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The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-21-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00258

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00258


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Concern turning to EgyptMilitary holds power in wake of recent democratic elections Millions of Egyptian people voted to elect a new president democratically, but the Egyptian militarys last-minute amendments to the countrys constitu tion concern the Defense De partment, Pentagon Press Sec retary George Little said in Washington, D.C., June 18. We support the Egyp tian people and their expectation that the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces will transfer full power to a democratically elected civilian government, as the SCAF previ ously announced, Little said in a statement released to reporters. We have, and will continue, to urge the SCAF to relinquish power to civilian-elected author ities and to respect the universal rights of the Egyptian people and the rule of law, he added. Little said the Defense De partment is deeply concerned about the new amendments to Egypts constitutional declaration and the timing of the an nouncement as polls closed for the presidential election. Fieen meet in St. Augustine for dinner on 70th anniversarye Mayport Florida Council hosted the 15th Annual Battle of Midway Commemoration din ner event at the Renaissance Hotel, World Golf Village in St. Augustine on June 9. e annual event honors the Midway survivors who typically travel from great distances like Michigan and Texas to attend. is year, there were 15 Midway Veterans among the more than 830 people in attendance, which is considered the largest Midway celebration nationally. Other notable heroes in atten dance were four Midway veteran widows, Medal of Honor recipi ent Robert Ingram, 12 former prisoners of war, 17 Wounded Warriors and numerous Navy participants from the Normandy Invasion, among other World War II battles. e event also recognized Vet erans from the Korean War, Viet nam War and the current war on terror. e guest speaker for the event was Admiral Mark Ferguson, vice chief of Naval Operations who discussed the similarities between the bravery displayed by these special veterans dur ing the Battle of Midway to the heroics of the servicemen and women now servicing in con icts abroad. Admiral Ferguson also provided a State of the Navy by providing an overview of the current operations and how our brave warriors are doing more with less and continue to bring the ght to the enemy. Following Admiral Fergusons discussion, a special memento was presented to each veteran in a very emotional ceremony as each biography was read. Other highlights of the event was a special Full Service Color Guard presentation by members of all six services, including the Merchant Marine, a moving Francis Gary Powers shot down, prisoner of Soviets in 1960More than half a century after his plane was shot down over the Soviet Union, the heroism Air Force Capt. Francis Gary Powers dis played while piloting his U-2 aircraft was recognized during a Pentagon ceremony June 15. Powers, who died in a helicopter crash in 1977, was post humously awarded the Silver Star the nations third-high est award for combat valor. Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Norton A. Schwartz presented the med al to Powers grandson, Francis Gary Trey Powers and grand daughter Lindsey Berry. e downing of his plane on May 1, 1960 was one of the most famous incidents of the Cold War. Powers was ying a clandestine mission in a U-2 over the former Soviet Union. e program, a Joint Air Force and Central Intelligence Agency mission, was a top-secret eort to monitor Soviet nuclear and missile programs. Powers took o from Pesha war, Pakistan, and headed over the Central Asian Soviet repub lics. e U-2 cameras gathered invaluable information for the United States and its allies at a time when the Soviet Bear seemed to be on the ascent. e Soviets had launched Sputnik, the worlds rst sat ellite, in 1957. en running for president, John F. Kennedy deplored the missile gap be tween the United States and SoUp Periscope What are your plans for summer vacation? Page 9 Old Ironsides USS Constitution crew at Baltimore Navy Week Page 11 Cowboy Up! USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) performs proof of concept Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com USS Floridas Culinary Specialists learn new skills from a Mayport mastere Navy Food Management Team Mayport hosted cake decorating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley, May 14 to 18. A dozen local Culinary Specialists attended the training, including four Sailors from Kings Bay home-ported USS Florida (SSGN 728). NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafs CS1 Adrian Dorsey provided the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the Navy. It was great opportunity for our local Culinary Specialists to receive handson cake decorat ing training, said NFMT Mayport Ocer in Charge CSCM Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, re-enlistments, and retirement ceremonies. ese were not your ordinary cakes. ey were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Ocer Chief Warrant Ocer 4 Wanda Trammell commended Dorsey for his outstanding training. CS1 Dorsey denitely provided a great foundation for those Culinary Specialists who are seeking to become cake decorators, Trammell said. His professional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for Icing on the cake . to perfection ... Dorsey in action was like watching an artist ... CSC David Hall USS Florida (SSGN 728) More on Midway Page 10 Midway vets honored Cold War pilot gets Silver Star

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a prepared ness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Progressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major appliances from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets includ ing 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. inking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Optical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. From July 1 to Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will of fer no interest, no down payment and no pay ments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, in cluding contact lenses, of $199 or more. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School pro gram. e Command Religious Pro gram of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is lo cated across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Ter minal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament ac counts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His res urrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and re hearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command repre sentative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel of ce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities avail able. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bi ble Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Bible School signup ends June 22Our summer basket ball program began Tuesday, June 11 at the fitness complex. We have 13 teams in the league, which is outstanding. There should be a good amount of par ity among the teams, and we should be in for some great competition. As with all of our programs, I hope that everyone has a good time on the court and that we keep sportsmanship as the top priority. e games for Week 1 went smoothly. I am very satised with the start of the season. Lets keep this positive momentum rolling into Week 2. I also am starting up our summer volleyball leagues. I will have an indoor league and a sand outdoor league. Registration has begun for both. Participants can register on our Web site at kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com, or come into the sports oce and ll out a roster. e indoor league will be Mondays and the outdoor league will be on Wednesdays. If weather becomes an issue with the outdoor league, I will combine the leagues into one indoor league. anks to all of for making our programs a success. I will continue take your input into consideration to oer the best possible variety of activities to the population of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Summer Basketball StandingsTeam Record PF PA SUBASE Globetrotters 2-0 129 120 USS Georgia Bulldogs 2-0 114 69 No Hope 1-1 66 74 Jaguars 1-1 135 116 Med-Ops 1-1 112 93 USS Tennessee Titans 1-1 65 57 Seabees/Port Ops 1-1 87 85 MCSFBn All-Stars 0-0 --USS Wyoming 0-0 --USS Florida 0-0 --Security 0-0 --MFPU Titans 0-2 92 124 USS Alaska 0-2 51 103Week 1 scoresJune 12USS Georgia Bulldogs 63, Seabees/Ports Ops 37 SUBASE Globetrotters 65, Jaguars 61 USS Tennessee Titans 33, No Hope 16 June 13 USS Georgia Bulldogs 41, USS Tennessee Titans 32 Med-Ops 53, USS Alaska 29 Jaguars 74, MFPU Titans 51 Thursday 6/14 Seabees/Port Ops 50. USS Alaska 22 SUBASE Globetrotters 64, Med-Ops 59 No Hope 50, MFPU Titans 41 Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports CoordinatorSummer basketball season tips oIn an effort to understand civil ian perceptions of Americas newest generation of returning Veterans, national nonprofit organization The Mission Continues and Hollywood film and television production company Bad Robot, commissioned a nationwide survey to assess how Americans perceive post-9/11 veterans. is research, entitled A New Generation of Leaders, is the rst of its kind to focus on public perceptions of the nearly 2.4 million military service members who are now returning home since volunteering to serve after 9/11 and who directly supported operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Modeled, in part, after a similar survey conducted in 1979, it reects a marked increase in positive public perception of our nations veterans. In conducting this research, e Mission Continues and Bad Robot retained the bi-partisan polling team of Greenberg Quinlan Ros ner Research and Public Opinion Research Strategies, whose report is available. A number of encouraging conclusions emerged. e public regards these young men and women as future leaders and as community and national assets. Compared to their non-veteran peers, the public nds them more disciplined, hav ing a stronger character and more involved in their communities. ose surveyed clearly recognize that U.S. military service members provide an important public ser vice: 86 percent ranked the veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan as a valuable national asset, on par with reghters (94 percent), nurses (91 percent), and doctors (87 percent) and more than 20 points higher than Supreme Court Justices (64 percent), lawyers (19 percent), politicians (11 percent) and celebrities (5 percent). Several misperceptions, however, surfaced through this research. ose surveyed believe that a majority of veterans have returned home suering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD is certainly a serious concern for post-9/11 veterans. On average two out of 10 veterans will experience some level of PTSD not the levels assumed in the survey respondents. In addition, the public incorrectly assumes that veterans have lower levels of education, a misperception that could impact veteran employment opportunities. According to the Department of Veterans Aairs veterans are actually more likely than their non-vet eran peers to have obtained some college education and advanced degrees. Finally, the public believes these men and women have done their part and deserve time to recover; the veterans community, however, understands that what these men and women need most is to serve and lead in their communities. Our veterans appreciate when people say thank you. But in addition to thank you, they need to hear we still need you. ey need to know that when we look at them we see them as assets in strengthening their communities and that we are willing to challenge them to nd a way to continue to be of service. Eric Greitens, CEO, e Mission Continues/former Navy SEAL e country delivers a very clear call to action in this survey. A huge majority believe we are not doing enough to help veterans coming home. A full 58 percent of respondents How post-9/11 vets are perceived Editorial We believe Egypts transition must continue and that Egypt is made stronger and more stable by a successful transition to democracy, he said. Egypt has an enduring role as a security partner and leader in promoting regional stability, and we look forward to working with the new government on a host of issues. Meeting with report ers along with Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. John Kirby, the press sec retary said Defense Department ocials remain in close contact with the Egyptian military on the matter, noting that De fense Secretary Leon E. Panetta spoke June 15 with Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, leader of Egypts ruling council. We plan to continue to maintain those close contacts and cooperation with the SCAF, Little said. at being said, we need to see where things go. Little said the U.S. and Egypt have maintained a very strong military-tomilitary relationship for many years. We want that to con tinue, [and] were going to monitor events closely, he said. Its very impor tant to the entire U.S. gov ernment, and the U.S. mil itary, that the SCAF take steps to promote a peace ful transition to democ racy and a government in Egypt that is responsive to the Egyptian people. Little said the United States has been clear about its position on Egypts transition to a democratically elected government and that he believes the SCAF is fully aware of these concerns. We believe theyve taken those concerns onboard, and theres time for all of this to be sorted out in the right way, he said. Kirby said the Defense Department has enjoyed a strong military-to-military relationship and coopera tion with the Egyptian mil itary for more than three decades and believes in maintaining it. Speaking from a purely military perspective, that relationship continues, he said. Its been important.Egypt 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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describe the benets provided to veterans as less than adequate. is is particularly true when it comes to helping these young men and women nd jobs. e public supports incentives for the private sector to hire veterans and by better than a 2:1 margin (62 to 25 percent), the public supports revis ing the GI Bill to include funding for returning vet erans to hone new skills through volunteer service with non-prots in their communities. Bad Robot is proud to partner with e Mission Continues to help advance our understanding of this newest generation of veterans, said J.J. Abrams, founder and president of Bad Robot. Our country needs their stories, expertise, ser vice and leadership now more than ever. We look forward to continuing to work with e Mission Continues and others to ensure our nations veter ans have a strong network upon their return home. To download the sur vey, visit www.missioncontinues.org/newgeneration. From e Mission Continues Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta thanked and praised military fathers for their seless service to the nation in his Fathers Day weekend message. Fathers Day was observed on Sunday, June 17. Here is the text of the secretarys message: As we mark Fathers Day this weekend, Id like to con vey my thanks and gratitude to the fathers and grand fathers in our military family. is is a time for all of us to recognize and show our appreciation to fathers for ev erything they do in bettering our military, securing our nation, helping to raise and nurture our families, and in spiring future generations of Americans to serve. To all fathers in uniform: thank you for your loyalty and dedication to our country, and for your willingness to balance the demands of military and family life. Over the past year as Secretary of Defense, Ive had the oppor tunity to meet many of you deployed around the world. Ive seen how you focus on the mission while enduring extended periods away from loved ones. rough it all, youve shown courage on the battleeld and tenderness to your families at home. To fathers and husbands of those who serve: we simply could not do our jobs without your love and support. It is never easy to deal with the challenges and concerns of a deployment, just as it is always hard to take care of every thing back at home. To all of you, I join your families in saluting you and oering my most heartfelt thanks. You are true heroes in the eyes of your fellow citizens and most especially in the eyes of your children. We honor you as fathers and we will always be thankful for your leadership and your love of family, of service, and of America. U.S. Department of Vet erans Aairs clinicians oer a comprehensive review of the health con cerns of Iraq and Afghani stan veterans and practical management guidelines for primary care providers in an article entitled, Post Deployment Care for Re turning Combat Veterans. e article is published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the of cial journal of the Society of General Internal Medicine. We at VA are always seeking ways to improve the quality of health care we provide to our veter ans, Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki said. is article provides valuable insight into the fastest-growing segment of the veteran population at a time they are currently returning from combat. Since September 11, 2001, approximately 2.4 million military personnel have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to VA ocials. e health care needs of this particular patient popula tion are complex, ocials said, and require a wellintegrated interdisciplinary approach to care. e article, written by Dr. Juliette F. Spelman, Dr. Stephen C. Hunt, Dr. Karen H. Seal, and Dr. Lu cile Burgo-Black, reviews how combat deployments can impact the physical, psychological, and social health of veterans and describes their unique health care needs. is in cludes the need for assess ment and management of injuries associated with blast exposures [includ ing mild traumatic brain injury] as well as mental health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and substance abuse. Other important health concerns discussed in clude chronic musculoskeletal pain, medically unexplained symptoms, complications from environmental exposures, heightened suicide risk, sleep disturbances, and impairments in family, occupational and social functioning. The article sum marizes evidence which supports elevated frequen cies of physi ological and behavioral cardiovascular risk fac tors, including hyperten sion and tobacco use, rais ing concerns about future health implications for these veterans. In light of relationships between physical, psychological and psychosocial concerns in this popula tion, the VA authors rec ommend an interdisciplinary approach to care directed toward mitigat ing the long-term health impacts of combat. is review by VA cli nicians will help VA and non-VA health providers oer veterans the best pos sible care as they return from combat. It aords all the opportunity to devel op greater collaboration between VA and commu nity providers to ensure optimal post-deployment care and services for our returning combat veterans and their families. Each VA medical cen ter has a highly specialized Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn care management team in place that coordi nates and oversees transi tion and care for service members and veterans. A dedicated case man ager is assigned to work with the service member/veteran and family to screen for case management needs and implement a plan of care to completion, or as long as needed.VA clinician review assists care providers Sec salutes fathersVets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 Midshipmen board Wyoming for professional training while performing routine operations at sea. A V-22 Osprey from Air Force Special Operations Command prepares to perform a proof of concept for personnel evacuation from the Ohioclass ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) June 6. Cowboy Up! USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) performs proof of concept Navy photos by MC1 James KimberCrew members from USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) wait topside for a personnel transfer June 6. Wyoming welcomed aboard a group of mid shipmen from the U.S. Naval Academy. Cmdr. Christopher Nash, USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (Gold), commanding officer, stands topside. Coast Guard Cutter Sea Dog escorts the group. Crew members wait topside for the personnel transfer.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 decorating cakes now and in the future. CSC David Hall of USS Florida also compliment ed Dorsey. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, Hall said. He denitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will denitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. Dorsey said he considers himself extremely lucky to have the opportunity to show his diversity in the Culinary Specialists rating. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other Culinary Specialists the things I have learned, he said. I am thankful to some great leaders who gave me the opportunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. at is something I will always remember. ceremonial presentation of the six-person POW/ MIA table by these same service members, the in troduction of the four Midway veteran widows, reading of Robert Ingrams Medal of Honor citation, reading of a short biography of the Midway veter ans and former POWs and recognition of the Wound ed Warriors from Iraq and Afghanistan who were in attendance. e audience gave numerous standing ovations. e evening concluded with a duet sung by 11 -year-old Faith Miller and a soloist from the Navy Region Southeast Band of Lee Greenwoods song God Bless the USA. e 16th annual Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, to celebrate the 71st anniversary of this great historical battle, will be held June 1, 2013, using the same venue. e Battle of Midway Committee this for years reunion and dinner con sisted of John Vargo, San dra Barrett, Bill Dudley, Bill and Betty Howard, Karen Turnbull, Becky Luke, Bob Price, George Huchting, Bill Boydstun, Roseanne Jamison, Dane Baird and Bill McLough lin. Midshipmen visit Cake Midway e pursuit of equality is fundamental to the American story, Defense Secre tary Leon E. Panetta said in a video message released June 15 to thank gay and lesbian service members and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civilians for their dedicated service to the nation. Recognizing June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, the secretary also thanked the families of gay and lesbian service mem bers and LGBT civilians. Diversity is one of the departments greatest strengths, the secretary said. During Pride Month, and every month, let us celebrate our rich diversi ty and renew our enduring commitment to equality for all, he said. In his video message, Panetta emphasized the militarys diversity. e successful repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell proved to the nation that, just like the country we defend, we share dierent back grounds, dierent values and dierent beliefs, he said. But together we form the greatest military force in the world. Integrity and respect are the cornerstones of mili tary culture, the secretary added. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force implemented the repeal with a focus on re spect and individual dig nity, Panetta said. Addressing the service members who now can serve openly regardless of their sexual orientation, the secretary lauded their service before the repeal. Before the repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell, he said, you faithfully served your country with profes sionalism and courage. And just like your fellow service members, you put your country before your self. Today, he added, they can be proud not only of serving their country, but also of who they are when in uniform. The president also recog nized June as LGBT Pride Month, noting that throughout the nations history, ordinary Americans have advocated for change and have led a proud and inexorable march toward freedom, fairness and full equality under the law not just for some, but for all. As the president signed the repeal act into law in December 2010, he said, We are not a nation that says, dont ask, dont tell. We are a nation that says, Out of many, we are one. We are a nation that wel comes the service of every patriot. We are a nation that believes that all men and women are created equal. ose are the ideals that generations have fought for. ose are the ideals that we uphold today. When the repeal took eect in September 2011, Panetta said anyone who is capable of serving in uniform should be able to do so e New York Mets and the USO hosted the fth an nual Military Appreciation Day on Memorial Day May 28 at Citi Field as part of Fleet Week New York 2012. Held nearly every year since 1984, Fleet Week New York is the citys cele bration of the sea services. Fleet Week New York provides an opportunity for the citizens of New York City and the sur rounding tri-state area to meet Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, as well as see, rst-hand, the lat est capabilities of todays maritime services. Adm. Tim Alexander, commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic, threw the rst pitch. Today were at Citi Field and theyre throw ing a big party for us for Military Appreciation Day here with the Mets, Alex ander said. e game opened with a performance by the USO Liberty Bells, followed by the National Anthem per formed by the U.S. Navy Band Northeast. e Strike Fighter Squadron 15 from Naval Air Station Oceana, homported in Virginia, ew over the eld at the end of the Star-Spangled Banner. Several service members and Delayed Entry Pro gram members also recited the Oath of Enlistment before the start of the game. At the end of the third inning the Mets welcomed veterans by recognizing the veteran of the game. ank you to New York for having us, and thank you to the Mets for giving us awesome seats and let ting us meet all the play ers in the dugout, said Marine Corporal Ronald Smith of 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, Bravo Company, who was the veteran of the game. Were getting treat ed like celebrities, and it doesnt happen very often, so its been great. More than 6,000 service men and women arrived aboard the ships for Fleet Week New York. is year, Fleet Week New York was one of the signature events around the country commemorating OpSail 2012, the Bicenten nial of the War of 1812 an the Star-Spangled Banner. e anniversary of the War of 1812 is a salute to all Sailors and Marines who fought gallantly in that conict, who served in all our nations con icts since then, and who are defending freedom around the world today. Baseball honors militaryPanetta salutes gays in military

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Steak Night with live music is Friday, July 20 at KB Finnegans. Enjoy a great evening with deli cious cooked-to-order ribeyes, baked potato, corn on the cob, macaroni salad, dinner roll and all the xins for only $14.95 in advance or $15.95 at the door. Live entertainment, beer sam plings and some great drink specials including happy hour from 5 to 8 p.m. and margaritas $1.50. Drawings will be from the advanced purchased tickets for free dinner. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Open Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes on the golf course will be open for fishing through Outdoor Adventure Center on Friday, July 13, Saturday, July 14 and July 27 and 28. For only $5 per person, you can fish in any of the three lakes at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Kings Bay Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Kings Bay permits. Its open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Under 16 must be accompanied by a parent. Space is limited so register early. Mark your calendar for additional dates: August 10, 11, 24 and 25. Call OAC at (912) 573-8103 for more infor mation. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., Thursday, June 21 inside KB Finnegans, host Doug Shankel, from Big Show Entertainment, is looking for some Karaoke fanatics. Enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing. Call 912-573-9492 for more infor mation. A Green Note from Morale, Welfare and Recreation MWR is making a change to go green and go paperless. With your help, MWR can achieve this planet-saving goal. Events are posted inside The Periscope and on Facebook. Additionally, a texting program is offered so you can receive instant messages from MWR on what is happening right now. Call (912) 573-4556 for more information on this new, innovative process and become part of making the change. Also, visit www.facebook.com/mwrk ingsbay or www.cnic.navy.mil/ kingsbay. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All-American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen rough Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Soccer registration for ages 3 to 15 is 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. now through July 30 at the Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. An additional sign-up day is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. Cost is $60 per child for ac tive duty, reservists and $65 per child for retirees, DoD civilians and NSB Kings Bay contractors. Uniforms are included in the cost. Age control date is August 1, 2012, children must turn 3 years old before and cannot be 16 before this date. Late registration for Fall Youth Soccer will be accepted after August 4 at Youth Center for an additional $5, if openings are available. All new players must bring a copy of their birth certicate and proof of eligibility. For more infor mation, call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 SAC Registration for before and after school Four different criteria dates for registration. Returning SAC patrons, CDC pre-K patrons going into kinder garten and single/dual active duty members will begin Monday, July 9; active duty with working or student spouse and DoD civilians may register Monday, July 16; DoD contractors may regis ter Monday, July 23; All oth ers register Monday, July 30. Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For chil dren kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through Aug. 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Soccer signup going Just for kids MWR Steak Night is July 20 Liberty call Dont accept defeat.Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tan trums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, June 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center this month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Individual Augmentee support viet Union. Powers mission was to overy Soviet missile sites, nuclear plants and rocket-launching facilities. Over Sverdlovsk his plane, ying at more than 70,000 feet, was hit by a SA-2 missile and brought down. Soviet forces captured Powers and he was held by the Soviet secret police, the KGB, in Luby anka Prison in Moscow. e shoot down sharp ly increased tensions between Washington and Moscow. President Dwight D. Eisenhower had to admit that the Unit ed States was ying over another sovereign nation. Protests over this broke out in Japan and Europe. Teams of KGB interro gators worked on Powers to get him to give up infor mation or turn against his country. ey never beat him, but held him in isolation and constantly threat ened him with death. Powers spent 21 months in a Moscow prison, Schwartz said. For nearly 107 days, Captain Powers was interrogated and ha rassed by numerous Sovi et secret police interrogation teams, the chief said. Although weakened by lack of food and denial of sleep and mental anguish of constant interrogation, Captain Powers refused all attempts to glean from him sensitive information that would have proved harmful to the defense and security of the United States, Schwartz said. In February 1962, the Soviets exchanged Powers for Soviet spy KGB Col. Rudolph Abel. Powers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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e Navy awarded a $2,381,448,356 contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. May 31, for the detail design and construction of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7), the Navys next large-deck amphibious assault ship. Im very proud of our NavyIndustry shipbuilding team and the tremendous eort that has culminated in the award of this critical shipbuilding program, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. is ship will ensure that the amphibious eet re mains capable of expeditionary warfare well into the 21st cen tury. e ship will be constructed at HIIs Ingalls Operations in Pas cagoula, Miss. Ship delivery is expected in scal year 2018. Like the future USS America (LHA 6), LHA 7 has an increased aviation capacity, including an enlarged hangar deck, realign ment and expansion of the avia tion maintenance facilities, a signicant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased avia tion fuel capacity. LHA 7 will use the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution and elec tric auxiliary systems designed and built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8), replacing the maintenance intensive steam plants of earlier amphibious ships. is unique auxiliary propulsion system is designed for fuel eciency. LHA 7 will provide a exible, multi-mission platform with capabilities that span the range of military operations from for ward deployed crisis response to forcible entry operations. e ship also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multinational maritime expeditionary forces. Tripoli will operate for sus tained periods in transit to and operations in an amphibious objective area to include: embarking, transporting, controlling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a marine air-ground task force, and sup porting forces by helicopters and tilt rotors supported by joint strike ghter aircraft (F-35B).ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and On ions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and din ner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Contract awarded 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Brenau University celebrated more than a quar ter century of operations on the Naval Submarine Base when it conducted its 25th commencement exercise for undergradu ate students on its Kings Bay campus, June 1. In the 1980s the uni versity commissioned the program at the behest of the Navy. About halfthe members of the student population on the campus are active duty mili tary personnel, members of their families, civilian employees on base, or military retirees, as were members of the 2012 graduating class. We are extremely proud of the relationship that Brenau has enjoyed with the Navy over the years, said the universitys President Ed L. Schrader, who addressed the graduates, friends and families in the Navy bases chapel. And we are honored that many of the ne young men and women who will go forth and serve our country are Brenau graduates. Brenau shares higher education chores on the base with a similar branch of Valdosta State College, whoseinterim president, Louis Levy, delivered the keynote commencement address. e institutions oer compatible, instead of competing, programs at the site along with other partner colleges and universities in the Navy Col lege Program. e 54 graduates who participated in the Friday ceremony will be among the 1,200 alumni who have received diplomas since 1987. Among the early graduates who attended the ceremony was Dr. Gale J. Allen, a Brenau University trustee who is also associ ate chief scientist for the Life and Microgravity Sciences division of NASA. Allen as a civilian em ployee of the Navy set up a chemistry lab when the new base rst opened and in 1991 completed a Master of Business Ad ministration degree from Brenau, which she credits with helping her break the glass ceiling in the male-dominated Defense Department and NASA or ganizations. At the ceremony Schrad er recognized Allen, who had been a top sciences student in her pre-Brenau academic career and car ried on as top student in the Kings Bay program. She is typical of the Oh boys, for the first time in ages, Ive got summer vacation plans! Im going to my 40th high school class reunion in DeKalb, Illinois. Single girls, look out! Its at one of my best friends farm with a beautiful lake. Then Im going with my daughter and granddaugh ter to visit my aunt who is recovering from a stroke. Then Ive got a lot of other friends to visit, including a girl I used to tend bar with, and a softball game to see my old team play, even though its mostly my teammates sons now. Sharon Hallett Family member Jacksonville, Fla. We already took our vacation. We went to Key West. Joel Garrido Retired Navy Surigao, Philippines The whole family is going on a Carnival Cruise for a family reunion. Lt. Peter Bugler USS Tennessee Blue Goldendale, Wash. Im flying to San Diego for a couple weeks. Mallory Smith Family member Laurel, Miss. We want to take our daughter to the aquarium and zoo in Atlanta. Nicole Cronkright Family member Schwartz Creek, Mich. Were traveling home to Michigan to see our family. ETCM Matt Suzor Submarine Squadron 20 Temperance, Mich. Were going to Pittsburgh this weekend.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Brenau graduates 54 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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Battle remembered at Midway ceremony Two veterans of the historic Battle of Midway returned to the battle site June 4, to observe the 70th anniversary of the conict credited with changing the course of World War II in the Pacic. John F. Miniclier and Ed Fox were among the Marines who laid their lives on the line against the Japanese attack, triumphing against all odds during the three-day assault in which the Americans were outnumbered and outgunned. As former Secretary of Defense James Schlessinger once said of Midway, e victory occurred despite the inferiority of our aircraft, the ineectiveness of our torpedoes, the substantial absence of backup surface ships and our overall nu merical inferiority. e two veterans were among the ap proximately 150 people who attended the anniversary event at what is now the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet; and Robyn orson, direc tor of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Pacic Region; addressed the crowd of veterans and their families, military his tory enthusiasts and the people who work on Midway. is morning as we pay tribute to the greatest generation, we pray that this time of memorial rightly distinguished their honorable service and their coura geous sacrice, Haney said. We think about the thousands of young men who over the course of a few short hours paid the ultimate sacrice. e commemoration was sponsored by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has operated the national wildlife refuge since taking re sponsibility for Midways wildlife in 1988. e Battle of Midway is considered the crucial turning point in the Pacic War. e Japanese lost all four aircraft carriers they had at Midway, preventing their na val forces from being an oensive force; while the U.S. lost only one aircraft carri er of the three they had there, largely due to the success of U.S. Naval intelligence to decode Japanese messages. anks to more than two decades of restoration work, Regional Director or son said, Midway now hosts the worlds largest colony of Laysan albatross and habitat for 18 other species of nesting seabirds, threatened green turtles and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Laysan ducks and Bonin petrels, once driven to near-extinction, now thrive on Midway. is place that was once in the vortex of the long and violent struggle of men longing to be free is now eternally pre served as a place of tranquility, of natural beauty and abundant life, orson said. Miniclier, who was a 20-year old pri vate rst class at the time of the battle, re called how he was stationed atop a 30-foot searchlight control tower where he could see U.S. planes take o for battle, and he could count the incoming enemy planes. He watched as a U.S. plane was shot down and its pilot bailed out and de ployed his parachute, only to be gunned by Japanese planes as he fell. I watched that poor guy die, Miniclier said. I made up my mind I was going to make it. Fox, also age 20 and a private rst class at the time of the battle, was stationed in a machine gun bunker in the far corner of the island. He later went on to serve in the invasion of Iwo Jima following his service on Midway. Returning to Midway 70 years later is one of the greatest gifts one could oer a veteran, Fox said. To be able to go back and peruse through ones indelible his tory is just one wonderful surprise gift. Following the anniversary ceremony, Miniclier and Fox cut the ribbon together on a new exhibit in the refuges visitor center memorializing the famous battle. Haney joined Sailors and American World War II veterans for a small boat o ral tribute as they released leis and ower petals in a ceremonial tribute to those who lost their lives 70 years ago. Sailors and civilians assigned to the Joint Information Dominance Corps commemorated one of the most impor tant moments in its history as it remem bered the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, June 4 to 7. Navy Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Cyber Forces, Naval Network War fare Command, Navy Information Op erations Command Norfolk and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command personnel remembered their technical predecessors who, in 1942, proved key to the Pacic battle when American cryp tologists broke the Japanese radio code in the weeks leading up the attack. eir expertise led to American naval forces defeating the numerically supe rior Japanese naval forces, putting the enemy on the defensive for the rst time during the war. e annual Battle of Mid way commemoration was presented by the JID Chief Petty Ocer Board-Eligible Petty Ocers First Class. Midway rests a little closer to our hearts, said CTN1 Cliord Stout, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command, because cryptanalysis allowed the Navy to be prepared for the ambush that Japa nese forces were planning. As information dominance warriors, we recognize that, while Midway was the turning point in the Pacic, it was also a pivotal point for information warfare, Stout said. In April 1942, Japan began plans for an ambush of American naval forces at Mid way, 1,500 miles from Hawaii, including the four aircraft carriers missed at the at tack on Pearl Harbor six months earlier. e Japanese naval code, known as JN 25, consisted of approximately 45,000 ve-digit numbers, each number repre senting a word or a phrase. One of the leading code-breakers in volved said it was like putting together a jigsaw puzzle with most of its pieces al ways missing. Leading the code-breaking eort was Station Hypo, the code name for the com bat intelligence unit at Pearl Harbor un der then-Cmdr. Joseph Rochefort. In the dank, air-conditioned basement where the intelligence teams worked, Rochefort and his sta could work virtually nonstop, and often went for days on a few hours of sleep. By early May, the team was certain that a major enemy operation was being planned at Midway, but Rocheforts superiors in Washington werent convinced. To convince them, the radio station at Midway intentionally sent an unencrypt ed message falsely reporting that the water distillation plan on the island was broken. Within 48 hours, Station Hypo decrypted a Japanese radio transmission alerting the Japanese commanders that Midway was short of water. Our crypotologic ancestors demonstrated that they were willing to be both persistent and creative when confronted with a challenge, Stout said. en-commander in chief of the Pacic Fleet, Adm. Chester Nimitz, quickly put plans in place to counter the Japa nese ambush. ree carriers were positioned north east of Midway, away from the Japanese forces. eir aircraft, along with landbased Navy and Army Air Corps air pow er from Midway, sank four Japanese car riers, the entire strength of the task force, with 322 aircraft and 5,000 sailors, as well as a cruiser. America lost 147 aircraft, 300 Sailors and USS Yorktown (CV 5). More impor tant, Japans navy had been stopped and damaged beyond recovery. It is incumbent upon us to sustain the legacy of this signicant battle and pass on to the Sailors who relieve us, said Master Chief Cryptologic Technician Kevin Radzewicz, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Center senior enlisted advi sor, that it was the courage and deter mination of our forces, with a little help from the cryptologists in Station Hypo, that helped us win the Battle of Midway. A ceremonial bugler from the Joint Ex peditionary Base Little Creek/Fort Story School of Music played taps and a mo ment of silence commemorated those who died, ending the ceremony. Code breakers remembered Navy honors Pearl veteran e last known Staten Island resident survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack visited Fleet Week New York 2012 at the e Sul livans Pier. Former Chief Boat swains Mate Alf Kongslie and three generations of his family visited Fleet Week and were treated to a tour of the pier and USS San Jacinto (CG-56) as a small token of their grati tude for his service. Seventy-one years ago, Kongslie was a crewmem ber aboard USS Saint Lou is (CL-49) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Kongslie thought his Sunday routine began like any other. I saw guys going across the harbor in a liberty boat, Kongslie, 91, said. I gured they were going to church. en I saw them jumping o into the water. I didnt know what was go ing on. What happened was the Japanese attack on the U.S. Pacic Fleet that would pull the United States in to World War II. During the confusion of the attack, he did his best to remain calm and per form his duties during the emergency. I kept trying to climb my way up ladders to get to my battle station, but guys kept knocking me o coming down the other way, he said. I nally got to my station and got to work. After the attack, Kong slie continued serving in the Navy until 1947. We were honored to have Mr. Kongslie and his family here today, said Navy Lt. Jared Jalbert, Fleet Week Staten Island ocer in charge. It was a great experience to show our appreciation to such a distinguished veteran. Cmdr. Rick Potter, exec utive ocer of San Jacinto, met Kongslie and his fam ily to personally present the World War II veteran a San Jacinto command ball cap and challenge coin before bonging him aboard the ship. I never thought Id ever see a boatswain chief bonged aboard a ship, Kongslie said with tears in his eyes. During the ships tour, crewmembers and civil ians alike constantly ap proached Kongslie to shake his hand and thank him. Its a real honor to meet you, sir, said Fire Control man 2nd Class Jennifer omas. I just wanted to say thank you for your ser vice. Im thankful for yours, Kongslie humbly replied before adding with a grin, Where were gals like you in the eet 70 years ago? 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Crew visits Baltimore Sailors assigned to USS Constitution participatedin Baltimore Navy Week as part of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 commemoration taking place there June 11 to 19. Constitution Sailors had multiple visits with local veterans planned, and performed War of 1812era gun drills and 17th century boarding pike drills daily in the vicinity of USS Constellation. We are excited about continuing the 1812 Bicentennial in Baltimore, said Cmdr. Matthew Bon ner, Constitutions 72nd commanding ocer. It is a city with a rich history, especially during the War of 1812, and it has warmly welcomed us during pre vious Navy Weeks. We are looking forward to the opportunity to share the ships rich history and its Sailors with the people of the city as well as the other ships that are supporting the event. Sailors were scheduled to help those in need at Lock Raven Veterans As sociation Community Liv ing Center and Hospice, the Ronald McDonald House of Baltimore, and serve food at Our Daily Bread soup kitchen. Additionally, they were to visit the Hartford County Boy Scouts Camp to pro vide mentorship and share their professional experiences with youth there. Navy weeks are an amazing opportunity to share the ships history and the mission of todays Navy with people from all over the country, said Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Christopher Haws. I am truly honored to par ticipate in Baltimores celebration because the city, much like Boston, was an integral factor in estab lishing our Navys founda tion. Baltimore was the fth of eight Navy Weeks Constitution Sailors are scheduled to participate in throughout 2012, cel ebrating the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Baltimore Navy Week was held in conjunction with the citys Star-Spangled Sailbration, a festival that hosted a series of tall ships and the Navy Blue Angels. e primary purpose of Navy Week is to increase Navy awareness by pre senting the Navy to Ameri cans who live in cities that normally do not have a signicant naval presence. Baltimore Navy Week showcased the mission, capabilities and achieve ments of the U.S. Navy and provide residents the opportunity to meet Sailors rsthand. Constitution is the worlds oldest commis sioned warship aoat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors per year. She defended the sea lanes against threat from 1797 to 1855, much like the mission of todays Navy. Constitutions mission today is to oer communi ty outreach and education about the ships history. Under SecNav keynotes forum At the U.S. Naval War Colleges 63nd annual Current Strategy Forum, Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work told more than 900 students and invited guests that the U.S. Navy is entering a golden era of seapower during a keynote speech, June 12. Despite dicult eco nomic challenges around the world, Work was op timistic about a strategic shift and focus toward Asia-Pacic and reect ed on how the Navy and Marine Corps team transitions from todays con icts and positions itself for the challenges of tomorrow. Our strategic concept and our organizational construct is precisely aligned with the strate gic requirements for the 21st century, he said. It is hard to imagine a more maritime friendly strate gic environment. Work discussed the con nection between Ameri cas national security and its economy. To explain the intercon nection, Work said the nation has not been in a situation like this since the early 1950s when Presi dent Eisenhower was in oce. He pointed out that the country is at a strategic inection point where the post Iraq and Afghanistan military drawdown is oc curring at the same time that public debt is increas ing. One thing that is very much dierent about this drawdown than the other drawdowns in our history is you cant buy as much with $700 billion as you could at $550 billion, he said. ings cost more so the Navy will emphasize capability over capacity. e importance and continued need for a strong nation was empha sized throughout his talk. e tenets of American sea power on world economic growth are as valid today as when Adm. Al fred ayer Mahan wrote e Inuence of Seapower on History, in 1890. Oceans are central to the economy, which means they are central to our national strategy, Work said. Ready reliable information, secure nances, stable economies, and free global trade depend upon the free navi gation of the oceans. In keeping with the theme of this years CSF, Sustaining US Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense Work emphasized the Na vy-Marine Corps teams importance to a national strategy focused on secur ing the economic interests of the U.S. is is a warghting Navy and Marine Corps, Work emphasized. e Navy-Marine Corps team is built and ready for war and will continue to operate forward to help pre serve the peace, protect America, allied and global interests, and assure free dom of access in peace and war. is year marks the 63rd annual CSF hosted by the Secretary of the Navy. e rst CSF held on May 9, 1949, under the title Round Table Talks of fered an opportunity for the nations public ser vants, scholars, and senior military ocers to join the College faculty and students to discuss the fu ture strategy of the United States. Over the decades, the forum has expanded to include a cross section of Americas civilian leadership to encourage a wide-ranging debate on national and international security. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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Pre-Commissioning Unit Mississippi (SSN 782) received a hearty welcome when the Navys newest Virginia-class attack sub marine arrived in Pasca goula on May 25. PCU Mississippi and her crew of 145 ocers and enlisted Sailors arrived in Pascagoula to prepare for the submarines commis sioning on June 2. As we approached the Port of Pascagoula during the early morning hours and watched the sun rise over the Gulf of Mexico, I was humbled in knowing that we are embarking on a truly amazing commis sioning week that we and the state of Mississippi will always remember, said Capt. John McGrath, PCU Mississippis commanding ocer. PCU Missis sippi and her crew are excited to be in our namesake state and are looking forward to our commis sioning on June 2. When the ninth Virgin ia-class submarine is com missioned, McGrath will become the submarines rst commanding ocer. McGrath and his crew are considered plank owners, a term dating back to the days of the wooden ships. I didnt realize at rst the signicance of be ing a plank owner, said McGrath. Now, as I look around and see how ev ery facet of our ships dayto-day operations were developed by the team, I understand why being a plank owner is a big deal. Chief Culinary Specialist Ryan Christianson, who has served aboard PCU Mississippi since May 2011, echoed the commanding ocers senti ment on the importance of serving as a plank owner in ones naval career. Its denitely a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity for me, Christianson said. It is truly special because not many others will have an opportunity to do this and set the initial stan dard for the rest of the fu ture Mississippi Sailors to follow. PCU Mississippi joins historical company with the four previous ships that have shared the proud name of the state. Christianson reected on the milestone event for the attack submarine and her crew. It is denitely signicant to participate in this opportunity because it is a memory only the initial crew can share, Chris tianson said. e rst Mississippi, a paddle frigate commis sioned on Dec. 22, 1841, was the rst ship of the United States to bear the name of the state Missis sippi. e second Mississippi (BB 23), a 13,000-ton bat tleship, was launched on September 1905 and com missioned at Philadelphia Navy Yard on Feb. 1, 1908. e third Mississippi (BB 41), a New-Mexico class battleship, was com missioned in 1917 and served in the Pacic in World War II. e fourth Mississippi (CGN 40), a Virginia-class, nuclear powered guidedmissile cruiser, was com missioned on Aug. 5, 1978 by then-President Jimmy Carter. Nathan visits NYCVeterans Moving For ward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the pup pies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As an assistance dog in training not only do I have to have mastery of many commands around 30 be fore I am a year old, but I have to be exposed to just about anything and ev erything so nothing unex pected will happen when I am with the person I will be assisting. So far, a lot of my train ing life has been learning about all the things in the world sounds, shapes, smells, touches. My handler tries to show me something new every day. She is kind of my best friend and is good to me so I trust her. She makes doing new things fun. My organization, Veter ans Moving Forward, is a new organization so they are seeking sources of funding so they can raise lots of pups like me to help wounded veterans. Because a foundation in New York City wanted to learn about helping vet erans they asked to meet me! My human handler felt I was ready for the challenge, so o we were to New York! e ride did not seem very long. I slept through most of it in my comfort able kennel. It was dark when we stopped in front of this very big building where a nice man in a crisp gray coat helped me out of the car and carried the bag with all my food and toys. Gosh, there were so many lights everywhere and lots of people walking every which way. Iit was a little confusing at rst. My handler gave me a hug, said I was doing great and reminded me of what a special pup I was getting to stay in a very nice place. She called it a hotel in the big city. So I walked with her through these funny mov ing doors into this big room. Lots of people stared at me as I walked across the big room. My paws slipped on the shiny oor and I had to really work to not fall down. Next we took a long ride in an elevator. I know what those are cause I ride them at my handlers of ce. When we got to our room, I walked around it and snied everything. en took my things out of my bag. I grabbed my girae and was only going to cuddle for a minute but I fell asleep. I woke up early the next morning and had my rst breakfast in Man hattan, then got ready to go outside. Up until now I have not mentioned too much about the commands I have learned. Well, one of them is a word that lets me know it is ok to urinate or pee to you and me cause humans believe there are some places I am supposed to pee and some places I am just not sup posed to pee. Do you know how long it takes to get out of a 15th oor hotel room and nd some grass in Manhattan? Well, it seemed like f-or-e-v-e-r to me, given my tiny bladder. Later that morning on our way to the foundation I heard a sound that I had heard as a little puppy. We moved toward the sound and it got louder. When we were right next to the sound I stopped to look at it. I had heard the sound but never saw this motion with it. My han dler said it was called a jack hammer. e man who was holding it made funny motions but smiled and waved at me when I stopped to look at him. You see when I was just a little puppy and with my litter mates and mom, Jasmine, my human mom would play noises for us. So while some pups may be afraid of loud or wailing noises I associate these noises with the warmth and comfort of my rst home, so they dont scare me. I think no big deal. We got to our meeting at the foundation on Park Avenue after so many blocks. Everyone was so impressed with my nap ping under the table dur ing the meeting. Little did they know that it was my usual morning nap time. ey invited me into an oce with windows that went from the oor to the ceiling and you could see lots of buildings and the cars and people looked so little down on the street. en it was time to go. On the way back to the hotel, we walked up to some men in uniforms. ey pet me, talked to me and were so nice. My handler said they were police ocers and they sometimes have part ners who are canines too. I knew I like these guys when I snied them! en, sadly, it was time to pack up my bag, jump in my kennel and say goodbye to the big city. It was fun to see all the new stu and meet nice people. But by the end of it I was ready for sleep. I think I slept all the way home puppies sleep a lot! Check back here soon when I share a story about meeting Mr. Bruckenthal, my namesakes father. Life of a Service Dog Part 3 PCU Mississippi goes to home state 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13 high quality students we get at Kings Bay, Schrader told the graduates. You are not among the best students at Brenau Uni versity. Year after year, you are our best students. Brenau previously had a relationship with the Navy at its supply school in Ath ens. Although the facility for training ocers for logis tics operations was locat ed on the campus at the University of Georgia, it was Brenau that became the Navys education part ner there in the 1970s. Brenau was one of the rst colleges in the area to oer evening and week end undergraduate and graduate programs, said former Brenau President John S. Burd, and that was a distinct advantage. You might be able to get a graduate degree at the University of Georgia dur ing regular hours, but if you had a job or were at tending classes for your Navy training during those regular business hours, you needed another op tion. Rear Adm. Patricia Wolfe, who entered the Navy through an ROTC program at her under graduate alma mater, Villanova University, earned an M.B.A. through the Brenau program in Ath ens. Retired Navy Capt. Robert Bjelland earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree at Brenaus Athens campus. Bjelland would later re turn to Brenau at the Kings Bay campus to earn an M.B.A. in 1994. He retired as a captain in the Navy af ter 34 years and now works for the Kootenai County, Wash., sheris depart ment recreational division performing marine and backcountry patrols. But, he said recently, in the Navy a Brenau M.B.A opens a lot of doors. Burd recalled that Bre nau was attempting to expand its weekend pro grams when he became president, but, when the idea of a branch operation at Kings Bay was present ed, it was not an automatic decision to move forward. e Athens location, less than an hours drive from Brenaus main cam pus in Gainesville, was a good t. Faculty could easily move between campuses. Because of the previous experience in Athens, when the Navy began gearing up the sub base, Brenau was a logical part ner. However, Kings Bay was about 300 miles away, Burd said. Faculty were not interchangeable. Brenau trustees, how ever, knowing the Wom ens College, which had been on the Gainesville campus since 1878, would need some help through growth of co-educational programs on other campuses, decided to take the gamble. What the university found was that, ironically, the Kings Bay student prospects, as Schrader acknowledged in his remarks, already collectively represented a very welleducated environment. Many of the sailors and support personnel already had at least techni cal training and under graduate degrees, mostly in technical or scientic disciplines, like nuclear engineering, or like Gale Allens chemistry degree from her undergraduate alma mater. You did not have to sell them on high er education. As Allen explained, she had been trying un successfully to get into NASA for years but had the wrong kind of science background. With the M.B.A., however, she not only quickly got a job with NASA, but also landed on the fast track to top man agement in the national space program. e Brenau program at Kings Bay was a godsend, Allen said. I had always been into science, and it was a totally new direction for me. For a technical person, much of the busi ness curriculum was like Greek. But the professors were great. ey worked with me individually and helped my science brain learn that this accounting stu was just another way of looking at things. Robert L. North Sr., di rector of the Kings Bay campus for Brenau, says the unique Kings Bay dy namic still exists. Youll nd a lot of students here who have to make adjust ments in their careers and get a broader education than they envisioned. Schrader agreed. Brenaus liberal artsbased curriculum is a way for people who are just starting their careers or who, for some reason, need more university-lev el education to broaden their academic creden tials and enhance career prospects, he said. Many of the Kings Bay people are already expe rienced, accomplished students when they come to us. at makes for an excellent academic environment that benets the university because it challenges faculty to be the best they can be, and that, in turn, attracts more good students. Navy College educational information Brenau



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Concern turning to EgyptMilitary holds power in wake of recent democratic elections Millions of Egyptian people voted to elect a new president democratically, but the Egyptian militarys last-minute amendments to the countrys constitution concern the Defense Department, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said in Washington, D.C., June 18. We support the Egyptian people and their expectation that the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces will transfer full power to a democratically elected civilian government, as the SCAF previously announced, Little said in a statement released to reporters. We have, and will continue, to urge the SCAF to relinquish power to civilian-elected authorities and to respect the universal rights of the Egyptian people and the rule of law, he added. Little said the Defense Department is deeply concerned about the new amendments to Egypts constitutional declaration and the timing of the announcement as polls closed for the presidential election. Fieen meet in St. Augustine for dinner on 70th anniversarye Mayport Florida Council hosted the 15th Annual Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner event at the Renaissance Hotel, World Golf Village in St. Augustine on June 9. e annual event honors the Midway survivors who typically travel from great distances like Michigan and Texas to attend. is year, there were 15 Midway Veterans among the more than 830 people in attendance, which is considered the largest Midway celebration nationally. Other notable heroes in attendance were four Midway veteran widows, Medal of Honor recipient Robert Ingram, 12 former prisoners of war, 17 Wounded Warriors and numerous Navy participants from the Normandy Invasion, among other World War II battles. e event also recognized Veterans from the Korean War, Vietnam War and the current war on terror. e guest speaker for the event was Admiral Mark Ferguson, vice chief of Naval Operations who discussed the similarities between the bravery displayed by these special veterans during the Battle of Midway to the heroics of the servicemen and women now servicing in conicts abroad. Admiral Ferguson also provided a State of the Navy by providing an overview of the current operations and how our brave warriors are doing more with less and continue to bring the ght to the enemy. Following Admiral Fergusons discussion, a special memento was presented to each veteran in a very emotional ceremony as each biography was read. Other highlights of the event was a special Full Service Color Guard presentation by members of all six services, including the Merchant Marine, a moving Francis Gary Powers shot down, prisoner of Soviets in 1960More than half a century after his plane was shot down over the Soviet Union, the heroism Air Force Capt. Francis Gary Powers dis played while piloting his U-2 aircraft was recognized during a Pentagon ceremony June 15. Powers, who died in a helicopter crash in 1977, was posthumously awarded the Silver Star the nations third-highest award for combat valor. Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Norton A. Schwartz presented the medal to Powers grandson, Francis Gary Trey Powers and granddaughter Lindsey Berry. e downing of his plane on May 1, 1960 was one of the most famous incidents of the Cold War. Powers was ying a clandestine mission in a U-2 over the former Soviet Union. e program, a Joint Air Force and Central Intelligence Agency mission, was a top-secret eort to monitor Soviet nuclear and missile programs. Powers took o from Peshawar, Pakistan, and headed over the Central Asian Soviet republics. e U-2 cameras gathered invaluable information for the United States and its allies at a time when the Soviet Bear seemed to be on the ascent. e Soviets had launched Sputnik, the worlds rst satellite, in 1957. en running for president, John F. Kennedy deplored the missile gap between the United States and SoUp Periscope What are your plans for summer vacation? Page 9 Old Ironsides USS Constitution crew at Baltimore Navy Week Page 11 Cowboy Up! USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) performs proof of concept Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com USS Floridas Culinary Specialists learn new skills from a Mayport mastere Navy Food Management Team Mayport hosted cake decorating training at the Naval Station Mayports Oasis Galley, May 14 to 18. A dozen local Culinary Specialists attended the training, including four Sailors from Kings Bay home-ported USS Florida (SSGN 728). NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafs CS1 Adrian Dorsey provided the training to the local Culinary Specialists. Dorsey is a renowned cake decorator, and some say one of the most gifted cake decorators in the Navy. It was great opportunity for our local Culinary Specialists to receive handson cake decorating training, said NFMT Mayport Ocer in Charge CSCM Michael Carter. Ive watched him decorate several cakes for change of commands, re-enlistments, and retirement ceremonies. ese were not your ordinary cakes. ey were very detailed and some of the most elaborate designed cakes I have ever seen. Naval Station Mayport Oasis Galley Food Service Ocer Chief Warrant Ocer 4 Wanda Trammell commended Dorsey for his outstanding training. CS1 Dorsey denitely provided a great foundation for those Culinary Specialists who are seeking to become cake decorators, Trammell said. His professional training and knowledge gave these Sailors some great ideas for Icing on the cake . to perfection ... Dorsey in action was like watching an artist ... CSC David Hall USS Florida (SSGN 728) More on Midway Page 10 Midway vets honored Cold War pilot gets Silver Star

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Progressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major appliances from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets includ ing 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. inking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Optical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. From July 1 to Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will offer no interest, no down payment and no payments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, including contact lenses, of $199 or more. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School program. e Command Religious Program of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is located across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Terminal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament accounts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His resurrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and rehearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel ofce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Bible School signup ends June 22Our summer basketball program began Tuesday, June 11 at the fitness complex. We have 13 teams in the league, which is outstanding. There should be a good amount of parity among the teams, and we should be in for some great competition. As with all of our programs, I hope that everyone has a good time on the court and that we keep sportsmanship as the top priority. e games for Week 1 went smoothly. I am very satised with the start of the season. Lets keep this positive momentum rolling into Week 2. I also am starting up our summer volleyball leagues. I will have an indoor league and a sand outdoor league. Registration has begun for both. Participants can register on our Web site at kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com, or come into the sports oce and ll out a roster. e indoor league will be Mondays and the outdoor league will be on Wednesdays. If weather becomes an issue with the outdoor league, I will combine the leagues into one indoor league. anks to all of for making our programs a success. I will continue take your input into consideration to oer the best possible variety of activities to the population of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Summer Basketball StandingsTeam Record PF PA SUBASE Globetrotters 2-0 129 120 USS Georgia Bulldogs 2-0 114 69 No Hope 1-1 66 74 Jaguars 1-1 135 116 Med-Ops 1-1 112 93 USS Tennessee Titans 1-1 65 57 Seabees/Port Ops 1-1 87 85 MCSFBn All-Stars 0-0 --USS Wyoming 0-0 --USS Florida 0-0 --Security 0-0 --MFPU Titans 0-2 92 124 USS Alaska 0-2 51 103Week 1 scoresJune 12USS Georgia Bulldogs 63, Seabees/Ports Ops 37 SUBASE Globetrotters 65, Jaguars 61 USS Tennessee Titans 33, No Hope 16 June 13 USS Georgia Bulldogs 41, USS Tennessee Titans 32 Med-Ops 53, USS Alaska 29 Jaguars 74, MFPU Titans 51 Thursday 6/14 Seabees/Port Ops 50. USS Alaska 22 SUBASE Globetrotters 64, Med-Ops 59 No Hope 50, MFPU Titans 41 Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports CoordinatorSummer basketball season tips oIn an effort to understand civilian perceptions of Americas newest generation of returning Veterans, national nonprofit organization The Mission Continues and Hollywood film and television production company Bad Robot, commissioned a nationwide survey to assess how Americans perceive post-9/11 veterans. is research, entitled A New Generation of Leaders, is the rst of its kind to focus on public perceptions of the nearly 2.4 million military service members who are now returning home since volunteering to serve after 9/11 and who directly supported operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Modeled, in part, after a similar survey conducted in 1979, it reects a marked increase in positive public perception of our nations veterans. In conducting this research, e Mission Continues and Bad Robot retained the bi-partisan polling team of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research and Public Opinion Research Strategies, whose report is available. A number of encouraging conclusions emerged. e public regards these young men and women as future leaders and as community and national assets. Compared to their non-veteran peers, the public nds them more disciplined, having a stronger character and more involved in their communities. ose surveyed clearly recognize that U.S. military service members provide an important public service: 86 percent ranked the veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan as a valuable national asset, on par with reghters (94 percent), nurses (91 percent), and doctors (87 percent) and more than 20 points higher than Supreme Court Justices (64 percent), lawyers (19 percent), politicians (11 percent) and celebrities (5 percent). Several misperceptions, however, surfaced through this research. ose surveyed believe that a majority of veterans have returned home suering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD is certainly a serious concern for post-9/11 veterans. On average two out of 10 veterans will experience some level of PTSD not the levels assumed in the survey respondents. In addition, the public incorrectly assumes that veterans have lower levels of education, a misperception that could impact veteran employment opportunities. According to the Department of Veterans Aairs veterans are actually more likely than their non-veteran peers to have obtained some college education and advanced degrees. Finally, the public believes these men and women have done their part and deserve time to recover; the veterans community, however, understands that what these men and women need most is to serve and lead in their communities. Our veterans appreciate when people say thank you. But in addition to thank you, they need to hear we still need you. ey need to know that when we look at them we see them as assets in strengthening their communities and that we are willing to challenge them to nd a way to continue to be of service. Eric Greitens, CEO, e Mission Continues/former Navy SEAL e country delivers a very clear call to action in this survey. A huge majority believe we are not doing enough to help veterans coming home. A full 58 percent of respondents How post-9/11 vets are perceived Editorial We believe Egypts transition must continue and that Egypt is made stronger and more stable by a successful transition to democracy, he said. Egypt has an enduring role as a security partner and leader in promoting regional stability, and we look forward to working with the new government on a host of issues. Meeting with reporters along with Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. John Kirby, the press secretary said Defense Department ocials remain in close contact with the Egyptian military on the matter, noting that Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta spoke June 15 with Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, leader of Egypts ruling council. We plan to continue to maintain those close contacts and cooperation with the SCAF, Little said. at being said, we need to see where things go. Little said the U.S. and Egypt have maintained a very strong military-tomilitary relationship for many years. We want that to continue, [and] were going to monitor events closely, he said. Its very important to the entire U.S. government, and the U.S. military, that the SCAF take steps to promote a peaceful transition to democracy and a government in Egypt that is responsive to the Egyptian people. Little said the United States has been clear about its position on Egypts transition to a democratically elected government and that he believes the SCAF is fully aware of these concerns. We believe theyve taken those concerns onboard, and theres time for all of this to be sorted out in the right way, he said. Kirby said the Defense Department has enjoyed a strong military-to-military relationship and cooperation with the Egyptian military for more than three decades and believes in maintaining it. Speaking from a purely military perspective, that relationship continues, he said. Its been important.Egypt 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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describe the benets provided to veterans as less than adequate. is is particularly true when it comes to helping these young men and women nd jobs. e public supports incentives for the private sector to hire veterans and by better than a 2:1 margin (62 to 25 percent), the public supports revising the GI Bill to include funding for returning veterans to hone new skills through volunteer service with non-prots in their communities. Bad Robot is proud to partner with e Mission Continues to help advance our understanding of this newest generation of veterans, said J.J. Abrams, founder and president of Bad Robot. Our country needs their stories, expertise, service and leadership now more than ever. We look forward to continuing to work with e Mission Continues and others to ensure our nations veterans have a strong network upon their return home. To download the survey, visit www.missioncontinues.org/newgeneration. From e Mission Continues Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta thanked and praised military fathers for their seless service to the nation in his Fathers Day weekend message. Fathers Day was observed on Sunday, June 17. Here is the text of the secretarys message: As we mark Fathers Day this weekend, Id like to convey my thanks and gratitude to the fathers and grandfathers in our military family. is is a time for all of us to recognize and show our appreciation to fathers for everything they do in bettering our military, securing our nation, helping to raise and nurture our families, and inspiring future generations of Americans to serve. To all fathers in uniform: thank you for your loyalty and dedication to our country, and for your willingness to balance the demands of military and family life. Over the past year as Secretary of Defense, Ive had the opportunity to meet many of you deployed around the world. Ive seen how you focus on the mission while enduring extended periods away from loved ones. rough it all, youve shown courage on the battleeld and tenderness to your families at home. To fathers and husbands of those who serve: we simply could not do our jobs without your love and support. It is never easy to deal with the challenges and concerns of a deployment, just as it is always hard to take care of everything back at home. To all of you, I join your families in saluting you and oering my most heartfelt thanks. You are true heroes in the eyes of your fellow citizens and most especially in the eyes of your children. We honor you as fathers and we will always be thankful for your leadership and your love of family, of service, and of America. U.S. Department of Veterans Aairs clinicians oer a comprehensive review of the health concerns of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans and practical management guidelines for primary care providers in an article entitled, Post Deployment Care for Returning Combat Veterans. e article is published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the of cial journal of the Society of General Internal Medicine. We at VA are always seeking ways to improve the quality of health care we provide to our veterans, Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki said. is article provides valuable insight into the fastest-growing segment of the veteran population at a time they are currently returning from combat. Since September 11, 2001, approximately 2.4 million military personnel have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, according to VA ocials. e health care needs of this particular patient population are complex, ocials said, and require a wellintegrated interdisciplinary approach to care. e article, written by Dr. Juliette F. Spelman, Dr. Stephen C. Hunt, Dr. Karen H. Seal, and Dr. Lucile Burgo-Black, reviews how combat deployments can impact the physical, psychological, and social health of veterans and describes their unique health care needs. is includes the need for assessment and management of injuries associated with blast exposures [including mild traumatic brain injury] as well as mental health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and substance abuse. Other important health concerns discussed include chronic musculoskeletal pain, medically unexplained symptoms, complications from environmental exposures, heightened suicide risk, sleep disturbances, and impairments in family, occupational and social functioning. The article sum marizes evidence which supports elevated frequen cies of physi ological and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension and tobacco use, raising concerns about future health implications for these veterans. In light of relationships between physical, psychological and psychosocial concerns in this population, the VA authors recommend an interdisciplinary approach to care directed toward mitigating the long-term health impacts of combat. is review by VA clinicians will help VA and non-VA health providers oer veterans the best possible care as they return from combat. It aords all the opportunity to develop greater collaboration between VA and community providers to ensure optimal post-deployment care and services for our returning combat veterans and their families. Each VA medical center has a highly specialized Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn care management team in place that coordinates and oversees transition and care for service members and veterans. A dedicated case manager is assigned to work with the service member/veteran and family to screen for case management needs and implement a plan of care to completion, or as long as needed.VA clinician review assists care providers Sec salutes fathersVets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 Midshipmen board Wyoming for professional training while performing routine operations at sea. A V-22 Osprey from Air Force Special Operations Command prepares to perform a proof of concept for personnel evacuation from the Ohioclass ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) June 6. Cowboy Up! USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) performs proof of concept Navy photos by MC1 James KimberCrew members from USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) wait topside for a personnel transfer June 6. Wyoming welcomed aboard a group of mid shipmen from the U.S. Naval Academy. Cmdr. Christopher Nash, USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (Gold), commanding officer, stands topside. Coast Guard Cutter Sea Dog escorts the group. Crew members wait topside for the personnel transfer.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 5 decorating cakes now and in the future. CSC David Hall of USS Florida also complimented Dorsey. Seeing CS1 Dorsey in action was like watching an artist compose one of his best paintings, Hall said. He denitely has a lot of talent, and he displayed it this week. We will denitely take back the knowledge and training he provided this week and use it in the future. All and all, it was a great week of training for everyone. Dorsey said he considers himself extremely lucky to have the opportunity to show his diversity in the Culinary Specialists rating. It has always been my goal to learn and share with other Culinary Specialists the things I have learned, he said. I am thankful to some great leaders who gave me the opportunities to expand my knowledge in my rate. at is something I will always remember. ceremonial presentation of the six-person POW/ MIA table by these same service members, the introduction of the four Midway veteran widows, reading of Robert Ingrams Medal of Honor citation, reading of a short biography of the Midway veterans and former POWs and recognition of the Wounded Warriors from Iraq and Afghanistan who were in attendance. e audience gave numerous standing ovations. e evening concluded with a duet sung by 11 -year-old Faith Miller and a soloist from the Navy Region Southeast Band of Lee Greenwoods song God Bless the USA. e 16th annual Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner, to celebrate the 71st anniversary of this great historical battle, will be held June 1, 2013, using the same venue. e Battle of Midway Committee this for years reunion and dinner consisted of John Vargo, Sandra Barrett, Bill Dudley, Bill and Betty Howard, Karen Turnbull, Becky Luke, Bob Price, George Huchting, Bill Boydstun, Roseanne Jamison, Dane Baird and Bill McLoughlin. Midshipmen visit Cake Midway e pursuit of equality is fundamental to the American story, Defense Secre tary Leon E. Panetta said in a video message released June 15 to thank gay and lesbian service members and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civilians for their dedicated service to the nation. Recognizing June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, the secretary also thanked the families of gay and lesbian service members and LGBT civilians. Diversity is one of the departments greatest strengths, the secretary said. During Pride Month, and every month, let us celebrate our rich diversity and renew our enduring commitment to equality for all, he said. In his video message, Panetta emphasized the militarys diversity. e successful repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell proved to the nation that, just like the country we defend, we share dierent backgrounds, dierent values and dierent beliefs, he said. But together we form the greatest military force in the world. Integrity and respect are the cornerstones of military culture, the secretary added. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force implemented the repeal with a focus on respect and individual dignity, Panetta said. Addressing the service members who now can serve openly regardless of their sexual orientation, the secretary lauded their service before the repeal. Before the repeal of Dont Ask, Dont Tell, he said, you faithfully served your country with professionalism and courage. And just like your fellow service members, you put your country before yourself. Today, he added, they can be proud not only of serving their country, but also of who they are when in uniform. The president also recog nized June as LGBT Pride Month, noting that throughout the nations history, ordinary Americans have advocated for change and have led a proud and inexorable march toward freedom, fairness and full equality under the law not just for some, but for all. As the president signed the repeal act into law in December 2010, he said, We are not a nation that says, dont ask, dont tell. We are a nation that says, Out of many, we are one. We are a nation that wel comes the service of every patriot. We are a nation that believes that all men and women are created equal. ose are the ideals that generations have fought for. ose are the ideals that we uphold today. When the repeal took eect in September 2011, Panetta said anyone who is capable of serving in uniform should be able to do so e New York Mets and the USO hosted the fth an nual Military Appreciation Day on Memorial Day May 28 at Citi Field as part of Fleet Week New York 2012. Held nearly every year since 1984, Fleet Week New York is the citys celebration of the sea services. Fleet Week New York provides an opportunity for the citizens of New York City and the surrounding tri-state area to meet Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, as well as see, rst-hand, the latest capabilities of todays maritime services. Adm. Tim Alexander, commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic, threw the rst pitch. Today were at Citi Field and theyre throwing a big party for us for Military Appreciation Day here with the Mets, Alexander said. e game opened with a performance by the USO Liberty Bells, followed by the National Anthem performed by the U.S. Navy Band Northeast. e Strike Fighter Squadron 15 from Naval Air Station Oceana, homported in Virginia, ew over the eld at the end of the Star-Spangled Banner. Several service members and Delayed Entry Pro gram members also recited the Oath of Enlistment before the start of the game. At the end of the third inning the Mets welcomed veterans by recognizing the veteran of the game. ank you to New York for having us, and thank you to the Mets for giving us awesome seats and letting us meet all the players in the dugout, said Marine Corporal Ronald Smith of 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, Bravo Company, who was the veteran of the game. Were getting treated like celebrities, and it doesnt happen very often, so its been great. More than 6,000 service men and women arrived aboard the ships for Fleet Week New York. is year, Fleet Week New York was one of the signature events around the country commemorating OpSail 2012, the Bicenten nial of the War of 1812 an the Star-Spangled Banner. e anniversary of the War of 1812 is a salute to all Sailors and Marines who fought gallantly in that conict, who served in all our nations conicts since then, and who are defending freedom around the world today. Baseball honors militaryPanetta salutes gays in military

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Steak Night with live music is Friday, July 20 at KB Finnegans. Enjoy a great evening with delicious cooked-to-order ribeyes, baked potato, corn on the cob, macaroni salad, dinner roll and all the xins for only $14.95 in advance or $15.95 at the door. Live entertainment, beer samplings and some great drink specials including happy hour from 5 to 8 p.m. and margaritas $1.50. Drawings will be from the advanced purchased tickets for free dinner. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Open Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes on the golf course will be open for fishing through Outdoor Adventure Center on Friday, July 13, Saturday, July 14 and July 27 and 28. For only $5 per person, you can fish in any of the three lakes at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Kings Bay Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Kings Bay permits. Its open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Under 16 must be accompanied by a parent. Space is limited so register early. Mark your calendar for additional dates: August 10, 11, 24 and 25. Call OAC at (912) 573-8103 for more information. Karaoke is looking for you From 6 to 9 p.m., Thursday, June 21 inside KB Finnegans, host Doug Shankel, from Big Show Entertainment, is looking for some Karaoke fanatics. Enjoy the singing or pick a few songs and sing. Call 912-573-9492 for more infor mation. A Green Note from Morale, Welfare and Recreation MWR is making a change to go green and go paperless. With your help, MWR can achieve this planet-saving goal. Events are posted inside The Periscope and on Facebook. Additionally, a texting program is offered so you can receive instant messages from MWR on what is happening right now. Call (912) 573-4556 for more information on this new, innovative process and become part of making the change. Also, visit www.facebook.com/mwrkingsbay or www.cnic.navy.mil/ kingsbay. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All-American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Run for the Fallen rough Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay. Rack-N-Roll Family Night From 5 to 9 p.m., every ursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Soccer registration for ages 3 to 15 is 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. now through July 30 at the Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. An additional sign-up day is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. Cost is $60 per child for active duty, reservists and $65 per child for retirees, DoD civilians and NSB Kings Bay contractors. Uniforms are included in the cost. Age control date is August 1, 2012, children must turn 3 years old before and cannot be 16 before this date. Late registration for Fall Youth Soccer will be accepted after August 4 at Youth Center for an additional $5, if openings are available. All new players must bring a copy of their birth certicate and proof of eligibility. For more information, call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 SAC Registration for before and after school Four different criteria dates for registration. Returning SAC patrons, CDC pre-K patrons going into kinder garten and single/dual active duty members will begin Monday, July 9; active duty with working or student spouse and DoD civilians may register Monday, July 16; DoD contractors may regis ter Monday, July 23; All oth ers register Monday, July 30. Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For children kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through Aug. 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Soccer signup going Just for kids MWR Steak Night is July 20 Liberty call Dont accept defeat.Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tan trums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, June 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center this month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Individual Augmentee support viet Union. Powers mission was to overy Soviet missile sites, nuclear plants and rocket-launching facilities. Over Sverdlovsk his plane, ying at more than 70,000 feet, was hit by a SA-2 missile and brought down. Soviet forces captured Powers and he was held by the Soviet secret police, the KGB, in Lubyanka Prison in Moscow. e shoot down sharply increased tensions between Washington and Moscow. President Dwight D. Eisenhower had to admit that the United States was ying over another sovereign nation. Protests over this broke out in Japan and Europe. Teams of KGB interrogators worked on Powers to get him to give up information or turn against his country. ey never beat him, but held him in isolation and constantly threatened him with death. Powers spent 21 months in a Moscow prison, Schwartz said. For nearly 107 days, Captain Powers was interrogated and harassed by numerous Soviet secret police interrogation teams, the chief said. Although weakened by lack of food and denial of sleep and mental anguish of constant interrogation, Captain Powers refused all attempts to glean from him sensitive information that would have proved harmful to the defense and security of the United States, Schwartz said. In February 1962, the Soviets exchanged Powers for Soviet spy KGB Col. Rudolph Abel. Powers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 7

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e Navy awarded a $2,381,448,356 contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. May 31, for the detail design and construction of the future USS Tripoli (LHA 7), the Navys next large-deck amphibious assault ship. Im very proud of our NavyIndustry shipbuilding team and the tremendous eort that has culminated in the award of this critical shipbuilding program, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. is ship will ensure that the amphibious eet remains capable of expeditionary warfare well into the 21st century. e ship will be constructed at HIIs Ingalls Operations in Pascagoula, Miss. Ship delivery is expected in scal year 2018. Like the future USS America (LHA 6), LHA 7 has an increased aviation capacity, including an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a signicant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. LHA 7 will use the same gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution and electric auxiliary systems designed and built for USS Makin Island (LHD 8), replacing the maintenance intensive steam plants of earlier amphibious ships. is unique auxiliary propulsion system is designed for fuel eciency. LHA 7 will provide a exible, multi-mission platform with capabilities that span the range of military operations from forward deployed crisis response to forcible entry operations. e ship also will provide forward presence and power projection as an integral part of joint, interagency and multinational maritime expeditionary forces. Tripoli will operate for sustained periods in transit to and operations in an amphibious objective area to include: embarking, transporting, controlling, inserting, sustaining and extracting elements of a marine air-ground task force, and supporting forces by helicopters and tilt rotors supported by joint strike ghter aircraft (F-35B).ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Contract awarded 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Brenau University celebrated more than a quarter century of operations on the Naval Submarine Base when it conducted its 25th commencement exercise for undergraduate students on its Kings Bay campus, June 1. In the 1980s the university commissioned the program at the behest of the Navy. About halfthe members of the student population on the campus are active duty military personnel, members of their families, civilian employees on base, or military retirees, as were members of the 2012 graduating class. We are extremely proud of the relationship that Brenau has enjoyed with the Navy over the years, said the universitys President Ed L. Schrader, who addressed the graduates, friends and families in the Navy bases chapel. And we are honored that many of the ne young men and women who will go forth and serve our country are Brenau graduates. Brenau shares higher education chores on the base with a similar branch of Valdosta State College, whoseinterim president, Louis Levy, delivered the keynote commencement address. e institutions oer compatible, instead of competing, programs at the site along with other partner colleges and universities in the Navy College Program. e 54 graduates who participated in the Friday ceremony will be among the 1,200 alumni who have received diplomas since 1987. Among the early graduates who attended the ceremony was Dr. Gale J. Allen, a Brenau University trustee who is also associate chief scientist for the Life and Microgravity Sciences division of NASA. Allen as a civilian employee of the Navy set up a chemistry lab when the new base rst opened and in 1991 completed a Master of Business Administration degree from Brenau, which she credits with helping her break the glass ceiling in the male-dominated Defense Department and NASA organizations. At the ceremony Schrader recognized Allen, who had been a top sciences student in her pre-Brenau academic career and carried on as top student in the Kings Bay program. She is typical of the Oh boys, for the first time in ages, Ive got summer vacation plans! Im going to my 40th high school class reunion in DeKalb, Illinois. Single girls, look out! Its at one of my best friends farm with a beautiful lake. Then Im going with my daughter and granddaughter to visit my aunt who is recovering from a stroke. Then Ive got a lot of other friends to visit, including a girl I used to tend bar with, and a softball game to see my old team play, even though its mostly my teammates sons now. Sharon Hallett Family member Jacksonville, Fla. We already took our vacation. We went to Key West. Joel Garrido Retired Navy Surigao, Philippines The whole family is going on a Carnival Cruise for a family reunion. Lt. Peter Bugler USS Tennessee Blue Goldendale, Wash. Im flying to San Diego for a couple weeks. Mallory Smith Family member Laurel, Miss. We want to take our daughter to the aquarium and zoo in Atlanta. Nicole Cronkright Family member Schwartz Creek, Mich. Were traveling home to Michigan to see our family. ETCM Matt Suzor Submarine Squadron 20 Temperance, Mich. Were going to Pittsburgh this weekend.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Brenau graduates 54 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 9

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Battle remembered at Midway ceremony Two veterans of the historic Battle of Midway returned to the battle site June 4, to observe the 70th anniversary of the conict credited with changing the course of World War II in the Pacic. John F. Miniclier and Ed Fox were among the Marines who laid their lives on the line against the Japanese attack, triumphing against all odds during the three-day assault in which the Americans were outnumbered and outgunned. As former Secretary of Defense James Schlessinger once said of Midway, e victory occurred despite the inferiority of our aircraft, the ineectiveness of our torpedoes, the substantial absence of backup surface ships and our overall numerical inferiority. e two veterans were among the approximately 150 people who attended the anniversary event at what is now the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet; and Robyn orson, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Pacic Region; addressed the crowd of veterans and their families, military history enthusiasts and the people who work on Midway. is morning as we pay tribute to the greatest generation, we pray that this time of memorial rightly distinguished their honorable service and their courageous sacrice, Haney said. We think about the thousands of young men who over the course of a few short hours paid the ultimate sacrice. e commemoration was sponsored by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has operated the national wildlife refuge since taking responsibility for Midways wildlife in 1988. e Battle of Midway is considered the crucial turning point in the Pacic War. e Japanese lost all four aircraft carriers they had at Midway, preventing their naval forces from being an oensive force; while the U.S. lost only one aircraft carrier of the three they had there, largely due to the success of U.S. Naval intelligence to decode Japanese messages. anks to more than two decades of restoration work, Regional Director orson said, Midway now hosts the worlds largest colony of Laysan albatross and habitat for 18 other species of nesting seabirds, threatened green turtles and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Laysan ducks and Bonin petrels, once driven to near-extinction, now thrive on Midway. is place that was once in the vortex of the long and violent struggle of men longing to be free is now eternally preserved as a place of tranquility, of natural beauty and abundant life, orson said. Miniclier, who was a 20-year old pri vate rst class at the time of the battle, re called how he was stationed atop a 30-foot searchlight control tower where he could see U.S. planes take o for battle, and he could count the incoming enemy planes. He watched as a U.S. plane was shot down and its pilot bailed out and deployed his parachute, only to be gunned by Japanese planes as he fell. I watched that poor guy die, Miniclier said. I made up my mind I was going to make it. Fox, also age 20 and a private rst class at the time of the battle, was stationed in a machine gun bunker in the far corner of the island. He later went on to serve in the invasion of Iwo Jima following his service on Midway. Returning to Midway 70 years later is one of the greatest gifts one could oer a veteran, Fox said. To be able to go back and peruse through ones indelible history is just one wonderful surprise gift. Following the anniversary ceremony, Miniclier and Fox cut the ribbon together on a new exhibit in the refuges visitor center memorializing the famous battle. Haney joined Sailors and American World War II veterans for a small boat oral tribute as they released leis and ower petals in a ceremonial tribute to those who lost their lives 70 years ago. Sailors and civilians assigned to the Joint Information Dominance Corps commemorated one of the most important moments in its history as it remembered the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, June 4 to 7. Navy Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Cyber Forces, Naval Network Warfare Command, Navy Information Operations Command Norfolk and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command personnel remembered their technical predecessors who, in 1942, proved key to the Pacic battle when American cryptologists broke the Japanese radio code in the weeks leading up the attack. eir expertise led to American naval forces defeating the numerically superior Japanese naval forces, putting the enemy on the defensive for the rst time during the war. e annual Battle of Midway commemoration was presented by the JID Chief Petty Ocer Board-Eligible Petty Ocers First Class. Midway rests a little closer to our hearts, said CTN1 Cliord Stout, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command, because cryptanalysis allowed the Navy to be prepared for the ambush that Japanese forces were planning. As information dominance warriors, we recognize that, while Midway was the turning point in the Pacic, it was also a pivotal point for information warfare, Stout said. In April 1942, Japan began plans for an ambush of American naval forces at Midway, 1,500 miles from Hawaii, including the four aircraft carriers missed at the attack on Pearl Harbor six months earlier. e Japanese naval code, known as JN 25, consisted of approximately 45,000 ve-digit numbers, each number representing a word or a phrase. One of the leading code-breakers involved said it was like putting together a jigsaw puzzle with most of its pieces always missing. Leading the code-breaking eort was Station Hypo, the code name for the combat intelligence unit at Pearl Harbor under then-Cmdr. Joseph Rochefort. In the dank, air-conditioned basement where the intelligence teams worked, Rochefort and his sta could work virtually nonstop, and often went for days on a few hours of sleep. By early May, the team was certain that a major enemy operation was being planned at Midway, but Rocheforts superiors in Washington werent convinced. To convince them, the radio station at Midway intentionally sent an unencrypted message falsely reporting that the water distillation plan on the island was broken. Within 48 hours, Station Hypo decrypted a Japanese radio transmission alerting the Japanese commanders that Midway was short of water. Our crypotologic ancestors demonstrated that they were willing to be both persistent and creative when confronted with a challenge, Stout said. en-commander in chief of the Pacic Fleet, Adm. Chester Nimitz, quickly put plans in place to counter the Japanese ambush. ree carriers were positioned northeast of Midway, away from the Japanese forces. eir aircraft, along with landbased Navy and Army Air Corps air power from Midway, sank four Japanese carriers, the entire strength of the task force, with 322 aircraft and 5,000 sailors, as well as a cruiser. America lost 147 aircraft, 300 Sailors and USS Yorktown (CV 5). More important, Japans navy had been stopped and damaged beyond recovery. It is incumbent upon us to sustain the legacy of this signicant battle and pass on to the Sailors who relieve us, said Master Chief Cryptologic Technician Kevin Radzewicz, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Center senior enlisted advisor, that it was the courage and determination of our forces, with a little help from the cryptologists in Station Hypo, that helped us win the Battle of Midway. A ceremonial bugler from the Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek/Fort Story School of Music played taps and a moment of silence commemorated those who died, ending the ceremony. Code breakers remembered Navy honors Pearl veteran e last known Staten Island resident survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack visited Fleet Week New York 2012 at the e Sullivans Pier. Former Chief Boatswains Mate Alf Kongslie and three generations of his family visited Fleet Week and were treated to a tour of the pier and USS San Jacinto (CG-56) as a small token of their gratitude for his service. Seventy-one years ago, Kongslie was a crewmember aboard USS Saint Louis (CL-49) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Kongslie thought his Sunday routine began like any other. I saw guys going across the harbor in a liberty boat, Kongslie, 91, said. I gured they were going to church. en I saw them jumping o into the water. I didnt know what was going on. What happened was the Japanese attack on the U.S. Pacic Fleet that would pull the United States in to World War II. During the confusion of the attack, he did his best to remain calm and perform his duties during the emergency. I kept trying to climb my way up ladders to get to my battle station, but guys kept knocking me o coming down the other way, he said. I nally got to my station and got to work. After the attack, Kongslie continued serving in the Navy until 1947. We were honored to have Mr. Kongslie and his family here today, said Navy Lt. Jared Jalbert, Fleet Week Staten Island ocer in charge. It was a great experience to show our appreciation to such a distinguished veteran. Cmdr. Rick Potter, executive ocer of San Jacinto, met Kongslie and his family to personally present the World War II veteran a San Jacinto command ball cap and challenge coin before bonging him aboard the ship. I never thought Id ever see a boatswain chief bonged aboard a ship, Kongslie said with tears in his eyes. During the ships tour, crewmembers and civilians alike constantly approached Kongslie to shake his hand and thank him. Its a real honor to meet you, sir, said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jennifer omas. I just wanted to say thank you for your service. Im thankful for yours, Kongslie humbly replied before adding with a grin, Where were gals like you in the eet 70 years ago? 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Crew visits Baltimore Sailors assigned to USS Constitution participatedin Baltimore Navy Week as part of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 commemoration taking place there June 11 to 19. Constitution Sailors had multiple visits with local veterans planned, and performed War of 1812era gun drills and 17th century boarding pike drills daily in the vicinity of USS Constellation. We are excited about continuing the 1812 Bicentennial in Baltimore, said Cmdr. Matthew Bonner, Constitutions 72nd commanding ocer. It is a city with a rich history, especially during the War of 1812, and it has warmly welcomed us during previous Navy Weeks. We are looking forward to the opportunity to share the ships rich history and its Sailors with the people of the city as well as the other ships that are supporting the event. Sailors were scheduled to help those in need at Lock Raven Veterans Association Community Living Center and Hospice, the Ronald McDonald House of Baltimore, and serve food at Our Daily Bread soup kitchen. Additionally, they were to visit the Hartford County Boy Scouts Camp to pro vide mentorship and share their professional experiences with youth there. Navy weeks are an amazing opportunity to share the ships history and the mission of todays Navy with people from all over the country, said Boatswains Mate 1st Class (SW) Christopher Haws. I am truly honored to participate in Baltimores celebration because the city, much like Boston, was an integral factor in establishing our Navys foundation. Baltimore was the fth of eight Navy Weeks Constitution Sailors are scheduled to participate in throughout 2012, celebrating the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Baltimore Navy Week was held in conjunction with the citys Star-Spangled Sailbration, a festival that hosted a series of tall ships and the Navy Blue Angels. e primary purpose of Navy Week is to increase Navy awareness by presenting the Navy to Americans who live in cities that normally do not have a signicant naval presence. Baltimore Navy Week showcased the mission, capabilities and achievements of the U.S. Navy and provide residents the opportunity to meet Sailors rsthand. Constitution is the worlds oldest commissioned warship aoat and welcomes more than 500,000 visitors per year. She defended the sea lanes against threat from 1797 to 1855, much like the mission of todays Navy. Constitutions mission today is to oer community outreach and education about the ships history. Under SecNav keynotes forum At the U.S. Naval War Colleges 63nd annual Current Strategy Forum, Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work told more than 900 students and invited guests that the U.S. Navy is entering a golden era of seapower during a keynote speech, June 12. Despite dicult economic challenges around the world, Work was optimistic about a strategic shift and focus toward Asia-Pacic and reected on how the Navy and Marine Corps team transitions from todays conicts and positions itself for the challenges of tomorrow. Our strategic concept and our organizational construct is precisely aligned with the strategic requirements for the 21st century, he said. It is hard to imagine a more maritime friendly strategic environment. Work discussed the connection between Americas national security and its economy. To explain the interconnection, Work said the nation has not been in a situation like this since the early 1950s when President Eisenhower was in oce. He pointed out that the country is at a strategic inection point where the post Iraq and Afghanistan military drawdown is occurring at the same time that public debt is increasing. One thing that is very much dierent about this drawdown than the other drawdowns in our history is you cant buy as much with $700 billion as you could at $550 billion, he said. ings cost more so the Navy will emphasize capability over capacity. e importance and continued need for a strong nation was emphasized throughout his talk. e tenets of American sea power on world economic growth are as valid today as when Adm. Alfred ayer Mahan wrote e Inuence of Seapower on History, in 1890. Oceans are central to the economy, which means they are central to our national strategy, Work said. Ready reliable information, secure nances, stable economies, and free global trade depend upon the free navigation of the oceans. In keeping with the theme of this years CSF, Sustaining US Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense Work emphasized the Navy-Marine Corps teams importance to a national strategy focused on securing the economic interests of the U.S. is is a warghting Navy and Marine Corps, Work emphasized. e Navy-Marine Corps team is built and ready for war and will continue to operate forward to help preserve the peace, protect America, allied and global interests, and assure freedom of access in peace and war. is year marks the 63rd annual CSF hosted by the Secretary of the Navy. e rst CSF held on May 9, 1949, under the title Round Table Talks offered an opportunity for the nations public servants, scholars, and senior military ocers to join the College faculty and students to discuss the future strategy of the United States. Over the decades, the forum has expanded to include a cross section of Americas civilian leadership to encourage a wide-ranging debate on national and international security. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 11

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Pre-Commissioning Unit Mississippi (SSN 782) received a hearty welcome when the Navys newest Virginia-class attack submarine arrived in Pascagoula on May 25. PCU Mississippi and her crew of 145 ocers and enlisted Sailors arrived in Pascagoula to prepare for the submarines commissioning on June 2. As we approached the Port of Pascagoula during the early morning hours and watched the sun rise over the Gulf of Mexico, I was humbled in knowing that we are embarking on a truly amazing commissioning week that we and the state of Mississippi will always remember, said Capt. John McGrath, PCU Mississippis commanding ocer. PCU Mississippi and her crew are excited to be in our namesake state and are looking forward to our commissioning on June 2. When the ninth Virginia-class submarine is commissioned, McGrath will become the submarines rst commanding ocer. McGrath and his crew are considered plank owners, a term dating back to the days of the wooden ships. I didnt realize at rst the signicance of being a plank owner, said McGrath. Now, as I look around and see how every facet of our ships dayto-day operations were developed by the team, I understand why being a plank owner is a big deal. Chief Culinary Specialist Ryan Christianson, who has served aboard PCU Mississippi since May 2011, echoed the commanding ocers sentiment on the importance of serving as a plank owner in ones naval career. Its denitely a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity for me, Christianson said. It is truly special because not many others will have an opportunity to do this and set the initial standard for the rest of the future Mississippi Sailors to follow. PCU Mississippi joins historical company with the four previous ships that have shared the proud name of the state. Christianson reected on the milestone event for the attack submarine and her crew. It is denitely signicant to participate in this opportunity because it is a memory only the initial crew can share, Christianson said. e rst Mississippi, a paddle frigate commissioned on Dec. 22, 1841, was the rst ship of the United States to bear the name of the state Mississippi. e second Mississippi (BB 23), a 13,000-ton battleship, was launched on September 1905 and commissioned at Philadelphia Navy Yard on Feb. 1, 1908. e third Mississippi (BB 41), a New-Mexico class battleship, was commissioned in 1917 and served in the Pacic in World War II. e fourth Mississippi (CGN 40), a Virginia-class, nuclear powered guidedmissile cruiser, was commissioned on Aug. 5, 1978 by then-President Jimmy Carter. Nathan visits NYCVeterans Moving Forward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As an assistance dog in training not only do I have to have mastery of many commands around 30 before I am a year old, but I have to be exposed to just about anything and everything so nothing unexpected will happen when I am with the person I will be assisting. So far, a lot of my training life has been learning about all the things in the world sounds, shapes, smells, touches. My handler tries to show me something new every day. She is kind of my best friend and is good to me so I trust her. She makes doing new things fun. My organization, Veterans Moving Forward, is a new organization so they are seeking sources of funding so they can raise lots of pups like me to help wounded veterans. Because a foundation in New York City wanted to learn about helping veterans they asked to meet me! My human handler felt I was ready for the challenge, so o we were to New York! e ride did not seem very long. I slept through most of it in my comfortable kennel. It was dark when we stopped in front of this very big building where a nice man in a crisp gray coat helped me out of the car and carried the bag with all my food and toys. Gosh, there were so many lights everywhere and lots of people walking every which way. Iit was a little confusing at rst. My handler gave me a hug, said I was doing great and reminded me of what a special pup I was getting to stay in a very nice place. She called it a hotel in the big city. So I walked with her through these funny moving doors into this big room. Lots of people stared at me as I walked across the big room. My paws slipped on the shiny oor and I had to really work to not fall down. Next we took a long ride in an elevator. I know what those are cause I ride them at my handlers ofce. When we got to our room, I walked around it and snied everything. en took my things out of my bag. I grabbed my girae and was only going to cuddle for a minute but I fell asleep. I woke up early the next morning and had my rst breakfast in Manhattan, then got ready to go outside. Up until now I have not mentioned too much about the commands I have learned. Well, one of them is a word that lets me know it is ok to urinate or pee to you and me cause humans believe there are some places I am supposed to pee and some places I am just not supposed to pee. Do you know how long it takes to get out of a 15th oor hotel room and nd some grass in Manhattan? Well, it seemed like f-or-e-v-e-r to me, given my tiny bladder. Later that morning on our way to the foundation I heard a sound that I had heard as a little puppy. We moved toward the sound and it got louder. When we were right next to the sound I stopped to look at it. I had heard the sound but never saw this motion with it. My handler said it was called a jack hammer. e man who was holding it made funny motions but smiled and waved at me when I stopped to look at him. You see when I was just a little puppy and with my litter mates and mom, Jasmine, my human mom would play noises for us. So while some pups may be afraid of loud or wailing noises I associate these noises with the warmth and comfort of my rst home, so they dont scare me. I think no big deal. We got to our meeting at the foundation on Park Avenue after so many blocks. Everyone was so impressed with my napping under the table during the meeting. Little did they know that it was my usual morning nap time. ey invited me into an oce with windows that went from the oor to the ceiling and you could see lots of buildings and the cars and people looked so little down on the street. en it was time to go. On the way back to the hotel, we walked up to some men in uniforms. ey pet me, talked to me and were so nice. My handler said they were police ocers and they sometimes have partners who are canines too. I knew I like these guys when I snied them! en, sadly, it was time to pack up my bag, jump in my kennel and say goodbye to the big city. It was fun to see all the new stu and meet nice people. But by the end of it I was ready for sleep. I think I slept all the way home puppies sleep a lot! Check back here soon when I share a story about meeting Mr. Bruckenthal, my namesakes father. Life of a Service Dog Part 3 PCU Mississippi goes to home state 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 21, 2012 13 high quality students we get at Kings Bay, Schrader told the graduates. You are not among the best students at Brenau University. Year after year, you are our best students. Brenau previously had a relationship with the Navy at its supply school in Athens. Although the facility for training ocers for logistics operations was located on the campus at the University of Georgia, it was Brenau that became the Navys education partner there in the 1970s. Brenau was one of the rst colleges in the area to oer evening and weekend undergraduate and graduate programs, said former Brenau President John S. Burd, and that was a distinct advantage. You might be able to get a graduate degree at the University of Georgia during regular hours, but if you had a job or were attending classes for your Navy training during those regular business hours, you needed another option. Rear Adm. Patricia Wolfe, who entered the Navy through an ROTC program at her undergraduate alma mater, Villanova University, earned an M.B.A. through the Brenau program in Athens. Retired Navy Capt. Robert Bjelland earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree at Brenaus Athens campus. Bjelland would later return to Brenau at the Kings Bay campus to earn an M.B.A. in 1994. He retired as a captain in the Navy after 34 years and now works for the Kootenai County, Wash., sheris department recreational division performing marine and backcountry patrols. But, he said recently, in the Navy a Brenau M.B.A opens a lot of doors. Burd recalled that Brenau was attempting to expand its weekend programs when he became president, but, when the idea of a branch operation at Kings Bay was presented, it was not an automatic decision to move forward. e Athens location, less than an hours drive from Brenaus main campus in Gainesville, was a good t. Faculty could easily move between campuses. Because of the previous experience in Athens, when the Navy began gearing up the sub base, Brenau was a logical partner. However, Kings Bay was about 300 miles away, Burd said. Faculty were not interchangeable. Brenau trustees, however, knowing the Womens College, which had been on the Gainesville campus since 1878, would need some help through growth of co-educational programs on other campuses, decided to take the gamble. What the university found was that, ironically, the Kings Bay student prospects, as Schrader acknowledged in his remarks, already collectively represented a very welleducated environment. Many of the sailors and support personnel already had at least technical training and undergraduate degrees, mostly in technical or scientic disciplines, like nuclear engineering, or like Gale Allens chemistry degree from her undergraduate alma mater. You did not have to sell them on higher education. As Allen explained, she had been trying unsuccessfully to get into NASA for years but had the wrong kind of science background. With the M.B.A., however, she not only quickly got a job with NASA, but also landed on the fast track to top management in the national space program. e Brenau program at Kings Bay was a godsend, Allen said. I had always been into science, and it was a totally new direction for me. For a technical person, much of the business curriculum was like Greek. But the professors were great. ey worked with me individually and helped my science brain learn that this accounting stu was just another way of looking at things. Robert L. North Sr., director of the Kings Bay campus for Brenau, says the unique Kings Bay dynamic still exists. Youll nd a lot of students here who have to make adjustments in their careers and get a broader education than they envisioned. Schrader agreed. Brenaus liberal artsbased curriculum is a way for people who are just starting their careers or who, for some reason, need more university-level education to broaden their academic credentials and enhance career prospects, he said. Many of the Kings Bay people are already experienced, accomplished students when they come to us. at makes for an excellent academic environment that benets the university because it challenges faculty to be the best they can be, and that, in turn, attracts more good students. Navy College educational information Brenau