<%BANNER%>

The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-14-2012 )

DARK ITEM
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00257

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00257


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Caldwell guest speaker at Change of Command June 8 at Point LomaA pier side change of command cer emony was held for Commander, Sub marine Squadron 11; and Commander, Submarine Forces U. S. Pacic Fleet Rep resentative West Coast, aboard Los Ange les-class submarine USS San Francisco (SSN 711), June 8. Capt. omas Ishee relieved Capt. Richard Correll as commanding ocer. Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet Rear Adm. James F. Caldwell Jr. was the guest speaker at the ceremony. He congratulated Correll on a job well done and remarked that Ishee comes to Submarine Squadron 11 with impressive credentials and many successes. I look forward to serving with you and to supporting the crews of Squadron 11 units, who proudly serve our great coun try, Ishee said. While under Corrells command, Squadron 11 oversaw submarines de ployed to the Arabian Gulf, Western Pa cic, Southern Pacic and the Arctic. Correll also oversaw the successful implementation of the East Pacic Integrat ed Training Syndicate initiative, which has greatly enhanced Anti-Submarine Warfare training in the ird Fleet. Ishee thanked Correll for his thorough turnover and commended his successful command tour. Congratulations on a truly outstand ing tour as Squadron 11s commodore, and best of luck to you on your follow-on assignment, Ishee said. Corrells next assign ment will be director, Submarine Ocer Dis tribution, Navy Personnel Command in Mil lington, Tenn. Ishee entered the submarine force in February 1988, with early sea tours aboard USS Sea Devil (SSN 664), USS Narwhal (SSN 671), USS Tunny (SSN 682) and USS La Jolla (SSN 701). He reported as commanding ocer of USS Key West (SSN 722) in March 2006, where the ship completed a Western Pacic deployment, earned a Battle Ef ciency E award, and was awarded the Pacic Fleet Arleigh Burke Trophy. He later served as director of Opera tions for Commander, Submarine Group 7. Most recently, he managed the U.S. Pa cic Command portfolio of plans for the Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. Submarine Squadron 11 is located aboard Naval Base Point Loma in San Di ego and consists of six Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered attack submarines, three Torpedo Retriev ers, and a oating drydock. e squadron sta is responsible for providing training, ma terial and personnel readiness support to the six submarines. THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope June celebrations ... do you observe any? Page 9 Wet & wild Damage Control Olympics test NSB personnel skills Page 4 Play ball! Homer Atlanta Braves host USS Georgia Gold Page 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com TTF, Alaska Gold break NSB military blood drive recordLast month, Americans all over the country celebrated Memorial Day in their own ways. Some laid owers at the grave sites of fallen family members and friends. Others had their rst barbecue of the season. Here on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, more than 20 commands participated in the Memorial Day Armed Ser vices Blood Program drive, donating 268 units of blood to forward operating eet hospitals. is topped Kings Bays drive last December by 30 units. Success was due in large part to several commands that made the drive a top priority. Among the shore com mands, top participation went to Trident Training Fa cility. More than 77 service members assigned to TTF came out to support the blood drive, and although ultimately not all were able to donate, the intention was clear. For many, the fact that their blood donation was going to wounded Sailors, Soldiers and Marines on the front line in Af ghanistan was all the incentive they needed. TTF Commanding Of cer Capt. Rod Hutton agreed. To have the opportu nity to directly support Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines who are serving all around the globe was an absolute honor for TTF Kings Bay, he said. Providing a life line to those who put their lives in jeopardy for our country is the least that we can do. Among the boat com mands, the USS Alaska (SSBN 732) Gold crew was the win Providing a life line ... is the least we can do. Capt. Rod Hutton Commanding officer, TTF Big turnout for military blood drive Up, up and away Ishee relieves Correll onboard Sub Squadron 11 Region getting new call centerNSB Kings Bay to be added Oct. 1 during Phase II upgrade A ribbon cutting ceremony was June 4 at Naval Facilities En gineering Command Southeast to ocially celebrate the open ing of its new Regional Call Cen ter projected to provide a $1.2 million annual savings. e Call Center started oper ations on Jan. 30 servicing Naval Air Station Key West, Fla., and on April 2 for NAS Corpus Chris ti, Texas to implement the new program, said Brian deLumeau, RCC program manager. Service to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will be added on July 1 to complete Phase I of the program. Phase II will begin Oct. 1 by adding Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, NAS Kingsville, Tex as, and Joint Reserve Base Ft. Worth, Texas. Phase III begins Oct. 1, 2013 at which time the remaining bases in the Southeast region includ ing JRB New Orleans, La.; Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Miss.; NAS Pensacola, Fla.; NAS Whiting Field, Fla.; Na

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. VA official at June 19 MOAAWalter Williams of the Department of Veterans Affairs will be the guest speaker at the June 19 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Officers of America Association, starting at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Cost of dinner is $19. RSVP date is June 15, with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@ tds.net.NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, through June 17, with the following schedule of events: ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a prepared ness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take ad vantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no pay ments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Pro gressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major applianc es from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets including 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24hour customer service including online access. inking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Op tical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. From July 1 to Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will oer no interest, no down payment and no payments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, including contact lenses, of $199 or more.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School pro gram. e Command Religious Pro gram of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 22, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is lo cated across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Ter minal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament ac counts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His res urrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and re hearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command repre sentative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel of ce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities avail able. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bi ble Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Vacation Bible School ies June 25 Within two weeks of being an nounced, the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program for eligible un employed veterans had received more than 12,000 online applica tions, according to the Department of Veterans Aairs. VA is committed to supporting veterans as they seek employment. is initiative will help provide education and training so that vet erans have an opportunity to nd meaningful employment in a highdemand eld, Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki said in a VA news release issued May 31. We will continue to build on the success of our initial outreach eorts to veter ans. e Veteran Retraining Assistance Program allows qualifying veterans between the ages of 35 and 60 to re ceive up to 12 months of education assistance. Maximum payment under VRAP is currently $1,473 monthly. Un der VRAP, veterans apply on a rstcome, rst-served basis for pro grams that begin on or after July 1. VA began accepting applications on May 15. Forty-ve thousand veterans can participate during the current scal year, and up to 54,000 may participate during the scal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. e goal of the program is to train 99,000 veterans for high-demand jobs over the next two years. Veter ans are encouraged to visit the near ly 3,000 VA career centers located across the nation for assistance from sta, local employment represen tatives, and disabled veterans out reach program specialists.Veterans initiative drawing interest Veterans Aairs Energy is the essence of life. Every day you decide how youre going to use it by knowing what you want and what it takes to reach that goal, and by maintaining focus. Oprah WinfreyA common excuse not to exer cise is lack of energy. Yet research shows that regular physical activity can provide an energy boost. I see this in my own life often. For instance, last week on one of those dreary, rainy days we had, I was feeling sluggish and fatigued. When it came time to teach an aerobics class that evening, I wondered how I would ever nd the energy to do it. But by the time the warmup was complete, I was already feeling that surge of energy I had been missing all day. It felt great to be moving and sweating. It was just what I needed. In our society where coee, energy drinks and even supplements are used liberally as a way to get us through the day, it is no wonder that so many people fail to utilize ex ercise as a natural source of energy. Yet strengthening our bodies through daily exercise, making our heart, lungs, and mus cles stronger, is an eective way to supply ourselves with energy for our daily activities. We can create the energy we want by simply adopting a healthier lifestyle. Many workplaces have adopted the practice of taking physical activity breaks throughout the day, which give employees the opportunity to recharge. Stepping out of the oce to take a brisk walk or break ing up a monotonous task with small bouts of exercise can provide the boost of energy that is needed to stay productive. Schools also have started us ing physical activity breaks in the classroom as a way to incorporate exercise into the school day. With nancial cuts impacting physical education, it is imperative that we nd creative ways to get kids moving, such as by encouraging teachers to use exercise as a learning tool. Mak ing exercise routine, yet fun for our youth will go a long way in helping them understand and experience the benets of daily physical activity. e next time you are ghting fatigue, instead of reaching for another cup of coee, grab your sneakers and get moving. Find a consistent workout routine and engage in exercise you enjoy. Incorporate physical activity breaks into your work day and make it a point to move as much as possible throughout the day. By choosing to get energized with exercise, you can experience the numerous health benets that daily physical activity can provide. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Create energy to get what you want Naval Supply Systems Command Global Logistics Support Household Goods services initiated social media campaign June 4 to reach out to customers and further reduce con fusion and make a household move easier on families. HHG is now employing the public Web, YouTube and Facebook, to un ravel some of remaining mystery as sociated with moving, shipping and storing household goods. Our No. 1 goal is easing the whole moving process for families mov ing across the country or around the world, said Deborah McGlen non, program manager, Household Goods and Global Distance Support Center in San Diego. We believe our Web presence, plus YouTube and Facebook Fan Page will pro vide relevant and interesting infor mation to NAVY service members and civilians initiating a household goods move. In addition, the You Tube Channel provides custom ers with instructions to set up their household goods move using the Defense Personal Property System. McGlennon said even as the pro cess incorporated www.move.mi and the Defense Personal Property Household goods add social media Navy Supply

PAGE 3

A Green Note from Morale, Welfare and Recreation to you. MWR is making a change to go green and go paperless. With your help, MWR can achieve this planet-saving goal. Events are posed inside e Periscope and on Facebook. Additionally, a texting program is oered so you can receive instant mes sages from MWR on what is happening right now. Call (912) 573-4556 for more information on this new innovative process and become part of the change. Also, visit www.facebook.com/ mwrkingsbay or www.cnic.navy. mil/kingsbay. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admission, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free gen eral admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Dive-In Movie At the Kings Bay Pool Complex, start ing at 7 p.m., Saturday, June 16 its fee admission for the feature lm Adventures of Tin-Tin (rated PG) on the outdoor theater. Bring your own oating device for the movie. Hot dogs, chips and drink will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-3001. Run for the Fallen Between June 14 Aug. 21, par ticipants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit the Facebook page @ www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay Rack-N-Roll Family Night Starting on ursday, June 21, from 5 to 9 p.m., every Thursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Navy General Services Administration Expo You are invited from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., June 19 at the Kings Bay Conference Center for a great Expo. If you are a government card holder or an end user this Expo is for you. Discover what GSA has to oer. Check out over 100 GSA vendors. Lunch will be provided. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. In cludes registration, instruc tions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camp. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fri days, except weekends and holidays. For more infor mation call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Fall Soccer Registration For ages 3 to 15 is 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. now through July 30 at the Youth Center, except holidays and weekends An additional sign-up day is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. Cost is $60 per child for active duty, reservists and $65 per child for retirees, DoD civilians and NSB Kings Bay contractors. Uniforms are included in the cost. Age control date is August 1, 2012, children must turn 3 years old before and cannot be 16 before this date. Late registration for Fall Youth Soccer will be accepted after August 4 at Youth Center for an additional $5, if openings are available. All new players must bring a copy of their birth certificate and proof of eligibility. For more infor mation, call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 SAC Registration for before and after school Four different criteria dates for registration. Returning SAC patrons, CDC pre-K patrons going into kinder garten and single/dual active duty members will begin Monday, July 9; active duty with working or student spouse and DoD civilians may register Monday, July 16; DoD contractors may regis ter Monday, July 23; All oth ers register Monday, July 30. Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 16, 17 Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief; June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For chil dren kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through August 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Soccer camp coming Just for kids MWR is now Going Green Liberty call System, the process can still be a bit daunting. e YouTube and FaceBook sites are designed to ease families into the move.mil and DPS process. It will be like pre-learning designed to familiarize fami lies with how these systems operate and integrate, she said. You can subscribe now to the HHG YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/Na vyHH and for tips, updates and additional information, make sure to like our Facebook Fan Page at www.facebook.com/ pages/NAVY-HouseholdGoods/294799990565426. In addition, the Navy Household Goods Web page also provides customers with information on getting start ed with their move, entitlements and contact informa tion. Check out www/navsup/ navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/ navsupgls/prod_serv/house hold. Finally, in addition to leav ing comments on our social media pages, you can e-mail householdgoods@navy.mil.Social THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Cpl. Jedediah Johnson of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion nears the finish line during a tie breaker race with USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold). Inset, from left, the winning team from Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic of HMC Roy Holder, MTC Kevin Hatcher, MTCS John Jenssen, MTC Delvason Weldon, MTCM Gary Aston, Lt. Travis Garland and MTC Jules Alarcon. Johnson gets a lead on MM1 Jason Tomes of USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold). Spray is used to move a ball on a line. Damage Control OlympicsLeft, Lance Cpl. Daniel Myers and Lance Cpl. Kyle Falkenstein of Security Force Battalion work together to push a ball down a tug-of-war line using only a charged hose. The nozzleman is required to be blindfolded to simulate visibility during a shipboard fire. Below, USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold) team member CS2 Cedric Johnson directs his blindfolded teammate, MM3 Robert Diaz, dur ing the annual Damage Control Olympics at Trident Training Facility June 1. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 5 When Chief Aviation Machinists Mate Anthony Hughes received news in November 2011, that he was on the Enlisted Reten tion Board list he felt like his life was over. I remember my CO (commanding ocer) sit ting me down and saying Chief, Ive got some bad news, and I immediately knew what was coming, Hughes said. His commanding of cer informed him of his selection for ERB, which angered him. I felt like I had honored my part of the bargain, and the Navy had just backed out on the deal, Hughes said. Instead of giving up or feeling sorry for himself, Hughes said he quickly accepted the news and started looking toward the future. I literally knew exactly what I had to do at that very moment; from that day on my only mission was to get my family back home, so I could get a new job ASAP, he said. Hughes is one of 2,946 Sailors chosen for sepa ration by the ERB in late 2011, all of whom were from a list of approxi mately 16,000 records the board reviewed to help reduce manning and meet quotas in various rates across the eet. With record-high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors, the Navy became over manned by greater than 103 percent in 31 of 84 rat ings, resulting in increased competition and reduced advancement opportunities for strong-performing Sailors to re-enlist. e ERB was introduced to allow the Navy to achieve stability and t across the force while re taining balance based on seniority, skills, and expe rience. Chief of Naval Op erations Adm. Jonathan Greenert explained in his ocial blog that, ERB re duces overall manpower by reducing the number of Sailors in overmanned ratings through conver sions and separations. Navy leadership real ized; however, that while the ERB was fair and nec essary for the needs of the Navy, it also left Sailors with questions and con cerns for their future. e ERB and follow-on transition process have my full attention, wrote Greenert, we are putting great eorts to ensure the ERB process is being con ducted professionally and fairly. More importantly, we look to ensure that the means for transition is clear, broadly applied, open and readily available. For Hughes, that mes sage couldnt have been clearer. I knew I couldnt mess around, he said. With a wife and two small kids, I have mouths to feed and bills to pay. ere was no way I was going to let this situation mess up my fam ily and our way of life, and as it turned out, neither was the Navy. Soon after Hughes received the news, a repre sentative from Challenger, Gray and Christmas, a rm contracted by the Navy to provide extensive transition services for ERB Sailors, reached out to him and began working with him on his life after active duty. One thing that I really needed to work on was Memorial Day with the Braves ner with 29 donors. Cmdr. Robert Wirth, commanding ocer of Alaska Gold, not only actively promot ed the drive, but donated a pint himself. Support among the leadership really made the dierence in this years drive, said Capt. Phillip OConnell, senior medical ocer at the Kings Bay Branch Medical Clinic. We saw a great increase in donors and competi tion among the boats. Right until the last hour of the drive, we werent sure if the (USS) Georgia (SSGN 729) or Alaska crew would win. Members of the Ft. Gor don ASBP were thrilled with the results and en thusiasm of the commu nity here in Kings Bay and are already planning for the team to return in early December. e support we received from donors, from the commands, and from volunteers was outstanding said Erin Hawkins, ASBP donor recruiter. We appreciate everyone who gave their time and lifesav ing blood to care for our troops and their families. e ASBP team also plans to make the Memo rial Day drive an annual event, in the hopes that it will continue to grow. e blood collected was tested and shipped within days to forward operating eet hospitals as part of Ft. Gordons weekly shipments. Because blood is per ishable and may be needed at any time, it must be collected regularly. Many of our wounded service members require more than 40 units of blood for a single surgery, making the need for blood always great. Although travel to cer tain areas, some medica tions and medical conditions can temporarily or permanently restrict do nation, most healthy adults are eligible to do nate blood. Since ASBPs inception more than 50 years ago, more than 1.5 million units of blood have been provided to treat battleeld illnesses and injuries. In addition to providing blood in combat situa tions for those in need, the ASBP also supports the peacetime needs of military personnel and their families. As a joint opera tion among the military services (Navy, Army, Air Force), the ASBP has many components working to gether to collect, process, store, distribute and trans fuse blood worldwide. For more information on the ASBP visit www. militaryblood.dod.mil.Drive val Support Activity Pan ama City, Fla.; and NSA Orlando, Fla. e center is where all emergency and rou tine service calls will be handled for Navy bases from Texas to Georgia and south to Key West, Fla., as well as their associated Navy Reserve Centers. We expect the center to provide eciency through work accomplished with less people saving an es timated $1.2 million per year, deLumeau said. Service calls will be received at the center from each respective Public Works Department or a representative appointed on the base. e RCC sta will pro cess the request through a Navy data management program and forward to a base operating system contract dispatch center or the PWD Shop at each base to have the work completed. e call center is on board NAS Jacksonville and managed by NAV FAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line and is staed by full-time gov ernment employees on a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week basis, beginning July 1. Currently, eight PWDs have in-house trouble desks and six have BOS operated trouble desks. ese separate call cen ters are estimated to con tain the cost equivalent of 40 positions, costing approximately $3 million per year. We believe that the new RCC can operate with 18 employees by regionalizing the work to this sin gle location, deLumeau said. e new program will also provide improved data integrity through quality control and one streamlined process throughout the region. e team is getting posi tive responses from their customers and dont even notice that the move has been made to Jacksonville. People call us directly on our toll-free number or e-mail us at our pub lic e-mail account, said Anne Rush who works in the RCC. My old custom ers didnt realize that I had relocated and moved when I tell them that I am working out of the oce in Jacksonville. e Regional Call Cen ter set up required proper facilities, computer equip ment and a phone system capable of receiving calls and evenly distributing them among the call cen ter employees. is was done by devel oping a round-robin type phone system which will ring service desk phones sequentially to distribute the workload. Each computer is sup plied with two monitors to allow multiple programs to open and fully viewable and a hands free handset. is was anticipated to speed up the process and allow for more accurate data transfers. e computers access the Navys Geographic Information System that gives operators access to maps and overhead photographs to pin point locations. Historically, NAVFAC Southeast had issues with the manning a Call Center at each base. Opera tional procedures were as diverse as the number of bases. Six bases had contractor operated call centers and some in-house workforces were also used. erefore, dier ent procedures were used, dierent approval systems and distribution of costs associated with calls. e Regional Call Cen ter provides proper train ing and consistent oper ating procedures to avoid old pitfalls, deLumeau said. Now appropriate chains of approval will be used to ensure consisten cy with processing calls and associated costs with associated repairs. deLumeau said that as they attain full steady state, the Regional Call Center will handle over 175,000 trouble calls annually. Region ere is life aer ERB

PAGE 6

Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sug gestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A mini mum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center this month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintain ing and providing current infor mation on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and mainte nance of sexual assault data. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the informa tion and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 21. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. New Moms and Dads Support 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 7

my resume, I was taking action on all other areas of my life, from my move to my out processing, but my resume needed work, and the folks at CGC really helped with it. Hughes said he was very impressed with the comprehensive resume ser vices oered by CGC. I felt like I was talking with someone that had been through the transition process, was in a similar position in the ser vice when they were active duty, so they knew literally all the aspects of creating a resume for me, he said. In the end my future em ployer told me my resume was excellent, and a key reason I got the job. CGC is an employment placement rm that was contracted to continue to build on the job skills, suc cess and training acquired during Sailors careers and succeed in the civilian job market, said Rick Trim mer, a contract manager for Commander, Navy Installations Command, who manages CGCs contract. We (the Navy) have asked them to reach out to each ERB Sailor and of fer as much assistance in their employment transition as possible, from re sume writing to help nd ing employers that need Sailors with their specic skill sets, he said. Hughes explained that CGC worked in a partner ship with other rms and assigned him a personal coach to help with his transition. e coach I had, Dennis, oered to take my phone calls with questions or concerns at any time, he even gave me his per sonal cell phone number. I knew he was doing every thing he could to help me nd a job, he said. Hughes reiterated that while CGC was a great help, they couldnt do all the work. A lot of this is self mo tivation, he said. Sure, theyll help you, but you need to take initiative and work with them too. For instance they could only give me a draft for the re sume; I had to ll out my information before their editors could make it pre sentable. CGC also is contracted to assist with actual job search help by providing employment resources to Sailors and even practice interviews and salary negotiation techniques. I was overwhelmed with all they were oering, luckily, with my network ing eorts I was fortunate enough to meet my future employer here on NSA Crane, so I didnt really need the full complement of CGCs services, Hughes said. In the end, Hughes set back turned out to be a road to a new a bright fu ture, noted his wife Nikki Hughes. e main stressor with getting out of the Navy is clearly the job search, said Nikki Hughes. But I must say, within the blink of an eye Anthony had a job oer ... with the ERB resources plus my hus bands natural abilities to take charge of the situation, we are ready for the next chapter. Hughes has a job oer with a local contracting company in his hometown of Crane, Ind., where he plans to settle his fam ily after he leaves active duty in September 2012. Ill tell you this, no one is going to hand you a job, but with a little help from the Navy and CGC, plus my willingness to lean for ward and make a plan, I was able to ensure a future and a life after my 14 year plus career in the Navy. e Navys contract with CGC is extensive and tasks them to reach out to all ERB Sailors. Sailors are encouraged to contact CGC by calling (800) 971-4288 or by e-mail at cgcusna vy@challengergray.com if they desire services and have not heard from CGC. Sailors can also contact the Help Center at Com mander, Navy Personnel Command by calling (866) 827-5672 for more infor mation. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc.navy. mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC customer service center at (866) 827-5672 or e-mail cscmailbox@navy. mil.ERB e Defense Department remains fo cused on eorts to return the only U.S. service member known to be in Taliban captivity to his family, Pentagon spokes man Navy Capt. John Kirby said June 8. Kirby told reporters that freeing Army Sgt. Bowe R. Bergdahl is a constant focus for commanders in Afghanistan. Every day there is time, attention and sometimes substantial resources ap plied to trying to locate, identify where he is and to continue to look at options for how to get him home, he said. Kirby was asked about Bergdahl dur ing a regular meeting with the Pentagon press corps. e 26-year-old soldier was found missing from his duty station in eastern Af ghanistan on June 30, 2009 and was declared missing/captured three days later. Bergdahl, from Hailey, Idaho, is as signed to the 1st Bat talion, 501st Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based at Fort Richardson, Alaska. e Defense Department is keeping the Bergdahl family informed of eorts to nd and return their son, Kirby said. Our thoughts and prayers and our hearts go out to the Bergdahl family and we appreciate the anguish that they con tinue to endure, he added. Search for Soldier missing in Afghanistan continues THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 9

June is the Aquarium Month. Its also the month for Accordion Awareness, Adopt a Cat, Candy, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Dairy, Fight the Filthy Fly, Gay Pride, Roses and Turkey Lovers. So my question is, do you, or would you, support or celebrate any of these causes. I like cats and turkey, I dont like flies and one of my friends can play Roll Out The Barrel on the accordion. When ever I bought roses for someone, in the long run it was a big waste of money. Except the ones I bought for my mom. Karen Dotson Naval Submarine Base Clinton, Md. National Adopt A Cat Month, because so many abandoned animals are in need of a loving home. Midshipman Garland Christopher Naval Academy Silver Springs, Md. Fruit and Vegetable Month. Its important to eat healthy with so many Americans being obese. Trai Murray Retired military Birmingham, Ala. If any, Turkey Lovers Month. I love turkey sandwiches and fried turkey. Midshipman Jesus Figueroa Naval Academy Asheville, N.C. Fruit and Vegetable Month, to promote healthy eating. Midshipman Andrew Felton Naval Academy Phoenix Dairy Month and Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month. Thats my life style. Cpl. Seann Charko Marine Corps Reserves St. Marys Probably none of them. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Program seeking ocers e Navy is accepting applications from eligible ocers for the Fiscal Year 2013 Specialty Career Path Program, according to a Navy message released May 29. e SCP Program pro vides ocers alternatives to the traditional com mand-at-sea-career path and supports demand for senior unrestricted line of cer expertise in growing mission areas, according to NAVADMIN 167/12. e program is designed to develop and utilize se lected ocers in the following distinct specialty career paths: Operations Analysis Financial Management Naval Operational Planner Anti-terrorism/Force Protection Shore Installation Management Anti-Submarine Warfare Mine Warfare Missile Defense Strategic Sealift Education and Training Management e FY-13 SCP Selection Board will be held July 23 to 27, 2012 at Navy Per sonnel Command. Applications must be received at NPC no later than June 25. Eligibility information and application proce dures can be found in the NAVADMIN. Ocers who meet eli gibility requirements may apply for up to two spe cialty career paths. e board will select eligible ocers best qualied to serve the needs of the Navy in each specialty career path. Selectees will retain their original of cer designator and will receive an additional qualication designator that indicates their area of specialization. Specialty career path provide selectees jobs with increasing complex ity and responsibility. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 9

PAGE 10

ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Pirates Cove menus 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 11

Summary of Water Quality InformationThe Kings Bay Community Water System is owned and operated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Georgia for supplying the water needs of housing, training and submarine sup port activities. If you encounter a water concern or need to report a leak, please call the Trouble Desk at 573-2555. The Kings Bay Water Source Three 900 foot deep wells withdrawing water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer are located on the Naval Submarine Base (SUBASE) Kings Bay to provide our water. The wells are enclosed in secure buildings to protect them from outside sources of pollution which could possibly contaminate our water supply. A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) was completed in May 2003 indicating our wells are at low risk for contamination. The plan also explains procedures for protecting our water supply. In the USA there are a variety of drinking water sources including riv ers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. Groundwater from confined aquifers such as the Upper Floridan is considered to be among the best water available to consumers. As water moves over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Testing to Keep You Safe: To keep your water safe we constantly test it. Every year more than 14,000 tests are run on water samples to ensure safe, high quality potable water is provided to our customers. This report provides you with the information you need to know about the sources of SUBASE drinking water, what it con tains and how it compares to regulatory agency standards. All plant operators and lab technicians hold state certifi cation. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires all water systems to provide their customers with an annual water quality report. The tests reported here are from January 1 through December 31, 2011 except for a few tests as noted in this report that do not need to be done annually. Your Kings Bay Water Department is committed to provid ing you with clean, safe and reliable water. We are pleased to report our water meets the standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act without any excep tions. How We Produce Water The Kings Bay Community Water System provides treated water 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Water is treated to remove contaminants by membrane filtration, aeration, pH adjustment, chlo rination and fluoridation. Water testing is performed at a number of locations and on a variety of schedules ranging from many times per day to annually and in a few cases longer intervals, depending on the test and the component being tested to ensure the qual ity of the water used by our customers. The Center for Disease Control & Prevention gave the water system a certificate for maintaining optimum control of fluoride in 2011. Ensuring Safe Water To insure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations limit ing the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Bottled water is regulated by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration and must provide the same protection for public health as public water supplies. Drinking water and bottled water may reasonably be expected to contain small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained at: EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 Or on-line at www.epa.gove/safewater. Vulnerability to Contaminants Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. People with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing chemotherapy, with organ transplants, with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants may be at risk from infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and microbial contaminants are available from: The Safe Drinking Water Hotline: (800) 426-4791 or on-line at www.epa.gov/safewater. Water Conservation is USING WATER EFFICIENTLY Water conservation is always a good idea. A good way to think of it is using water efficiently Its a gift that we can give ourselves that lowers expenses and provides for the future. This takes added importance because of con tinuing drought conditions in Georgia. Three of the past four years have had rainfall well below normal. Rainfall in 2010 & 2011 was more than thirty inches below normal and drought con ditions are continuing in 2012. Even if the recent rains continue in 2011, the effects of drought will be seen for some time to come. Coastal Georgia has an additional set of issues besides drought due to increased demand for water in this area. High withdrawal rates in many areas has resulted in saltwater intru sion into the ground water sources used along the coast. This is already causing restrictions on growth and greater regulation of groundwater sup plies along the coast. SUBASE is complying with Presidential Executive orders mandating reductions for water usage at all facilities. The goal is to reduce usage by 2% per year through 2025. Your help is needed to achieve this ambitious goal. There are many simple ways to be effi cient in use of water in daily activities. Lets use them and reap the benefits. One good information source for water savings at home is: http://www.con servewatergeorgia.net/ An additional benefit when we conserve water is the energy savings that nearly always accompany it When you find a new way to be water efficient, SHARE it with your neighbors and coworkers. Drought Conditions in Georgia Because of the low rainfall in the State of Georgia, EPD has declared Level One Drought Rules to be in effect that require done from midnight to 10:00 AM and from 4:00 pm to midnight three days a week based on the odd/even schedule in which odd numbered addresses may water on Tuesdays, Thursdays & Sundays while even number address may water on Mondays, Wednesdays & Saturdays. There is no watering on Fridays There is an exception for newly landscaped areas for 30 days after installation. or other public health & safety purposes. For more information on watering see the following web site: http://www. gaepd.org/Documents/outdoorwater. html NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT The Kings Bay Public Works Dept. teamed up with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command to upgrade our Water Treatment Plant to alleviate trihalomethanes (THMs) of concern in the water chlorination process. The system completed its first full year of operation in 2011 with excellent results in reducing THMs as shown in the table below. The new system reduces chemi cal usage and softens the water. The water produced is better than previ ously supplied. Definitions of Terms and Abbreviations in this Report Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, trig gers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as a close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): reasonable goals for drinking water quality. Exceeding SMCLs may adversely affect odor or appearance, but there is no known risk to human health. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disin fectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbiological contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. N/A : Not Applicable. N/D : Not Detected, The contaminant was not detected ppb or g/l: parts per billion or micro grams per liter (g/l) (Note that one ppb is equivalent to one second in 32 years) ppm or mg/l: parts per million or milligram per liter (mg/l) (Note that one ppm is equivalent to one second in 12 days) pCi/l: picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. Potential Contaminants Microbial contaminants [None Detected] such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treat ment plants, septic systems, agricul tural livestock operations, and wildlife. Data are given in Table 5. Inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domes tic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. There were only low levels of a few naturallyoccurring ones out of all tests run. See Tables 1, 3 and 4. There were none that exceeded the MCL. Pesticides and herbicides which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. None Detected at SUBASE. See Table 2. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum pro duction, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems. Only byproducts of water disinfection as shown in Table 2 were found. Radioactive contaminants which can be naturally occurring or be the results of oil and gas production and mining activities. None have been detected. See Table 6. For copies of this report or for more information on it, please contact Mr. Scott Bassett, Kings Bays Public Affairs Office, at (912) 573-4714. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 11

PAGE 12

Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012



PAGE 1

Caldwell guest speaker at Change of Command June 8 at Point LomaA pier side change of command ceremony was held for Commander, Submarine Squadron 11; and Commander, Submarine Forces U. S. Pacic Fleet Representative West Coast, aboard Los Angeles-class submarine USS San Francisco (SSN 711), June 8. Capt. omas Ishee relieved Capt. Richard Correll as commanding ocer. Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet Rear Adm. James F. Caldwell Jr. was the guest speaker at the ceremony. He congratulated Correll on a job well done and remarked that Ishee comes to Submarine Squadron 11 with impressive credentials and many successes. I look forward to serving with you and to supporting the crews of Squadron 11 units, who proudly serve our great country, Ishee said. While under Corrells command, Squadron 11 oversaw submarines deployed to the Arabian Gulf, Western Pacic, Southern Pacic and the Arctic. Correll also oversaw the successful implementation of the East Pacic Integrated Training Syndicate initiative, which has greatly enhanced Anti-Submarine Warfare training in the ird Fleet. Ishee thanked Correll for his thorough turnover and commended his successful command tour. Congratulations on a truly outstanding tour as Squadron 11s commodore, and best of luck to you on your follow-on assignment, Ishee said. Corrells next assignment will be director, Submarine Ocer Distribution, Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn. Ishee entered the submarine force in February 1988, with early sea tours aboard USS Sea Devil (SSN 664), USS Narwhal (SSN 671), USS Tunny (SSN 682) and USS La Jolla (SSN 701). He reported as commanding ocer of USS Key West (SSN 722) in March 2006, where the ship completed a Western Pacic deployment, earned a Battle Efciency E award, and was awarded the Pacic Fleet Arleigh Burke Trophy. He later served as director of Operations for Commander, Submarine Group 7. Most recently, he managed the U.S. Pacic Command portfolio of plans for the Oce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. Submarine Squadron 11 is located aboard Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego and consists of six Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered attack submarines, three Torpedo Retrievers, and a oating drydock. e squadron sta is responsible for providing training, material and personnel readiness support to the six submarines. THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope June celebrations ... do you observe any? Page 9 Wet & wild Damage Control Olympics test NSB personnel skills Page 4 Play ball! Homer Atlanta Braves host USS Georgia Gold Page 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com TTF, Alaska Gold break NSB military blood drive recordLast month, Americans all over the country celebrated Memorial Day in their own ways. Some laid owers at the grave sites of fallen family members and friends. Others had their rst barbecue of the season. Here on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, more than 20 commands participated in the Memorial Day Armed Services Blood Program drive, donating 268 units of blood to forward operating eet hospitals. is topped Kings Bays drive last December by 30 units. Success was due in large part to several commands that made the drive a top priority. Among the shore commands, top participation went to Trident Training Facility. More than 77 service members assigned to TTF came out to support the blood drive, and although ultimately not all were able to donate, the intention was clear. For many, the fact that their blood donation was going to wounded Sailors, Soldiers and Marines on the front line in Afghanistan was all the incentive they needed. TTF Commanding Ofcer Capt. Rod Hutton agreed. To have the opportunity to directly support Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines who are serving all around the globe was an absolute honor for TTF Kings Bay, he said. Providing a life line to those who put their lives in jeopardy for our country is the least that we can do. Among the boat commands, the USS Alaska (SSBN 732) Gold crew was the win Providing a life line ... is the least we can do. Capt. Rod Hutton Commanding officer, TTF Big turnout for military blood drive Up, up and away Ishee relieves Correll onboard Sub Squadron 11 Region getting new call centerNSB Kings Bay to be added Oct. 1 during Phase II upgrade A ribbon cutting ceremony was June 4 at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast to ocially celebrate the opening of its new Regional Call Center projected to provide a $1.2 million annual savings. e Call Center started operations on Jan. 30 servicing Naval Air Station Key West, Fla., and on April 2 for NAS Corpus Christi, Texas to implement the new program, said Brian deLumeau, RCC program manager. Service to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport will be added on July 1 to complete Phase I of the program. Phase II will begin Oct. 1 by adding Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, NAS Kingsville, Texas, and Joint Reserve Base Ft. Worth, Texas. Phase III begins Oct. 1, 2013 at which time the remaining bases in the Southeast region including JRB New Orleans, La.; Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport, Miss.; NAS Pensacola, Fla.; NAS Whiting Field, Fla.; Na

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. VA official at June 19 MOAAWalter Williams of the Department of Veterans Affairs will be the guest speaker at the June 19 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Officers of America Association, starting at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Cost of dinner is $19. RSVP date is June 15, with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@ tds.net.NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, through June 17, with the following schedule of events: ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Progressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major appliances from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets including 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24hour customer service including online access. inking about getting new prescription eyewear or contact lenses? Navy Exchange Optical Shops are featuring a special oer on eyewear, just in time for back-to-school. From July 1 to Sept. 30, NEX Optical Shops will oer no interest, no down payment and no payments for one year when purchasing eyewear with a Military Star Card. Oer applies to any complete prescription eyewear package, including contact lenses, of $199 or more.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School program. e Command Religious Program of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 22, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is located across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Terminal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament accounts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His resurrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and rehearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel ofce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Vacation Bible School ies June 25 Within two weeks of being announced, the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program for eligible unemployed veterans had received more than 12,000 online applications, according to the Department of Veterans Aairs. VA is committed to supporting veterans as they seek employment. is initiative will help provide education and training so that veterans have an opportunity to nd meaningful employment in a highdemand eld, Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki said in a VA news release issued May 31. We will continue to build on the success of our initial outreach eorts to veterans. e Veteran Retraining Assistance Program allows qualifying veterans between the ages of 35 and 60 to receive up to 12 months of education assistance. Maximum payment under VRAP is currently $1,473 monthly. Under VRAP, veterans apply on a rstcome, rst-served basis for programs that begin on or after July 1. VA began accepting applications on May 15. Forty-ve thousand veterans can participate during the current scal year, and up to 54,000 may participate during the scal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. e goal of the program is to train 99,000 veterans for high-demand jobs over the next two years. Veterans are encouraged to visit the nearly 3,000 VA career centers located across the nation for assistance from sta, local employment representatives, and disabled veterans outreach program specialists.Veterans initiative drawing interest Veterans Aairs Energy is the essence of life. Every day you decide how youre going to use it by knowing what you want and what it takes to reach that goal, and by maintaining focus. Oprah WinfreyA common excuse not to exercise is lack of energy. Yet research shows that regular physical activity can provide an energy boost. I see this in my own life often. For instance, last week on one of those dreary, rainy days we had, I was feeling sluggish and fatigued. When it came time to teach an aerobics class that evening, I wondered how I would ever nd the energy to do it. But by the time the warmup was complete, I was already feeling that surge of energy I had been missing all day. It felt great to be moving and sweating. It was just what I needed. In our society where coee, energy drinks and even supplements are used liberally as a way to get us through the day, it is no wonder that so many people fail to utilize exercise as a natural source of energy. Yet strengthening our bodies through daily exercise, making our heart, lungs, and muscles stronger, is an eective way to supply ourselves with energy for our daily activities. We can create the energy we want by simply adopting a healthier lifestyle. Many workplaces have adopted the practice of taking physical activity breaks throughout the day, which give employees the opportunity to recharge. Stepping out of the oce to take a brisk walk or breaking up a monotonous task with small bouts of exercise can provide the boost of energy that is needed to stay productive. Schools also have started us ing physical activity breaks in the classroom as a way to incorporate exercise into the school day. With nancial cuts impacting physical education, it is imperative that we nd creative ways to get kids moving, such as by encouraging teachers to use exercise as a learning tool. Mak ing exercise routine, yet fun for our youth will go a long way in helping them understand and experience the benets of daily physical activity. e next time you are ghting fatigue, instead of reaching for another cup of coee, grab your sneakers and get moving. Find a consistent workout routine and engage in exercise you enjoy. Incorporate physical activity breaks into your work day and make it a point to move as much as possible throughout the day. By choosing to get energized with exercise, you can experience the numerous health benets that daily physical activity can provide. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Create energy to get what you want Naval Supply Systems Command Global Logistics Support Household Goods services initiated social media campaign June 4 to reach out to customers and further reduce confusion and make a household move easier on families. HHG is now employing the public Web, YouTube and Facebook, to unravel some of remaining mystery associated with moving, shipping and storing household goods. Our No. 1 goal is easing the whole moving process for families moving across the country or around the world, said Deborah McGlennon, program manager, Household Goods and Global Distance Support Center in San Diego. We believe our Web presence, plus YouTube and Facebook Fan Page will provide relevant and interesting information to NAVY service members and civilians initiating a household goods move. In addition, the YouTube Channel provides customers with instructions to set up their household goods move using the Defense Personal Property System. McGlennon said even as the process incorporated www.move.mi and the Defense Personal Property Household goods add social media Navy Supply

PAGE 3

A Green Note from Morale, Welfare and Recreation to you. MWR is making a change to go green and go paperless. With your help, MWR can achieve this planet-saving goal. Events are posed inside e Periscope and on Facebook. Additionally, a texting program is oered so you can receive instant messages from MWR on what is happening right now. Call (912) 573-4556 for more information on this new innovative process and become part of the change. Also, visit www.facebook.com/ mwrkingsbay or www.cnic.navy. mil/kingsbay. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admission, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Dive-In Movie At the Kings Bay Pool Complex, starting at 7 p.m., Saturday, June 16 its fee admission for the feature lm Adventures of Tin-Tin (rated PG) on the outdoor theater. Bring your own oating device for the movie. Hot dogs, chips and drink will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-3001. Run for the Fallen Between June 14 Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. For more information, call (912) 573-3990 or visit the Facebook page @ www.facebook.com/ navytkingsbay Rack-N-Roll Family Night Starting on ursday, June 21, from 5 to 9 p.m., every Thursday bowl for only $30 per family. Cost includes a lane for one and half hours, shoe rental, a large one topping pizza and 25 tokens to the game room. For more information, call RNR Lanes at (912) 573-9492. Navy General Services Administration Expo You are invited from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., June 19 at the Kings Bay Conference Center for a great Expo. If you are a government card holder or an end user this Expo is for you. Discover what GSA has to oer. Check out over 100 GSA vendors. Lunch will be provided. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. Includes registration, instructions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camp. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Fall Soccer Registration For ages 3 to 15 is 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. now through July 30 at the Youth Center, except holidays and weekends An additional sign-up day is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. Cost is $60 per child for active duty, reservists and $65 per child for retirees, DoD civilians and NSB Kings Bay contractors. Uniforms are included in the cost. Age control date is August 1, 2012, children must turn 3 years old before and cannot be 16 before this date. Late registration for Fall Youth Soccer will be accepted after August 4 at Youth Center for an additional $5, if openings are available. All new players must bring a copy of their birth certificate and proof of eligibility. For more information, call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 SAC Registration for before and after school Four different criteria dates for registration. Returning SAC patrons, CDC pre-K patrons going into kinder garten and single/dual active duty members will begin Monday, July 9; active duty with working or student spouse and DoD civilians may register Monday, July 16; DoD contractors may regis ter Monday, July 23; All oth ers register Monday, July 30. Fees are based on gross fam ily income. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., at the Youth Center Youth Center, except holidays and weekends. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 16, 17 Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief; June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Summer Camp at the Youth Center For children kindergarten through age 12, camp runs through August 13. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Soccer camp coming Just for kids MWR is now Going Green Liberty call System, the process can still be a bit daunting. e YouTube and FaceBook sites are designed to ease families into the move.mil and DPS process. It will be like pre-learning designed to familiarize fami lies with how these systems operate and integrate, she said. You can subscribe now to the HHG YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/Na vyHH and for tips, updates and additional information, make sure to like our Facebook Fan Page at www.facebook.com/ pages/NAVY-HouseholdGoods/294799990565426. In addition, the Navy Household Goods Web page also provides customers with information on getting started with their move, entitlements and contact information. Check out www/navsup/ navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/ navsupgls/prod_serv/house hold. Finally, in addition to leaving comments on our social media pages, you can e-mail householdgoods@navy.mil.Social THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Cpl. Jedediah Johnson of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion nears the finish line during a tie breaker race with USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold). Inset, from left, the winning team from Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic of HMC Roy Holder, MTC Kevin Hatcher, MTCS John Jenssen, MTC Delvason Weldon, MTCM Gary Aston, Lt. Travis Garland and MTC Jules Alarcon. Johnson gets a lead on MM1 Jason Tomes of USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold). Spray is used to move a ball on a line. Damage Control OlympicsLeft, Lance Cpl. Daniel Myers and Lance Cpl. Kyle Falkenstein of Security Force Battalion work together to push a ball down a tug-of-war line using only a charged hose. The nozzleman is required to be blindfolded to simulate visibility during a shipboard fire. Below, USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold) team member CS2 Cedric Johnson directs his blindfolded teammate, MM3 Robert Diaz, dur ing the annual Damage Control Olympics at Trident Training Facility June 1. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 5 When Chief Aviation Machinists Mate Anthony Hughes received news in November 2011, that he was on the Enlisted Retention Board list he felt like his life was over. I remember my CO (commanding ocer) sitting me down and saying Chief, Ive got some bad news, and I immediately knew what was coming, Hughes said. His commanding ofcer informed him of his selection for ERB, which angered him. I felt like I had honored my part of the bargain, and the Navy had just backed out on the deal, Hughes said. Instead of giving up or feeling sorry for himself, Hughes said he quickly accepted the news and started looking toward the future. I literally knew exactly what I had to do at that very moment; from that day on my only mission was to get my family back home, so I could get a new job ASAP, he said. Hughes is one of 2,946 Sailors chosen for separation by the ERB in late 2011, all of whom were from a list of approximately 16,000 records the board reviewed to help reduce manning and meet quotas in various rates across the eet. With record-high retention and low attrition among active duty Sailors, the Navy became overmanned by greater than 103 percent in 31 of 84 ratings, resulting in increased competition and reduced advancement opportunities for strong-performing Sailors to re-enlist. e ERB was introduced to allow the Navy to achieve stability and t across the force while retaining balance based on seniority, skills, and experience. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert explained in his ocial blog that, ERB reduces overall manpower by reducing the number of Sailors in overmanned ratings through conversions and separations. Navy leadership realized; however, that while the ERB was fair and necessary for the needs of the Navy, it also left Sailors with questions and concerns for their future. e ERB and follow-on transition process have my full attention, wrote Greenert, we are putting great eorts to ensure the ERB process is being conducted professionally and fairly. More importantly, we look to ensure that the means for transition is clear, broadly applied, open and readily available. For Hughes, that message couldnt have been clearer. I knew I couldnt mess around, he said. With a wife and two small kids, I have mouths to feed and bills to pay. ere was no way I was going to let this situation mess up my family and our way of life, and as it turned out, neither was the Navy. Soon after Hughes received the news, a representative from Challenger, Gray and Christmas, a rm contracted by the Navy to provide extensive transition services for ERB Sailors, reached out to him and began working with him on his life after active duty. One thing that I really needed to work on was Memorial Day with the Braves ner with 29 donors. Cmdr. Robert Wirth, commanding ocer of Alaska Gold, not only actively promoted the drive, but donated a pint himself. Support among the leadership really made the dierence in this years drive, said Capt. Phillip OConnell, senior medical ocer at the Kings Bay Branch Medical Clinic. We saw a great increase in donors and competition among the boats. Right until the last hour of the drive, we werent sure if the (USS) Georgia (SSGN 729) or Alaska crew would win. Members of the Ft. Gordon ASBP were thrilled with the results and enthusiasm of the community here in Kings Bay and are already planning for the team to return in early December. e support we received from donors, from the commands, and from volunteers was outstanding said Erin Hawkins, ASBP donor recruiter. We appreciate everyone who gave their time and lifesav ing blood to care for our troops and their families. e ASBP team also plans to make the Memorial Day drive an annual event, in the hopes that it will continue to grow. e blood collected was tested and shipped within days to forward operating eet hospitals as part of Ft. Gordons weekly shipments. Because blood is perishable and may be needed at any time, it must be collected regularly. Many of our wounded service members require more than 40 units of blood for a single surgery, making the need for blood always great. Although travel to certain areas, some medications and medical conditions can temporarily or permanently restrict donation, most healthy adults are eligible to donate blood. Since ASBPs inception more than 50 years ago, more than 1.5 million units of blood have been provided to treat battleeld illnesses and injuries. In addition to providing blood in combat situations for those in need, the ASBP also supports the peacetime needs of military personnel and their families. As a joint operation among the military services (Navy, Army, Air Force), the ASBP has many components working together to collect, process, store, distribute and transfuse blood worldwide. For more information on the ASBP visit www. militaryblood.dod.mil.Drive val Support Activity Panama City, Fla.; and NSA Orlando, Fla. e center is where all emergency and routine service calls will be handled for Navy bases from Texas to Georgia and south to Key West, Fla., as well as their associated Navy Reserve Centers. We expect the center to provide eciency through work accomplished with less people saving an estimated $1.2 million per year, deLumeau said. Service calls will be received at the center from each respective Public Works Department or a representative appointed on the base. e RCC sta will process the request through a Navy data management program and forward to a base operating system contract dispatch center or the PWD Shop at each base to have the work completed. e call center is on board NAS Jacksonville and managed by NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line and is staed by full-time government employees on a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week basis, beginning July 1. Currently, eight PWDs have in-house trouble desks and six have BOS operated trouble desks. ese separate call centers are estimated to contain the cost equivalent of 40 positions, costing approximately $3 million per year. We believe that the new RCC can operate with 18 employees by regionalizing the work to this single location, deLumeau said. e new program will also provide improved data integrity through quality control and one streamlined process throughout the region. e team is getting positive responses from their customers and dont even notice that the move has been made to Jacksonville. People call us directly on our toll-free number or e-mail us at our public e-mail account, said Anne Rush who works in the RCC. My old customers didnt realize that I had relocated and moved when I tell them that I am working out of the oce in Jacksonville. e Regional Call Center set up required proper facilities, computer equipment and a phone system capable of receiving calls and evenly distributing them among the call center employees. is was done by developing a round-robin type phone system which will ring service desk phones sequentially to distribute the workload. Each computer is supplied with two monitors to allow multiple programs to open and fully viewable and a hands free handset. is was anticipated to speed up the process and allow for more accurate data transfers. e computers access the Navys Geographic Information System that gives operators access to maps and overhead photographs to pin point locations. Historically, NAVFAC Southeast had issues with the manning a Call Center at each base. Operational procedures were as diverse as the number of bases. Six bases had contractor operated call centers and some in-house workforces were also used. erefore, dierent procedures were used, dierent approval systems and distribution of costs associated with calls. e Regional Call Center provides proper training and consistent operating procedures to avoid old pitfalls, deLumeau said. Now appropriate chains of approval will be used to ensure consistency with processing calls and associated costs with associated repairs. deLumeau said that as they attain full steady state, the Regional Call Center will handle over 175,000 trouble calls annually. Region ere is life aer ERB

PAGE 6

Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sug gestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A mini mum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center this month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintain ing and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and mainte nance of sexual assault data. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the informa tion and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 21. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. Call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. New Moms and Dads Support 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 7

my resume, I was taking action on all other areas of my life, from my move to my out processing, but my resume needed work, and the folks at CGC really helped with it. Hughes said he was very impressed with the comprehensive resume services oered by CGC. I felt like I was talking with someone that had been through the transition process, was in a similar position in the service when they were active duty, so they knew literally all the aspects of creating a resume for me, he said. In the end my future employer told me my resume was excellent, and a key reason I got the job. CGC is an employment placement rm that was contracted to continue to build on the job skills, suc cess and training acquired during Sailors careers and succeed in the civilian job market, said Rick Trim mer, a contract manager for Commander, Navy Installations Command, who manages CGCs contract. We (the Navy) have asked them to reach out to each ERB Sailor and offer as much assistance in their employment transition as possible, from resume writing to help nding employers that need Sailors with their specic skill sets, he said. Hughes explained that CGC worked in a partnership with other rms and assigned him a personal coach to help with his transition. e coach I had, Dennis, oered to take my phone calls with questions or concerns at any time, he even gave me his personal cell phone number. I knew he was doing everything he could to help me nd a job, he said. Hughes reiterated that while CGC was a great help, they couldnt do all the work. A lot of this is self motivation, he said. Sure, theyll help you, but you need to take initiative and work with them too. For instance they could only give me a draft for the resume; I had to ll out my information before their editors could make it presentable. CGC also is contracted to assist with actual job search help by providing employment resources to Sailors and even practice interviews and salary negotiation techniques. I was overwhelmed with all they were oering, luckily, with my networking eorts I was fortunate enough to meet my future employer here on NSA Crane, so I didnt really need the full complement of CGCs services, Hughes said. In the end, Hughes setback turned out to be a road to a new a bright future, noted his wife Nikki Hughes. e main stressor with getting out of the Navy is clearly the job search, said Nikki Hughes. But I must say, within the blink of an eye Anthony had a job oer ... with the ERB resources plus my husbands natural abilities to take charge of the situation, we are ready for the next chapter. Hughes has a job oer with a local contracting company in his hometown of Crane, Ind., where he plans to settle his family after he leaves active duty in September 2012. Ill tell you this, no one is going to hand you a job, but with a little help from the Navy and CGC, plus my willingness to lean forward and make a plan, I was able to ensure a future and a life after my 14 year plus career in the Navy. e Navys contract with CGC is extensive and tasks them to reach out to all ERB Sailors. Sailors are encouraged to contact CGC by calling (800) 971-4288 or by e-mail at cgcusnavy@challengergray.com if they desire services and have not heard from CGC. Sailors can also contact the Help Center at Commander, Navy Personnel Command by calling (866) 827-5672 for more information. For more information visit the NPC ERB Web Page at www.npc.navy. mil/boards/ERB/, contact the NPC customer service center at (866) 827-5672 or e-mail cscmailbox@navy. mil.ERB e Defense Department remains focused on eorts to return the only U.S. service member known to be in Taliban captivity to his family, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. John Kirby said June 8. Kirby told reporters that freeing Army Sgt. Bowe R. Bergdahl is a constant focus for commanders in Afghanistan. Every day there is time, attention and sometimes substantial resources applied to trying to locate, identify where he is and to continue to look at options for how to get him home, he said. Kirby was asked about Bergdahl during a regular meeting with the Pentagon press corps. e 26-year-old soldier was found missing from his duty station in eastern Afghanistan on June 30, 2009 and was declared missing/captured three days later. Bergdahl, from Hailey, Idaho, is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based at Fort Richardson, Alaska. e Defense Department is keeping the Bergdahl family informed of eorts to nd and return their son, Kirby said. Our thoughts and prayers and our hearts go out to the Bergdahl family and we appreciate the anguish that they continue to endure, he added. Search for Soldier missing in Afghanistan continues THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 9

June is the Aquarium Month. Its also the month for Accordion Awareness, Adopt a Cat, Candy, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Dairy, Fight the Filthy Fly, Gay Pride, Roses and Turkey Lovers. So my question is, do you, or would you, support or celebrate any of these causes. I like cats and turkey, I dont like flies and one of my friends can play Roll Out The Barrel on the accordion. When ever I bought roses for someone, in the long run it was a big waste of money. Except the ones I bought for my mom. Karen Dotson Naval Submarine Base Clinton, Md. National Adopt A Cat Month, because so many abandoned animals are in need of a loving home. Midshipman Garland Christopher Naval Academy Silver Springs, Md. Fruit and Vegetable Month. Its important to eat healthy with so many Americans being obese. Trai Murray Retired military Birmingham, Ala. If any, Turkey Lovers Month. I love turkey sandwiches and fried turkey. Midshipman Jesus Figueroa Naval Academy Asheville, N.C. Fruit and Vegetable Month, to promote healthy eating. Midshipman Andrew Felton Naval Academy Phoenix Dairy Month and Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month. Thats my lifestyle. Cpl. Seann Charko Marine Corps Reserves St. Marys Probably none of them. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Program seeking ocers e Navy is accepting applications from eligible ocers for the Fiscal Year 2013 Specialty Career Path Program, according to a Navy message released May 29. e SCP Program provides ocers alternatives to the traditional command-at-sea-career path and supports demand for senior unrestricted line ofcer expertise in growing mission areas, according to NAVADMIN 167/12. e program is designed to develop and utilize selected ocers in the following distinct specialty career paths: Operations Analysis Financial Management Naval Operational Planner Anti-terrorism/Force Protection Shore Installation Management Anti-Submarine Warfare Mine Warfare Missile Defense Strategic Sealift Education and Training Management e FY-13 SCP Selection Board will be held July 23 to 27, 2012 at Navy Personnel Command. Applications must be received at NPC no later than June 25. Eligibility information and application procedures can be found in the NAVADMIN. Ocers who meet eligibility requirements may apply for up to two specialty career paths. e board will select eligible ocers best qualied to serve the needs of the Navy in each specialty career path. Selectees will retain their original ofcer designator and will receive an additional qualication designator that indicates their area of specialization. Specialty career path provide selectees jobs with increasing complexity and responsibility. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 9

PAGE 10

ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Pirates Cove menus 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012

PAGE 11

Summary of Water Quality InformationThe Kings Bay Community Water System is owned and operated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Georgia for supplying the water needs of housing, training and submarine support activities. If you encounter a water concern or need to report a leak, please call the Trouble Desk at 573-2555. The Kings Bay Water Source Three 900 foot deep wells withdrawing water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer are located on the Naval Submarine Base (SUBASE) Kings Bay to provide our water. The wells are enclosed in secure buildings to protect them from outside sources of pollution which could possibly contaminate our water supply. A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) was completed in May 2003 indicating our wells are at low risk for contamination. The plan also explains procedures for protecting our water supply. In the USA there are a variety of drinking water sources including rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. Groundwater from confined aquifers such as the Upper Floridan is considered to be among the best water available to consumers. As water moves over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Testing to Keep You Safe: To keep your water safe we constantly test it. Every year more than 14,000 tests are run on water samples to ensure safe, high quality potable water is provided to our customers. This report provides you with the information you need to know about the sources of SUBASE drinking water, what it contains and how it compares to regulatory agency standards. All plant operators and lab technicians hold state certification. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires all water systems to provide their customers with an annual water quality report. The tests reported here are from January 1 through December 31, 2011 except for a few tests as noted in this report that do not need to be done annually. Your Kings Bay Water Department is committed to provid ing you with clean, safe and reliable water. We are pleased to report our water meets the standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act without any exceptions. How We Produce Water The Kings Bay Community Water System provides treated water 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Water is treated to remove contaminants by membrane filtration, aeration, pH adjustment, chlorination and fluoridation. Water testing is performed at a number of locations and on a variety of schedules ranging from many times per day to annually and in a few cases longer intervals, depending on the test and the component being tested to ensure the quality of the water used by our customers. The Center for Disease Control & Prevention gave the water system a certificate for maintaining optimum control of fluoride in 2011. Ensuring Safe Water To insure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Bottled water is regulated by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration and must provide the same protection for public health as public water supplies. Drinking water and bottled water may reasonably be expected to contain small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained at: EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 Or on-line at www.epa.gove/safewater. Vulnerability to Contaminants Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. People with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing chemotherapy, with organ transplants, with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants may be at risk from infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and microbial contaminants are available from: The Safe Drinking Water Hotline: (800) 426-4791 or on-line at www.epa.gov/safewater. Water Conservation is USING WATER EFFICIENTLY Water conservation is always a good idea. A good way to think of it is using water efficiently. Its a gift that we can give ourselves that lowers expenses and provides for the future. This takes added importance because of con tinuing drought conditions in Georgia. Three of the past four years have had rainfall well below normal. Rainfall in 2010 & 2011 was more than thirty inches below normal and drought conditions are continuing in 2012. Even if the recent rains continue in 2011, the effects of drought will be seen for some time to come. Coastal Georgia has an additional set of issues besides drought due to increased demand for water in this area. High withdrawal rates in many areas has resulted in saltwater intrusion into the ground water sources used along the coast. This is already causing restrictions on growth and greater regulation of groundwater supplies along the coast. SUBASE is complying with Presidential Executive orders mandating reductions for water usage at all facilities. The goal is to reduce usage by 2% per year through 2025. Your help is needed to achieve this ambitious goal. There are many simple ways to be efficient in use of water in daily activities. Lets use them and reap the benefits. One good information source for water savings at home is: http://www.con servewatergeorgia.net/ An additional benefit when we conserve water is the energy savings that nearly always accompany it When you find a new way to be water efficient, SHARE it with your neighbors and coworkers. Drought Conditions in Georgia Because of the low rainfall in the State of Georgia, EPD has declared Level One Drought Rules to be in effect that require done from midnight to 10:00 AM and from 4:00 pm to midnight three days a week based on the odd/even schedule in which odd numbered addresses may water on Tuesdays, Thursdays & Sundays while even number address may water on Mondays, Wednesdays & Saturdays. There is no watering on Fridays. There is an exception for newly landscaped areas for 30 days after installation. or other public health & safety purposes. For more information on watering see the following web site: http://www. gaepd.org/Documents/outdoorwater. html NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT The Kings Bay Public Works Dept. teamed up with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command to upgrade our Water Treatment Plant to alleviate trihalomethanes (THMs) of concern in the water chlorination process. The system completed its first full year of operation in 2011 with excellent results in reducing THMs as shown in the table below. The new system reduces chemical usage and softens the water. The water produced is better than previously supplied. Definitions of Terms and Abbreviations in this Report Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as a close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): reasonable goals for drinking water quality. Exceeding SMCLs may adversely affect odor or appearance, but there is no known risk to human health. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbiological contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. N/A : Not Applicable. N/D : Not Detected, The contaminant was not detected ppb or g/l: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (g/l) (Note that one ppb is equivalent to one second in 32 years) ppm or mg/l: parts per million or milligram per liter (mg/l) (Note that one ppm is equivalent to one second in 12 days) pCi/l: picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. Potential Contaminants Microbial contaminants, [None Detected] such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. Data are given in Table 5. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. There were only low levels of a few naturallyoccurring ones out of all tests run. See Tables 1, 3 and 4. There were none that exceeded the MCL. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. None Detected at SUBASE. See Table 2. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems. Only byproducts of water disinfection as shown in Table 2 were found. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the results of oil and gas production and mining activities. None have been detected. See Table 6. For copies of this report or for more information on it, please contact Mr. Scott Bassett, Kings Bays Public Affairs Office, at (912) 573-4714. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012 11

PAGE 12

Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 14, 2012