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The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-07-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00256

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00256


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Midway victory honoredKings Bay ceremony memorial to turning point in Pacic War Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay took part on Monday in Navy-wide commemorations of the 70th anniversary of the 1942 Battle of Midway, widely regarded as the turning point of the Pacic eater of World War II. In a ceremony overseen by CMDCM James Schubert, a 29-year Navy veteran and Kings Bays Command Master Chief, Installation Commander Capt. John ONeil and Submarine Group Ten Chief of Sta Capt.Kelly McDowell laid a ceremonial wreath on Kings Bays World War II Memorial. In his remarks, Cap. ONeil stressed the importance of re membering and applying the lessons of our naval heritage and relayed the Chief of Naval Op erations message to all Sailors: is historic victory at Midway can be attributed to traits that continue in our Navy today: bold, condent, and procient sailors willing to go into harms way with well-built, resilient ships and air craft. Our Sailors and Marines demonstrate this same warf ighting ethos today as they face unique and demanding chal lenges, on land and sea, operat ing forward deployed, fully ready, around the globe. is legacy is built on the foundation of veter ans, like those at Midway, who have blazed the trail before us. Let us never forget those veterans and their legacy.ey shaped world events for many years and will continue to do so, for it is in our DNA. As navy professionals, it is up to us to preserve and cel ebrate our rich history, knowing that understanding the past will empower us to overcome future challenges. Capt. McDowell spoke to the assembled sailors on the impor tance and lessons of the battle, reminding them that, It isnt merely enough to survive, we must win and prevail. Adversar ies shoot back, and there is no second place. World War I hero honored at Kings Bay ceremony United States Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay held a dedication and naming ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, June 1. Lt. Cmdr. om as Evans, Maritime Force Protec tion Unit Kings Bay executive of cer, ocially an nounced the current training building will be named after Rear Adm. Randolph Ridgely, Jr. Although much has changed since Rear Admiral Ridgely served in the Coast Guard, we owe much of who we are to day to him Evans said. What hasnt changed is the ghting spirit of the Coast Guard. at spirit and Rear Admiral Ridgelys success as an ocer, as a sail or and as a leader, is part of our service legacy, and for that we can thank him for setting the standard. e ceremony took place at Ridgely Hall at 9 a.m. and concluded at 10 a.m. with Ridgelys grandson, Mr. H. Scott Camp in atten dance. It makes me very proud to be here today and to be part of this cer emony, Camp said. Its really hard to describe how honored I am. My grandfather would be so proud. Ridgely was a native THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Our panel of experts picks NBA champs Page 9 Bible school Children can sign up now for summer activity Page 2 Remember Memorial Day observed worldwide Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Doing the right thing Coast Guard names building for Rear Adm. Ridgely Safety program helps mentor against destructive decisionse commander of Submarine Group Ten and Kings Bay junior enlisted Sailors signed a 101 Critical Days of Summer Proclamation June 1. e proclamations signing took place during the annual Damage Control Olympics at Trident Training Facility. Senior enlisted leaders here drafted the proclamation o of elements from already estab lished safety and awareness programs, and incorporated them into one combined statement. Some of the strongest bullet points that most directly speak to the Kings Bay community were used from Navy programs the leadership team believed to have excellent messages. We wanted to put word out of our vision for summer safety in Kings Bay, said Master Chief Elec tronics Techni cian Mike McLauch lan, Trident Training Facility command master chief and the proclamations writer. [e senior leadership] cares about our Sailors and crew. We want everyone to have fun, but remain safe. Commander, Submarine Group Ten, Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, also took the time to recognize the local Coalition of Sailors Against Destruc tive Decisions chapter which stood up just a few months ago and rein forced all the Kings Bay commands recent General Military Training sessions to increase DUI awareness and to promote summer safety. CSADD is a grassroots eort from our junior Sailors, Tofalo said. e initial focus was to eliminate DUIs, but the junior Sailors wanted to expand eorts to include raising awareness of ... we owe much of who we are today to him. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Evans MFPU executive officer More on Midway Page 6 Its a program to provide positive mentorship Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group Ten

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Budget for Baby class June 7Navy-Marine Crops Relief Societys Budget for Baby workshop is at 9:30 a.m., ursday, June 7. B4B is a monthly class which helps expectant parents prepare nancially for a new addition to the family. Each participant receives a free layette, with Gerber gear and handmade blanket. For more information or to register, call NMCRS Kings Bay at 573-3928 or visit @ www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay. Kids run registration ends June 8e 2012 Americas Armed Forces Kids Run is Saturday, June 9. Its free for ages 5 to 13. e event takes place at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay football eld/track at 9 a.m. Check in time starts at 8:30 a.m. You can register on line at www.americaskidsrun.org. e rst 50 children to register online will receive a free Tshirt the day of the event. You also can register 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m at the Youth Center or at the youth sports elds concession stand during games. Registration is open until June 8. For more information call (912) 573-8202.NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a prepared ness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take ad vantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no pay ments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Pro gressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major applianc es from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets including 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24hour customer service including online access.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School pro gram. e Command Religious Pro gram of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is lo cated across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Ter minal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament ac counts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His res urrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and re hearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command repre sentative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel of ce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities avail able. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bi ble Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Vacation Bible School nearing e Navys Public Library Service now oers Transparent Language Online, a fun, eective, and engag ing language-learning program for libraries and their patrons. e program is accessible via Web-browser and will be available for free to all Navy library patrons through Navy Knowledge Online. Transparent Language Online is packed full of pronunciation, speech, grammar, writing, and vo cabulary building lessons for more than 80 languages. Featuring top-of-the-line course work combined with extensive so cial media resources, Transparent Language Online is the most com plete language-learning system available to library patrons. Designed by Transparent Language, a leading provider of bestpractice language-learning soft ware for consumers, educational institutions, government agencies, and businesses, Transparent Lan guage Online uses the same learning method that has helped millions of individuals learn new languages quickly, easily, and eectively. Our partnership with Transpar ent Language Online in this eort is another great way for us to increase our services to the feet, ghter, and family; not just for the bases and in stallations, but for the entire Navy around the globe, aoat and ashore, said Nellie Mott, Navy General Library Program manager. e Transparent Language Online language-learning program contains: Essentials Courses 33 lessons to get every learner started Byki Quick Start 10 lists of key words and phrase for patrons with limited learning time Byki Vocabulary a full library of supplemental vocabulary lists Language Reference resources to explore higher-level language and culture elements Language and Culture Blogs designed to add variety and depth to the learning experience Word of the Day makes lan guage learning part of patrons daily routines Online Social Communities patrons can interact with Transparent Languages online community of over 2 million fans, followers, and friends, all learning language together Pronunciation and Conversation Practice record, playback, and compare speech to the pronuncia tion of real native speakers SlowSound Technology slow down speech to hear every nuance Interactive games includ ing Four-Square, Game Show, Unscramble, and more Byki Mobile for iPhone and Android devices allows for language learning on-the-go Proficiency tests Note that learning material varies by lan guage. Navy Library patrons may regis ter for a Transparent Language Online account by Logging into NKO at www.nko.navy.mil. Click on the Reference heading in the upper left part of the screen. en click on e-Library Language and Culture and nally click on the Transparent Language Online Logo. Once registered, users can access Transparent Language Online from home, school, or any Internet con nected computer.Transparent Language oered on-line Installations Command Together, let us Run for the Fallen Run for the Fallen OrganizationThroughout the year, there are races all over this country that support great causes. Often when you run in one, you are motivated not by the competi tion, but the cause. When I run on my own, I often feel overwhelm ingly fortunate for the ability to do so, for the way it leaves me feeling powerful and accomplished, and for the sense of freedom it instills. But when running in a race that supports a worthy cause, it is the community togetherness and the dedication to that cause that make it so very special. When I decided to train for the Marine Corps Marathon last year, I wanted to do so because running a marathon had been on my bucket list for a while, and I had heard that the MCM was a good one for rsttime marathoners. I also thought it would be exciting to run through our nations capital in a race founded and organized by the Marine Corps. On race day, although I was prepared for the physical demands of running 26.2 miles, I was caught o guard by the emotional impact that running this race had on me. I am sure many of the other runners experienced this charge of emotions as well. Not only was it moving to have the encour agement from Marines at every hydration station along the race course and to have a Marine hang a medal around my neck when I crossed the nish line, but to run alongside wounded warriors and hundreds of Americas heroes was awe-inspiring. It was the energy that the collective group created that day that made this one of the most memorable experiences of my life. Another race that supports our Armed Forces and recognizes the sacrice so many have made to protect our freedom is the Run for the Fallen. I learned that the organization started back in 2008 with a dedicated team of runners who made it their mission to remember and honor those service members lost in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Opera tion Enduring Freedom. On June 14, 2008, this team of runners set out to run across America, dedicating every mile along the way to a fallen soldier by marking it with an American ag and personalized sign card. Today, the Run for the Fallen continues with more than 150,000 miles recorded since 2008. Kings Bay has participated for the past three years and will continue to support this great cause with two 5 Ks this summer. In addition, between June 14 and Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. e Run for the Fallen organization asks that communities help them continue to honor and remember our service members, bringing people and communities together. In October at the MCM, it was an honor to run with many of our nations heroes. Starting on June 14, it will be an honor to run for them. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Run for the Fallen starts June 14 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta called the situa tion in Syria intolerable and said the United States will continue to work with the international commu nity to get Syrian Presi dent Bashar Assad to step down. Assads troops allegedly mas sacred thou sands of Syrians since dem onstra tions began there last year. eres no question that we are very concerned about the atroci ties that are taking place in Syria, Panetta said. It just makes clear how impor tant it is to remove Assad from power and imple ment the political reforms that are necessary in that country. Panetta spoke May 31 during a news conference aboard his plane en route to Singapore. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have stressed the need for the international community to work together to con tinue to put economic and diplomatic pressure the Assad regime. e U.S. will work with others to take whatever other steps need to be tak en in order to make very clear that Assad has to step down, Panetta said. e secretary said this includes continuing to put pressure on Russia so that country will use its inu ence on the regime. It means continuing to explore every other possible option to try to continue the eort to get Assad to step down, the secretary said. is is an intolerable situation, we cannot be satised with whats going on. Panetta stressed it is always important for the U.S. to project every pos sible option for taking ac tion. But I think it is very important right now to continue to work with the international community because we all share the same concerns and the same goals here, he said. My hope is that the international community becomes much more aggressive at deciding what additional steps are nec essary. Panetta did not speak directly about what military steps are possible, but he did allude to further options. One thing we do at the Pentagon is we plan for all contingencies, and weve done that here, Panetta said. Im not going to go into what we briefed the president on, but suce to say we are prepared for any contingency or any action we are called on to do. Submarine veteran T. Steven Sullivan will pres ent a free seminar on ebook self publishing at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay. e seminar will be 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, at the Big EZ Sports Zone, Building 1039. Over the last two years, the growing popularity of ebooks has kicked the world of self-publishing into ank speed. Nobody knows this bet ter than Sullivan. When Sullivan, a former Tor pedo mans Mate and Diver, fin ished his rst novel Hot Run the Kindle had just opened up for self-pub lishers. Since Sullivan had written Hot Run as a tribute to his buddies from the boat, he gured self-publishing would be a convenient way to distrib ute his story to his fellow bubbleheads. At the time, Sullivan could not have predicted the success he would have going the self-publishing route, but a year later, with more than 20,000 cop ies of his novel sold, he could not be more pleas antly surprised. However, thats not to say that Sul livan dove into the waters of self-publishing without caution. When Sullivan left the Navy in 1997, he began working as an actor, stunt man and voice-over artist. He quickly learned that there was an entire indus try comprised of predators who preyed on peoples dreams. Promises of easy suc cess for the right price were plenty. Rarely though, did these promises lead to anything but a lighter wallet. When Sullivan inl trated the world of selfpublishing, he saw all of the red ags cropping up in that dominion. For that reason, Sullivan has put together a free, self-pub lishing seminar that he will bring to Kings Bay, in conjunction with Morale, Welfare and Recreation, for all Navy personnel and their families. In his seminar, he will not only inspire you to n ish that book youve been kicking around in your head, but also give you the resources so that you can self-publish in the most cost-eective manner. June 6 seminar topic: self-publishing ebooks Panetta: Scene in Syria intolerable THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 A military honor guard leads the 145th Kings County Memorial Day Parade in Brooklyn during Fleet Week New York 2012. Memoia D 2012Donna Engeman visits the grave of her husband, John, at Arlington National Cemetery, Va.Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey and his wife, Deanie, observe names on the Vietnam Memorial. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta escorts 93-year-old Sarah Shay to lay a wreath in remem brance of her son, Maj. Donald Shay, Jr., missing in action from the Vietnam War for 42 years, at the Vietnam War Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C., May 28.Retired Army Command Sgt. Maj. Sterling R. Cale, 90-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, takes a moment in the shrine room of the USS Arizona Memorial during a Memorial Day service there.Service members prepare to present a wreath during a Memorial Day ceremony at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan.PO1 Megan Weikleenget sings America the Beautiful during a Memorial Day ceremony at Manhattans Riverside Park. President Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Administration Secretary Eric Shinseki render honors.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 5 of Augusta, Ga. and served as the commanding ocer of USCGC Yamacraw and later USS Castine dur ing World War I. I can think of no better place to honor Rear Ad miral Ridgely than right here, in this building, on this base and in this state, Evans said. A son of Geor gia, a ne sailor and dis tinguished Coast Guard ocer, with a penchant for escort operations, his life, in many respects, parallels our mission and purpose here at Kings Bay. I for one, take with great pride in the opportunity to dedicate this building to the admiral. Ridgely was awarded the Navy Cross in 1918 for his performance in the important, exacting and hazardous duty of transporting and escort ing troops and supplies through waters infested with enemy submarines and mines. He later went on to serve as the Super intendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Kings Bay Adult Sports and Outdoor Adventure departments hosted a paintball tournament Thursday, May 24, as a part of Morale, Welfare and Recreations Customer Appreciation Week. e event was free of charge and open to all Ac tive Duty and Department of Defense members on the base. ere was a strong showing of eight teams from the base represent ing a variety of commands. ere also were several spectators and family members that showed up to watch the tournament and cheer on their team. e stage for the tour nament was the monstrous inatable paintball arena, set up on our football eld. It was quite a sight to behold. Inside the arena, there were several obstacles and shelters for the players to strategically maneuver around as they stalked the opposing team. Everyone seemed to have a great time at the event, and they seemed eager to participate in future paintball tournaments. I am sure there are sev eral more paintball events on the horizon and that our inatable arena will get increased usage. e champions of the tournament were the Wyoming Weapons of the USS Wyoming. Captain Billy Middleton led the team, comprised of himself, Adam Schumacher, Josh Forrest, and Josh Forte. Being a doubleelimination tournament, spectators were in for a treat as the championship match lasted the full three sets of games. e runnerup team, Team Boats of Port Ops, fought until the bitter end and came up just short. Team Boats consisted of Juan Fuentes, Germaine Peligan, Larry Daniels, Brandon Mitchell, Nicholas Leonard, Robert Freeman, and Matthew Edwards. I would like to extend a special thanks to the great sta at GTF Paintball in Yulee, Fla. ey provided the ocials for this event and they did an amazing job. We could not be happier with the way the event was ociated. GTF promotes a Military Weekend, which runs on the weekend military personnel get paid. In the result of a weekday pay day, Military Weekend is observed the following weekend. During these promotional weekends, military personnel only have to pay for the paint they use when they visit the GTF eld. All other charges are waived by the sta at GTF. For more information, contact Robert at (904) 548-7256, or visit gtfpaint ball.com. is tournament was a great success. I hope we get to host another in the near future. ank you all for your participation and enthusiasm for the event. Customer Appreciation Week was MWRs way of showing our support for all military personnel and their families. We hope that you enjoyed all of the great events throughout the week.Wyoming Weapons wins NSB paintball tourney Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator destructive decisions. Its a program to provide posi tive mentorship to help shipmates, the Navy and the community. CSADD originated at Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic as a peer in uence social group. e popularity and message of the program spread and chapters were established at other commands. As a result, CSADD has been launched Navywide. is program provides an additional resource and communication tool that facilitates positive Sailor interaction and complements a commanders message direct ing proper conduct both on and o duty. e CSADD chapter at Trident Training Facility represents the future of our Submarine Force, said Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba, Submarine Group Ten command master chief. I can think of no better way to kick o the critical days of summer by having our highly motivated future leaders sit down with the Commander Submarine Group Ten and put their signatures on this years Summer Safety Proclamation. CSADD is designed to positively inuence Sailors behavior through re sources and tools that promote good decisionmaking processes, en abling leadership devel opment and inuence among peers at the junior level which, in turn, fos ters both an attitude and atmosphere conducive to good order and discipline. e popularity and message of the program spread and chapters were established at other com mands. As a result, CSADD has been launched Navywide. e goal of this program is to encourage positive social interaction and development of leader ship and decision-making skills. Junior Sailors at each command will be provid ed the opportunity to create social networks, use a variety of communication tools and see visual mes sages to discourage de structive decisions within their peer group. According to the Naval Safety Center Web site, seven Sailors and 15 Ma rines worldwide lost their lives in scal year 2010 while o duty, some of which could have been prevented. e goal of the procla mation is to prevent these incidents from ever happening so that no com mand, or more important ly no family, has to endure any loss of life, injury or incident that takes time away from either home or work. SafetyRidgely

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Midway turning point in battle for Pacic In June 1942, a month after the decisive U.S. vic tory in the Coral Sea, Ja pan was dealt a fatal blow at Midway Island a blow that would turn the course of World War II in favor of the Allies. In August 1942 ALL HANDS, then known as the Bureau of Naval Per sonnel Information Bulletin, published the follow ing account of the Battle of Midway the beginning of the end of the ght in the Pacic. Early in June, near the island of Midway, about 1100 miles to the west of Pearl Harbor, units of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps joined action with a strong Japanese Invasion eet which was approaching our Midway outpost. At about 9 a.m., June 3, Navy Patrol planes report ed a strong force of enemy ships about 700 miles o Midway, proceeding east ward. Nine U.S. Army B-17 Flying Fortresses based on Midway immediately were ordered to intercept and attack the approaching enemy. e Japanese force was approaching in ve columns and was composed of many cruisers, transports, cargo vessels, and other escort ships. e Army bombers scored hits on one cruiser and one transport. Both ships were severely dam aged and left burning. About dawn on June 4, several groups of Army medium and heavy bombers and Marine Corps dive bombers and torpedo planes took to the air from Midway to attack the ap proaching enemy. Four Army torpedo bombers attacked two enemy aircraft carriers through a heavy screen of enemy ghter protection and a curtain of anti-air craft re. One torpedo hit on a carrier is believed to have been made. Two of the four bombers failed to return. Six Marine Corps tor pedo planes attacked the enemy force in the face of heavy odds. It is believed this group scored one hit on an enemy ship. Only one of the six planes re turned to its base. Sixteen Marine Corps dive bombers attacked and scored three hits on a carrier, which is to have been the Soryu. Only half of the attacking planes re turned. Another group of 11 Marine Corps dive bomb ers made a later attack on enemy ships and reported two bomb hits on an en emy battleship, which was left smoking and listing. A group of 16 U.S. Army Flying Fortresses carried out high-level bombing attacks, according three hits on enemy carriers. One carrier was left smok ing heavily. Shortly after the Marine Corps planes had left Midway, the island itself was attacked by a large group of carrier-based enemy planes. ey were engaged by a badly outnumbered Marine Corps ghter force, which met the enemy in the air as he arrived. ese defending ght ers, aided by anti-aircraft batteries, shot down at least 40 of the enemy planes. As the result, the material damage to shore installations, though serious, was not disabling. No plane was caught grounded at Midway. Meanwhile, U.S. Naval forces aoat were being brought into position. Our carrier-based aircraft were launched and were pro ceeding to the spot where the enemys previous course and speed would have placed him had he chosen to continue the as sault. Unaware of the enemys of course, one group of Navy ghters and dive bombers searched along the reported track to the southeast until short age of gas forced them to abandon the search. Some were forced down at sea when they ran out of gas. Most were later rescued. A dierent ight composed of ghters, dive bombers, and torpedo planes concluded that the enemy was retreating. Fifteen torpedo planes from this group, located the enemy westward and proceeded to attack at once without protection or assistance of any kind. Although some hits were reported by radio, and al though some enemy ght ers were shot down, the total damage inicted in this attack may never be known. None of the 15 planes returned. e sole survivor of the 30 ocers was Ensign G.H. Gay Jr., who scored one torpedo hit on an enemy carrier before he was shot down. Other torpedo planes proceeded to press the at tack after the enemy had been located. In spite of heavy losses during these attacks, the torpedo planes engaged the attention of the enemy ghters and anti-aircraft batteries to such a degree that our dive bombers were able to drop bomb after bomb on the enemy ships without serious interference. Navy dive bombers scored many hits and inicted upon the enemy the following dam age: e Kaga, Akagi, and Soryu, aircraft carriers, were severely damaged. Gasoline in planes caught on their ight decks ig nited, starting res which burned until each car rier had sunk. Two battle ships were hit. One was left burning ercely. One destroyer was hit and is believed to have sunk. Shortly after this battle, a force of about 36 enemy planes from the damaged carrier Hiryu attacked the U.S. aircraft carrier York town and her escorts. Eleven of 18 Japanese bombers in this group were shot down before their bombs were dropped. Seven got through our ghter protection. Of the seven, one was disintegrated by a surface ships anti-aircraft re; a second dropped its bomb load into the sea and plunged in after it; while a third was torn to shreds by machine gun re from U.S. ghter planes. Four enemy bombers escaped after scoring three hits. Shortly afterward, 12 to 15 enemy torpedo planes escorted by ghters at tacked Yorktown. Five succeeded in launching torpedoes, but were destroyed as they at tempted to escape. York 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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town was hit and put out of action. e damage caused a list which rendered her ight deck useless. Her aircraft, however, continued operating from other U.S. carriers. While this attack on Yorktown was in progress, some of her own planes located the carrier Hiryu in company with battle ships, cruisers, and destroyers. Our carrier planes im mediately attacked this newly-located force. Hiryu was hit repeatedly and left blazing from stem to stern. She sank the following morning. Two of the enemy bat tleships were pounded severely by bombs and a heavy cruiser was damaged severely. During the same after noon, June 4, a U.S. submarine scored three tor pedo hits on the smoking carrier Soryu as the enemy was attempting to take her into tow. Soryu sank dur ing the night. Just before sunset U.S. Army bombers delivered a heavy bomb attack on the crippled and burn ing ships. ree hits were scored on a damaged car rier, probably Akagi; one hit was scored on a large ship; one hit on a cruiser was left burning; and one destroyer was believed sunk. By sundown on June 4 the United States forces had gained mastery of the air in the region of Mid way. At dawn June 5 our forces were marshalling their strength for further assaults against the en emy eets which by now had separated into several groups, all in full retreat. In the afternoon of June 5, Army Flying Fortresses attacked enemy cruisers again and scored three direct hits upon one heavy cruiser. On the return, one of these planes was lost; a second was forced down at sea 15 miles from the Midway. All except one of the crew of the second plane were rescued. Early on June 6 an air search discovered two groups of enemy ships, each containing cruisers and destroyers. Between 9:30 and 10 a.m., U.S. carrier planes attacked one group which contained the heavy cruis ers Mikuma and Mogami and three destroyers. At least two bomb hits were scored on each Japanese cruiser. One of these de stroyers was sunk. e attacks were carried on until 5:30 p.m. Mikuma was sunk shortly after noon. Mogami was gutted and subsequently sunk. Another enemy cruiser and a destroyer also were hit during these series of attacks. It was during this after noon June 6 that the U.S. destroyer Hammann was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Most of her crew were rescued. Repeated attempts were made to contact the re mainder of the Japanese invasion eet but without success. e battle was over. e following is a reca pitulation of the damage inicted upon the enemy during the battle of Midway. Four Japanese aircraft carriers, the Kaga, Akagi, Soryu, and Hiryu were sunk. ree battleships were damaged by bomb and torpedo hits, one se verely. Two heavy cruis ers, Mogami and Mikuma were sunk. ree others were damaged, one or two severely. One light cruiser was damaged. ree destroyers were sunk and sev eral others were damaged by bombs. At least three transports or auxiliary ships were damaged, and one or more sunk. e Battle of Midway was a complex and wide spread action involving a number of engagements lasting more than three days and nights. Even our active partici pants in the numerous at tacks and counter-attacks are unable to give an accurate account of the dam age inicted by any group in the many individual and unied attacks of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps personnel. Midway THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 7

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The strike-shortened NBA season is drawing to a close, so I went to the Pirates Cove Galley May 30 to consult my panel of experts on who will win this years championship. At the time, San Antonio had a 2-0 lead in its West Conference Finals with Oklahoma City, while Miami led Boston 1-0 in the East. I thought the Thunder would go all the way before they got down to the Spurs. Now, Im picking San Antonio. I just wish I was younger and could stay awake to watch it. MM3 Cordell Erskine USS Rhode Island Blue Irvington, N.J. I believe it will be the Oklahoma City Thunder. Kevin Durrant is unstop pable. ETSN Dylan Davenport USS Rhode Island Blue Elkhart, Ind. I hope the Celtics win. Id rather see that than the Big 3 from Miami. CS2 Bretlan Shelvin Submarine Group 10 Abbeville, La. San Antonio. Theyve got a good bench and a lot of veterans on the team. Pfc. Jacob Frazeur Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Alpharetta, Ga. The Heat. Theyve got Lebron (James) and (Dwyane) Wade and they just dominate. MASR Mack Waldrup Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Houston Oklahoma, because nobody can stop Kevin Durrant or (Russell) Westrook. MM3 Quinton Gray USS Maryland Blue Baltimore The Heat, hands down, been there, done that! No one can keep up with them, theyre too physical and fast-paced. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Jose Musauding NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Iligan, Phillipines. The Heat. Theyve got Lebron (James) and (Dwyane) Wade and they were supposed to win the last time. e Pearl Harbor Submarine Park and Parche Memorial on board Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam was the setting for a Memorial Day ceremo ny held May 28. e ceremony gave retired and active duty submariners and guests the opportunity to pay tribute to the World War II submarines on Eternal Patrol and all those service mem bers that defended our country. e ceremony opened with the parading of the colors as the Pacic Fleet Band performed the National Anthem followed by the ceremony invocation by Cmdr. Steven Moses, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet Force chaplain. A roll call was announced consist ing of a tolling of the bell for each submarine lost and a presentation of a special lei to the USS Growler (SS 215), the Hawaii Chapter U.S. Submarine Veterans of WWII desig nated state submarine lost in World War II. Guest speaker, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet reected on the World War II subma rines on Eternal Patrol and the sac rice and heroism of their crews as well as all the submariners who have followed their paths. Today, as we gather at this unique submarine memorial park, we observe the plaques of these lost boats and their heroic Sailors, we recognize those lost in the sub service during WWII. We recognize the importance of their sacrice and the legacy they have bestowed upon us, Haney, For it was through their eort and ultimately their sacrice, that our submarine force has be come what it is today, a formidable force capable of protecting the very nation that they gave their lives to defend. Today we have gathered to honor and remember not those brave men of the submarine force who paid the ultimate price in ser vice to our country, but all who gave their lives throughout the history of our grateful nation. e conclusion of the ceremony included the Joint Base Pearl Har bor-Hickam Regional Ceremonial Guard Honors and Ceremonies Detachment performing a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps by Musician 1st Class Justin Skorupa from U.S. Pacic Fleet Ceremonial Band. Pacic sub vets observe Memorial Day THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, infor mation and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separat ing military, and family mem bers of relocating civil service person nel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9 and 10. For more informa tion and to register, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their com mand and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 14.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attend ing on how to navigate success fully through financial challenges that accompany them. This train ing was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing sailors today. It provides you with financial management skills to be used over a lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. FFSC workshops Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Alman dine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburg ers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dress ing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sand wiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Pota toes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes with adult summer bowling leagues. For sign-up informa tion contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanc tioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. In cludes registration, instruc tions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camp. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fri days, except weekends and holidays. For more infor mation call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 9, 10 Judy Moody & the Not so Bummer Summer ; June 16, 17 Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief ; June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Soccer camp coming Just for kids Bowling leagues running Liberty call Coffee & Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transi tion, employment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change.Menu FFSC THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012



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Midway victory honoredKings Bay ceremony memorial to turning point in Pacic War Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay took part on Monday in Navy-wide commemorations of the 70th anniversary of the 1942 Battle of Midway, widely regarded as the turning point of the Pacic eater of World War II. In a ceremony overseen by CMDCM James Schubert, a 29-year Navy veteran and Kings Bays Command Master Chief, Installation Commander Capt. John ONeil and Submarine Group Ten Chief of Sta Capt.Kelly McDowell laid a ceremonial wreath on Kings Bays World War II Memorial. In his remarks, Cap. ONeil stressed the importance of re membering and applying the lessons of our naval heritage and relayed the Chief of Naval Op erations message to all Sailors: is historic victory at Midway can be attributed to traits that continue in our Navy today: bold, condent, and procient sailors willing to go into harms way with well-built, resilient ships and air craft. Our Sailors and Marines demonstrate this same warf ighting ethos today as they face unique and demanding chal lenges, on land and sea, operat ing forward deployed, fully ready, around the globe. is legacy is built on the foundation of veter ans, like those at Midway, who have blazed the trail before us. Let us never forget those veterans and their legacy.ey shaped world events for many years and will continue to do so, for it is in our DNA. As navy professionals, it is up to us to preserve and cel ebrate our rich history, knowing that understanding the past will empower us to overcome future challenges. Capt. McDowell spoke to the assembled sailors on the importance and lessons of the battle, reminding them that, It isnt merely enough to survive, we must win and prevail. Adversaries shoot back, and there is no second place. World War I hero honored at Kings Bay ceremony United States Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay held a dedication and naming ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, June 1. Lt. Cmdr. omas Evans, Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay executive ofcer, ocially announced the current training building will be named after Rear Adm. Randolph Ridgely, Jr. Although much has changed since Rear Admiral Ridgely served in the Coast Guard, we owe much of who we are today to him Evans said. What hasnt changed is the ghting spirit of the Coast Guard. at spirit and Rear Admiral Ridgelys success as an ocer, as a sailor and as a leader, is part of our service legacy, and for that we can thank him for setting the standard. e ceremony took place at Ridgely Hall at 9 a.m. and concluded at 10 a.m. with Ridgelys grandson, Mr. H. Scott Camp in attendance. It makes me very proud to be here today and to be part of this ceremony, Camp said. Its really hard to describe how honored I am. My grandfather would be so proud. Ridgely was a native THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Our panel of experts picks NBA champs Page 9 Bible school Children can sign up now for summer activity Page 2 Remember Memorial Day observed worldwide Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Doing the right thing Coast Guard names building for Rear Adm. Ridgely Safety program helps mentor against destructive decisionse commander of Submarine Group Ten and Kings Bay junior enlisted Sailors signed a 101 Critical Days of Summer Proclamation June 1. e proclamations signing took place during the annual Damage Control Olympics at Trident Training Facility. Senior enlisted leaders here drafted the proclamation o of elements from already established safety and awareness programs, and incorporated them into one combined statement. Some of the strongest bullet points that most directly speak to the Kings Bay community were used from Navy programs the leadership team believed to have excellent messages. We wanted to put word out of our vision for summer safety in Kings Bay, said Master Chief Elec tronics Techni cian Mike McLauch lan, Trident Training Facility command master chief and the proclamations writer. [e senior leadership] cares about our Sailors and crew. We want everyone to have fun, but remain safe. Commander, Submarine Group Ten, Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, also took the time to recognize the local Coalition of Sailors Against Destruc tive Decisions chapter which stood up just a few months ago and rein forced all the Kings Bay commands recent General Military Training sessions to increase DUI awareness and to promote summer safety. CSADD is a grassroots eort from our junior Sailors, Tofalo said. e initial focus was to eliminate DUIs, but the junior Sailors wanted to expand eorts to include raising awareness of ... we owe much of who we are today to him. Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Evans MFPU executive officer More on Midway Page 6 Its a program to provide positive mentorship Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group Ten

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Budget for Baby class June 7Navy-Marine Crops Relief Societys Budget for Baby workshop is at 9:30 a.m., ursday, June 7. B4B is a monthly class which helps expectant parents prepare nancially for a new addition to the family. Each participant receives a free layette, with Gerber gear and handmade blanket. For more information or to register, call NMCRS Kings Bay at 573-3928 or visit @ www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay. Kids run registration ends June 8e 2012 Americas Armed Forces Kids Run is Saturday, June 9. Its free for ages 5 to 13. e event takes place at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay football eld/track at 9 a.m. Check in time starts at 8:30 a.m. You can register online at www.americaskidsrun.org. e rst 50 children to register online will receive a free Tshirt the day of the event. You also can register 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m at the Youth Center or at the youth sports elds concession stand during games. Registration is open until June 8. For more information call (912) 573-8202.NSB lost/found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil NMCRS offers free uniform itemsNeed a Navy or Marine Corps uniform item? Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Uniform Locker has serviceable uniform items for free. Visit the Uniform Locker from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday at NMCRS, Building 1032. For questions regarding NMCRS programs or services, call 573-3928 or nd them at www.facebook/nmcrskingsbay.com. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. From June 27 to July 10, customers will have no down payment, no interest and no payments for 360 days when using their Military Star Card to purchase furniture from Ashley, Franklin, Corinthian, Lane, United and Progressive or mattresses made by Simmons, Serta, Sealy, Paramount and Tempur Pedic. Customers can also purchase major appliances from Kenmore, Whirlpool, GE, Maytag, LG, Samsung and Frigidaire. Special orders may also be placed. e Military Star Card oers many benets including 10 percent o the rst days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24hour customer service including online access.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School program. e Command Religious Program of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS continues through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is located across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Terminal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament accounts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His resurrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and rehearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel ofce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Vacation Bible School nearing e Navys Public Library Service now oers Transparent Language Online, a fun, eective, and engaging language-learning program for libraries and their patrons. e program is accessible via Web-browser and will be available for free to all Navy library patrons through Navy Knowledge Online. Transparent Language Online is packed full of pronunciation, speech, grammar, writing, and vocabulary building lessons for more than 80 languages. Featuring top-of-the-line coursework combined with extensive social media resources, Transparent Language Online is the most complete language-learning system available to library patrons. Designed by Transparent Language, a leading provider of bestpractice language-learning software for consumers, educational institutions, government agencies, and businesses, Transparent Language Online uses the same learning method that has helped millions of individuals learn new languages quickly, easily, and eectively. Our partnership with Transparent Language Online in this eort is another great way for us to increase our services to the feet, ghter, and family; not just for the bases and installations, but for the entire Navy around the globe, aoat and ashore, said Nellie Mott, Navy General Library Program manager. e Transparent Language Online language-learning program contains: Essentials Courses 33 lessons to get every learner started Byki Quick Start 10 lists of key words and phrase for patrons with limited learning time Byki Vocabulary a full library of supplemental vocabulary lists Language Reference resources to explore higher-level language and culture elements Language and Culture Blogs designed to add variety and depth to the learning experience Word of the Day makes language learning part of patrons daily routines Online Social Communities patrons can interact with Transparent Languages online community of over 2 million fans, followers, and friends, all learning language together Pronunciation and Conversation Practice record, playback, and compare speech to the pronunciation of real native speakers SlowSound Technology slow down speech to hear every nuance Interactive games including Four-Square, Game Show, Unscramble, and more Byki Mobile for iPhone and Android devices allows for language learning on-the-go Proficiency tests Note that learning material varies by language. Navy Library patrons may register for a Transparent Language Online account by Logging into NKO at www.nko.navy.mil. Click on the Reference heading in the upper left part of the screen. en click on e-Library Language and Culture and nally click on the Transparent Language Online Logo. Once registered, users can access Transparent Language Online from home, school, or any Internet connected computer.Transparent Language oered on-line Installations Command Together, let us Run for the Fallen Run for the Fallen OrganizationThroughout the year, there are races all over this country that support great causes. Often when you run in one, you are motivated not by the competition, but the cause. When I run on my own, I often feel overwhelmingly fortunate for the ability to do so, for the way it leaves me feeling powerful and accomplished, and for the sense of freedom it instills. But when running in a race that supports a worthy cause, it is the community togetherness and the dedication to that cause that make it so very special. When I decided to train for the Marine Corps Marathon last year, I wanted to do so because running a marathon had been on my bucket list for a while, and I had heard that the MCM was a good one for rsttime marathoners. I also thought it would be exciting to run through our nations capital in a race founded and organized by the Marine Corps. On race day, although I was prepared for the physical demands of running 26.2 miles, I was caught o guard by the emotional impact that running this race had on me. I am sure many of the other runners experienced this charge of emotions as well. Not only was it moving to have the encouragement from Marines at every hydration station along the race course and to have a Marine hang a medal around my neck when I crossed the nish line, but to run alongside wounded warriors and hundreds of Americas heroes was awe-inspiring. It was the energy that the collective group created that day that made this one of the most memorable experiences of my life. Another race that supports our Armed Forces and recognizes the sacrice so many have made to protect our freedom is the Run for the Fallen. I learned that the organization started back in 2008 with a dedicated team of runners who made it their mission to remember and honor those service members lost in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Opera tion Enduring Freedom. On June 14, 2008, this team of runners set out to run across America, dedicating every mile along the way to a fallen soldier by marking it with an American ag and personalized sign card. Today, the Run for the Fallen continues with more than 150,000 miles recorded since 2008. Kings Bay has participated for the past three years and will continue to support this great cause with two 5 Ks this summer. In addition, between June 14 and Aug. 21, participants can log their own miles on a miles donation card, which will be collected at the end to tally up Kings Bay contribution. e Run for the Fallen organization asks that communities help them continue to honor and remember our service members, bringing people and communities together. In October at the MCM, it was an honor to run with many of our nations heroes. Starting on June 14, it will be an honor to run for them. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Run for the Fallen starts June 14 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta called the situation in Syria intolerable and said the United States will continue to work with the international community to get Syrian President Bashar Assad to step down. Assads troops allegedly mas sacred thou sands of Syrians since dem onstra tions began there last year. eres no question that we are very concerned about the atrocities that are taking place in Syria, Panetta said. It just makes clear how important it is to remove Assad from power and implement the political reforms that are necessary in that country. Panetta spoke May 31 during a news conference aboard his plane en route to Singapore. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have stressed the need for the international community to work together to continue to put economic and diplomatic pressure the Assad regime. e U.S. will work with others to take whatever other steps need to be taken in order to make very clear that Assad has to step down, Panetta said. e secretary said this includes continuing to put pressure on Russia so that country will use its inuence on the regime. It means continuing to explore every other possible option to try to continue the eort to get Assad to step down, the secretary said. is is an intolerable situation, we cannot be satised with whats going on. Panetta stressed it is always important for the U.S. to project every possible option for taking action. But I think it is very important right now to continue to work with the international community because we all share the same concerns and the same goals here, he said. My hope is that the international community becomes much more aggressive at deciding what additional steps are necessary. Panetta did not speak directly about what military steps are possible, but he did allude to further options. One thing we do at the Pentagon is we plan for all contingencies, and weve done that here, Panetta said. Im not going to go into what we briefed the president on, but suce to say we are prepared for any contingency or any action we are called on to do. Submarine veteran T. Steven Sullivan will present a free seminar on ebook self publishing at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e seminar will be 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, at the Big EZ Sports Zone, Building 1039. Over the last two years, the growing popularity of ebooks has kicked the world of self-publishing into ank speed. Nobody knows this better than Sullivan. When Sullivan, a former Tor pedo mans Mate and Diver, fin ished his rst novel Hot Run the Kindle had just opened up for self-publishers. Since Sullivan had written Hot Run as a tribute to his buddies from the boat, he gured self-publishing would be a convenient way to distribute his story to his fellow bubbleheads. At the time, Sullivan could not have predicted the success he would have going the self-publishing route, but a year later, with more than 20,000 copies of his novel sold, he could not be more pleasantly surprised. However, thats not to say that Sullivan dove into the waters of self-publishing without caution. When Sullivan left the Navy in 1997, he began working as an actor, stuntman and voice-over artist. He quickly learned that there was an entire industry comprised of predators who preyed on peoples dreams. Promises of easy success for the right price were plenty. Rarely though, did these promises lead to anything but a lighter wallet. When Sullivan inltrated the world of selfpublishing, he saw all of the red ags cropping up in that dominion. For that reason, Sullivan has put together a free, self-publishing seminar that he will bring to Kings Bay, in conjunction with Morale, Welfare and Recreation, for all Navy personnel and their families. In his seminar, he will not only inspire you to nish that book youve been kicking around in your head, but also give you the resources so that you can self-publish in the most cost-eective manner. June 6 seminar topic: self-publishing ebooks Panetta: Scene in Syria intolerable THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 A military honor guard leads the 145th Kings County Memorial Day Parade in Brooklyn during Fleet Week New York 2012. Memoia D 2012Donna Engeman visits the grave of her husband, John, at Arlington National Cemetery, Va.Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey and his wife, Deanie, observe names on the Vietnam Memorial. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta escorts 93-year-old Sarah Shay to lay a wreath in remembrance of her son, Maj. Donald Shay, Jr., missing in action from the Vietnam War for 42 years, at the Vietnam War Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C., May 28.Retired Army Command Sgt. Maj. Sterling R. Cale, 90-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, takes a moment in the shrine room of the USS Arizona Memorial during a Memorial Day service there.Service members prepare to present a wreath during a Memorial Day ceremony at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan.PO1 Megan Weikleenget sings America the Beautiful during a Memorial Day ceremony at Manhattans Riverside Park. President Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Administration Secretary Eric Shinseki render honors.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 5 of Augusta, Ga. and served as the commanding ocer of USCGC Yamacraw and later USS Castine during World War I. I can think of no better place to honor Rear Admiral Ridgely than right here, in this building, on this base and in this state, Evans said. A son of Georgia, a ne sailor and distinguished Coast Guard ocer, with a penchant for escort operations, his life, in many respects, parallels our mission and purpose here at Kings Bay. I for one, take with great pride in the opportunity to dedicate this building to the admiral. Ridgely was awarded the Navy Cross in 1918 for his performance in the important, exacting and hazardous duty of transporting and escorting troops and supplies through waters infested with enemy submarines and mines. He later went on to serve as the Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Kings Bay Adult Sports and Outdoor Adventure departments hosted a paintball tournament Thursday, May 24, as a part of Morale, Welfare and Recreations Customer Appreciation Week. e event was free of charge and open to all Active Duty and Department of Defense members on the base. ere was a strong showing of eight teams from the base representing a variety of commands. ere also were several spectators and family members that showed up to watch the tournament and cheer on their team. e stage for the tournament was the monstrous inatable paintball arena, set up on our football eld. It was quite a sight to behold. Inside the arena, there were several obstacles and shelters for the players to strategically maneuver around as they stalked the opposing team. Everyone seemed to have a great time at the event, and they seemed eager to participate in future paintball tournaments. I am sure there are several more paintball events on the horizon and that our inatable arena will get increased usage. e champions of the tournament were the Wyoming Weapons of the USS Wyoming. Captain Billy Middleton led the team, comprised of himself, Adam Schumacher, Josh Forrest, and Josh Forte. Being a doubleelimination tournament, spectators were in for a treat as the championship match lasted the full three sets of games. e runnerup team, Team Boats of Port Ops, fought until the bitter end and came up just short. Team Boats consisted of Juan Fuentes, Germaine Peligan, Larry Daniels, Brandon Mitchell, Nicholas Leonard, Robert Freeman, and Matthew Edwards. I would like to extend a special thanks to the great sta at GTF Paintball in Yulee, Fla. ey provided the ocials for this event and they did an amazing job. We could not be happier with the way the event was ociated. GTF promotes a Military Weekend, which runs on the weekend military personnel get paid. In the result of a weekday pay day, Military Weekend is observed the following weekend. During these promotional weekends, military personnel only have to pay for the paint they use when they visit the GTF eld. All other charges are waived by the sta at GTF. For more information, contact Robert at (904) 548-7256, or visit gtfpaintball.com. is tournament was a great success. I hope we get to host another in the near future. ank you all for your participation and enthusiasm for the event. Customer Appreciation Week was MWRs way of showing our support for all military personnel and their families. We hope that you enjoyed all of the great events throughout the week.Wyoming Weapons wins NSB paintball tourney Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator destructive decisions. Its a program to provide positive mentorship to help shipmates, the Navy and the community. CSADD originated at Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic as a peer inuence social group. e popularity and message of the program spread and chapters were established at other commands. As a result, CSADD has been launched Navywide. is program provides an additional resource and communication tool that facilitates positive Sailor interaction and complements a commanders message directing proper conduct both on and o duty. e CSADD chapter at Trident Training Facility represents the future of our Submarine Force, said Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba, Submarine Group Ten command master chief. I can think of no better way to kick o the critical days of summer by having our highly motivated future leaders sit down with the Commander Submarine Group Ten and put their signatures on this years Summer Safety Proclamation. CSADD is designed to positively inuence Sailors behavior through resources and tools that promote good decisionmaking processes, enabling leadership development and inuence among peers at the junior level which, in turn, fosters both an attitude and atmosphere conducive to good order and discipline. e popularity and message of the program spread and chapters were established at other commands. As a result, CSADD has been launched Navywide. e goal of this program is to encourage positive social interaction and development of leadership and decision-making skills. Junior Sailors at each command will be provided the opportunity to create social networks, use a variety of communication tools and see visual messages to discourage destructive decisions within their peer group. According to the Naval Safety Center Web site, seven Sailors and 15 Marines worldwide lost their lives in scal year 2010 while o duty, some of which could have been prevented. e goal of the proclamation is to prevent these incidents from ever happening so that no command, or more importantly no family, has to endure any loss of life, injury or incident that takes time away from either home or work. SafetyRidgely

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Midway turning point in battle for Pacic In June 1942, a month after the decisive U.S. victory in the Coral Sea, Japan was dealt a fatal blow at Midway Island a blow that would turn the course of World War II in favor of the Allies. In August 1942 ALL HANDS, then known as the Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin, published the following account of the Battle of Midway the beginning of the end of the ght in the Pacic. Early in June, near the island of Midway, about 1100 miles to the west of Pearl Harbor, units of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps joined action with a strong Japanese Invasion eet which was approaching our Midway outpost. At about 9 a.m., June 3, Navy Patrol planes reported a strong force of enemy ships about 700 miles o Midway, proceeding eastward. Nine U.S. Army B-17 Flying Fortresses based on Midway immediately were ordered to intercept and attack the approaching enemy. e Japanese force was approaching in ve columns and was composed of many cruisers, transports, cargo vessels, and other escort ships. e Army bombers scored hits on one cruiser and one transport. Both ships were severely damaged and left burning. About dawn on June 4, several groups of Army medium and heavy bombers and Marine Corps dive bombers and torpedo planes took to the air from Midway to attack the approaching enemy. Four Army torpedo bombers attacked two enemy aircraft carriers through a heavy screen of enemy ghter protection and a curtain of anti-aircraft re. One torpedo hit on a carrier is believed to have been made. Two of the four bombers failed to return. Six Marine Corps torpedo planes attacked the enemy force in the face of heavy odds. It is believed this group scored one hit on an enemy ship. Only one of the six planes returned to its base. Sixteen Marine Corps dive bombers attacked and scored three hits on a carrier, which is to have been the Soryu. Only half of the attacking planes returned. Another group of 11 Marine Corps dive bombers made a later attack on enemy ships and reported two bomb hits on an enemy battleship, which was left smoking and listing. A group of 16 U.S. Army Flying Fortresses carried out high-level bombing attacks, according three hits on enemy carriers. One carrier was left smoking heavily. Shortly after the Marine Corps planes had left Midway, the island itself was attacked by a large group of carrier-based enemy planes. ey were engaged by a badly outnumbered Marine Corps ghter force, which met the enemy in the air as he arrived. ese defending ghters, aided by anti-aircraft batteries, shot down at least 40 of the enemy planes. As the result, the material damage to shore installations, though serious, was not disabling. No plane was caught grounded at Midway. Meanwhile, U.S. Naval forces aoat were being brought into position. Our carrier-based aircraft were launched and were proceeding to the spot where the enemys previous course and speed would have placed him had he chosen to continue the assault. Unaware of the enemys of course, one group of Navy ghters and dive bombers searched along the reported track to the southeast until shortage of gas forced them to abandon the search. Some were forced down at sea when they ran out of gas. Most were later rescued. A dierent ight composed of ghters, dive bombers, and torpedo planes concluded that the enemy was retreating. Fifteen torpedo planes from this group, located the enemy westward and proceeded to attack at once without protection or assistance of any kind. Although some hits were reported by radio, and although some enemy ghters were shot down, the total damage inicted in this attack may never be known. None of the 15 planes returned. e sole survivor of the 30 ocers was Ensign G.H. Gay Jr., who scored one torpedo hit on an enemy carrier before he was shot down. Other torpedo planes proceeded to press the attack after the enemy had been located. In spite of heavy losses during these attacks, the torpedo planes engaged the attention of the enemy ghters and anti-aircraft batteries to such a degree that our dive bombers were able to drop bomb after bomb on the enemy ships without serious interference. Navy dive bombers scored many hits and inicted upon the enemy the following damage: e Kaga, Akagi, and Soryu, aircraft carriers, were severely damaged. Gasoline in planes caught on their ight decks ignited, starting res which burned until each carrier had sunk. Two battleships were hit. One was left burning ercely. One destroyer was hit and is believed to have sunk. Shortly after this battle, a force of about 36 enemy planes from the damaged carrier Hiryu attacked the U.S. aircraft carrier Yorktown and her escorts. Eleven of 18 Japanese bombers in this group were shot down before their bombs were dropped. Seven got through our ghter protection. Of the seven, one was disintegrated by a surface ships anti-aircraft re; a second dropped its bomb load into the sea and plunged in after it; while a third was torn to shreds by machine gun re from U.S. ghter planes. Four enemy bombers escaped after scoring three hits. Shortly afterward, 12 to 15 enemy torpedo planes escorted by ghters attacked Yorktown. Five succeeded in launching torpedoes, but were destroyed as they attempted to escape. York6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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town was hit and put out of action. e damage caused a list which rendered her ight deck useless. Her aircraft, however, continued operating from other U.S. carriers. While this attack on Yorktown was in progress, some of her own planes located the carrier Hiryu in company with battleships, cruisers, and destroyers. Our carrier planes immediately attacked this newly-located force. Hiryu was hit repeatedly and left blazing from stem to stern. She sank the following morning. Two of the enemy battleships were pounded severely by bombs and a heavy cruiser was damaged severely. During the same afternoon, June 4, a U.S. submarine scored three torpedo hits on the smoking carrier Soryu as the enemy was attempting to take her into tow. Soryu sank during the night. Just before sunset U.S. Army bombers delivered a heavy bomb attack on the crippled and burning ships. ree hits were scored on a damaged carrier, probably Akagi; one hit was scored on a large ship; one hit on a cruiser was left burning; and one destroyer was believed sunk. By sundown on June 4 the United States forces had gained mastery of the air in the region of Midway. At dawn June 5 our forces were marshalling their strength for further assaults against the enemy eets which by now had separated into several groups, all in full retreat. In the afternoon of June 5, Army Flying Fortresses attacked enemy cruisers again and scored three direct hits upon one heavy cruiser. On the return, one of these planes was lost; a second was forced down at sea 15 miles from the Midway. All except one of the crew of the second plane were rescued. Early on June 6 an air search discovered two groups of enemy ships, each containing cruisers and destroyers. Between 9:30 and 10 a.m., U.S. carrier planes attacked one group which contained the heavy cruisers Mikuma and Mogami and three destroyers. At least two bomb hits were scored on each Japanese cruiser. One of these destroyers was sunk. e attacks were carried on until 5:30 p.m. Mikuma was sunk shortly after noon. Mogami was gutted and subsequently sunk. Another enemy cruiser and a destroyer also were hit during these series of attacks. It was during this afternoon June 6 that the U.S. destroyer Hammann was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Most of her crew were rescued. Repeated attempts were made to contact the remainder of the Japanese invasion eet but without success. e battle was over. e following is a recapitulation of the damage inicted upon the enemy during the battle of Midway. Four Japanese aircraft carriers, the Kaga, Akagi, Soryu, and Hiryu were sunk. ree battleships were damaged by bomb and torpedo hits, one severely. Two heavy cruisers, Mogami and Mikuma were sunk. ree others were damaged, one or two severely. One light cruiser was damaged. ree destroyers were sunk and several others were damaged by bombs. At least three transports or auxiliary ships were damaged, and one or more sunk. e Battle of Midway was a complex and widespread action involving a number of engagements lasting more than three days and nights. Even our active participants in the numerous attacks and counter-attacks are unable to give an accurate account of the damage inicted by any group in the many individual and unied attacks of our Army, Navy, and Marine Corps personnel. Midway THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 7

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The strike-shortened NBA season is drawing to a close, so I went to the Pirates Cove Galley May 30 to consult my panel of experts on who will win this years championship. At the time, San Antonio had a 2-0 lead in its West Conference Finals with Oklahoma City, while Miami led Boston 1-0 in the East. I thought the Thunder would go all the way before they got down to the Spurs. Now, Im picking San Antonio. I just wish I was younger and could stay awake to watch it. MM3 Cordell Erskine USS Rhode Island Blue Irvington, N.J. I believe it will be the Oklahoma City Thunder. Kevin Durrant is unstoppable. ETSN Dylan Davenport USS Rhode Island Blue Elkhart, Ind. I hope the Celtics win. Id rather see that than the Big 3 from Miami. CS2 Bretlan Shelvin Submarine Group 10 Abbeville, La. San Antonio. Theyve got a good bench and a lot of veterans on the team. Pfc. Jacob Frazeur Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Alpharetta, Ga. The Heat. Theyve got Lebron (James) and (Dwyane) Wade and they just dominate. MASR Mack Waldrup Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Houston Oklahoma, because nobody can stop Kevin Durrant or (Russell) Westrook. MM3 Quinton Gray USS Maryland Blue Baltimore The Heat, hands down, been there, done that! No one can keep up with them, theyre too physical and fast-paced. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Jose Musauding NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Iligan, Phillipines. The Heat. Theyve got Lebron (James) and (Dwyane) Wade and they were supposed to win the last time. e Pearl Harbor Submarine Park and Parche Memorial on board Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam was the setting for a Memorial Day ceremony held May 28. e ceremony gave retired and active duty submariners and guests the opportunity to pay tribute to the World War II submarines on Eternal Patrol and all those service members that defended our country. e ceremony opened with the parading of the colors as the Pacic Fleet Band performed the National Anthem followed by the ceremony invocation by Cmdr. Steven Moses, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet Force chaplain. A roll call was announced consisting of a tolling of the bell for each submarine lost and a presentation of a special lei to the USS Growler (SS 215), the Hawaii Chapter U.S. Submarine Veterans of WWII designated state submarine lost in World War II. Guest speaker, Adm. Cecil Haney, commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet reected on the World War II submarines on Eternal Patrol and the sacrice and heroism of their crews as well as all the submariners who have followed their paths. Today, as we gather at this unique submarine memorial park, we observe the plaques of these lost boats and their heroic Sailors, we recognize those lost in the sub service during WWII. We recognize the importance of their sacrice and the legacy they have bestowed upon us, Haney, For it was through their eort and ultimately their sacrice, that our submarine force has become what it is today, a formidable force capable of protecting the very nation that they gave their lives to defend. Today we have gathered to honor and remember not those brave men of the submarine force who paid the ultimate price in service to our country, but all who gave their lives throughout the history of our grateful nation. e conclusion of the ceremony included the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Regional Ceremonial Guard Honors and Ceremonies Detachment performing a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps by Musician 1st Class Justin Skorupa from U.S. Pacic Fleet Ceremonial Band. Pacic sub vets observe Memorial Day THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, infor mation and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separat ing military, and family mem bers of relocating civil service person nel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9 and 10. For more informa tion and to register, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 14.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attend ing on how to navigate success fully through financial challenges that accompany them. This train ing was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing sailors today. It provides you with financial management skills to be used over a lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. FFSC workshops Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes with adult summer bowling leagues. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. Includes registration, instructions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camp. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. June 9, 10 Judy Moody & the Not so Bummer Summer ; June 16, 17 Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief ; June 23, 24 Aliens in the Attic ; June 30, July 1 Furry Vengence. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. Soccer camp coming Just for kids Bowling leagues running Liberty call Coffee & Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transi tion, employment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change.Menu FFSC THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 7, 2012