying at high speeds through complex environments, such as forests or urban settings. Researchers are trying to understand why birds make particular ight path choices and how they can do so quickly at higher speeds than would be safe for current engineered air systems in these environ ments. e goal is to develop and successfully demonstrate a small aircraft that can navigate obstacles in very complex and unstruc tured surroundings, while maintaining speeds as fast as 5 meters per second. e theoretical results being developed may also be applicable to larger UAVs for particular tasks, such as landing at dicult, unprepared sites. Autonomous sys tems technology can be a great way to deliver in creased capability to the Navy and Marine Corps at an aordable price, said Marc Steinberg, a research program ocer in ONRs Science of Autonomy Program. We can provide warghters with a lot more exibility and enable new mission performance, from ight under a forest canopy and in urban canyons to dam age control applications onboard ships. Flying ani mals provide evidence it is possible to build compact platforms with limited sensing that can safely move through challenging environments. In the lab, researchers set up an articial forest with tall pipes serving as trees at Harvard Universitys Concord Field Station. Birds and a Massachu setts Institute of Technology-built UAV are wired with small digital video cameras and motion-capture technology similar to that used in Hollywood. Both are studied in parallel to compare and learn from performance as the research progresses. A goal is to move to ight in a real forest by the programs end. e idea is not to copy the birds but to incorpo rate lessons about how they navigate and use dy namic obstacle avoidance methods into a system that can make real-time decisions that take into account its surroundings. For example, researchers already have discov ered a theoretical speed at which the probability of a collision is high in forests with an average distribu tion of trees; if a UAV stays below that threshold, the probability of an accident lowers dramatically. e program also has begun to reveal the types of ight strategies used by birds in these environ ments. We want to build smallscale UAVs that can y quickly through indoor and/or cluttered environ ments, but controlling these UAVs is very dif ferent than controlling a ghter jet ying up above the clouds, said Dr. Russ Tedrake, X Consortium associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and aeronautics and astronautics at MIT and the MURI lead. To be successful, we have to solve a number of incredibly hard prob lems in computer vision and nonlinear control. is long-term project lets us focus on the basic research questions that will lead to fundamental re sults and, ultimately, dramatic new capabilities for UAVs. In addition to provid ing warghters greater exibility, small UAVs are more agile and easily transportable, and theyre less expensive. A program goal is to be able to do this type of ight with cheap, lightweight digital video cameras as the main sensors. is would eliminate the need for other sensors typically used, such as laser-based ones that add cost and weight, and the MURI is testing feasibility. e MURI involves researchers and engineers from MIT, Harvard Uni versity, Carnegie Mellon University, New York University and Stanford University. A closely connected MURI with the University of Washington, Boston University, Uni versity of Maryland and University of North Carolina is examining similar issues with animals in the wild, including birds, bats and large insects such as hawk moths. ONR provides the sci ence and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engage ment in 50 states, 30 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry partners. ONR employs approxi mately 1,065 people, com prising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. ONR research study focuses on ight of birds As families head to beaches and lakes, now is the perfect time to learn about keeping you and your loved ones safe. One of the biggest dangers on our nations beaches and lakefronts are rip currents. Rip cur rents are narrow channels of fast-moving water that pull swimmers away from the shore. ey can occur any time, in good or bad weather, on breezy days and calm days and at high tide or low tide. ey occur along any coastline featuring break ing waves and are one of the most frequent reasons Coast Guard crews are launched in the summer months. But before Coast Guard crews or lifesaving profes sionals are called in, you can do your part to pre vent being trapped in a rip current. Your rst line of defense is to read the surf forecast before you head to the beach. e National Weather Service is your rst stop for this critical safety in formation. You can check its Website or tune in to lo cal weather reports. Your local beach may also post signs or ags to warn youof hazardous conditions. Once you have checked the weather reports, the next step in staying safe is by learning how to spot a rip current before you jump into the water. One of the rst indica tors of a rip current is a change in the texture of the water. Look for a channel of churning or choppy water. Another sure sign of a rip current is a drastic change in color. Look for an area with a recogniz able dierence in the wa ters color. Any lines of foam, sea weed or debris moving steadily seaward or any breaks in incoming wave patterns also can help you identify a potential haz ardous current. If you do nd yourself caught in a rip current, the most important thing you can do is remain calm. You should immediately yell for help to let others know you are caught in a rip current, however you should not panic and try to swim against the cur rent, as this will just tire you out. You can escape the rip current by swimming par allel to the beach until you are free. If you are unable to swim out of the rip cur rent, oat or calmly tread water. When out of the current, swim toward the shore at an angle away from the rip current. Share these important safety tips with friends and family.Rip currents a real danger Four thousand miles from Kaneohe Bay, Ha waii, where he ran his rst around-the-island marathon for charity, 79-yearold Tom Knoll stood astir shifting conversation left and right among a handful of supporters earlier this summer in the nal sec onds before he kicked o his latest endeavor. e man who spent the past three decades run ning to raise donations for charities was at it again, this time embarking on a 1,650-mile trot from New Orleans to International Falls, Minn., on the edge of the Canadian border. is one here is just to show that senior citizens can do stu too, and also to make some money for everyone said the slender 5-foot-8 philanthropist. Knoll started running to make money for charities when he was stationed at Kaneohe Bay in the mid70s. en Master Gunnery Sgt. Knoll, who had picked up long distance running a couple of years earlier, was asked to donate money for a charity drive. e Marine had a more ambi tious idea in mind. I said to hell with this, Ill do a charity run around the island instead 133.6 miles and youll make money and its going to be a lot better than my $25 donation, he said. He circled Kaneohe Bay and raised $500. From then on, Knoll was hooked. In 1978, the 56-year-old Marine deployed to Okinawa. ere, Knoll plotted on running the 250-mile perimeter of the island to raise money for crippled children. Hes one of the most committed people that Ive ever met and hes very imaginative, said Laura Murray, Knolls girlfriend. He likes to do things that have meaning. Instead of doing a long run just for the heck of it, he likes to do it for charity. Double the distance of his Hawaii feat, Okinawa would test Knolls commitment and mark a turn ing point in his mindset. Ten miles from the nish line and 57 hours al ready committed, the eects of a 250-mile run began to amass his brain. Im never doing this gain, he told his friend who was running with him at the time. Knoll nished the race. At the nish line stood crippled child Megumi Nakata who donned a wide smile hovered over her crutches, awaiting her hero. She changed my mind, he said of Nakata. She gave me a big kiss and she said I love you Tom. e run generated more than $8,000 for the crip pled kids. is is when Knoll asked himself, Why not a million? Why not a million? Little did I know at the time her show of appre ciation would bring me back from various places throughout the world to Okinawa for nine more Christmas holiday runs, according to Why not a Million?, a book he wrote about his running adven tures. On his second Okinawa perimeter run, Knoll set out to circle the island twice in less than a week. He completed the 500 miles within ten minutes of his projected goal and his eorts has made half a million dollars for crip pled children. e contributions for the Okinawa runs and how it aided crippled chil dren propelled Knoll to imagine what other wor thy causes he could run for, he said in his book. He does it for those who cant do it or have the opportunity to do it, said retired Sgt. Maj. Dave Danford, who served with Knoll and has known him for more than half a centu ry. If you want somebody in charity working for you, he is the guy. In 1979, Knoll was stationed back in the United States. He continued to run several marathons and ultra marathons state side and across the globe for various causes. In addition to jogging in 135-degree weather in Afghanistan, Knoll has completed 197 marathons all over world to include places such as: Vietnam, Greece, Istanbul, Bangkok, Wales and 40 states in America. Knoll has amassed more than 75,000 miles in his runs, enough to circle the world three times. Hes also been recognized for his humanitarian eorts to include a prestigious award from the Japanese government, having a day named after him in Colo rado and receiving the Golden Shoe award from Runners World magazine. Knoll is also an origi nal Ironman. He came in sixth place in the inaugu ral multi-sport event that had fteen competitors swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and run 26.2 miles Retired Marine, 79, on run

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e free Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex on Saturday, Aug. 18 will be Up, rated PG. Gates open at 7 p.m. at the Outdoor eater. Its $2 for a hamburger, chips and bever age. Bring your own oating device for the movie. For more information, call (912) 573-3001. Navy Entertainment pres ents The Craig Karges Dinner and Show is Thursday, Aug. 15 at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Social hour begins at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person and are being sold at ITT and at the Conference Center. Suggested ages are 10 years and up. Come and expe rience the extraordinary mind blowing show that features tables floating, minds being read and metal bending. Craig Karges has been seen on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Larry King Live, Fox News, E Entertainment Television, CNN Headline News and CNBC. For more information call (912) 573-4559. CocoLoco Luau Its 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the Rack-N-Roll Entertain-ment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, inflatables, music, con tests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Check out MWRs Outdoor Recreation special for August Camping equipment is 40 percent off for the month of August. This includes camping tents, sleeping bags and either the 16-foot or 18-foot Zoom Campers while supplies last. Contact the Outdoor Adventure Center at (912) 573-8103 for questions or stop by and make your reservation today. Travel through the Labor Day Weekend safely e Auto Skills Center is oering a free 10-point check up for your vehi cle by appointment only from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21, through Thursday, Aug. 31. All other services are normal pricing. e inspection includes tire pressures and wear on all tires and spare, coolant, exhaust, CV joints, auto trans mission levels, windshield wip ers, break and power steering uid, belts and hoses, A/C temp and batteries and alternator. Call for your appointment today at (912) 573-9629. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips for August. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen e run will be Tuesday, Aug. 21 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Special opening ceremony is at 6:30 am. All participants should arrive by 6:30 a.m. e race will begin at 7 a.m. e command with the most participation will win a pool party. For more information call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fun in the Sun is at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. Enjoy a day of fun. Cost is $3 per person with a $10 max for four people or more. Hot dog lunch, cot ton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Winter Youth Bowling League Registrationis going on now through Saturday, Aug. 25 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling begins Sept. 8 and con tinues through March 30 at 9 a.m. every Saturday. Registration fee is $17 and there is an $8.50 weekly fee. Registration fee includes shirt, sanction card, awards and prizes. There will be a party at the end of the sea son. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Aug. 18, 19 Alpha & Omega and Aug. 25, 26 We Bought a Zoo Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Officials are Needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Fun in Sun Aug. 18 Just for kids Dive-In Movie Up Aug. 18 Liberty call around the Hawaiian is land of Oahu in 1978. Swollen ankles and pesky insects In 1983, Knoll had six months to kill between retiring from the Marines and going to work for a government agency in Washington D.C. I said, Im going to run across the United States for charity, he remembered. He took o with a couple of friends from the Marine Corps Iwo Jima memorial in D.C. on a mid-80s July afternoon. Traveling at a speed of 46 miles per day, he arrived in Los Angeles 64 days and 3,100 miles later. In 2008, he reversed the course and with his son, they trekked from San Diego back to the Iwo Jima memorial in D.C. Knoll recounted his daily running experiences in Why not a Mil lion? He shared some of his odd encounters such as snakes, coyotes, down pour, swollen ankles and pesky insects. Mother nature is go ing to get you one way or another, he said. Its either the heat, the cold, the wind or tornadoes. Knoll has been dodging Mother Natures bullets so far with success.When he was training by the river, a guy about a half-a-mile away was struck and killed by lightning. He said on his second cross country venture, 19 people were killed by a tornado in Mis souri only a day before he ran through state. On the rst day of that same cross country run, he tripped and fell onto hard concrete cement which left his head bleeding profusely. He had to get 26 stitches above his eye. ats not the way you want to start o a run, but for the next 3,000 miles no incidents occurred what soever, he said. My son was running with me, he thought the run was over. I said dont worry about it. e next day I went out and ran 30 miles. Victory lap Knoll made his million for charity last year. An avid racing spectator and in adhering to an old rac ing tradition, he wanted to do a victory lap. His victory lap will cover 1,650 miles from New Or leans to the Canadian bor der and gather donations for a host of dierent char ities, including wounded veterans and cancer research. Im lucky, he said. Im a Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, but I still got two legs and two arms. I am doing it for the guys and gals that lose a leg, lose an arm, get xed and are ready to go back. Knolls causes may be noble and personal but an escapade of this caliber dees human nature. Most people, if they make it past age 70, are in fragile health and choose to spend their remaining days relaxing, but not Knoll. His friends say hed rather be out running than sitting around enjoying a beer and shooting the breeze. You call him and hes on the track running! said Danford. Hell probably put something in his thatll require his casket to be moved a certain number of miles, joked Carolyn Danford, wife of Dave Danford and also a friend of Knoll. In Knolls calculus, unbroken promises trump the obstacles, giving is better than receiving, and running keeps the mind and body healthy. My trick is I tell a lot of people Im going to do it, then I cant quit, he humored. Run 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Anger management seminar Aug. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon,Aug. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 30. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Aug. 21. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Aug. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Aug. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513. job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 29. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Aug. 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Aug. 30. Registration is required. For more informa tion, call 573-4513.Parenting classes Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Aug. 20 and 27. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic There will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 to 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. workshop upcomingRelocating due to a Permanent Change of Station assignment is exciting, but it also can be expensive too. Even though the government provides relocation allowances, many families find a move puts a strain on their financial budget. This workshop targets active-duty military and their families who are relocating and will be from 9 to 11 a.m., Aug. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 5734513. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retire ment and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Dont accept defeat. F ight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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No injuries as warship, tanker crash No one was hurt when a U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer and a large Japanese owned merchant vessel collided near the Strait of Hormuz Aug. 12. e collision between USS Por ter (DDG 78) and the Panamani an-agged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan occurred at approximate ly 1 a.m. local time. Porter transited under its own power to Jebel Ali, UAE and is now pierside for assessment and repair. e incident is under investigation. USS Porter is on a scheduled de ployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater se curity cooperation eorts.In August, there are Air Conditioning Appreciation Week, National Apple Week, National Clown Week, plus American Dance Week, Elvis Week and National Smile Week. Maybe its too much Olympics, but I decided to break these into two heats with semifinals and a cham pionship for which week sounds most interesting to interviewees. I like apples, appreciate A/C, am not afraid of clowns, used to be a good dancer, dont mind Elvis and enjoys smiles. But Im stumped as to what sounds best. Verne Daniels Retired Navy Zephyrhills, Fla. Apples. Elvis. Elvis, because of his music and movies . STS2 Julian Romero Trident Refit Facility Atlanta Clowns. Dance. Lets go with Clowns. It sounds like it must be fun. EM1 Jeff Graby USS Georgia Blue Greece, N.Y. Apples. Smile. Apples. I grew up near Hilton, N.Y., and a big thing there is their orchards and Apple Fest. YN2 Bryce Mack USS Tennessee Gold Dallas Air Conditioning. Smile. Smile, because I love to smile. NCC Alex Roque NSB Kings Bay Miami Clowns. Smile. Clowns. Clowns is the most ridiculous. Elizabeth Price Family member Los Angeles Air Conditioning. Smile. Air Conditioning. It gets so hot outside, you have to have air conditioning. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e hunting season is upon us, and there will soon be hunters in the woods. Hunting aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is necessary to control the deer population, thus reducing the number of deer involved in vehicle accidents. NSB Kings Bay is an enclosed habitat. Hunting prevents exceed ing available food sources and promotes a healthy and productive deer herd. Hunting season is Sept. 8 through Jan. 15, 2013. Authorized hunt ing days are Wednesday and ursday afternoons and evenings, weekends, holidays and the week between Christmas and New Years. Each hunting area is marked with a yellow sign containing a letter and number, for example, B-1 or G-2. e hunting areas and rules are outlined in the SUBASE Hunting Instruction, SUBASEINST 11015.1S. You can access it through the SUBASE home page or at www. cnic.navy.mil/navycni/Hunting season begins Sept. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, in stant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various des sert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus Army studies brain trama A new dimension in imaging technology de tects minute levels of vas cular damage in the form of bleeding, clots and re duced levels of oxygenation that may better illu minate our understanding of brain injury, particular ly related to trauma. e U.S. Army Medi cal Research and Materiel Commands Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center is managing a related proj ect that is being led by Dr. E. Mark Haacke of Wayne State University. Haacke recently presented his work in suscep tibility weighted imaging and mapping, or SWIM, to a national panel of mili tary and civilian medical experts. In this current project, he is exploring advanced magnetic reso nance imaging methods and SWIM to improve di agnosis and outcome pre diction of mild traumatic brain injury. is study is just one example of the promis ing research that TATRC supports. Collaborations among the investigators we bring together may lead to creative solutions we hadnt imagined, said Col. Karl Friedl, TATRC director. In 1997, Haackes team developed susceptibil ity weighted imaging, a highly sensitive technique to detect the presence of blood products. Haacke said it has been proved to be the most sensitive approach to visualizing ce rebral microbleeds and shearing of vessels in traumatic brain injury, or TBI. ese conditions do seem to be reliable indica tors of injury because we have imaged hundreds of adults over the years, of all ages, and rarely nd them in the normal control pop ulation, Haacke said. In recent years, Haackes team and other neuroim aging researchers have applied concepts similar to SWIM to provide a new measure of iron content through quantitative sus ceptibility mapping. Haackes approach, SWIM, is a rapid method that not only provides a quantitative map of iron but at the same time re veals the presence of ce rebral microbleeds and abnormal veins. Iron in the form of deoxyhemoglobin can also be used to measure changes in local oxygen saturation, important for evaluating potential changes in local blood ow or tissue function (similar to what is seen in stroke using SWI). SWIM also can be used to monitor changes in iron content over time to see if previous iron deposition is being resorbed or if bleed ing continues, both im portant diagnostic pieces of information for the cli nician. SWIM is among the highest quality and fast est types of quantitative susceptibility mapping, Haacke said. We believe it could be in much wider use in about a year. Haacke has been working with researchers through out the world for more than ve years applying his tech niques specically to traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinsons disease and multiple sclerosis. In this current project, he has demonstrated that there is a lower impact load, either inertia or di rect impact forces, which may damage only veins, and he has shown medul lary vein damage that has not been visualized with other techniques. e medullary veins drain the frontal white matter of the brain, so reduced blood ow here could possibly impair the higher level frontal neu rocognitive functions. In light of this, treatments that improve blood ow to the brain might be a prom ising direction to pursue. While many investigators have focused on arteri al changes related to brain injuries, Haacke remained focused on the veins. Veins have relatively more fragile vessel walls than arteries and are more susceptible to dam age during head injury, Haacke said. is im portant component of the vascular system is often overlooked but may help us better diagnose what is wrong. Doctor Haackes team has a dierent slant for studying these injury re gions that may lead to a new avenue in diag nosis and treatment for traumatic or other types of brain injury, said Dr. Anthony Pacico, who manages TATRCs Medical Imaging Technologies Portfolio. For instance, the study of dementia could well benet from SWI and SWIM, Haacke said. Per haps as much as one-third of all dementia is vascular dementia. Haacke and Dr. Zhifeng Kou are working to complete a larger database of normal and mildly braininjured imaging scans and dene the appropriate parameters so that SWIM can be run at most clinical sites. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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access further complicates the rescue, Fire Prevention Ocer Assistant Chief Kim Maxwell said. Maintaining unobstruct ed emergency ingress and egress paths is not always achievable aboard submarines, but should be a top consideration when planning maintenance ac tivities. At the scene, Paramedic Capt. James Todd took initial command and led EMS personnel to board the vessel and begin im mediate patient assess ment. e patient displayed the classic symptoms of severe dehydration and was too unstable to walk under her own strength. e arriving incident commander directed the second-in engine to prepare equipment for a high angle rescue. e second-in crew was led by Paramedic Capt. Tom Middleton, who directed his team to gather rope, rescue equipment and a long backboard to support a technical-res cue operation. As Todd worked to sta bilize the patient, rescue personnel with technical extrication equipment in tow, boarded the submarine. With medical assess ment complete and the patient stable for trans port, the KBFD team rap idly transitioned from initial patient care to a rescue operation. After the patient was stabilized and secured on a long backboard for ex trication, crews began the delicate process of remov ing the patient from the sail and o the submarine. Utilizing specialized rescue ropes and equip ment, reghters carefully lowered the patient to the deck of the submarine, and with the assistance of several submarine crew members, they traversed the deck avoiding several open missile tubes and several pieces of mainte nance equipment. e patient was loaded in the ambulance where medical treatment con tinued en route o base to Camden Medical Center. Anything involving a submarine re or rescue will be extremely complex, Fireghter Jason Ackerman said. Limited manpower, near 100-de gree heat with 95 percent humidity only makes the job more dicult. Take it from a professional re ghter, if you dont keep yourself cool and hydrat ed as you work, well be coming to see you! e KBFD team members expressed thanks and appreciation to personnel aboard the USS Georgia who rendered their assis tance. Anyone who has lived in an area prone to high heat and humidity, elec trical storms, tornadoes and hurricanes could tell you that dozens of deaths a year are attributed to these weather phenom ena. Of these, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis tration, Heat is the No. 1 weather-related killer in the United States, result ing in hundreds of fatali ties each year. In fact, on average, excessive heat claims more lives each year than oods, light ning, tornadoes and hur ricanes combined. In a summer season plagued with heat-related emergencies, the KBFD team can attest to this. ese dedicated reght ers have responded to dozens of heat-related medical responses rang ing from minor heat stress to unconscious heat stroke victims. Rescue As the Defense Depart ment adopts a new para digm for the U.S. military to remain a formidable force while absorbing $487 billion in spending reductions over the next decade, the prospect of an additional $500 billion spending reduction over that period would be a disaster not only for na tional defense, but also for defense communities, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in Monterey, Calif., Aug. 6. In remarks at an Asso ciation of Defense Communities conference, the secretary said the new defense strategy and the Pentagons budget decisions reect the need to bring the governments budget under control. ere is a strategic and scal imperative that is driving the department to a smaller, leaner and more agile force thats the reality, Panetta said. It would be irresponsible not to reduce the budget and do our role in con fronting the scal chal lenges facing this country. e secretary noted that though the department and the nation are weath ering a period of great chal lenge, an opportu nity for planning emerges. Under the new strategy, Panetta said, the force will remain agile, quickly deployable, exible, and prepared to deal with crises anywhere in the world. As drawdowns in Iraq and Afghanistan unfold, the United States will con tinue to sharpen its focus on matters in the Asia-Pa cic region, sparking a rebalance of global posture as part of an overall strat egy to maintain a presence elsewhere in the world. Additionally, he said, vigilance against cyber space threats is essential. He called the cyber arena the battleeld for the fu ture, with the potential to cripple progress for the United States and its allies. e strategy also must Defense boss talks budget, strategy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 11

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include investment in and protection of DODs industrial base, the secre tary said. Close partnerships with members of Congress, committees, caucuses, defense industrial part ners, foreign allies, for eign partners and defense communities across the country remain one of the guiding principles in im plementing the new strat egy, Panetta said. Noting that he has to put every area of the de fense budget on the table, the secretary acknowledged challenges that stem from assessing ma jor areas such as compensation, which he said has increased by 80 percent. Panetta called seques tration an indiscriminate formula that was never meant to take eect. It was never designed to be implemented, he said. It was designed to trigger such untold damage that it would force people to do the right thing. He urged the defense community leaders to do what they can to ensure Congress reaches a solu tion that avoids seques tration. Navy College groups/public/docu ments/document/cnicp_ a141117.pdf. e hunting season in no way restricts nonhunters from enjoying the same areas that hunters do. e key is to be aware that you may encounter hunters in the woods. For your own safety wear bright colored cloth ing, and stay on bike-paths and perimeter roads. If you choose to hike in the woods, contact the Kings Bay Game Warden at (912) 674-6817 or NSB Security Dispatch at (912) 573-2145. e Game War den can advise you on which areas are not being hunted, to ensure a safe outing without encroaching on the hunters. Hunters must have a Georgia state hunting li cense, big game license and purchase a SUBASE hunting permit from out door recreation. Hunters will attend an annual rules, regulations, and safety brief prior to hunting or scouting on base. Hunters also must have a state approved Hunter Safety Course Cer ticate from any state, if born after January 1961 and a SUBASE weapons registration for their hunt ing weapon from Stimson pass and I.D. SUBASE hunting rules, regulations and safety briefs will be conducted at 4:30 p.m., Aug. 22, and 29 at the indoor rie range, Building 3072. Additional hunting briefs will be at 4:30 p.m. every Wednes day at HVA Escort, Build ing 2040) through the end of October.Hunting Budget 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Hot stu: Corps trains in Jordanian desert Standing post and hik ing patrols are not the most glamorous work in an infantrymans career. But these security mea sures ensured the safety of the 24th Marine Ex peditionary Units Aviation Combat Element and forced those Marines tasked with providing se curity to get back to basics in Jordan throughout the month of May during Ex ercise Eager Lion 12. is exercise allowed the Marines from 3rd platoon, Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th MEU, to reinforce their knowledge of defense while in a train ing environment, which is part of the Marine Corps train as you ght doctrine. e U.S. Air Force maintained security for the aircraft throughout the exercise with vehicle checkpoints and periodic roaming vehicles. Despite this, the Marines confessed they felt safer with boots on the ground. e Air Force is great, but these Marines were very proactive of setting a defensive posture, said Capt. Christopher Kupka, the anti-terrorism and force-protection ocer for 24th MEU who was responsible for ensuring the air base had a robust security posture while the Marines were there. ey set up multiple defensive measures with entry control points, machine gun emplacements, and daily patrols. e defensive posture and capabilities increased immediately once the Ma rines with Charlie Com pany arrived. e Marines hit the ground running with nothing in hand but the commanders intent, Kupka said. e Marines searched through the on-base dump to collect scraps and debris to build de fenses. We didnt have any supplies when we got here so we had to salvage ev erything from the dump, said 1st Lt. William J. Norris, 3rd platoon commander and Naples, Fla., native. e Marines maintained a boundary of nearly 5,000 meters of concertina wire, as well as sand-lled bar rels along the perimeter to stop larger vehicles. After establishing the perimeter and various en try control points, the Ma rines moved into a steady schedule of eight hours on post, eight hours on patrol, and eight hours to rest and maintain a quick reaction force. e Marines are awe some, theyve maintained 24-hour operations for a month straight, Norris said. e Marines also con structed machine gun posts to protect the am munition supply point. We put up two M240D machine gun posts along with a MK19 (grenade launcher) to cover some of the additional dead space, said Cpl. Ryan Kretschmer, 23, 3rd squad leader and Twin Lakes, Wis., native. e posts were built from scrap metal, wood, sandbags and sweat as the Marines dug the gun emplacements into the embankments surrounding the ASP. ey were made en tirely out of garbage, and they look pretty good for being built out of garbage, Norris said. Kretschmer was given very little direction before being released to establish and maintain the machine guns. ey told me what they wanted with and we just made it happen, he said. ese patrols, posts and machine guns added that extra layer of security the Marines require for a Ma rine Corps installation. People see us on pa trol and they see us on post so they know we are out here and were keep ing this place safe, said Lance Cpl. Jason O. Otero, 24, machine gunner and New York City native. Its safer because they see us always here, always on guard, always on patrol. While the Marines on post missed the training ranges from Exercise Ea ger Lion 12, they regarded their work here as more representative of the daily grind in a combat environ ment. I didnt think it would be like this when we got out here, said Cpl. Benja min Young, 21, 2nd squad leader and Chattanooga, Tenn., native. We usually do live-re ranges dur ing a training exercise but here, its been just like real world. Its a good experience for the young Marines. We got here and hit the ground running, said Young. Im really happy how the boys did. e extensive increase in security allowed the Charlie Company Marines to see what they are ca pable of in a short period of time. It also allowed the squad leaders to train their Marines in a realworld environment. We did a lot in four days when we didnt have anything, Kupka said. Weve made this place even 10 times better in se curity posture. e patrols and guard posts have worn on the Marines here as their mo rale struggled with the grueling pace of their security posture. Despite their weariness and burden, the Marines trudged on to ensure a secure workplace for the Marines throughout the exercise. Eager Lion 12 was an international training ex ercise with more than 19 countries and approximately 11,000 participants designed to promote cooperation and militaryto-military relationships among participating forc es. e exercise scenario is intended to portray real istic, modern-day security challenges. e 24th MEU is de ployed with the Iwo Jima ARG to the U.S. Central Command area of opera tions as a theater reserve and crisis response force. Sandlot football for realMarines with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and Marine Forces Central Command along with Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 8th Regiment, 1st Bri gade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, faced o in some friendly football competition as they awaited the beginning of Exercise Eager Lion 12. e Marines, from the command element of the 24th MEU and advance party element from MAR CENT, worked steadily preparing the camp for their command sta. Meanwhile, the Soldiers provided security for the camp in constant rotations. Neither branch worked together and had little contact during this time while focused on their separate missions. Football changed that. It was a friendly competition, aint nothing wrong with that, said Lance Cpl. Jared Harrington, an em bark specialist with MARCENT. We got to meet each other over a game of football and everyone had fun. e games provided an opportunity for the service members to meet each other and build camaraderie and cohesion before the exercise begins. e Marines won the rst game, but the Army wanted a rematch to give other Soldiers an opportunity to play and claim the second days victory. We beat them yesterday, but they got their re venge today, said Cpl. Fenton Reese, a combat cor respondent with MARCENT. e Marines and Soldiers pushed the game until long after the sun had set. We played until we couldnt see the ball anymore said Sta Sgt. Dellon Arthur, a military information support operations specialist with the 24th MEU. It was a good time. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 13

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012



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Kings Bay Fireghters extract heat victim from submarine sail For the second time in less than three weeks, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department personnel faced the tactical challenges of patient access, restricted work space and a complex extrication. On Aug. 9, the KBFD responded to a 911 call for a woman down in the sail of the nuclear submarine U.S.S. Georgia. Clearly understanding the urgency of the call and degree of difculty they would face in extricating a person from the sail, KBFD personnel wasted no time and put the rst re apparatus on-scene within 10 minutes. With heat stress injuries, time is of the essence; and restricted Military adds to USAs winning medal countAir Force family member Janay DeLoach leaped 6.89 meters last night at Olympic Stadium here to take the bronze medal in womens long jump at the Summer Olympics. USA teammate Brittney Reese won the gold with a jump of 7.12 meters, and Russias Elena Sokolova earned the silver with a jump of 7.07. DeLoach said Reese motivates her to improve and provides advice. She helps me get on the board, DeLoach said of her rst-place teammate. Reese isnt her only supporter, though. My dads here with me, cheering me on, DeLoach said. Hes been there the whole way through. Hes always supported me in all my endeavors. Her father is retired Air Force Chief Master Sgt. William DeLoach, whose last assignment was at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. He now works as a contractor there with the 416th Flight Test Squadron. His daughter began competing in long jump at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, at age 13. I didnt get too many meets in, but you know, it set the stage for where I am now, DeLoach said of competing in track and eld at Ben Eielson High School. She went on to compete in track and eld at Colorado State University, but said she didnt really get serious about long jumping until last year. at was the year that I won indoors, said the 26-year-old, 5-foot5-inch athlete. DeLoach won the World Indoor Championship last year with a jump of 6.99 meters. At the Olympic track and eld triChildrens safety program Aug. 18Girl Scout, Kings Bay commands team up for presentationCamden County parents and children are invited to attend the Keeping All Kids Safe program from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. e event will be at the Youth Center, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, inside the children and is free. Mika Searles of Girl Scout Troop 30365 is organizing the program as her project to earn a Girl Scout Silver Award. Searles chose this project to bring awareness to the community on keeping all kids safe. So many bad things are happening to kids, and they need to know how to protect themselves and handle the situation, she said. Some activities that will be presented to help keep all kids safe include the Drug Education for Youth, a Self Defense Demonstration, Fire Prevention, Hurricane and Severe Weather, Healthy Food Choices, Bullying, Latch Key Safety, Demonstration from Safekids Organization of Kingsland, Internet Safety, and Fingerprinting and ID cards for kids. Some activities will be inforUp Periscope Its August, so what would you celebrate? Page 9 Brain trauma Army study takes new approach at solution Page 10 Guadalcanal First Pacific Island battle remembered in service Page 3Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Summer vacation ends with Bash Middle School Mania, High School Hype at NSB Kings Bay Fitness Center pool e Camden County School systems 2012-13 school year began Tuesday, Aug. 14. As part of the Youth Sponsorship Program, two Back-to-School Bash events were hosted to oer military children new to the area a casual environment in which to make new friends before the start of the school year. Last weekends rst Back-to-School Bash, Middle School Mania, was on Saturday at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex pool. e middle school students in attendance enjoyed music, games, trivia questions, food and prize drawings. Guidance counselors from both St. Marys Middle School and Camden Middle School, along with a representative from the St. Marys Middle School PTO, also were available to share information with students and parents. High school students came out later that same night from to attend High School Hype. e high school students enjoyed games, prizes, food and spending time with each other. With the disk jockey blasting the latest tunes, students danced the night away as the sun set on this last weekend of the 2012 summer. e high school students were greeted by the Camden County High School Ninth Grade Academy principal and a guidance counselor. e school administrators said they were pleased to have the opportunity to welcome new and returning students to Camden County High School. Sta from NSB Kings Bay Child and Youth Program, Navy Federal Credit Union and the Fleet and Family Support Cen ter worked together with volunteers from the Branch Medical Clinic to make both of these events spe cial for the nearly 185 military students and parents who at tended these Backto-School events. e success of these activities, oered at no cost to families, is a tribute to the partnership between command organizations and local schools. Its a fantastic way for military children to mark the end of summer and the start the 20122013 school year.Another daunting rescue Anything involving a submarine fire or rescue will be extremely complex Firefighter Jason Ackerman NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Londons Olympic Games close Up next Fun In The Sun 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18 at NSB Kings Bay Youth Center

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Mosquito spraying Aug. 18 or 19An aerial spray to control nuisance biting midges and mosquitoes is planned for Aug. 18, with rain day of the Aug. 19. is will reduce the negative impact of insect bites on outdoor training at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. An Air Force unit from Youngstown, Ohio, will perform this function. Times are uncertain depending upon weather. An in-brief is planned for Friday, Aug. 17, with more information, time and place to follow. Call Rachel Manning at 573-8311, if there are any questions.ShipShape weight loss Aug. 16If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an 8-week actionoriented weight management program focusing on nutrition education, increasing exercise, and behavior modication skills that support a healthy lifestyle. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information program or to sign up. Classes start 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., August 16 in the Fitness Complex classroom.Navy Gateway Inns sets pricesEective Oct. 1, per-night room rates at the Navy Gateway Inns & Suites aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will be $55 for standard rooms, $60 for suites and $75 for VIP Suites. Gateway Inns & Suites are open to active, reserve and retired military, Department of Defense and Nonappropriated Fund employees, and sponsored guests, with amenities comparable to other quality hotels and fabulous destinations worldwide. Its easy to make reservations. Locally call (912) 573-4971/4871 or go to www.dodlodging.net. You also can call the central reservations line at (877) 628-9233.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course. e Armed Forces of America Motorcycle Club will have a poker run Saturday, Aug. 18, to benet Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Registration is 4 to 5 p.m. at the USS Bancroft Memorial, outside the Franklin Gate at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Cost is $15 per hand, with $100 for best hand. For more information phone (912) 510-8494.Agent Orange meeting Sept. 18 e Vietnam Veterans of America, Florida State Council Duval Co. Chapter 1046 and Clay County Chapter 1059 present an Agent Orange town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m., Sept. 18 at the Morocco Shrine Center, 3800 St. Johns Blu Road South, Jacksonville. ere will be a panel discussion on Agent Orange and stories collected from veterans in attendance.There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Need a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Editors note: e Camden Partnership is an example of a highly successful cooperative eort between the Camden County community and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.Leaders from each of the services shared their perspectives on how to maintain community ties in an era of eciencies, stewardship and renewable energy pursuits at a conference in Monterey, Calif., Aug. 7. Craig College, deputy assistant chief of sta, installation management; Rear Adm. Dixon Smith, Navy southwest region commander; Jim Holland, deputy for Air Force installation policy; and Dave Clifton, Marine Corps Installation Command deputy spoke at the installation leadership forum during the 2012 Association of Defense Communities Annual Conference. College lauded initiatives such as e Community Covenant, an Army program designed to foster and sustain eective state and community partnerships with all services to improve the quality of life for soldiers and their families at both current and future duty stations. Its this partnering relationship without the exchange of cash, without the exchange of contracts, that gives me some optimism as we look to things like municipal services that we have already (a) framework of cooperation that will permit us to gure out how to bring (more) of those kinds of support groups, College said. Holland spoke about the community support the Air Force received through a partnership regarding the services recent decision to base the F-35 at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. e partnership is important not only to the aircraft arrival in scal 2015, but also in December 2014 when the Air Force will make its next F-35 basing decision. Air Force bases throughout the nation have seen local community partnership surges in ventures ranging from resorts to hotels and even to hyperbaric chambers, Holland said, but the aviation aspect is one of the larger pieces of the budget puzzle. For every dollar that a barrel of crude goes up, the aviation fuel bill goes up $600 million so you can see why we watch this, he said. e volatility of the market is huge, Holland explained, stressing the urgency of the service looking to the commercial sector to help carry the load for alternative fuels. Clifton shared Hollands sentiment regarding budgetary tides. e pace and volume of change is enormous right now, he said. For leadership to have clear priorities, we need to have a good idea about what we can do dierently. Clifton said the Marine Corps has pushed eciencies, paring where feasible and adding where needed, specically with the addition of 22,000 Marines for war, land acquisitions at 29 Palms, Calif., and the insourcing of information technology and security forces assets. Smith, whose command is headquartered in San Diego, acknowledged the vitality of the job market for military, contractors and retirees in his domain. One in four jobs in San Diego exists either because the individual is in the military, or a civilian employee of the Department of Defense or a contractor, he said. We cannot do anything within a stovepipe; we have to work with the community. With just six months in the region, Dixon said, he already has been asked to join the board for Cleantech Group, a San Diego-based organization that works in collaboration with about 200 eco-centric companies to develop green solutions for business leaders in the military and private sectors. Our military forces and installations are phenomenal stewards of the environment, Dixon said. Defense Communities Military leaders back partnerships One of the many relocation challenges faced by military families is that of managing the diering educational requirements or standards between the sending and the receiving school systems. Did you know that the standards by which most students will be evaluated are about to change? e Georgia Performance Standards, formerly known as GPS, are being rewritten to conform to Common Core Standards. e State of Georgia, along with 46 other states, e District of Columbia and other U.S. territories adopted the Common Core Standards which denes educational performance goals for kindergarten through high school senior year students across various content areas. e new Common Core Georgia Performance Standards provide a revised framework to prepare students for success in college and/or the 21st century workplace. Whether you plan to remain in Georgia or relocate to another state you will want to know how these common core standards will impact your military childs education. Come and hear as Camden County professionals share this important information at 6 p.m., ursday, Aug. 30 at the Kings Bay Youth Center. For more information about this workshop or to register your interest in attending, e-mail Clainetta. Jeerson@navy.mil or phone (912) 573-8986. Student standards meeting Aug. 30mational presentations regarding the Drug Education For Youth program, re prevention, hurricanes and severe weather, healthy food choices, bullying, latch key safety and Internet safety. Demonstrations include self defense and a presentation by the Safekids Organization of Kingsland. NSB Kings Bay Security and Fire Departments will participate. Fingerprinting and identication cards for children will be available. is program gives the public a chance to see what their community has to oer and get education in areas that are not normally addressed in schools or the workplace, said Sgt. Kyle Rust of NSB Kings Bay Security, who is helping Searles coordinate the event. To attend, enter through the Jackson Gate for base housing. A base ID is not required, however you must have a valid drivers license, car insurance and car registration. Outside the Youth Center on the same day is Morale, Welfare and Recreations Fun In e Sun, featuring a hot dog lunch, cotton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. is event is $3 and open to the public. A Camden County High School freshman, Searles, 14, has been working on preparing and meeting the requirements for her Silver Award Project since the Spring 2010. Shes active in DEFY as a volunteer Junior Mentor and is an honor roll student. Mika is amazing, Rust said. To take on a project of this magnitude at her age is a true display of her character. I believe she will have an amazing and successful future. e Girl Scout Silver Award is the highest award a Cadette Girl Scout, in 6th, 7th or 8th grade, can earn. It represents a girls accomplishments in Girl Scouting and in her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others. e rst four requirements of the Girl Scout Silver Award help girls build skills, explore careers, gain leadership skills and make a commitment to self-improvement. For more information on the Keep All Kids Safe program, contact Mika Searles at (912) 322-7217. als in Eugene, Ore. ve weeks ago, DeLoach earned the No. 3 spot on the USA team with a jump of 7.03 meters. At the long-jump nals here, DeLoach was in third place early with her rst attempt of 6.77 meters. en the second jump for Brittney Reese of the United States put her in rst place with a 7.12-meter leap. is dropped DeLoach to fourth place. After three jumps, DeLoach remained in fourth place, with her longest jump still the initial 6.77 meters. But it was enough to put her in the top eight and give her an opportunity for three more attempts. On her fourth jump, DeLoach leaped 6.74 meters, still just short of her rst attempt and still in fourth place. On her fth attempt, however, DeLoach soared through the air for a jump of 6.89 meters. She got up out of the sand pit with a smile. After judges registered the distance, DeLoach realized she was one centimeter in front of Latvias Ineta Radevica for the bronze. e Latvian had jumped 6.88 meters on her rst try in the nals. On her nal attempt, Redevica ew across the sand and planted her feet close to DeLoachs best of the day. But judges measured it at 6.79 meters, 10 centimeters short of the bronze. Oh I was crumbling, DeLoach said. I was like, Please God, let me have this bronze medal. I knew she could do it, but it just didnt happen at this point. I inched her out by just a centimeter. en Russias Anna Nazorova made her last attempt, again looking close to the mark DeLoach set. But the jump was measured at 6.62 and DeLoach threw her hands up in joy, realizing she had the bronze medal. Kids Olympics 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Seventy years after the Aug. 7, 1942 start to what would be a brutal, six-month-long battle over an island in the South Pacic, veterans of Guadalcanal gathered at Arlington National Cemetery to pay respects to their fellow Marines, Soldiers, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. Fifteen members of the Guadalcanal Campaign Veterans Association, or GCVA, gathered in the cemeterys amphitheater for a roll call of those known and to recognize the unknown battle buddies who had passed away over the last year. In their 80s and 90s now, the veterans were accompanied to the event by wives, sons, daughters, grandchildren and friends. We want to honor all participants of Guadalcanal, those who perished in the air, sea and land and those who came home, raised families, started careers and have since passed, said GCVAs national secretary, Gerald Mohn Jr., whose father had served with the 1st Marine Division on Guadalcanal. We think its important that these men be honored for their sacrice, they are the greatest generation. Nicholas Schlosser, of the Marine Corps History Division, discussed the signicance of the Guadalcanal Campaign to the eventual Allied victory over Imperial Japanese forces in the Pacic. I would say Guadalcanal was no less than the turning point of the war in the Pacic theater, Schlosser said. ere were very few battles in the war that were fought equally on air, land and sea that hang in the balance for so long. e battle was six months, and up until mid-November, if not December, there were still concerns that the Allies might not win. Schlosser said it was the determination of Allied forces that made Guadalcanal a decisive battle in the Allies favor. It was really through the fortitude and courage of all those ghting on the island, at sea and in the air around the island, that enabled the Allies to achieve victory and advance, he added. It no longer was a question of will the Allies win the war; it became a matter of when will Japan lose the war and how long until surrender. e invasion force to hit the beaches on Aug. 7, 1942, was made up of about 16,000 Marines which would later swell to a force of 60,000 joint service personnel, including Soldiers from the 164th Infantry Regiment of the Americal Division. e participating Allied forces there included forces from Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the British Solomon Islands, Tonga and Fiji. One of those Americal Soldiers at Guadalcanal was William J. Hanusek, of Mt. Pleasant, Pa. When he turned 21, Hanusek found himself drafted while in the process of enlisting. He wanted to be a bulldozer or crane operator, but during processing into the Army, Hanusek was asked if hed had any special training under his belt. Hanusek told the captain processing him that hed taken a rst-aid course when he was with the Civilian Conservation Corps for Youth in 1936. at was enough to get him sent o to medic school after boot camp. Hanusek eventually found himself caring for wounded Soldiers in Guadalcanal ... while carrying a carbine. Hanusek said that in the Pacic theater, unlike in the European theater, Allied medical personnel were routinely shot. I had some great friends in Guadalcanal, he recalled. In the position youre in, the guy next to you in the foxhole is your best friend in the world, hes more than a brother to you. Vets gather to mark Guadalcanal 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Child and Youth staff member Anna Chapman supervises a competitive game of Quarterback Toss. Students enjoyed a lunch of pizza, chips, cookies and juice. Middle school students line up to play a game of poolside Spelling Bee.Branch Medical Clinics HN3 Demonterio Tisdale, left, helps Child and Youth staff serve lunch. e fun is not over. Stu dents of all ages are invited to attend Fun in the Sun 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Aug. 18, being oered by the Kings Bay Youth Center in conjunction with the 4-H Engaging Teens Serving Communities initiative. For $3 per person, $10 maximum for a family of four or more, students of all ages can participate in exciting games, enjoy delicious food and win prizes. For information about other educational support services contact NSB Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson at 5738986 or write Clainetta.Jefferson@navy.mil. For more information about the Child and Youth Teen Program, call the Youth Center at 573-2380. Bash

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 5 e Oce of Naval Research is looking at birds perceptual and maneuvering abilities as inspiration for small unmanned aerial vehicle autonomy, and Popular Science is featuring this eort in its August issue, posted online July 25. An ONR-funded, veyear Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative program is examining the control and behavioral processes of birds and other small animals when ying at high speeds through complex environments, such as forests or urban settings. Researchers are trying to understand why birds make particular ight path choices and how they can do so quickly at higher speeds than would be safe for current engineered air systems in these environments. e goal is to develop and successfully demonstrate a small aircraft that can navigate obstacles in very complex and unstruc tured surroundings, while maintaining speeds as fast as 5 meters per second. e theoretical results being developed may also be applicable to larger UAVs for particular tasks, such as landing at dicult, unprepared sites. Autonomous systems technology can be a great way to deliver increased capability to the Navy and Marine Corps at an aordable price, said Marc Steinberg, a research program ocer in ONRs Science of Autonomy Program. We can provide warghters with a lot more exibility and enable new mission performance, from ight under a forest canopy and in urban canyons to damage control applications onboard ships. Flying animals provide evidence it is possible to build compact platforms with limited sensing that can safely move through challenging environments. In the lab, researchers set up an articial forest with tall pipes serving as trees at Harvard Universitys Concord Field Station. Birds and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-built UAV are wired with small digital video cameras and motion-capture technology similar to that used in Hollywood. Both are studied in parallel to compare and learn from performance as the research progresses. A goal is to move to ight in a real forest by the programs end. e idea is not to copy the birds but to incorporate lessons about how they navigate and use dynamic obstacle avoidance methods into a system that can make real-time decisions that take into account its surroundings. For example, researchers already have discovered a theoretical speed at which the probability of a collision is high in forests with an average distribution of trees; if a UAV stays below that threshold, the probability of an accident lowers dramatically. e program also has begun to reveal the types of ight strategies used by birds in these environments. We want to build smallscale UAVs that can y quickly through indoor and/or cluttered environments, but controlling these UAVs is very different than controlling a ghter jet ying up above the clouds, said Dr. Russ Tedrake, X Consortium associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and aeronautics and astronautics at MIT and the MURI lead. To be successful, we have to solve a number of incredibly hard problems in computer vision and nonlinear control. is long-term project lets us focus on the basic research questions that will lead to fundamental results and, ultimately, dramatic new capabilities for UAVs. In addition to providing warghters greater exibility, small UAVs are more agile and easily transportable, and theyre less expensive. A program goal is to be able to do this type of ight with cheap, lightweight digital video cameras as the main sensors. is would eliminate the need for other sensors typically used, such as laser-based ones that add cost and weight, and the MURI is testing feasibility. e MURI involves researchers and engineers from MIT, Harvard University, Carnegie Mellon University, New York University and Stanford University. A closely connected MURI with the University of Washington, Boston University, University of Maryland and University of North Carolina is examining similar issues with animals in the wild, including birds, bats and large insects such as hawk moths. ONR provides the sci ence and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engage ment in 50 states, 30 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. ONR research study focuses on ight of birds As families head to beaches and lakes, now is the perfect time to learn about keeping you and your loved ones safe. One of the biggest dangers on our nations beaches and lakefronts are rip currents. Rip currents are narrow channels of fast-moving water that pull swimmers away from the shore. ey can occur any time, in good or bad weather, on breezy days and calm days and at high tide or low tide. ey occur along any coastline featuring breaking waves and are one of the most frequent reasons Coast Guard crews are launched in the summer months. But before Coast Guard crews or lifesaving professionals are called in, you can do your part to prevent being trapped in a rip current. Your rst line of defense is to read the surf forecast before you head to the beach. e National Weather Service is your rst stop for this critical safety information. You can check its Website or tune in to local weather reports. Your local beach may also post signs or ags to warn youof hazardous conditions. Once you have checked the weather reports, the next step in staying safe is by learning how to spot a rip current before you jump into the water. One of the rst indicators of a rip current is a change in the texture of the water. Look for a channel of churning or choppy water. Another sure sign of a rip current is a drastic change in color. Look for an area with a recognizable dierence in the waters color. Any lines of foam, seaweed or debris moving steadily seaward or any breaks in incoming wave patterns also can help you identify a potential hazardous current. If you do nd yourself caught in a rip current, the most important thing you can do is remain calm. You should immediately yell for help to let others know you are caught in a rip current, however you should not panic and try to swim against the current, as this will just tire you out. You can escape the rip current by swimming parallel to the beach until you are free. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, oat or calmly tread water. When out of the current, swim toward the shore at an angle away from the rip current. Share these important safety tips with friends and family.Rip currents a real danger Four thousand miles from Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, where he ran his rst around-the-island marathon for charity, 79-yearold Tom Knoll stood astir shifting conversation left and right among a handful of supporters earlier this summer in the nal seconds before he kicked o his latest endeavor. e man who spent the past three decades running to raise donations for charities was at it again, this time embarking on a 1,650-mile trot from New Orleans to International Falls, Minn., on the edge of the Canadian border. is one here is just to show that senior citizens can do stu too, and also to make some money for everyone said the slender 5-foot-8 philanthropist. Knoll started running to make money for charities when he was stationed at Kaneohe Bay in the mid70s. en Master Gunnery Sgt. Knoll, who had picked up long distance running a couple of years earlier, was asked to donate money for a charity drive. e Marine had a more ambitious idea in mind. I said to hell with this, Ill do a charity run around the island instead 133.6 miles and youll make money and its going to be a lot better than my $25 donation, he said. He circled Kaneohe Bay and raised $500. From then on, Knoll was hooked. In 1978, the 56-year-old Marine deployed to Okinawa. ere, Knoll plotted on running the 250-mile perimeter of the island to raise money for crippled children. Hes one of the most committed people that Ive ever met and hes very imaginative, said Laura Murray, Knolls girlfriend. He likes to do things that have meaning. Instead of doing a long run just for the heck of it, he likes to do it for charity. Double the distance of his Hawaii feat, Okinawa would test Knolls commitment and mark a turning point in his mindset. Ten miles from the nish line and 57 hours already committed, the eects of a 250-mile run began to amass his brain. Im never doing this gain, he told his friend who was running with him at the time. Knoll nished the race. At the nish line stood crippled child Megumi Nakata who donned a wide smile hovered over her crutches, awaiting her hero. She changed my mind, he said of Nakata. She gave me a big kiss and she said I love you Tom. e run generated more than $8,000 for the crippled kids. is is when Knoll asked himself, Why not a million? Why not a million? Little did I know at the time her show of appreciation would bring me back from various places throughout the world to Okinawa for nine more Christmas holiday runs, according to Why not a Million?, a book he wrote about his running adventures. On his second Okinawa perimeter run, Knoll set out to circle the island twice in less than a week. He completed the 500 miles within ten minutes of his projected goal and his eorts has made half a million dollars for crippled children. e contributions for the Okinawa runs and how it aided crippled children propelled Knoll to imagine what other worthy causes he could run for, he said in his book. He does it for those who cant do it or have the opportunity to do it, said retired Sgt. Maj. Dave Danford, who served with Knoll and has known him for more than half a century. If you want somebody in charity working for you, he is the guy. In 1979, Knoll was stationed back in the United States. He continued to run several marathons and ultra marathons stateside and across the globe for various causes. In addition to jogging in 135-degree weather in Afghanistan, Knoll has completed 197 marathons all over world to include places such as: Vietnam, Greece, Istanbul, Bangkok, Wales and 40 states in America. Knoll has amassed more than 75,000 miles in his runs, enough to circle the world three times. Hes also been recognized for his humanitarian eorts to include a prestigious award from the Japanese government, having a day named after him in Colorado and receiving the Golden Shoe award from Runners World magazine. Knoll is also an original Ironman. He came in sixth place in the inaugural multi-sport event that had fteen competitors swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and run 26.2 miles Retired Marine, 79, on run

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e free Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex on Saturday, Aug. 18 will be Up, rated PG. Gates open at 7 p.m. at the Outdoor eater. Its $2 for a hamburger, chips and beverage. Bring your own oating device for the movie. For more information, call (912) 573-3001. Navy Entertainment pres ents The Craig Karges Dinner and Show is Thursday, Aug. 15 at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Social hour begins at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person and are being sold at ITT and at the Conference Center. Suggested ages are 10 years and up. Come and expe rience the extraordinary mind blowing show that features tables floating, minds being read and metal bending. Craig Karges has been seen on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Larry King Live, Fox News, E Entertainment Television, CNN Headline News and CNBC. For more information call (912) 573-4559. CocoLoco Luau Its 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14 at the Rack-N-Roll Entertain-ment Center. A pig roast with all the xins, inflatables, music, con tests, door prizes and more. ere will be bowling $1 games and $1 shoes. KB Finnegans will have beer sampling and drink specials. is is free for all. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Check out MWRs Outdoor Recreation special for August Camping equipment is 40 percent off for the month of August. This includes camping tents, sleeping bags and either the 16-foot or 18-foot Zoom Campers while supplies last. Contact the Outdoor Adventure Center at (912) 573-8103 for questions or stop by and make your reservation today. Travel through the Labor Day Weekend safely e Auto Skills Center is oering a free 10-point check up for your vehicle by appointment only from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21, through Thursday, Aug. 31. All other services are normal pricing. e inspection includes tire pressures and wear on all tires and spare, coolant, exhaust, CV joints, auto transmission levels, windshield wipers, break and power steering uid, belts and hoses, A/C temp and batteries and alternator. Call for your appointment today at (912) 573-9629. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips for August. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen e run will be Tuesday, Aug. 21 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Special opening ceremony is at 6:30 am. All participants should arrive by 6:30 a.m. e race will begin at 7 a.m. e command with the most participation will win a pool party. For more information call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fun in the Sun is at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. Enjoy a day of fun. Cost is $3 per person with a $10 max for four people or more. Hot dog lunch, cotton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Winter Youth Bowling League Registrationis going on now through Saturday, Aug. 25 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling begins Sept. 8 and con tinues through March 30 at 9 a.m. every Saturday. Registration fee is $17 and there is an $8.50 weekly fee. Registration fee includes shirt, sanction card, awards and prizes. There will be a party at the end of the season. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Free movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Aug. 18, 19 Alpha & Omega and Aug. 25, 26 We Bought a Zoo Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Officials are Needed for the upcoming Youth Sports Soccer Season Games run September through October. If you are 14 years or older and interested in earning extra money, you are needed. Certified or uncer tified, MWR will do all the training. The training date is to be announced. Looking to make a difference in a childs life? This is your chance. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Fun in Sun Aug. 18 Just for kids Dive-In Movie Up Aug. 18 Liberty call around the Hawaiian island of Oahu in 1978. Swollen ankles and pesky insects In 1983, Knoll had six months to kill between retiring from the Marines and going to work for a government agency in Washington D.C. I said, Im going to run across the United States for charity, he remembered. He took o with a couple of friends from the Marine Corps Iwo Jima memorial in D.C. on a mid-80s July afternoon. Traveling at a speed of 46 miles per day, he arrived in Los Angeles 64 days and 3,100 miles later. In 2008, he reversed the course and with his son, they trekked from San Diego back to the Iwo Jima memorial in D.C. Knoll recounted his daily running experiences in Why not a Million? He shared some of his odd encounters such as snakes, coyotes, downpour, swollen ankles and pesky insects. Mother nature is going to get you one way or another, he said. Its either the heat, the cold, the wind or tornadoes. Knoll has been dodging Mother Natures bullets so far with success.When he was training by the river, a guy about a half-a-mile away was struck and killed by lightning. He said on his second cross country venture, 19 people were killed by a tornado in Missouri only a day before he ran through state. On the rst day of that same cross country run, he tripped and fell onto hard concrete cement which left his head bleeding profusely. He had to get 26 stitches above his eye. ats not the way you want to start o a run, but for the next 3,000 miles no incidents occurred whatsoever, he said. My son was running with me, he thought the run was over. I said dont worry about it. e next day I went out and ran 30 miles. Victory lap Knoll made his million for charity last year. An avid racing spectator and in adhering to an old racing tradition, he wanted to do a victory lap. His victory lap will cover 1,650 miles from New Orleans to the Canadian border and gather donations for a host of dierent charities, including wounded veterans and cancer research. Im lucky, he said. Im a Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, but I still got two legs and two arms. I am doing it for the guys and gals that lose a leg, lose an arm, get xed and are ready to go back. Knolls causes may be noble and personal but an escapade of this caliber dees human nature. Most people, if they make it past age 70, are in fragile health and choose to spend their remaining days relaxing, but not Knoll. His friends say hed rather be out running than sitting around enjoying a beer and shooting the breeze. You call him and hes on the track running! said Danford. Hell probably put something in his thatll require his casket to be moved a certain number of miles, joked Carolyn Danford, wife of Dave Danford and also a friend of Knoll. In Knolls calculus, unbroken promises trump the obstacles, giving is better than receiving, and running keeps the mind and body healthy. My trick is I tell a lot of people Im going to do it, then I cant quit, he humored. Run 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Anger management seminar Aug. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon,Aug. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 30. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Aug. 21. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Aug. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Aug. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513. job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 29. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Aug. 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Aug. 30. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Parenting classes Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Aug. 20 and 27. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic There will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 to 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. workshop upcomingRelocating due to a Permanent Change of Station assignment is exciting, but it also can be expensive too. Even though the government provides relocation allowances, many families find a move puts a strain on their financial budget. This workshop targets active-duty military and their families who are relocating and will be from 9 to 11 a.m., Aug. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 5734513. classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research HospitalA CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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No injuries as warship, tanker crash No one was hurt when a U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer and a large Japanese owned merchant vessel collided near the Strait of Hormuz Aug. 12. e collision between USS Porter (DDG 78) and the Panamanian-agged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan occurred at approximately 1 a.m. local time. Porter transited under its own power to Jebel Ali, UAE and is now pierside for assessment and repair. e incident is under investigation. USS Porter is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater se-curity cooperation eorts.In August, there are Air Conditioning Appreciation Week, National Apple Week, National Clown Week, plus American Dance Week, Elvis Week and National Smile Week. Maybe its too much Olympics, but I decided to break these into two heats with semifinals and a cham pionship for which week sounds most interesting to interviewees. I like apples, appreciate A/C, am not afraid of clowns, used to be a good dancer, dont mind Elvis and enjoys smiles. But Im stumped as to what sounds best. Verne Daniels Retired Navy Zephyrhills, Fla. Apples. Elvis. Elvis, because of his music and movies. STS2 Julian Romero Trident Refit Facility Atlanta Clowns. Dance. Lets go with Clowns. It sounds like it must be fun. EM1 Jeff Graby USS Georgia Blue Greece, N.Y. Apples. Smile. Apples. I grew up near Hilton, N.Y., and a big thing there is their orchards and Apple Fest. YN2 Bryce Mack USS Tennessee Gold Dallas Air Conditioning. Smile. Smile, because I love to smile. NCC Alex Roque NSB Kings Bay Miami Clowns. Smile. Clowns. Clowns is the most ridiculous. Elizabeth Price Family member Los Angeles Air Conditioning. Smile. Air Conditioning. It gets so hot outside, you have to have air conditioning. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e hunting season is upon us, and there will soon be hunters in the woods. Hunting aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is necessary to control the deer population, thus reducing the number of deer involved in vehicle accidents. NSB Kings Bay is an enclosed habitat. Hunting prevents exceeding available food sources and promotes a healthy and productive deer herd. Hunting season is Sept. 8 through Jan. 15, 2013. Authorized hunting days are Wednesday and ursday afternoons and evenings, weekends, holidays and the week between Christmas and New Years. Each hunting area is marked with a yellow sign containing a letter and number, for example, B-1 or G-2. e hunting areas and rules are outlined in the SUBASE Hunting Instruction, SUBASEINST 11015.1S. You can access it through the SUBASE home page or at www. cnic.navy.mil/navycni/Hunting season begins Sept. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 9

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus Army studies brain trama A new dimension in imaging technology detects minute levels of vascular damage in the form of bleeding, clots and reduced levels of oxygenation that may better illuminate our understanding of brain injury, particularly related to trauma. e U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Commands Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center is managing a related project that is being led by Dr. E. Mark Haacke of Wayne State University. Haacke recently presented his work in susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping, or SWIM, to a national panel of military and civilian medical experts. In this current project, he is exploring advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods and SWIM to improve diagnosis and outcome prediction of mild traumatic brain injury. is study is just one example of the promis ing research that TATRC supports. Collaborations among the investigators we bring together may lead to creative solutions we hadnt imagined, said Col. Karl Friedl, TATRC director. In 1997, Haackes team developed susceptibility weighted imaging, a highly sensitive technique to detect the presence of blood products. Haacke said it has been proved to be the most sensitive approach to visualizing cerebral microbleeds and shearing of vessels in traumatic brain injury, or TBI. ese conditions do seem to be reliable indicators of injury because we have imaged hundreds of adults over the years, of all ages, and rarely nd them in the normal control population, Haacke said. In recent years, Haackes team and other neuroimaging researchers have applied concepts similar to SWIM to provide a new measure of iron content through quantitative susceptibility mapping. Haackes approach, SWIM, is a rapid method that not only provides a quantitative map of iron but at the same time reveals the presence of cerebral microbleeds and abnormal veins. Iron in the form of deoxyhemoglobin can also be used to measure changes in local oxygen saturation, important for evaluating potential changes in local blood ow or tissue function (similar to what is seen in stroke using SWI). SWIM also can be used to monitor changes in iron content over time to see if previous iron deposition is being resorbed or if bleeding continues, both important diagnostic pieces of information for the clinician. SWIM is among the highest quality and fastest types of quantitative susceptibility mapping, Haacke said. We believe it could be in much wider use in about a year. Haacke has been working with researchers through out the world for more than ve years applying his tech niques specically to traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinsons disease and multiple sclerosis. In this current project, he has demonstrated that there is a lower impact load, either inertia or direct impact forces, which may damage only veins, and he has shown medullary vein damage that has not been visualized with other techniques. e medullary veins drain the frontal white matter of the brain, so reduced blood ow here could possibly impair the higher level frontal neurocognitive functions. In light of this, treatments that improve blood ow to the brain might be a promising direction to pursue. While many investigators have focused on arteri al changes related to brain injuries, Haacke remained focused on the veins. Veins have relatively more fragile vessel walls than arteries and are more susceptible to damage during head injury, Haacke said. is important component of the vascular system is often overlooked but may help us better diagnose what is wrong. Doctor Haackes team has a dierent slant for studying these injury regions that may lead to a new avenue in diagnosis and treatment for traumatic or other types of brain injury, said Dr. Anthony Pacico, who manages TATRCs Medical Imaging Technologies Portfolio. For instance, the study of dementia could well benet from SWI and SWIM, Haacke said. Perhaps as much as one-third of all dementia is vascular dementia. Haacke and Dr. Zhifeng Kou are working to complete a larger database of normal and mildly braininjured imaging scans and dene the appropriate parameters so that SWIM can be run at most clinical sites. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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access further complicates the rescue, Fire Prevention Ocer Assistant Chief Kim Maxwell said. Maintaining unobstructed emergency ingress and egress paths is not always achievable aboard submarines, but should be a top consideration when planning maintenance activities. At the scene, Paramedic Capt. James Todd took initial command and led EMS personnel to board the vessel and begin immediate patient assessment. e patient displayed the classic symptoms of severe dehydration and was too unstable to walk under her own strength. e arriving incident commander directed the second-in engine to prepare equipment for a high angle rescue. e second-in crew was led by Paramedic Capt. Tom Middleton, who directed his team to gather rope, rescue equipment and a long backboard to support a technical-rescue operation. As Todd worked to stabilize the patient, rescue personnel with technical extrication equipment in tow, boarded the submarine. With medical assessment complete and the patient stable for transport, the KBFD team rapidly transitioned from initial patient care to a rescue operation. After the patient was stabilized and secured on a long backboard for extrication, crews began the delicate process of removing the patient from the sail and o the submarine. Utilizing specialized rescue ropes and equipment, reghters carefully lowered the patient to the deck of the submarine, and with the assistance of several submarine crew members, they traversed the deck avoiding several open missile tubes and several pieces of maintenance equipment. e patient was loaded in the ambulance where medical treatment continued en route o base to Camden Medical Center. Anything involving a submarine re or rescue will be extremely complex, Fireghter Jason Ackerman said. Limited manpower, near 100-degree heat with 95 percent humidity only makes the job more dicult. Take it from a professional reghter, if you dont keep yourself cool and hydrated as you work, well be coming to see you! e KBFD team members expressed thanks and appreciation to personnel aboard the USS Georgia who rendered their assistance. Anyone who has lived in an area prone to high heat and humidity, electrical storms, tornadoes and hurricanes could tell you that dozens of deaths a year are attributed to these weather phenomena. Of these, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Heat is the No. 1 weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. In fact, on average, excessive heat claims more lives each year than oods, lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes combined. In a summer season plagued with heat-related emergencies, the KBFD team can attest to this. ese dedicated reghters have responded to dozens of heat-related medical responses ranging from minor heat stress to unconscious heat stroke victims. Rescue As the Defense Department adopts a new paradigm for the U.S. military to remain a formidable force while absorbing $487 billion in spending reductions over the next decade, the prospect of an additional $500 billion spending reduction over that period would be a disaster not only for national defense, but also for defense communities, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in Monterey, Calif., Aug. 6. In remarks at an Association of Defense Communities conference, the secretary said the new defense strategy and the Pentagons budget decisions reect the need to bring the governments budget under control. ere is a strategic and scal imperative that is driving the department to a smaller, leaner and more agile force thats the reality, Panetta said. It would be irresponsible not to reduce the budget and do our role in confronting the scal challenges facing this country. e secretary noted that though the department and the nation are weath ering a period of great chal lenge, an opportu nity for planning emerges. Under the new strategy, Panetta said, the force will remain agile, quickly deployable, exible, and prepared to deal with crises anywhere in the world. As drawdowns in Iraq and Afghanistan unfold, the United States will continue to sharpen its focus on matters in the Asia-Pacic region, sparking a rebalance of global posture as part of an overall strategy to maintain a presence elsewhere in the world. Additionally, he said, vigilance against cyberspace threats is essential. He called the cyber arena the battleeld for the future, with the potential to cripple progress for the United States and its allies. e strategy also must Defense boss talks budget, strategy THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012 11

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include investment in and protection of DODs industrial base, the secretary said. Close partnerships with members of Congress, committees, caucuses, defense industrial partners, foreign allies, foreign partners and defense communities across the country remain one of the guiding principles in implementing the new strategy, Panetta said. Noting that he has to put every area of the defense budget on the table, the secretary acknowledged challenges that stem from assessing major areas such as compensation, which he said has increased by 80 percent. Panetta called sequestration an indiscriminate formula that was never meant to take eect. It was never designed to be implemented, he said. It was designed to trigger such untold damage that it would force people to do the right thing. He urged the defense community leaders to do what they can to ensure Congress reaches a solution that avoids sequestration. Navy College groups/public/docu ments/document/cnicp_ a141117.pdf. e hunting season in no way restricts nonhunters from enjoying the same areas that hunters do. e key is to be aware that you may encounter hunters in the woods. For your own safety wear bright colored clothing, and stay on bike-paths and perimeter roads. If you choose to hike in the woods, contact the Kings Bay Game Warden at (912) 674-6817 or NSB Security Dispatch at (912) 573-2145. e Game Warden can advise you on which areas are not being hunted, to ensure a safe outing without encroaching on the hunters. Hunters must have a Georgia state hunting license, big game license and purchase a SUBASE hunting permit from outdoor recreation. Hunters will attend an annual rules, regulations, and safety brief prior to hunting or scouting on base. Hunters also must have a state approved Hunter Safety Course Certicate from any state, if born after January 1961 and a SUBASE weapons registration for their hunting weapon from Stimson pass and I.D. SUBASE hunting rules, regulations and safety briefs will be conducted at 4:30 p.m., Aug. 22, and 29 at the indoor rie range, Building 3072. Additional hunting briefs will be at 4:30 p.m. every Wednesday at HVA Escort, Building 2040) through the end of October.Hunting Budget 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Hot stu: Corps trains in Jordanian desert Standing post and hiking patrols are not the most glamorous work in an infantrymans career. But these security measures ensured the safety of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Units Aviation Combat Element and forced those Marines tasked with providing security to get back to basics in Jordan throughout the month of May during Exercise Eager Lion 12. is exercise allowed the Marines from 3rd platoon, Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th MEU, to reinforce their knowledge of defense while in a training environment, which is part of the Marine Corps train as you ght doctrine. e U.S. Air Force maintained security for the aircraft throughout the exercise with vehicle checkpoints and periodic roaming vehicles. Despite this, the Marines confessed they felt safer with boots on the ground. e Air Force is great, but these Marines were very proactive of setting a defensive posture, said Capt. Christopher Kupka, the anti-terrorism and force-protection ocer for 24th MEU who was responsible for ensuring the air base had a robust security posture while the Marines were there. ey set up multiple defensive measures with entry control points, machine gun emplacements, and daily patrols. e defensive posture and capabilities increased immediately once the Marines with Charlie Company arrived. e Marines hit the ground running with nothing in hand but the commanders intent, Kupka said. e Marines searched through the on-base dump to collect scraps and debris to build defenses. We didnt have any supplies when we got here so we had to salvage everything from the dump, said 1st Lt. William J. Norris, 3rd platoon commander and Naples, Fla., native. e Marines maintained a boundary of nearly 5,000 meters of concertina wire, as well as sand-lled barrels along the perimeter to stop larger vehicles. After establishing the perimeter and various entry control points, the Marines moved into a steady schedule of eight hours on post, eight hours on patrol, and eight hours to rest and maintain a quick reaction force. e Marines are awesome, theyve maintained 24-hour operations for a month straight, Norris said. e Marines also constructed machine gun posts to protect the ammunition supply point. We put up two M240D machine gun posts along with a MK19 (grenade launcher) to cover some of the additional dead space, said Cpl. Ryan Kretschmer, 23, 3rd squad leader and Twin Lakes, Wis., native. e posts were built from scrap metal, wood, sandbags and sweat as the Marines dug the gun emplacements into the embankments surrounding the ASP. ey were made entirely out of garbage, and they look pretty good for being built out of garbage, Norris said. Kretschmer was given very little direction before being released to establish and maintain the machine guns. ey told me what they wanted with and we just made it happen, he said. ese patrols, posts and machine guns added that extra layer of security the Marines require for a Marine Corps installation. People see us on patrol and they see us on post so they know we are out here and were keeping this place safe, said Lance Cpl. Jason O. Otero, 24, machine gunner and New York City native. Its safer because they see us always here, always on guard, always on patrol. While the Marines on post missed the training ranges from Exercise Eager Lion 12, they regarded their work here as more representative of the daily grind in a combat environment. I didnt think it would be like this when we got out here, said Cpl. Benjamin Young, 21, 2nd squad leader and Chattanooga, Tenn., native. We usually do live-re ranges during a training exercise but here, its been just like real world. Its a good experience for the young Marines. We got here and hit the ground running, said Young. Im really happy how the boys did. e extensive increase in security allowed the Charlie Company Marines to see what they are capable of in a short period of time. It also allowed the squad leaders to train their Marines in a realworld environment. We did a lot in four days when we didnt have anything, Kupka said. Weve made this place even 10 times better in security posture. e patrols and guard posts have worn on the Marines here as their morale struggled with the grueling pace of their security posture. Despite their weariness and burden, the Marines trudged on to ensure a secure workplace for the Marines throughout the exercise. Eager Lion 12 was an international training exercise with more than 19 countries and approximately 11,000 participants designed to promote cooperation and militaryto-military relationships among participating forces. e exercise scenario is intended to portray realistic, modern-day security challenges. e 24th MEU is deployed with the Iwo Jima ARG to the U.S. Central Command area of operations as a theater reserve and crisis response force. Sandlot football for realMarines with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and Marine Forces Central Command along with Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 8th Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, faced o in some friendly football competition as they awaited the beginning of Exercise Eager Lion 12. e Marines, from the command element of the 24th MEU and advance party element from MARCENT, worked steadily preparing the camp for their command sta. Meanwhile, the Soldiers provided security for the camp in constant rotations. Neither branch worked together and had little contact during this time while focused on their separate missions. Football changed that. It was a friendly competition, aint nothing wrong with that, said Lance Cpl. Jared Harrington, an embark specialist with MARCENT. We got to meet each other over a game of football and everyone had fun. e games provided an opportunity for the service members to meet each other and build camaraderie and cohesion before the exercise begins. e Marines won the rst game, but the Army wanted a rematch to give other Soldiers an opportunity to play and claim the second days victory. We beat them yesterday, but they got their revenge today, said Cpl. Fenton Reese, a combat correspondent with MARCENT. e Marines and Soldiers pushed the game until long after the sun had set. We played until we couldnt see the ball anymore said Sta Sgt. Dellon Arthur, a military information support operations specialist with the 24th MEU. It was a good time. 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