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The Kings Bay periscope ( 08-02-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00263

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00263


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Twenty-eight members earn degrees at Chapel Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay celebrated the graduation of 28 youths who participated in the second annual Drug Education for Youth Program, July 26. e graduating youth participat ed in the eight-day summer camp, known as Phase I, in July 2011 and participated in monthly follow-up meetings for Phase II with their peers and mentors. During the summer camp, the youths participated in workshops on peer pressure, gang resistance, drugs, alcohol and more. ey also participated in many team-building exercises such as a low ropes course at Epworth by the Sea, a 3-mile hike at Fort Clinch, team sporting events and physical challenges. During the monthly follow-up meetings, DEFY members participated in a wide variety of activities, ranging from community service projects to a eld trip to the Okefe nokee Wildlife Refuge. e graduation ceremony began with the Parading of Colors per formed by the Kings Bay Sea Cadets. e Sea Cadets served as junior mentors during the summer camp and helped teach the class military Fleet and Family Support Center oers classes Life Skills have been dened by the World Health Organization as abilities for adaptive and positive behavior that enable individuals to deal eectively with the demands and challenges of ev eryday life. ey represent the psycho-social skills that deter mine valued behavior and include reective skills such as problemsolving and critical thinking, to per sonal skills such as self-awareness, and to interpersonal skills. Practicing Life Skills leads to qualities such as self esteem, sociability and tolerance, to action competencies including to take action and generate change, and to capabilities to have the freedom to decide what to do and who to be. Kings Bay FFSC oers several Life Skills building classes such as Anger Management, Parenting, Eective Communication, and Stress Management. Up Periscope Who is your all-time favorite Olympian ? Page 9 I do, I do Kings Bay husband, wife team re-enlist together Page 9 No fear Devil Pups take 25-foot leap into swimming pool Page 3 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Life Skills tipsThis months Life Skills Building Tips are things you can do with your anger: Speak up when something is important to you response Think before speaking out. Speak in I language: I think I feel I want Only you are responsible for how you feel. Life Skills key to successful living Left, SA Anthony Belvedere, NARS B-1 Squadron, and SA Connor Stedt, American Veterans Division, on the Marine obstacle course. Photos by PO2 Jonathan Shoemaker, NSCC United States Naval Sea Cadets from around the country gathered for a week-long Master-at-Arms training on Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, July 22. Twenty-nine cadets participated in the training, conducted by active-duty Master-at-Arms MA2 Roy Miller, MA2 Amber Ball and MASN Camron Langley, with the help of Sgt. Kyle Rust, one of the lead instructors for the NSB Kings Bay Security Training Department. Miller, Ball and Langley were full time volunteers for the duration of the course, and also volunteer their time to the Naval Sea Cadet Corps on a monthly basis. MA training is designed to teach Sea Cadets about the Navys Master at Arms specialization. During the training, Cadets were instructed in the use and function of the M-9 pistol, general rearm safety and suspect take-down tactics. ey learned about the Uniform Code of Military Justice and other guidance employed by Navy MAAs. Additionally, Sea Cadets participated in physical training twice a day, lived in the Navy enlisted quarters and ate chow in the base galley. To pass the course, all Cadets Ready . aim . re!Navy Reservist hits London Olympics with her best shotDespite having a dicult Olympic debut, Navy Reserve Petty Ocer 1st Class San dra Uptagrats experience in London featured enough goosebumps and memories to last a lifetime July 29. Uptagrat, wife of Sgt. 1st Class Eric Uptatgrat of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, nished 28th with a score of 378 in the womens 10-meter air pistol event at the Royal Artillery Barracks. Firsttime Olympic jitters, common to many shooters who toe the line for the rst time on the worlds grandest stage, led to a result that was not in her game plan. Once I hit the match but ton, it hit me that I am at the Olympic Games, and it kind of took me out of my rhythm, Sandra said. It took me a while to settle down and re focus. ats what I was able to do my last two strings. Its NSBs DEFY class graduates

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really disappointing, be cause I knew going into the match that this would happen. Chinas Wenjen Guo won the gold medal with a total score of 488.1 points. Frances Celine Goberville (486.6) claimed the silver. Ukraines Olena Kostevych (486.6) took the bronze. Adding to Uptagrats displeasure was the fact that her sister Andrea trav eled from Singapore yes terday to watch her com pete in a match for the rst time. Sandra said she was thinking, is is not an example of what to do, and that she was disheart ened because her sister saw her shoot poorly. e outcome, though, had no bearing on the joy Andrea experienced while watching her sister com pete in the biggest sport ing event in the world. It was pretty cool, An drea said. I was surprised everyone was so calm and calculated. I was trying to keep calm as well, because I was slightly nervous and hoping for her to do well. I am very proud of her. I know this whole thing is overwhelming. After the match, the sisters shared a hug. Up tagrats husband, however, was not there for the reunion. Eric missed his wifes Olympic debut because of a lack of train ing space at the Olym pic shooting venue for upcoming competitors, which forced several Team USA shooters to return to Denmark to train. Eric will compete Aug. 3 in mens prone rie. Al though he missed Sandras match, they were able to share something much more memorable when they walked together in the Opening Ceremony at Olympic Stadium on the night of July 27. at was a moment Sandra said she will never forget. Walking into the open ing ceremonies was the ultimate high, she said. I still get goosebumps thinking about it now. To walk the opening ceremo nies with my husband, hand-in-hand, just made it that much more meaningful and something I will carry the rest of my life. Uptagrat said she en joyed the camaraderie THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Blessing of the Backpack Aug. 9 e Blessing of the Backpack is about bless ing all students, their backpacks, the teachers and administration. Its about celebrating and blessing the beginning of the new school year. Its about giving thanks for our kids and bless ing their journey of learning this new school year. e Blessing of the Backpacks is at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel, at 4:30 p.m., Aug. 9. Following the Blessing, you and your family are invited to stay for a cook out. For more information, contact the Chapel sta at 573-4501.ShipShape weight loss Aug. 16If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an 8-week actionoriented weight management program fo cusing on nutrition education, increasing ex ercise, and behavior modication skills that support a healthy lifestyle. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information program or to sign up. Classes start 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., August 16 in the Fitness Complex classroom.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course.CACs updated on RAPIDS site RAPIDS Self-Service is available to Common Access Card holders. RSS is a Web site that allows CAC holders to update their information and verify family members for DoD ID card reissuance. Using this Web-based application, CAC holders have the ability to update certain information associated with their record. Ad ditionally, they may use RSS to verify a family members relationship and eligibility by digi tally signing the DD Form 1172-2 for ID card re-issuance. A DD Form 1172-2 that is digital ly-signed and generated through RSS will be stored in DEERS and is a viewable document in RAPIDS. Once veried using RSS, spon sors no longer need to accompany their fam ily members to get the ID card. When a family member arrives at an ID card site, the DEERS/ RAPIDS operator may view the signed 1172-2 by opening the sponsors record. To use the RSS Web site, one must be a sponsor with a DoD CAC and have a CAC enabled personal computer. Sponsors that are CAC holders may access RAPIDS Self Service at https://www. dmdc.osd.mil/self_service/NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Navy Exchange offers valuesinking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Optical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. rough Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will of fer no interest, no down payment and no pay ments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, in cluding contact lenses, of $199 or more. Now hear this! Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki warned Congress today that looming budget cuts as well as the surge of troops returning from a decade of wars will further challenge the governments ability to provide for veterans in a timely manner. Both testied before a joint ses sion of the House Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Veterans Aairs. Panetta told lawmakers troop drawdowns as well as the impact of wars over the last decade will, for years to come, place additional strain on an already burdened sys tem charged with caring for veter ans. Were going to be adding another hundred thousand per year. And the ability to be able to respond to that in a way that eectively deals with the heath care issues, with the benets issues, with all of the other challenges, that is not going to be an easy challenge, he said, adding that the current system is already over whelmed. Shinseki, whose agency is at tempting to process a backlog of vet erans claims within a bureaucracy that he described as still largely unautomated and paperbound, further laid out the daunting task ahead. Our history suggests that VAs requirements will continue growing for a decade or more after the operational missions in Iraq and Af ghanistan are ended, he said. Over the next ve years, there is the po tential for 1 million serving men and women to either leave military ser vice or demobilize from active duty. Of the roughly 1.4 million veterans who have returned from both wars, nearly 70 percent, he said, currently rely on the VA. Rep. Howard McKeon of Califor nia, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, noted if an additional round of draconian budget cuts known as sequestration takes eect next year, 100,000 additional service personnel will be leaving the military and likely would add to the strain on resources that DOD and VA are providing to current veterans. Shinseki told lawmakers he has been informed that VA would be largely exempt from sequestration, and that only administrative costs would be aected. He told the panel he doesnt yet have a denition of administrative costs, and he oered to provide that information later. Sequestration is a federal budget maneuver written into legislation passed last year that raised the U.S. debt ceiling. Unless lawmakers take action to prevent it, the measure will slash spending across the federal budget beginning in January, taking an ad ditional $500 billion from defense accounts. Panetta has said the cuts would be a disaster, and told lawmakers to day that such a move would make it near impossible to do the kind of work the departments are trying to do. Veterans Aairs Ocials warn of budget stress on VA In order to ensure high priority senior enlisted leadership positions are manned in the Fleet, the Navy is updating E-7 to E-9 detailing busi ness rules, ocials announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, released July 26. e CPO Early Return to Sea pro gram is part of the Navys coordi nated eort to aggressively address gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Under the program, the Navy will curtail the shore duty of selected se nior enlisted Sailors of ranks E-7 to E-9, and detail them back to sea to ll operational billets that cannot be lled by rotating Sailors. is pro gram is an update to the previous CPO to Sea program and is designed to ensure high-priority, senior leadership positions at sea are manned for operational readiness. Our Fleet needs senior Sailors who have the right skills and lead ership experience to meet our criti cal at-sea missions, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director of Military Plans and Policy. e CPO Early Return to Sea program will help us ensure critical senior enlisted leadership is where we need it most. Except to meet the most critical operational requirements, only Sailors who have completed at least 24 months of shore duty at the time of transfer will be considered for early return to sea. e Navy will only involuntarily curtail a Sailors shore duty orders to ll a needed requirement when there are no available CPOs in the projected rotation date window and there are no excess personnel on sea duty within the geographic area that can be reassigned. To minimize the number of CPOs impacted, detailers will ll as many high priority sea duty billets as pos sible by fully utilizing the authorized transfer window, including moving Sailors three months prior to, or four months beyond their PRD month. Candidates will be selected based on various factors including length of time on shore; recent advance ment; eet experience; NEC/skills held; type of previous sea duty; and remaining OBLISERV. Impact on the shore duty com mands mission also will be evaluat ed. E8 and E9 Sailors may be chosen to ll vacant E-7, E-8 or E-9 billets, and E-7 Sailors may be chosen to ll vacant E-8 billets. As detailers will attempt to ll all billets using voluntary measures rst, CPOs should consider applying for the Voluntary Sea Duty Program, which provides several incentives, including geographic choice or sta bility and High Year Tenure waiver consideration. Also, depending on rating, pay grade and skills, sea duty incentive pay may also be available. We understand that the force management decisions we make directly aect the careers and lives of our Sailors and their families, Kurta said. Our goal is to cause the least amount of disruption to the careers of our Sailors and their families, while ensuring the Fleet has the manning required to remain mis sion-ready. Fleet readiness require ments will ultimately be the guiding factor in Sailor assignments. Commands will have the opportunity to request a Flag review if there are extenuating circumstances that preclude execution of the sea duty assignment. According to the NAV ADMIN, requests to retire (transfer to the eet reserve) from CPOs selected for Early Return to Sea may be disapproved. CPO Early Return to Sea Move on to return leadership to shipsOlympics 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Camp Pendleton Marines worked with members of Devil Pups Incor porated to have a group of Devil Pups perform a 25-foot tower jump at the 62 Area pool, July 12. Devil Pups is a nonprot organization de signed to help young chil dren gain self-condence and learn to take responsibility for their actions. is event, taking place on training day eight ofthe 10-day encampment, is a requirement for graduation. Marines throughout Camp Pendleton volunteered to be instructors and play the role of drill instructor for the Devil Pups. I have always wanted to be a drill instructor, and this has given me a glimpse of what it would be like in the drill eld, said Rachael E. Allison, a motor transport operator with 1st Marine Logistics Group, also an instructor for the Devil Pups training encampment. Similar to Marine Corps recruit training, the in structors are vicious dur ing the beginning phases of training. roughout the 10 day cycle, the in structorstransition from being aggressive and de manding into a mentor ship role. e second phase of training gives the instruc tors a chance to pass on Marine Corps knowledge and a chance for the Devil Pups to ask questions, said Gunnery Sgt. Miriam M. Jenkins, a bulk fuel specialist with 7th Engineer Support Battalion, and series commander for the Devil Pups training encampment. Pups asked a wide variety questions, ranging from our careers, what it takes to become a Marine and what happens after you become a Marine, Jenkins said. is training was not only a valuable learning experience for the pups, it also gave Marines a chance to catch a glimpse of what their future as drill instructors could entail. Devil Pups take the big plunge Olympics and support exhibited by all of the U.S. shooters, something they normally do not get to share, because most matches are spread around the world. e venues and the ath letes village have been great, she said. With one event completed, Sandra is ready to compete again Aug. 1 in the womens 25-meter sport pistol event. I denitely had a learn ing experience here, and I am hoping to take what I learned in this match and take it into my next one, she said. Hopefully, this got the jitters out of the way, and if I can execute my shot plan, I hope to nd myself in the nals. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 Sea Cadets train at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Photos by PO 2 Jonathan Shoemaker and SA Ryan Theroux, Naval Sea Cadet CorpsSea Cadets march in for mation to the Pirates Cove Galley for lunch onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. The Cadets spent a week of training on the base. Cadets trained for the week of July 23 to 27. SN Brian Campbell, Kings Bay Division, PO2 Steven DOrlando, Daytona Division, LPO, and shipmates prep for the obstacle course. PO3 Riley Regul, SN Catherine Recicar and SA Trayanna Rucker review lessons in a classroom. SA William Shaw III, St. Augustine Battalion, works on completing a scavenger hunt at the St. Marys Submarine Museum.SA Dallas Weir, Boca Delray Division, helps a shipmate over a wall obstacle.were required to demonstrate prociency in reciting the Sailors Creed and the Eleven General Orders, as well as being evaluated on leadership and followership. Five cadets earned the distinction of Navy Expert Marksman, 10 cadets earned the Sharpshooter distinction and 13 cadets earned the Marksman distinction in the M-9 pistol simulator. To pass the MAA course, cadets were required to pass a written test and to complete a physical challenge which consisted of car rying two training logs for two miles in less than 40 minutes. In their non-training time, cadets were able to tour the Ohioclass ballistic missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) and to run the Marine Corps obstacle course, under the supervision of the active duty Marines. Cadets also visited the St. Marys Submarine Museum and were treated to an evening at a local water park and a pizza night o base. e Naval Sea Cadet Corps is sponsored by the Navy League of the United States and is for males and females between the ages of 13 and 17. Sea Cadets earn rank by completing the Basic Military Requirements correspondence courses, time in grade and prociency tests. Cadets also wear specially modied Navy uniforms proudly. e Sea Cadets National Web site can be found at: www.seacadets.org.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 5 Left, MASN Ryan MiserendinoEspinoza, USN, instructing the cadets on warm up personal training before tackling the obstacle course. Below, Security Force staff, the on wall, and Cadets of the 2012 Naval Sea Cadet Corps MAA Summer Training. Cadets trained from 17 units within the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, from as far north as Massachusetts, west to Texas and south to South Florida.Above, SA Frederick DApice, Charlotte Division, and PO2 Erik Tanberg, Tampa Bay Division, on the obstacle course. Left, SN Brian Campbell and SA Zachary Vitale at practice fighting techniques at the NSB Kings Bay Fitness Center.Left, SA Gavin Alatar, 2745th Seabee Battalion, and SA Matthew Whitchurch, NARS B-1 Squadron, practice Mach levels and take downs. Right, SN Brian Campbell, Kings Bay Division, practices his takedown on SA Zachary Vitale, also of Kings Bay Division.

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Navy Entertainment pres ents Craig Karges Dinner and Show on ursday, Aug. 15 at the Kings Bay Conference Cen ter. Social hour begins at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person and are being sold at ITT and at the Conference Cen ter. Suggested ages are 10 years and up. Come and experience the extraordinary mind blowing show that features tables oat ing, minds being read and metal bending. Craig Karges has been seen on e Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Larry King Live, Fox News, E! Entertainment Television, CNN Headline News and CNBC. For more information call (912) 573-4559 today. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips for August. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. 80s Prom Night at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 8 p.m. to midmight, Friday, Aug. 3. Cost is $20 per person, or $100 for an entire lane and up to six people. You must register no later than Aug. 1. Come on out with your favorite partner and enjoy a funlled evening with a dance, best couple, biggest hair competition and maybe you could be the next Kings Bay Prom King and Queen. Price includes bowl ing, shoes, photo ops, dancing, heavy hors doeuvres, drink specials, Budweiser sampling, 80s music and more. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Back to School Movie Under the Stars At Rack-N-Roll Lanes by the lake on Tuesday, Aug. 7 at dusk, free movie will be Mirror, Mirror rated PG. Also, Rack-N-Roll Lanes special for one night only from 1 to 9 p.m., $1 bowling and $1 shoe rental. Dominos is oering a $5 medium one-topping pizza from 5 to 8 pm. Gather up the family and come out for an eve ning of fun before the school years begins. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Sealed bids Navy Lake Site Allatoona, Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment (1) Hurricane boat No. 1170 with trailer No. 1385/ S/N 4123 no motor in poor working con dition with needed repairs. (1) Pontoon boat without trailer no motor in poor working condi tion with needed repairs No. 1129. All the above equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Sealed bid applica tions may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville Ga 30120. Sealed bids must be mailed to Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Attn: Mary Dawson, 950 USS James Madison Road Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. e sealed bid process began at 9 a.m. July 9, and bids must be received/ postmarked by Aug. 9. Bids will be opened 9 a.m., Aug. 13. For more information, contact Navy Lake Site Manager at (770) 9746309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Back to School Dollar Day is at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, 1 to 9 p.m. Aug. 6. Bowling $1 games and rent $1 shoes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more informa tion call (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen rough Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Back to School Bash events are being held for students returning to school this year. From noon to 2 p.m., Aug. 4 will be Elementary Extravaganza at the Pool Complex. Admission to the pool will be required, but a complimen tary lunch will be provided for each elementary student. From 6:30 to 8 p.m. Aug. 11 with free admission will be Middle School Mania and from 8:30 to 10 p.m. will be High School Hype. ese are some great events if you are new to the area or promoted to a new school, even if you are returning to your old school. is is truly a great way for military kids to meet new friends or just stay connected. Games, activities, food and music will be part of the mix. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-8986. Fun in the Sun is at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. Enjoy a day of fun. Cost is $3 per person with a $10 max for four people or more. Hot dog lunch, cot ton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. SAC Registration for before and after school Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Aug. 4, 5 is Dr. Suesss The Lorax Aug. 11, 12 Space Chimps, Aug. 18, 19 Alpha & Omega and Aug. 25, 26 We Bought a Zoo Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For children kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through Aug. 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Back to School soon Just for kids Karges dinner, show Aug. 15 Liberty call 1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgChildren need a loving, healthy, supportive environment.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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e Oce of Naval Research in conjunction with the Association for Un manned Vehicle Systems International sponsored the 15th annual RoboSub competition hosted at the Navys Space and Naval Warfare Systems Trans ducer Evaluation Center in San Diego, July 17 to 22. e competition brought together 28 teams of students from 10 coun tries to compete in an un derwater obstacle course using autonomous un derwater vehicles that the teams designed. e goal of the compe tition, the AUVSI Web site said, was to advance the development of autono mous underwater vehicles by challenging a new gen eration of engineers to perform realistic missions in an underwater environment. e event also served to foster ties between young engineers and the organizations developing AUV technologies. ere were teams from the United States, Spain, China, India, Turkey, Japan, Sweden, Iceland, Canada and for the rst time a team from the Russian Federation. is year has been a pretty good year, inter nationally, said David Novick, Technical Direc tor for AUVSI. e teams gathered at the pool daily to test their vehicles before their turn on the obstacle course. e complexity of these submarines is such that, if 99 percent of it works right, you still have that 1 percent that could ruin the whole thing, said Daryl Davidson, executive director of AUVSI. e students worked for months designing and testing the machines be fore arriving at the compe tition. Its all autonomous, so the most they can do after they put it in the water is cross their ngers, Novick said. ere are obstacles that they have to pass over. eres bins where they can drop markers into, and then, nally, they have a couple of octagons where there are acoustic pingers. ey can hone in on the pingers and theres an object this year its a laurel wreath PVC struc ture that they have to retrieve and take to the surface. e competition was the culmination of long hours of work for the students. Its always really excit ing because, during the school year, we work really hard on this. en, when we come here, we get to see a lot of other people who are interested in the same things that we are interested in, said Leah Gum, a student at the University of Southern California. So not only is there that cool spirit of competition of everyone trying to do the best that they can with their vehicle, but also collaboration because everyone wants to see this eld advance further. At this years event Cornell University came out on top, with the University of Florida placing second. Team SONIA, a Canadian team from cole de Technologie Suprieure took third, the Chinese Harbin Engineering University placed fourth and, rst-time competitors, Far Eastern Federal University from the Russian Federation took fth. A prize of $20,000 was split between the winning teams. is years competing U.S. teams include Ama dor Valley High School; Carl Hayden High School; Cornell University; Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Montana State University; Mt. San Anto nio College; North Caroli na State University; Prairie View A&M University; Also, San Diego City Ro botics; San Diego Mesa College; Southern Polytechnic State University; University of California, Irvine; University of Cen tral Florida; University of Florida; University of Maryland; University of Southern California; U.S. Naval Academy; Utah State University; Virginia Tech; and Washington State University. International teams include: Canadas Ecole de Technologie Superieure and University of Alberta; Chinas Harbin Engineer ing University; Icelands Reykjavik University; Indias IIT Bombay, Banga lore Robotics and Panima lar Institute of Technology; And, Japans Kyushu In stitute of Technology; the Russian Federations Far Eastern Federal Univer sity Scientic-Educational Center; Spains Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ing enieros Navales, FuVe-E; Swedens Malardalen University; and Turkeys Istan bul Technical University. e Department of the Navys ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with en gagement in 50 states, 30 countries and 1,035 institutions of higher learning. ONR employs approxi mately 1,065 people, com prising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. AUVSI, established in 1972, is an international non-prot organization dedicated to promoting and supporting the unmanned systems and ro botics industry through communication, education and leadership. e Navys TRANSDEC pool was built in 1964 and simulates a large body of water, free of echoes, which allows for optimal research conditions. Cornell captures ONRs Robosub top prize Subs ght mock battleTeams of high school and college engineering students put underwater robots through their paces in gladiator-themed missions at the 15th In ternational RoboSub Competition is years event required team AUVs to tra verse an obstacle course made of PVC pipes; drop markers within a predetermined gladiator ring area; engage in battle, shooting mock torpedoes though a cutout in a piece of plywood; feed grapes to the emperor-essentially, manipulating cylinders suspended vertically and horizontally within cutouts in a board; and collect a laurel wreath to crown the emperor by nding an object emitting a sonar signal, grabbing the object and then moving and releasing it. e submarine robots must withstand pressure and heat buildup, as well as prevent water leak age-all autonomously. To compete successfully, teams must have a ba sic understanding of submarine ballasting, buoy ancy and drag; underwater propulsion, including momentum and thrust; and underwater sensing in both visual and acoustic domains. RoboSub is one of the oldest and most dicult robotics challenges that ONR sponsors. Naval en gineers and scientists from around the country are available to advise the teams during competition preparation, and numerous organizations loan equipment, such as electronic boards, cameras, compasses, thrusters and depth sensors. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 7

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Ionly saw him compete in old black-and-white films, but my favorite Olympic star was Jesse Owens. Hes the only Olympian I ever talked to. I interviewed him once in the 1970s, when he was in his 60s. He was a wonderful gentleman. And aside from being one of the our greatest Olympic stars, athletes like Jesse Owens and Joe Louis paved the way for the integration of the military and pro team sports, in turn helping launch the civil rights movement of the s and s. EM2 Brandon Tucker Trident Refit Facility McComb, Miss. Michael Johnson. Hes one of the few Ive followed, and he was amazing. EM1 Stephen Wallace USS Tennessee Blue Memphis, Tenn. Shawn Johnson. Shes a gymnast. My daughter is in gymnastics, and weve watched her a lot. MT1 Brian Piercy USS Rhode Island Gold West Covina, Calif. Dave Johnson. He was in the decathlon in the early s and had a big rivalry with Dan OBrien. OS1 Robert Kruger Maritime Force Protection Unit Homestead, Fla. Michael Phelps. To this point, hes been a positive role model. Hal Smith Retired Air Force Patterson, Ga. Bruce Jenner. He just did it all, didnt he? Cheri Bellow Family member Ocala, Fla. Mary Lou Retton. Her tumbling technique was always phenomenal. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Husband, wife joint re-enlistment Raking it in THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 9

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Interview and Salary Negotiation class comingSuccess in job interviewing and salary negotiation takes preparation. Optimize that preparation and avoid the mis takes candidates most com monly make. e two-hour class incorporates practical exercises and demonstration of useful print and electronic resources. is class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Aug. 7 For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Aug. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon,Aug. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Aug. 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 15. To register, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Aug. 21Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Aug. 21. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Aug. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Aug. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 29. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, JAug. 7, 14, 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 6 to 9 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Aug. 30. Registration is required. For more informa tion, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Aug. 9. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Renting workshop set for Aug. 9Renting a house or apart ment can be an expensive cost most people are not prepared to make. This workshop is suitable for all those planning to rent and designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level of the renter, but can also serve as a refresher for those planning to move and start renting again. This training is scheduled 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 9. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 30. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 to 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Money and The Move workshop upcomingRelocating due to a Permanent Change of Station assignment is exciting, but it can be expen sive too. Even thought the gov ernment provides relocation allowances, many families find a move puts a strain on their budget. This workshop targets active-duty military and their families who are relocating and will be 9 to 11 a.m., Aug. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Aug. 11 and 12. For more information and to regis ter call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Did You Know?Symptoms of DiabetesIf you notice one or more of the following symtoms, see a doctor immediately: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Drowsiness, lethargy Sugar in urine Sudden vision changes Increased appetite Sudden weight loss Fruity, sweet, or wine-like odor on breath Heavy, labored breathing Stupor, unconsciousness To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfw 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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basics, such as marching and how to fold the Amer ican ag. Kelly Wirfel, DEFY program coordinator ad dressed the guests at the Kings Bay Chapel. I want to thank three dierent groups of people tonight, the parents, the sta and the kids, Wirfel said. Your commitment has been vital to the suc cess of this program. e sta was then presented with certicates. Following the sta rec ognition, the studentss were all smiles as they were each presented with their graduation certicates. Wirfel closed out the event. e goal of this pro gram is to help youths es tablish the life skills and the condence necessary to make positive life deci sions, she said. A big part of that is accomplished by building positive relationships between the men tors and the peers. I can, without a doubt say, that we accomplished that goal very well this year. DEFY THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 11

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Standing on the dock at Charlestown Navy Yard in Massachusetts, a sea man discusses shipboard life while eortlessly tying knots. Soon hes joined by another crewmember regaling the crowd with descriptions of food storage at sea, back in 1812. Because of the unre lenting heat, the men take swigs of water straight from authentic pewter mugs. Standing in the midday sun in shirts with stand-up collars and long, tapered white pants with a front ap and a cloth neck stock takes some getting used to. e pair are volunteers with the Coast Guards 1812 Historic Ships Com pany. Delivering compel ling performances, they paint a picture of the reve nue Cutter Service, prede cessor to the modern-day Coast Guard. e ships company was the brainchild of Capt. Steven Pope, a reservist with a passion for history. e historic ships com pany whose inaugural presentation began in New Orleans, La., back in April now has six events under their belt. I know of no better tool than one-on-one inter action with the public to bring to light the history of the Revenue Cutter Ser vice, Pope said. Pope says the compa nys eorts are breathing life into the War of 1812. ats critical he said, be cause the Coast Guards predecessor service helped our young nation establish maritime bor ders and developed legacy missions such as port se curity and intelligence. rough the Revenue Cutter Service our nation assumed greater coastal defense responsibilities, gaining respect from the international community for commerce on the high seas. Staying in character, the seamen explained the Revenue Cutter Service was part of the Treasury Department; both found ed by Alexander Hamilton. Its essential to un derstand that as it helps explain our role and our maritime history, es pecially during the War of 1812, says Matthew Krogh, a Coast Guard Aux iliarist and Historic Ships Company member. Kroghs wife Juliann also plays the role of a crewmember.Using kits with props and background information developed by the Watermens Museum in Yorktown, Va., Juliann interprets navigation circa 1812, displaying an octant, a navigational device re sembling a sextant. Back in 1812, she said, crews could measure latitude, but not longitude, a tidbit eliciting appreciative sighs from the crowd. She also shares that in 1812 the calendar day be gan at noon, rather than midnight, because it could be marked by the sun. e members who make up the Historic Ships Company are a diverse group of dedicated active duty members, auxiliarists and reservists. Its their enthusiasm and knowledge that cre ates a captivating mix at presentations. Navy College educational information Blueback Base Submarine veter ans toured submarine tender USS Frank Cable (AS 40), recently, after the ship completed a $30 million overhaul in Portland, Ore. During the visit, Frank Cable Sailors led several tours for 70 sub marine veterans through the ships spaces including the galley, carpen ter shop, sheet metal shop, machine shop, boat deck, COs and XOs state rooms, ships store and the bridge. All the feedback I have gotten from participating members has been nothing short of outstanding, Blueback Base President Ray Lough said. e crew showed us every courtesy and answered all ques tions. We were amazed at all the capabilities the USS Frank Cable has. ree World War II veterans at tended the tour including Tudor Da vis, a retired submariner who served aboard the USS Halibut (SS 232). Oh it was terric, Davis said. I was never on a tender before except to walk across to go on liberty. Now Im seeing the whole thing and its beautiful. e tour ended with the veterans eating lunch on the mess deck with the Sailors. All of the veterans said it was a visit they would never forget. We wish all of the crew fair winds and following seas, and a safe jour ney home, Lough said. WW II Sub Vets tour sub tender Coast Guard re-enacts War of 1812 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012



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Twenty-eight members earn degrees at Chapel Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay celebrated the graduation of 28 youths who participated in the second annual Drug Education for Youth Program, July 26. e graduating youth participated in the eight-day summer camp, known as Phase I, in July 2011 and participated in monthly follow-up meetings for Phase II with their peers and mentors. During the summer camp, the youths participated in workshops on peer pressure, gang resistance, drugs, alcohol and more. ey also participated in many team-building exercises such as a low ropes course at Epworth by the Sea, a 3-mile hike at Fort Clinch, team sporting events and physical challenges. During the monthly follow-up meetings, DEFY members participated in a wide variety of activities, ranging from community service projects to a eld trip to the Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge. e graduation ceremony began with the Parading of Colors performed by the Kings Bay Sea Cadets. e Sea Cadets served as junior mentors during the summer camp and helped teach the class military Fleet and Family Support Center oers classes Life Skills have been dened by the World Health Organization as abilities for adaptive and positive behavior that enable individuals to deal eectively with the demands and challenges of ev eryday life. ey represent the psycho-social skills that determine valued behavior and include reective skills such as problemsolving and critical thinking, to personal skills such as self-awareness, and to interpersonal skills. Practicing Life Skills leads to qualities such as self esteem, sociability and tolerance, to action competencies including to take action and generate change, and to capabilities to have the freedom to decide what to do and who to be. Kings Bay FFSC oers several Life Skills building classes such as Anger Management, Parenting, Eective Communication, and Stress Management. Up Periscope Who is your all-time favorite Olympian ? Page 9 I do, I do Kings Bay husband, wife team re-enlist together Page 9 No fear Devil Pups take 25-foot leap into swimming pool Page 3 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Life Skills tipsThis months Life Skills Building Tips are things you can do with your anger: Speak up when something is important to you response Think before speaking out. Speak in I language: I think I feel I want Only you are responsible for how you feel. Life Skills key to successful living Left, SA Anthony Belvedere, NARS B-1 Squadron, and SA Connor Stedt, American Veterans Division, on the Marine obstacle course. Photos by PO2 Jonathan Shoemaker, NSCC United States Naval Sea Cadets from around the country gathered for a week-long Master-at-Arms training on Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, July 22. Twenty-nine cadets participated in the training, conducted by active-duty Master-at-Arms MA2 Roy Miller, MA2 Amber Ball and MASN Camron Langley, with the help of Sgt. Kyle Rust, one of the lead instructors for the NSB Kings Bay Security Training Department. Miller, Ball and Langley were full time volunteers for the duration of the course, and also volunteer their time to the Naval Sea Cadet Corps on a monthly basis. MA training is designed to teach Sea Cadets about the Navys Master at Arms specialization. During the training, Cadets were instructed in the use and function of the M-9 pistol, general rearm safety and suspect take-down tactics. ey learned about the Uniform Code of Military Justice and other guidance employed by Navy MAAs. Additionally, Sea Cadets participated in physical training twice a day, lived in the Navy enlisted quarters and ate chow in the base galley. To pass the course, all Cadets Ready . aim . re!Navy Reservist hits London Olympics with her best shotDespite having a dicult Olympic debut, Navy Reserve Petty Ocer 1st Class Sandra Uptagrats experience in London featured enough goosebumps and memories to last a lifetime July 29. Uptagrat, wife of Sgt. 1st Class Eric Uptatgrat of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, nished 28th with a score of 378 in the womens 10-meter air pistol event at the Royal Artillery Barracks. Firsttime Olympic jitters, common to many shooters who toe the line for the rst time on the worlds grandest stage, led to a result that was not in her game plan. Once I hit the match button, it hit me that I am at the Olympic Games, and it kind of took me out of my rhythm, Sandra said. It took me a while to settle down and refocus. ats what I was able to do my last two strings. Its NSBs DEFY class graduates

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really disappointing, because I knew going into the match that this would happen. Chinas Wenjen Guo won the gold medal with a total score of 488.1 points. Frances Celine Goberville (486.6) claimed the silver. Ukraines Olena Kostevych (486.6) took the bronze. Adding to Uptagrats displeasure was the fact that her sister Andrea traveled from Singapore yesterday to watch her compete in a match for the rst time. Sandra said she was thinking, is is not an example of what to do, and that she was disheartened because her sister saw her shoot poorly. e outcome, though, had no bearing on the joy Andrea experienced while watching her sister compete in the biggest sporting event in the world. It was pretty cool, Andrea said. I was surprised everyone was so calm and calculated. I was trying to keep calm as well, because I was slightly nervous and hoping for her to do well. I am very proud of her. I know this whole thing is overwhelming. After the match, the sisters shared a hug. Uptagrats husband, however, was not there for the reunion. Eric missed his wifes Olympic debut because of a lack of training space at the Olympic shooting venue for upcoming competitors, which forced several Team USA shooters to return to Denmark to train. Eric will compete Aug. 3 in mens prone rie. Although he missed Sandras match, they were able to share something much more memorable when they walked together in the Opening Ceremony at Olympic Stadium on the night of July 27. at was a moment Sandra said she will never forget. Walking into the opening ceremonies was the ultimate high, she said. I still get goosebumps thinking about it now. To walk the opening ceremonies with my husband, hand-in-hand, just made it that much more meaningful and something I will carry the rest of my life. Uptagrat said she enjoyed the camaraderie THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Blessing of the Backpack Aug. 9 e Blessing of the Backpack is about blessing all students, their backpacks, the teachers and administration. Its about celebrating and blessing the beginning of the new school year. Its about giving thanks for our kids and blessing their journey of learning this new school year. e Blessing of the Backpacks is at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel, at 4:30 p.m., Aug. 9. Following the Blessing, you and your family are invited to stay for a cookout. For more information, contact the Chapel sta at 573-4501.ShipShape weight loss Aug. 16If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an 8-week actionoriented weight management program focusing on nutrition education, increasing exercise, and behavior modication skills that support a healthy lifestyle. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information program or to sign up. Classes start 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., August 16 in the Fitness Complex classroom.State Hunting Ed Course Sept. 8 Residents and non-residents born on or af ter Jan. 1, 1961, must successfully complete the Georgia Hunters Education Course prior to hunting on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is free course will be provided by the NSB Se curity Dept. Criminal Investigations Division, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 8, at the base Chapel. ere is limited seating. To register or for more infor mation, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer at (912) 674-6837. ere will be an alternate date of Sept. 15. is is one-time course.CACs updated on RAPIDS site RAPIDS Self-Service is available to Common Access Card holders. RSS is a Web site that allows CAC holders to update their information and verify family members for DoD ID card reissuance. Using this Web-based application, CAC holders have the ability to update certain information associated with their record. Additionally, they may use RSS to verify a family members relationship and eligibility by digitally signing the DD Form 1172-2 for ID card re-issuance. A DD Form 1172-2 that is digitally-signed and generated through RSS will be stored in DEERS and is a viewable document in RAPIDS. Once veried using RSS, sponsors no longer need to accompany their family members to get the ID card. When a family member arrives at an ID card site, the DEERS/ RAPIDS operator may view the signed 1172-2 by opening the sponsors record. To use the RSS Web site, one must be a sponsor with a DoD CAC and have a CAC enabled personal computer. Sponsors that are CAC holders may access RAPIDS Self Service at https://www. dmdc.osd.mil/self_service/NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michaeljack Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Navy Exchange offers valuesinking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Optical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. rough Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will offer no interest, no down payment and no payments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, including contact lenses, of $199 or more. Now hear this! Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki warned Congress today that looming budget cuts as well as the surge of troops returning from a decade of wars will further challenge the governments ability to provide for veterans in a timely manner. Both testied before a joint session of the House Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Veterans Aairs. Panetta told lawmakers troop drawdowns as well as the impact of wars over the last decade will, for years to come, place additional strain on an already burdened system charged with caring for veterans. Were going to be adding another hundred thousand per year. And the ability to be able to respond to that in a way that eectively deals with the heath care issues, with the benets issues, with all of the other challenges, that is not going to be an easy challenge, he said, adding that the current system is already overwhelmed. Shinseki, whose agency is attempting to process a backlog of veterans claims within a bureaucracy that he described as still largely unautomated and paperbound, further laid out the daunting task ahead. Our history suggests that VAs requirements will continue growing for a decade or more after the operational missions in Iraq and Afghanistan are ended, he said. Over the next ve years, there is the potential for 1 million serving men and women to either leave military service or demobilize from active duty. Of the roughly 1.4 million veterans who have returned from both wars, nearly 70 percent, he said, currently rely on the VA. Rep. Howard McKeon of California, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, noted if an additional round of draconian budget cuts known as sequestration takes eect next year, 100,000 additional service personnel will be leaving the military and likely would add to the strain on resources that DOD and VA are providing to current veterans. Shinseki told lawmakers he has been informed that VA would be largely exempt from sequestration, and that only administrative costs would be aected. He told the panel he doesnt yet have a denition of administrative costs, and he oered to provide that information later. Sequestration is a federal budget maneuver written into legislation passed last year that raised the U.S. debt ceiling. Unless lawmakers take action to prevent it, the measure will slash spending across the federal budget beginning in January, taking an additional $500 billion from defense accounts. Panetta has said the cuts would be a disaster, and told lawmakers today that such a move would make it near impossible to do the kind of work the departments are trying to do. Veterans Aairs Ocials warn of budget stress on VA In order to ensure high priority senior enlisted leadership positions are manned in the Fleet, the Navy is updating E-7 to E-9 detailing business rules, ocials announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, released July 26. e CPO Early Return to Sea program is part of the Navys coordinated eort to aggressively address gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Under the program, the Navy will curtail the shore duty of selected senior enlisted Sailors of ranks E-7 to E-9, and detail them back to sea to ll operational billets that cannot be lled by rotating Sailors. is program is an update to the previous CPO to Sea program and is designed to ensure high-priority, senior leadership positions at sea are manned for operational readiness. Our Fleet needs senior Sailors who have the right skills and leadership experience to meet our critical at-sea missions, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director of Military Plans and Policy. e CPO Early Return to Sea program will help us ensure critical senior enlisted leadership is where we need it most. Except to meet the most critical operational requirements, only Sailors who have completed at least 24 months of shore duty at the time of transfer will be considered for early return to sea. e Navy will only involuntarily curtail a Sailors shore duty orders to ll a needed requirement when there are no available CPOs in the projected rotation date window and there are no excess personnel on sea duty within the geographic area that can be reassigned. To minimize the number of CPOs impacted, detailers will ll as many high priority sea duty billets as possible by fully utilizing the authorized transfer window, including moving Sailors three months prior to, or four months beyond their PRD month. Candidates will be selected based on various factors including length of time on shore; recent advancement; eet experience; NEC/skills held; type of previous sea duty; and remaining OBLISERV. Impact on the shore duty commands mission also will be evaluated. E8 and E9 Sailors may be chosen to ll vacant E-7, E-8 or E-9 billets, and E-7 Sailors may be chosen to ll vacant E-8 billets. As detailers will attempt to ll all billets using voluntary measures rst, CPOs should consider applying for the Voluntary Sea Duty Program, which provides several incentives, including geographic choice or stability and High Year Tenure waiver consideration. Also, depending on rating, paygrade and skills, sea duty incentive pay may also be available. We understand that the force management decisions we make directly aect the careers and lives of our Sailors and their families, Kurta said. Our goal is to cause the least amount of disruption to the careers of our Sailors and their families, while ensuring the Fleet has the manning required to remain mission-ready. Fleet readiness requirements will ultimately be the guiding factor in Sailor assignments. Commands will have the opportunity to request a Flag review if there are extenuating circumstances that preclude execution of the sea duty assignment. According to the NAVADMIN, requests to retire (transfer to the eet reserve) from CPOs selected for Early Return to Sea may be disapproved. CPO Early Return to Sea Move on to return leadership to shipsOlympics 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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Camp Pendleton Marines worked with members of Devil Pups Incorporated to have a group of Devil Pups perform a 25-foot tower jump at the 62 Area pool, July 12. Devil Pups is a nonprot organization designed to help young children gain self-condence and learn to take responsibility for their actions. is event, taking place on training day eight ofthe 10-day encampment, is a requirement for graduation. Marines throughout Camp Pendleton volunteered to be instructors and play the role of drill instructor for the Devil Pups. I have always wanted to be a drill instructor, and this has given me a glimpse of what it would be like in the drill eld, said Rachael E. Allison, a motor transport operator with 1st Marine Logistics Group, also an instructor for the Devil Pups training encampment. Similar to Marine Corps recruit training, the instructors are vicious during the beginning phases of training. roughout the 10 day cycle, the instructorstransition from being aggressive and demanding into a mentorship role. e second phase of training gives the instructors a chance to pass on Marine Corps knowledge and a chance for the Devil Pups to ask questions, said Gunnery Sgt. Miriam M. Jenkins, a bulk fuel specialist with 7th Engineer Support Battalion, and series commander for the Devil Pups training encampment. Pups asked a wide variety questions, ranging from our careers, what it takes to become a Marine and what happens after you become a Marine, Jenkins said. is training was not only a valuable learning experience for the pups, it also gave Marines a chance to catch a glimpse of what their future as drill instructors could entail. Devil Pups take the big plunge Olympics and support exhibited by all of the U.S. shooters, something they normally do not get to share, because most matches are spread around the world. e venues and the athletes village have been great, she said. With one event completed, Sandra is ready to compete again Aug. 1 in the womens 25-meter sport pistol event. I denitely had a learning experience here, and I am hoping to take what I learned in this match and take it into my next one, she said. Hopefully, this got the jitters out of the way, and if I can execute my shot plan, I hope to nd myself in the nals. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 Sea Cadets train at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Photos by PO 2 Jonathan Shoemaker and SA Ryan Theroux, Naval Sea Cadet CorpsSea Cadets march in formation to the Pirates Cove Galley for lunch onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. The Cadets spent a week of training on the base. Cadets trained for the week of July 23 to 27. SN Brian Campbell, Kings Bay Division, PO2 Steven DOrlando, Daytona Division, LPO, and shipmates prep for the obstacle course. PO3 Riley Regul, SN Catherine Recicar and SA Trayanna Rucker review lessons in a classroom. SA William Shaw III, St. Augustine Battalion, works on completing a scavenger hunt at the St. Marys Submarine Museum.SA Dallas Weir, Boca Delray Division, helps a shipmate over a wall obstacle.were required to demonstrate prociency in reciting the Sailors Creed and the Eleven General Orders, as well as being evaluated on leadership and followership. Five cadets earned the distinction of Navy Expert Marksman, 10 cadets earned the Sharpshooter distinction and 13 cadets earned the Marksman distinction in the M-9 pistol simulator. To pass the MAA course, cadets were required to pass a written test and to complete a physical challenge which consisted of carrying two training logs for two miles in less than 40 minutes. In their non-training time, cadets were able to tour the Ohioclass ballistic missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) and to run the Marine Corps obstacle course, under the supervision of the active duty Marines. Cadets also visited the St. Marys Submarine Museum and were treated to an evening at a local water park and a pizza night o base. e Naval Sea Cadet Corps is sponsored by the Navy League of the United States and is for males and females between the ages of 13 and 17. Sea Cadets earn rank by completing the Basic Military Requirements correspondence courses, time in grade and prociency tests. Cadets also wear specially modied Navy uniforms proudly. e Sea Cadets National Web site can be found at: www.seacadets.org.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 5 Left, MASN Ryan MiserendinoEspinoza, USN, instructing the cadets on warm up personal training before tackling the obstacle course. Below, Security Force staff, the on wall, and Cadets of the 2012 Naval Sea Cadet Corps MAA Summer Training. Cadets trained from 17 units within the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, from as far north as Massachusetts, west to Texas and south to South Florida.Above, SA Frederick DApice, Charlotte Division, and PO2 Erik Tanberg, Tampa Bay Division, on the obstacle course. Left, SN Brian Campbell and SA Zachary Vitale at practice fighting techniques at the NSB Kings Bay Fitness Center.Left, SA Gavin Alatar, 2745th Seabee Battalion, and SA Matthew Whitchurch, NARS B-1 Squadron, practice Mach levels and take downs. Right, SN Brian Campbell, Kings Bay Division, practices his takedown on SA Zachary Vitale, also of Kings Bay Division.

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Navy Entertainment presents Craig Karges Dinner and Show on ursday, Aug. 15 at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Social hour begins at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person and are being sold at ITT and at the Conference Center. Suggested ages are 10 years and up. Come and experience the extraordinary mind blowing show that features tables oating, minds being read and metal bending. Craig Karges has been seen on e Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Larry King Live, Fox News, E! Entertainment Television, CNN Headline News and CNBC. For more information call (912) 573-4559 today. Liberty Trips For active duty only, check out the latest trips for August. GTF Paintball, Jacksonville Suns game, Mall & Movie Trip, Ginnie Springs, Busch Gardens/Tampa and go rock climbing at the Edge Rock Gym. Also, check out the pool, Texas Hold Em, and Spades tournaments. X-Box challenges are every Monday night and even a free bowling night. For more information call (912) 5734548 for details. 80s Prom Night at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 8 p.m. to midmight, Friday, Aug. 3. Cost is $20 per person, or $100 for an entire lane and up to six people. You must register no later than Aug. 1. Come on out with your favorite partner and enjoy a funlled evening with a dance, best couple, biggest hair competition and maybe you could be the next Kings Bay Prom King and Queen. Price includes bowl ing, shoes, photo ops, dancing, heavy hors doeuvres, drink specials, Budweiser sampling, 80s music and more. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Back to School Movie Under the Stars At Rack-N-Roll Lanes by the lake on Tuesday, Aug. 7 at dusk, free movie will be Mirror, Mirror rated PG. Also, Rack-N-Roll Lanes special for one night only from 1 to 9 p.m., $1 bowling and $1 shoe rental. Dominos is oering a $5 medium one-topping pizza from 5 to 8 pm. Gather up the family and come out for an eve ning of fun before the school years begins. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Sealed bids Navy Lake Site Allatoona, Cartersville, Ga., has the following equipment (1) Hurricane boat No. 1170 with trailer No. 1385/ S/N 4123 no motor in poor working condition with needed repairs. (1) Pontoon boat without trailer no motor in poor working condition with needed repairs No. 1129. All the above equipment can be seen at Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Sealed bid applications may be picked up at the Navy Lake Site, 166 Sandtown Road, Cartersville Ga 30120. Sealed bids must be mailed to Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Attn: Mary Dawson, 950 USS James Madison Road Bldg. 1039, Kings Bay GA 31547. e sealed bid process began at 9 a.m. July 9, and bids must be received/ postmarked by Aug. 9. Bids will be opened 9 a.m., Aug. 13. For more information, contact Navy Lake Site Manager at (770) 9746309. If you are the successful bidder you will be notied when and where you may pick up your equipment. Back to School Dollar Day is at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, 1 to 9 p.m. Aug. 6. Bowling $1 games and rent $1 shoes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Jaguar tickets Tickets are on sale now. Stop by the Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel oce. Season tickets start at $420. Two pre-season games are available. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen rough Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Back to School Bash events are being held for students returning to school this year. From noon to 2 p.m., Aug. 4 will be Elementary Extravaganza at the Pool Complex. Admission to the pool will be required, but a complimen tary lunch will be provided for each elementary student. From 6:30 to 8 p.m. Aug. 11 with free admission will be Middle School Mania and from 8:30 to 10 p.m. will be High School Hype. ese are some great events if you are new to the area or promoted to a new school, even if you are returning to your old school. is is truly a great way for military kids to meet new friends or just stay connected. Games, activities, food and music will be part of the mix. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-8986. Fun in the Sun is at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18. Enjoy a day of fun. Cost is $3 per person with a $10 max for four people or more. Hot dog lunch, cotton candy, bounce houses, games and prizes. For more information call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. SAC Registration for before and after school Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Aug. 4, 5 is Dr. Suesss The Lorax Aug. 11, 12 Space Chimps, Aug. 18, 19 Alpha & Omega and Aug. 25, 26 We Bought a Zoo Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For children kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through Aug. 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Back to School soon Just for kids Karges dinner, show Aug. 15 Liberty call 1-800-919-9338www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.orgChildren need a loving, healthy, supportive environment.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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e Oce of Naval Research in conjunction with the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International sponsored the 15th annual RoboSub competition hosted at the Navys Space and Naval Warfare Systems Transducer Evaluation Center in San Diego, July 17 to 22. e competition brought together 28 teams of students from 10 countries to compete in an underwater obstacle course using autonomous underwater vehicles that the teams designed. e goal of the competition, the AUVSI Web site said, was to advance the development of autonomous underwater vehicles by challenging a new generation of engineers to perform realistic missions in an underwater environment. e event also served to foster ties between young engineers and the organizations developing AUV technologies. ere were teams from the United States, Spain, China, India, Turkey, Japan, Sweden, Iceland, Canada and for the rst time a team from the Russian Federation. is year has been a pretty good year, internationally, said David Novick, Technical Director for AUVSI. e teams gathered at the pool daily to test their vehicles before their turn on the obstacle course. e complexity of these submarines is such that, if 99 percent of it works right, you still have that 1 percent that could ruin the whole thing, said Daryl Davidson, executive director of AUVSI. e students worked for months designing and testing the machines before arriving at the competition. Its all autonomous, so the most they can do after they put it in the water is cross their ngers, Novick said. ere are obstacles that they have to pass over. eres bins where they can drop markers into, and then, nally, they have a couple of octagons where there are acoustic pingers. ey can hone in on the pingers and theres an object this year its a laurel wreath PVC structure that they have to retrieve and take to the surface. e competition was the culmination of long hours of work for the students. Its always really exciting because, during the school year, we work really hard on this. en, when we come here, we get to see a lot of other people who are interested in the same things that we are interested in, said Leah Gum, a student at the University of Southern California. So not only is there that cool spirit of competition of everyone trying to do the best that they can with their vehicle, but also collaboration because everyone wants to see this eld advance further. At this years event Cornell University came out on top, with the University of Florida placing second. Team SONIA, a Canadian team from cole de Technologie Suprieure took third, the Chinese Harbin Engineering University placed fourth and, rst-time competitors, Far Eastern Federal University from the Russian Federation took fth. A prize of $20,000 was split between the winning teams. is years competing U.S. teams include Amador Valley High School; Carl Hayden High School; Cornell University; Embry Riddle Aeronautical University; Montana State University; Mt. San Antonio College; North Carolina State University; Prairie View A&M University; Also, San Diego City Robotics; San Diego Mesa College; Southern Polytechnic State University; University of California, Irvine; University of Central Florida; University of Florida; University of Maryland; University of Southern California; U.S. Naval Academy; Utah State University; Virginia Tech; and Washington State University. International teams include: Canadas Ecole de Technologie Superieure and University of Alberta; Chinas Harbin Engineering University; Icelands Reykjavik University; Indias IIT Bombay, Bangalore Robotics and Panimalar Institute of Technology; And, Japans Kyushu Institute of Technology; the Russian Federations Far Eastern Federal University Scientic-Educational Center; Spains Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Navales, FuVe-E; Swedens Malardalen University; and Turkeys Istanbul Technical University. e Department of the Navys ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 30 countries and 1,035 institutions of higher learning. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. AUVSI, established in 1972, is an international non-prot organization dedicated to promoting and supporting the unmanned systems and robotics industry through communication, education and leadership. e Navys TRANSDEC pool was built in 1964 and simulates a large body of water, free of echoes, which allows for optimal research conditions. Cornell captures ONRs Robosub top prize Subs ght mock battleTeams of high school and college engineering students put underwater robots through their paces in gladiator-themed missions at the 15th International RoboSub Competition is years event required team AUVs to traverse an obstacle course made of PVC pipes; drop markers within a predetermined gladiator ring area; engage in battle, shooting mock torpedoes though a cutout in a piece of plywood; feed grapes to the emperor-essentially, manipulating cylinders suspended vertically and horizontally within cutouts in a board; and collect a laurel wreath to crown the emperor by nding an object emitting a sonar signal, grabbing the object and then moving and releasing it. e submarine robots must withstand pressure and heat buildup, as well as prevent water leakage-all autonomously. To compete successfully, teams must have a basic understanding of submarine ballasting, buoyancy and drag; underwater propulsion, including momentum and thrust; and underwater sensing in both visual and acoustic domains. RoboSub is one of the oldest and most dicult robotics challenges that ONR sponsors. Naval engineers and scientists from around the country are available to advise the teams during competition preparation, and numerous organizations loan equipment, such as electronic boards, cameras, compasses, thrusters and depth sensors. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 7

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Ionly saw him compete in old black-and-white films, but my favorite Olympic star was Jesse Owens. Hes the only Olympian I ever talked to. I interviewed him once in the 1970s, when he was in his 60s. He was a wonderful gentleman. And aside from being one of the our greatest Olympic stars, athletes like Jesse Owens and Joe Louis paved the way for the integration of the military and pro team sports, in turn helping launch the civil rights movement of the s and s. EM2 Brandon Tucker Trident Refit Facility McComb, Miss. Michael Johnson. Hes one of the few Ive followed, and he was amazing. EM1 Stephen Wallace USS Tennessee Blue Memphis, Tenn. Shawn Johnson. Shes a gymnast. My daughter is in gymnastics, and weve watched her a lot. MT1 Brian Piercy USS Rhode Island Gold West Covina, Calif. Dave Johnson. He was in the decathlon in the early s and had a big rivalry with Dan OBrien. OS1 Robert Kruger Maritime Force Protection Unit Homestead, Fla. Michael Phelps. To this point, hes been a positive role model. Hal Smith Retired Air Force Patterson, Ga. Bruce Jenner. He just did it all, didnt he? Cheri Bellow Family member Ocala, Fla. Mary Lou Retton. Her tumbling technique was always phenomenal. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Husband, wife joint re-enlistment Raking it in THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 9

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Interview and Salary Negotiation class comingSuccess in job interviewing and salary negotiation takes preparation. Optimize that preparation and avoid the mistakes candidates most commonly make. e two-hour class incorporates practical exercises and demonstration of useful print and electronic resources. is class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Aug. 7 For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar Aug. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon,Aug. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Aug. 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 15. To register, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Aug. 21Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Aug. 21. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Aug. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Aug. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 29. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, JAug. 7, 14, 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 6 to 9 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Aug. 30. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Aug. 9. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Renting workshop set for Aug. 9Renting a house or apart ment can be an expensive cost most people are not prepared to make. This workshop is suitable for all those planning to rent and designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level of the renter, but can also serve as a refresher for those planning to move and start renting again. This training is scheduled 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 9. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 30. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 20 to 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Money and The Move workshop upcomingRelocating due to a Permanent Change of Station assignment is exciting, but it can be expensive too. Even thought the government provides relocation allowances, many families find a move puts a strain on their budget. This workshop targets active-duty military and their families who are relocating and will be 9 to 11 a.m., Aug. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Aug. 11 and 12. For more information and to register call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Aug. 6, 13, 20 and 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Did You Know?Symptoms of DiabetesIf you notice one or more of the following symtoms, see a doctor immediately: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Drowsiness, lethargy Sugar in urine Sudden vision changes Increased appetite Sudden weight loss Fruity, sweet, or wine-like odor on breath Heavy, labored breathing Stupor, unconsciousness To learn more, call 800.533.CURE or visit jdrf.org.A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. a CFC participant Provided as a public service marchofdimes.com/vfw 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012

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basics, such as marching and how to fold the American ag. Kelly Wirfel, DEFY program coordinator addressed the guests at the Kings Bay Chapel. I want to thank three dierent groups of people tonight, the parents, the sta and the kids, Wirfel said. Your commitment has been vital to the success of this program. e sta was then presented with certicates. Following the sta recognition, the studentss were all smiles as they were each presented with their graduation certicates. Wirfel closed out the event. e goal of this program is to help youths establish the life skills and the condence necessary to make positive life decisions, she said. A big part of that is accomplished by building positive relationships between the mentors and the peers. I can, without a doubt say, that we accomplished that goal very well this year. DEFY THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012 11

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Standing on the dock at Charlestown Navy Yard in Massachusetts, a seaman discusses shipboard life while eortlessly tying knots. Soon hes joined by another crewmember regaling the crowd with descriptions of food storage at sea, back in 1812. Because of the unrelenting heat, the men take swigs of water straight from authentic pewter mugs. Standing in the midday sun in shirts with stand-up collars and long, tapered white pants with a front ap and a cloth neck stock takes some getting used to. e pair are volunteers with the Coast Guards 1812 Historic Ships Company. Delivering compelling performances, they paint a picture of the revenue Cutter Service, predecessor to the modern-day Coast Guard. e ships company was the brainchild of Capt. Steven Pope, a reservist with a passion for history. e historic ships company whose inaugural presentation began in New Orleans, La., back in April now has six events under their belt. I know of no better tool than one-on-one interaction with the public to bring to light the history of the Revenue Cutter Service, Pope said. Pope says the companys eorts are breathing life into the War of 1812. ats critical he said, because the Coast Guards predecessor service helped our young nation establish maritime borders and developed legacy missions such as port security and intelligence. rough the Revenue Cutter Service our nation assumed greater coastal defense responsibilities, gaining respect from the international community for commerce on the high seas. Staying in character, the seamen explained the Revenue Cutter Service was part of the Treasury Department; both founded by Alexander Hamilton. Its essential to understand that as it helps explain our role and our maritime history, especially during the War of 1812, says Matthew Krogh, a Coast Guard Auxiliarist and Historic Ships Company member. Kroghs wife Juliann also plays the role of a crewmember.Using kits with props and background information developed by the Watermens Museum in Yorktown, Va., Juliann interprets navigation circa 1812, displaying an octant, a navigational device resembling a sextant. Back in 1812, she said, crews could measure latitude, but not longitude, a tidbit eliciting appreciative sighs from the crowd. She also shares that in 1812 the calendar day began at noon, rather than midnight, because it could be marked by the sun. e members who make up the Historic Ships Company are a diverse group of dedicated active duty members, auxiliarists and reservists. Its their enthusiasm and knowledge that creates a captivating mix at presentations. Navy College educational information Blueback Base Submarine veterans toured submarine tender USS Frank Cable (AS 40), recently, after the ship completed a $30 million overhaul in Portland, Ore. During the visit, Frank Cable Sailors led several tours for 70 submarine veterans through the ships spaces including the galley, carpenter shop, sheet metal shop, machine shop, boat deck, COs and XOs staterooms, ships store and the bridge. All the feedback I have gotten from participating members has been nothing short of outstanding, Blueback Base President Ray Lough said. e crew showed us every courtesy and answered all questions. We were amazed at all the capabilities the USS Frank Cable has. ree World War II veterans attended the tour including Tudor Davis, a retired submariner who served aboard the USS Halibut (SS 232). Oh it was terric, Davis said. I was never on a tender before except to walk across to go on liberty. Now Im seeing the whole thing and its beautiful. e tour ended with the veterans eating lunch on the mess deck with the Sailors. All of the veterans said it was a visit they would never forget. We wish all of the crew fair winds and following seas, and a safe journey home, Lough said. WW II Sub Vets tour sub tender Coast Guard re-enacts War of 1812 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, August 2, 2012