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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-31-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00255

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00255


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Dempsey reects on dayJoint chiefs chair notes sacrices past and presentIn a round of Memorial Day television interviews Monday, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta urged Americans to re ect on the meaning of this national holiday, a message underscored by the on-going mission in Af ghanistan as well as fresh reminders of the militarys obligation to be ready to respond if called upon. I would ask people to take a solemn moment at some point Two USS Wyoming ocers participate in discussions e Navy Memorials Naval Heritage Center hosted a roundtable discussion May 24 in Washington, D.C., to discuss the status of the Navys submarine force. e panel answered questions from civilian and military media on issues like the importance of junior ocers on subs and gen der integration within the submarine community. Its very challenging being a junior ocer on board [a sub marine], said Lt. j.g. Maxwell Mayer, operations ocer aboard USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). Were out there as one of the largest nuclear forces, and were there 24 hours a day, ready and deterring other countries from doing bad things. e leader ship and responsibility oppor tunities you get are unmatched. Roundtable members ac knowledged that teamwork and professionalism are vital in suc ceeding in the submarine eld. To be a submariner takes a lot of tenacity, integrity and courage, said Lt. j.g. Vanessa Esch, electrical assistant aboard USS Ohio (SSGN 726). Every single one of us is responsible for a vital part of our submarine. e standards that we set as a community make me proud to be a part of this community. e submarine force is one of many platforms the Navy has at its disposal, but it oers the unique option of providing our national decision makers with the full range of operational choices, from undetectable clandestine maneuvers to fullon attack. Were all Sailors, she said. We go to work, we do our job and do it well, whether its above the sea or under it, said Lt. j.g. Emma Larenes, supply ocer on board USS Wyoming. [How ever, submarine] training is so rigorous and dierent than any other community that it kind of sets us apart. e majority of the media in terest at the roundtable focused on the recent gender inteTHEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope The best and worst in chip flavoring Page 9 Josh Gracin Country star plays at MWR concert Page 4 Remember Old Guard decorates for Memorial Day Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com MMST earns Kimball Award Kings Bay unit rst in Coast Guard to repeat honor e crewmembers assigned to Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay are now con sidered among the Coast Guard elite after receiving the presti gious Sumner I. Kimball Readi ness Award for two consecutive years. e unit accepted the award from Captain Je Novotny, De ployable Operations Group Deputy Commander May 22. e MSST unit underwent a meticulous review in March by an independent Coast Guard Standardization team. e team measured the units ability to carry out its multiple missions. Units that not only meet, but far exceed all requirements, receive the Kimball Award. I view the receipt of this award as a total team eort, said Cmdr. Matthew Baer, Kings Bay Maritime Safety and Security Team commanding ocer. By winning this award two years in a row, it proves that our unit is not only committed to earning a level of excellence but also committed to sustaining it. Tobe able to earn the Kimball Award ittakes a combination of good test scores, great condition of the vessels, excellent performance of underway drills, a successful and progressive unit training program, survival systems readiness and good ad ministrative work by all mem bers. Failure in any one of these areas will likely prevent a unit from achieving this award. Overall the unit achieved a score of 46 out of 50 possible Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, USS Tennessee receive honors for 2012e Secretary of the Navy has selected the 2012 Safety Excellence Award recipients who will be honored at a ceremony July 11 at the Navy Memorial Heritage Center eater in Washington, D.C. Each year, the Secretary of the Navy bestows the Safety Excellence Award upon those Navy and Marine Corps commands who achieved exceptional and sustained safety performance during the previous year. Under Secretary of the Navy Robert O. Work, will present 19 Safety Excellence Awards: Industrial, Category A NAVFAC Northwest; Industrial, Category B Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF JRMC); Industrial, Category C Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow; Non-Industrial, Category A Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Non-Industrial, Category B Naval Air Station Lemoore; Non-Industrial, Category C Naval Base Ventura County; Fleet Operational/Fleet Support Safety awards earned USS Tennessee docks at NSB Kings Bay. Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber101 Days of Summer Naval Heritage Center has roundtable on sub eet

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a prepared ness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take ad vantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Opera tion New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Pursue a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Commander, Navy Installations Command, announced the phased Navy-wide release of the Housing Early Application Tool beginning May 1. is Web-based tool will allow Sailors and their families to apply for housing online from any computer. HEAT makes the Navy house hunting process smoother and less stressful for our Sailors and their families, said Vice Adm. William French, commander, Navy Installa tions Command. By providing the early housing application online, Sailors and their spouses can use HEAT to review housing and com munity information, and make an informed decision on a home before receiving their permanent change of station orders. HEAT utilizes authoritative sys tems to reduce the amount of per sonal information and to steam line the online process. HEAT can be securely accessed from any computer with an internet connection. Service members or their spous es can use HEAT prior to receiving PCS orders to request information about community housing or check on their eligibility for military and privatized housing. ey also may submit HEAT re quests to multiple Installations if they are not sure where they may be stationed next. Our goal with HEAT is to reach out to Sailors early in the PCS pro cess to reduce stress and provide proactive support when moving from one duty station to another, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC Hous ing Program Manager. With HEAT, Sailors and their families are able to make contact with our Navy Hous ing Service Centers and Privatization Partners to discuss their hous ing needs and learn about their housing options at any time. HEAT makes it easy to connect with our housing professionals and make informed decisions before even hav ing orders. HEAT will be deployed Navy-wide by Navy Region according to the fol lowing schedule: Naval District Washington, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic and Navy Region Midwest began May 1, Navy Region Southwest began May 8, Navy Region Southeast began May 15, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Asia beginning May 22, Navy Region Hawaii beginning May 29, Navy Region Japan, Navy Region Korea and Singapore Area Coordinator beginning June 8, Joint Region Marianas beginning June 15. HEAT will be implemented by region and will be Navy-wide by June 30. To access HEAT and for more in formation about when your base will have HEAT, visit www.cnic.navy. mil/HEAT. Housing application tool is on-line Hurricane season is fast ap proaching. Many prepare for this, but what about tornadoes, ooding, house res, brush res or even family emergencies? One of the most important things to do for hurricane season or any di saster is to be prepared. Fleet and Family Support Centers will have a Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 6 and 2 to 4 p.m., June 12. ere, you will get im portant information and resources from FFSC, Naval Submarine Base Emergency Management, the Fire Department, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross, Camden County Emergency Man agement Agency, Balfour Beatty, Base Security and training and demonstration will be provided on the Navy Family Accountability Assess ment System. Once you have attended the Town Hall Meeting, you can make a thor ough assessment of what you need to prepare in case of a disaster. Get the whole family involved and come up with an emergency plan. Should a disaster situation occur, everyone will know what to do. Free childcare will be provided for active duty military for the June 6 session only. Register with the Child Development Center by June 1 at 573-9918. For additional information on the Ready Navy Emergency Prepared ness Town Hall Meeting, call 5734513.Hurricane prep at June 1 town hall Fleet & Family Support Health is the thing that makes you feel that now is the best time of the year. Franklin P. AdamsWith the school year draw ing to a close and summer right around the corner, now is the perfect time to start planning some ways that you and your family can stay active and fit over the summer months. Although you already may be dreaming about vacations, cookouts and lazy summer days, if you forego your tness regimen or fail to keep a balanced diet, by fall you could be left with some undesirable results. ere is no such thing as taking a vacation from tness. So if you have a busy summer ahead, plan for the disruption in your normal routine by coming up with creative ways to work tness in. A summer vacation does not need to end with feelings of guilt about overindulging and avoiding exercise. You can maintain your healthy lifestyle and still enjoy time away by staying conscious of what you eat and balanc ing it with a little planned physical activity each day you are away. For example, take a jump rope and a resistance band for a simple and quick workout that you could do right in your hotel room. Play games with your kids that involve exercise, such as soccer or softball on the beach. Or plan activities such as hiking or kayaking that have the workout built right in. Do some kind of activity each day that you nd enjoyable and fun so that you wont mind doing it. If you are an outdoor exerciser, dont let the heat of summer keep you from working out. Move indoors. Use it as an opportunity to try something new. Check out the group tness classes at the gym or pick up swimming as a way to stay cool and t. When attending or hosting a summer cookout, prepare a healthy dish or two, and choose it over the other unhealthy alternatives. As much as possible, avoid drinking your calories by choosing water or unsweetened beverages over alcoholic drinks and soda. Finally, shift your focus by spending time socializing or playing games versus hanging out by the picnic tables full of food. Whether at home or away on vacation, I encourage you to nd ways to make tness fun for you and your entire family this summer. With a little creative planning and commitment to staying t, an active and healthy lifestyle can be enjoyed year-round.Avoiding the lazy days this summer Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Installations Command e summer months herald the busiest move season of the year as hundreds of thousands of Depart ment of Defense and Coast Guard servicemen and women receive or ders to new assignments across the nation and worldwide. Naval Supply Systems Command Global Logistics Support Household Goods Assistant Program Manager Andrea Gergen advises those trans ferring to book their moves early. e period of May 15 and August 31 is the annual peak move season, Gergen said. Gergen advises that movers should give their Household Goods oces a minimum of three weeks lead time or more to initiate an ef fective, smoother move experience. DoD and the USCG book an es timated 225,000 household goods shipments each summer, Gergen said. In addition to these moves, many federal civilian employees also choose to schedule their moves dur ing the summer, since most schools are out of session and the relocation will be less disruptive for children. Service members who are faced with trying to move during this bottleneck period might nd them selves with fewer options if they wait too long to book a move date. Gergen suggested that families be exible with their moving dates, plan ahead, and recognize that now is the time to get rid of unwanted items to reduce their shipments weight. No one wants to get a bill for be ing overweight on their shipment, Gergen said. Summer is peak season for moving Naval Supply

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NAVADMIN 164/12, re leased May 18, announced the chief of naval operations approval of a num ber of changes to uniforms and uniform wear policy. ese uniform changes are the direct result of Sailor and leadership feedback, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Updating Navy uniforms is part of out tting the 21st Century Sailor, ensuring our Sail ors have practical uniforms they want and that represent our proud naval heritage while reecting advances in clothing technology and design. An improved design of the male E1-E6 Service Dress Blue Uniform, in corporating a side zipper on the jumper and a hidden center zipper on the trousers, is approved. e uniform is scheduled to begin distribution in October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, and Fleet availabil ity is expected by October 2018. Specic details regarding eet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. e E1-E6 mens and womens Service Dress White jumper approved design improvements include incorporating a side zipper, front and rear yoke, Navy blue piping on the ap and sleeve cus with Navy blue piping and but ton fasteners. Introduc tion of the new E1 to E6 SDW will begin October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes. Fleet roll out will begin by October 2018. Specic details regarding Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. e contemporary de sign for Service Dress Kha ki is approved for optional wear. Detailed guidance on the occasion for wear and Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. A number of changes to the Navy ight suit occa sion and manner of wear are contained in the NAV ADMIN, including changes to the approved colors for undershirts and align ing the manner of wear of the one-piece ight suit with the Navy Working Uniform Type I. Among the changes to NWU policy approved in the NAVADMIN is the op tion to wear a nametape on the left shoulder pock et ap of the NWU Type I Parka, beginning July, 17. ese nametapes will be purchased at the Sailors expense during the op tional period. Nametapes will become mandatory Oct 1, 2013. Sailors will receive a clothing replacement allowance to help purchase one additional nametape for the parka. Other changes to the NWU policy include the approval to wear as an optional item a nylon webbing rigger belt and NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers. e optional rigger belt will be a one and three-fourth inch wide, one-piece adjust able nylon webbing, metal or plastic buckle. Belts worn by E-1 through E-6 personnel will be black, while belts worn by E-7 and above will be tan/khaki. Sailors will be able to buy the NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers for wear during inclement weather to and from home and work. Personally pur chased trousers will not be worn to perform ocial or assigned duties. e trousers will be available for purchase at selected Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line and 1-800 call centers be ginning Oct. 1. e NAVADMIN includes a list of additional commands authorized to wear the NWU Type III (Woodland) for daily and deployment and deployment training wear, as well as further guidance on approval authority for the wear of this uniform. Fleet Commanders will now be the authorizing authority for wear of the NWU Type III for deploy ment and pre-deployment work up/training. When not in a deployment or pre-deployment training status, personnel will wear the NWU Type I or service uniform as appropriate. In June 2013, an op tional redesigned khaki maternity blouse with adjustable waist tabs and slightly shorter length will be available in regular and long sizes. e blouse will become a mandatory, as needed, item in 2015. e NAVADMIN also approved several insignia and badge additions and changes including standardizing the design and reducing the number of Navy Security Forces Identication badges from eight to three badges: U.S. Navy Security Forces, U.S. Navy Corrections Specialist and U.S. Navy Masterat-Arms. A Strategic Sealift Of cer Warfare Insignia for wear by ocers who have successfully completed the qualication require ments will be available May 2013. e United States Cyber Command identication badge is authorized to be worn by ocers and enlisted assigned to US CYBERCOM beginning July 17. Also beginning July 17, the Marine Corps Combatant Diver breast insig nia is authorized for wear on Navy uniforms by Sailors that successfully meet all qualication requirements stipulated in MILP ERSMAN article 1220-101. Illustrations of the new uniform items and insig nia, as well as instructions on how to submit uniform changes to the Uniform Board, can be found on the Navy Uniform Matters Oce Web site at www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/uniforms/ pages/default2.aspx. New uniform regs issuedService members have two options for moving their household goods. ey can choose a govern ment-arranged move, in which a contractor packs and ships their household goods, or they may per form a Personally Procured Move formerly known as a DITY move, where the customer arranges to rent a truck or trailer, or uses their own vehicle to move their items. For more information on either option and to start the move process, customers should go to www.move.mil. For questions or con cerns about moving cus tomers may e-mail householdgoods@navy.mil for assistance or contact their local personal property shipping oce.Move Navy implementation of Department of Defense policy allowing Reservists to carry over leave earned during an active duty pe riod to a later active duty period was announced in NAVADMIN 163/12, May 18. Reserve Sailors may now earn and carry over up to 60 days of accrued leave. Additionally, as part of the 2010 National De fense Authorization Act, all service members may carry over up to 75 days if the leave was accrued between Oct. 1, 2008 and Sept. 30, 2013. If serving in a combat tax exclusion zone, active duty and Reserve Sailors may be eligible to carry over up to 120 days of ac crued leave. Reservists desiring leave carry-over must sign a Page 13 documenting the leave carried over at their Personnel Support Detachment at the time of separation from an active duty period. Service members who choose to sell back car ried over leave may do so at separation from their next active duty period, separation from the ser vice (unless discharged under other than honor able conditions) or upon retirement. e new leave carryover changes are being updated to reect the cur rent MILPERSMAN articles that apply (1050-060, 1050-070 and 7220-340). For more information, read NAVADMIN 163/12 or contact your servicing PSD.Policy for carry-over leave changed THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 The crowd settles in as Josh Gracin and his band begin playing. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeffrey Pafford welcomes country singer and Marine veteran Josh Gracin to MWRs Concert In The Park, May 23. Josh GracinGracin and his lead guitarist, right, captivate the crowd with their performance. Enthusiastic fans get comfortable for the free concert. The event was sponsored by Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and Recreation and was part of its Customer Appreciation Week. Children of all ages enjoyed singing along and dancing to the music.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 5 points. Most notably, MSST Kings Bay re ceived zero discrepancies during an ex tensive review of all its personnel protec tive equipment and rescue and survival systems gear. e great thing about this award is it is not an individual award, its a team and unit award, said Capt. Je Novotny, Deployable Operations Group Deputy Commander. It it is a true reection of your exceptional performance and atten tion to detail that you all attain each and every day. Kimball was the general superinten dent of the Revenue Marine Bureau from 1871 to 1878, which evolved into the U.S. Life Saving Service, a predecessor to the modern day Coast Guard. Kimball is credited for putting the ser vice on the road to professionalism by dening and heavily enforcing the fundamentals of training and equipment.Kimball e Oce of Naval Research took some of its hottest technologies and hands-on science activi ties to the city that never sleeps during Fleet Week New York May 23 to 30, a free event open to the public. is is a great opportunity to connect with others across the maritime fam ily and with New Yorkers to show how ONRs work is improving their armed forces capabilities and national security, said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder. We thank New York for showing its appreciation to those who serve and honoring the heroes whove made the ultimate sacrice. ONR had exhibits on Piers 86 and 92. At Pier 92, ONR fea tured some of its cuttingedge technologies. Mak ing its rst Fleet Week appearance was the new F/A-18E/F Super Hornet ight simulator. Visitors can tried piloting a virtual F/A-18 featuring newly developed ight control software that aids landing aboard aircraft carriers. Other featured technol ogies included: Catapult Capacity Selector Valve Calculator a handheld electronic device with custom soft ware that allows flight deck officers to accurately and quickly compute the proper catapult setting for aircraft carrier launches Fuel Cell Vehicle this automotive technol ogy runs on hydrogenpowered fuel cells rather than a standard internal combustion engine, pro ducing zero emissions Ground Unmanned Support Surrogate Vehicle an unmanned vehicle designed to re-supply troops, reduce the loads carried by Marines and provide an immediate means for evacuating combat casualties Improved Flight Deck Uniform includes new, safer head protection; a more durable, quickdrying and comfortable jersey a coat that acts as a flotation device in emer gencies; and trousers with secure pockets and an improved fit Modular Advanced Armed Robotic System a remotely oper ated unmanned ground vehicle that can provide remote targeting and weapons engagement, as well as advanced intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance Multiple Weapon Control Sight an infan try weapon fire control unit that mounts to the side of numerous weapon systems to provide ballistic fire control with a range knob and lightemitting diode (LED) dis play screen Octavia a mobile, dexterous, social robot that moves on wheels and can express humanlike facial expressions, gesture with its hands and move objects At Pier 86, next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, ONR dis played two of its projectbased educational out reach tools: SeaPerch and Physics of Sail. Visitors took part in the SeaPerch national, curric ulum-based STEM education program by driving the underwater remotely operated vehicle. Physics of Sail gave at tendees the opportunity to construct boats from aluminum foil, Popsicle sticks and paper sails and race them across a pool to test construction and design. Since 1984, Fleet Week New York has served as the citys celebration of the sea services. According to organizers, the event provides an opportunity for the citizens of New York City and the surrounding area to meet Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen and view some of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guards latest capabilities. e event also includes military demonstrations and displays, as well as tours of some participat ing ships. ONR provides the sci ence and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engage ment in 50 states, 30 coun tries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry part ners. ONR employs approxi mately 1,065 people, com prising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.Fleet Week focus on tech Prosthetics help wounded walk againMarine Corps Cpl. Garrett Carnes was on a clearing mission in Afghanistans southern Helmand province in February when he stepped on a pressure plate that exploded and cost him both legs. Two months later, the former squad leader was tted with prosthetic legs one with the X2 microprocessor power knee, and the new combination of a bionic foot and ankle at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center here. Carnes, 22, called his rst steps moti vating. e gift of being able to walk so soon exceeded his expectations. Men tally, it feels good to get back on my feet, he said, taking steps on a slightly elevated ramp with parallel bars to grasp. Its a little awkward, like a baby whos learning to walk. Such steps are taken every day at Wal ter Reeds prosthetics gait lab, where rap idly changing technology is giving activeduty service members the chance to walk again and, in some cases, return to duty, said Dr. Charles Scoville, chief of ampu tee services in the orthopedics and reha bilitation department. First considered impossible to design, the X2 and higher grade X3 knees have provided a new way of life for above-theknee amputees, Scoville said. New microprocessors have ve sensors, compared with the original C-Leg, which had two. Now, a combination of gyroscopes, accelerators and hydraulics provide the knee with greater stability, mobility and versatility by recognizing actions, of cials said. e multiple sensors can determine when the wearer wants to sit down or go up and down ramps and stairs, all without presetting the limb with a remote device, as required by the for mer technology. e rst prosthetic limbs, Scoville said, had mechanical knees that were neither limber nor conducive to the warghter. e wearer had to swing the leg outward and project himself forward to walk. e Biom ankle a combination foot and ankle prosthetic that works with the X2 or X3 knee and is specically designed for returning warghters is the newest device that enables exibility. Scoville describes the knee and ankle/ foot combination as more intuitive than older versions. It does the work for you, he said. By replacing the once-rigid prostheses, the new, lighter and user-friendly limbs al low enough exibility to stand on one leg, and step or walk backward without fall ing, he said. Army Sta Sgt. Billy Costello demon strated his knee, foot and ankle exibility by sitting on the oor and stretching to pull his foot toward him. He also lost a leg by stepping on an improvised explosive device while on a clearance mission. We had just taken out 19 IEDs, he said. I found one more the hard way. Costello was another patient who pro gressed faster than his doctors expected. Soon to be discharged, he is an intern at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Va. and plans to enter the National Guard when he returns to North Carolina. I still want to support the guys, he said, adding that he would deploy if his medical condition allows it, but quickly added he doesnt want to be a liability to his unit. e vast majority of patients wont return to active duty, Scoville said. Our goal is to bring them totheir highest level of function. Scoville said 1,453 troops with severe limb loss have been tted with prosthe ses since December 2001 and of those, some 300 service members returned to duty, with 53 redeploying to Iraq and Af ghanistan. We view patients as tactical athletes, Scoville said. ey dont have an o-sea son and they dont know when their next game will be. Marine Corps Cpl. Rory Hammill plans to resume his active lifestyle once hes discharged from active-duty. Before an accident in Marja, Afghanistan claimed one of his legs, he was a runner, snow boarder and surfer, all of which he hopes to resume he said, close to the level of ability he once had. ese service members are just a few of the 200-250 patients who are tted with prosthetic limbs each month at Walter Reed, said David Laufer, chief of orthot ics and prosthetics services. By contrast, he added, the civilian sector produces about the same number per year.In ad dition to limbs, the lab also creates hands that can move ngers, with such dexterity that they can operate a computer mouse and perform other daily tasks. Designing and developing hands is the labs niche, Laufer said, noting that work is ongoing to enable hands to act intuitively like an kles, feet and knees. Far fewer hands are made in the lab than legs. e standard of care is shift ing, Scoeld said. Its made a signicant impact on the wounded warriors who live with these advances. We want people to know were restoring their lives. To help Sailors defeat small boat threats and aer ial targets without using bullets, the Oce of Naval Research wants to develop a solid-state laser weapon prototype that will demonstrate multi-mission capabilities aboard a Navy ship, ocials announced May 8. We believe its time to move forward with solidstate lasers and shift the focus from limited demonstrations to weapon prototype development and related technology advancement, said Peter Morrison, program ocer of the Solid-State Laser Technology Maturation program. ONR will host an indus try day, May 16, to provide the research and develop ment community with information about the program. A Broad Agency An nouncement is expected to be released thereafter to solicit proposals and bids. e Navys long history of advancing directed-en ergy technology has yield ed kilowatt-scale lasers ca pable of being employed as weapons. Among the programs, the Maritime Laser Demonstration developed a proof-of-concept technology that was tested at sea aboard a de commissioned Navy ship. e demonstrator was able to disable a small boat target. Another program, the ONR eyeing laser weapon prototype

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 during the day to remem ber exactly what we are celebrating and that is were celebrating our free dom, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told NBCs Today show from the Pen tagon. e freedom that was purchased by more than two million men and women throughout the course of our history and, of course, more than 64-hundred or so in the past 10 years alone. On multiple morning news programs, ques tioning quickly turned to the war in Afghanistan, with Dempsey saying he denes progress there as having Afghans able to provide for their own se curity and governance. Success in Afghanistan will be when the Af ghan Security Forces are capable of maintaining stability inside their own country and the central government of Afghanistan is able to provide gov ernance. I think that has always been the denition of success both in Iraq and Afghanistan, he told CNNs Starting Point. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sug gestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 4, 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered June 6The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, infor mation and referrals on employment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family mem bers of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contem plating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The semi nars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 to 7 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 5, 12, 19 and 26. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain sup port from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 5. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be June 7, 10 a.m. to noon June 7. it provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strate gies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 14.Financial planning for deployment June 6This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will pro vide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 6. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfo lio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., June 7. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the information and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 21. For more infor mation and to register, call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employ ment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guaran tee a minimum of five partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Child abuse prevention gration of the submarine force. It was a smooth transition, Mayer said. e dynamic may be dierent, but the overall mission and goal hasnt changed. We all have a very high stan dard of professionalism and we take pride in that. e Department of the Navy an nounced its decision to allow women to serve on submarines when then Sec retary of Defense Robert Gates formally presented a letter to congressional lead ers Feb. 19, 2010. e document in formed leadership the DoNs desire to re verse the policy prohibiting women from serving on subs. Submarines are designed to dominate both the littorals and deep oceans and serve as a valuable asset in supporting the core capabilities of Maritime Strat egy: sea control, power projection, for ward presence, maritime security and deterrence.FleetMemorial

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Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes with adult summer bowling leagues. For sign-up informa tion contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanc tioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soc cer Camp. Sessions are 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 11 to 15 for ages 13 to 18 and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child ages 7 to 18. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. In cludes registration, instruc tions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Ma jor credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register now to June 4 for the June 11 to 15 camp and through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camps. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon days through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912573-4548.Soccer camp coming Just for kids Bowling leagues running Liberty call Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 7

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Laser Weapon System, demonstrated a similar ability to shoot down four small unmanned test air craft. e SSL-TM program builds upon ONRs direct ed-energy developments and knowledge gained from other laser research initiatives, including the MK 38 Tactical Laser Demonstration tested at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. All of these eorts could help the Department of the Navy become the rst of the armed forces to deploy high-energy laser weapons. ONR provides the sci ence and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with en gagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning plus an additional 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island; Large Deck Combatant USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Surface Combatant USS Lake Champlain (CG 57); Amphibious USS Green Bay (LPD 20); Submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734); Auxiliary USNS Grasp (T-ARS 51); Marine Corps Active Duty Aviation Marine Attack Squadron 223; Navy Active Duty Aviation Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 77 Saberhawks; Marine Corps Reserve Aviation Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 773; Navy Reserve Aviation Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 57 Conquistadors; Training Aviation Training Squadron 10 Wildcats; Safety Integration in Acquisition NAVSEA Shallow Water Combat Submersible Team; and, the Emerging Center of Excellence U.S. Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A), Naval Sea Systems Command, NOSSA, and USFOR-A Systems Safety.SafetyLaser Parks worth visitAsk people what their all-time favorite fam ily vacation has been and chances are goodnational parks will bein most of the answers. I dont have any science to back that up, but I have been struck by the num ber of people who recollect their best memories of family bonding in places like Yellowstone, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon. Somehow, even travel ing for hours in a cramped car with cranky kids seems to vanish from the memo ries of those who have ex perienced Americas most magnicent places. From the peaks of Alas kas Denali to the lowlands of Floridas Everglades, the National Park Servicess 397 national parks and many thousands of his torical and archaeological sites and wetlands were each brought into the fed eral system because they are the best of the best those places deemed wor thy of protecting for every one to see. ats exactly what In teriour Secretary Ken Salazar had in mind when he announced recently that the $80 annual pass for all the national parks and public lands will be waived for active-duty military members and their dependents, start ing May 19, Armed Forces Day. Salazar said he hopes military members and their families will visit the parks and public lands for fun, rest and relaxation, family bonding, and to experience those places America holds dear. As the Interior secretary said, these are the very places they not only de fend, but that they own. e World War II gener ation had a close connec tion to the parks, National Park Service Director John Jarvis said, because some military training was done there such as when the 10th Moutain Division trained on Mount Rami er in Washington and some places were re served for a time only for returning service mem bers and their families. Also, the federal government then made a push to improve the parks and add infrastructure for the returning warriors. If you talk to folks of that generation, they came back, had kids, got in the station wagon, and did the national park tours, Jarvis said. Ocials hope todays generation of troops and families make the same connections. And with national parks 84 million acres of land and 4.5 million acres of oceans, lakes and res ervoirs in every state except Delaware, many are just a day trip, or less, away. So, why wait? Play hooky on your Saturday chores, let the kids miss soccer practice, pry the electronics out of their hands, and hop in the SUV. ose mountain trails, battleelds, nature preserves and historic homes are just around the corner. Navy unmanned aircraft will be able to distinguish small pirate boats from other vessels when an Of ce of Naval Researchfunded sensor starts air borne tests this summer, ocials said April 5. Called the Multi-Mode Sensor Seeker, the sensor is a mix of high-denition cameras, mid-wave infrared sensors and laser-radar technology. It will be placed on a robotic helicopter called Fire Scout. Carrying advanced au tomatic target recogni tion software, the sensor prototype will allow Fire Scout to autonomously identify small boats on the water, reducing the work load of Sailors operating it from control stations aboard Navy ships. Sailors who control robotic systems can become overloaded with data, of ten sifting through hours of streaming video search ing for a single ship, said Ken Heeke, program of cer in ONRs Naval Air Warfare and Weapons De partment. e automatic target recognition soft ware gives Fire Scout the ability to distinguish target boats in congested coastal waters using LADAR, and it sends that information to human operators, who can then analyze those vessels in a 3-D picture. Navy-developed target recognition algorithms aboard Fire Scout will ex ploit the 3-D data collected by the LADAR, utilizing a long-range, high-res, eyesafe laser. e software compares the 3-D imagery to vessel templates or schematics stored in the systems memory. e 3-D data gives you a leg up on target identication, said Dean Cook, principal investigator for the MMSS program at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. Infrared and visible cameras produce 2-D pictures, and objects in them can be dicult to automatically identify. With LADAR data, each pixel corresponds to a 3-D point in space, so the automatic target recognition algo rithm can calculate the dimensions of an object and compare them to those in a database. e algorithms have been successfully tested in shore-based systems against vessels at sea. e software is being integrat ed into a BRITE Star II tur ret by a team from NAW CWD, Raytheon, FLIR Systems, BAE Systems and Utah State University for airborne testing aboard a manned test helicopter. e ight assessment will be conducted against groups of approximately seven small boats in a military sea range o the California coast later this summer. Sensors to go on Fire Scout 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012

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Army puts ags in ArlingtonMore than 1,200 soldiers with the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, e Old Guard, gathered at Arlington National Cemetery May 25 to place miniature Ameri can ags on each of its gravesites and niches for the annual Flags In rit ual thats been performed just before each Memorial Day for 64 years. e Old Guard, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, is the Armys cere monial unit and has hon ored Americans buried at the cemetery with the Flags In commemoration every year since 1948. e regiments troops placed the ags on nearly 260,000 gravesites and 22,000 niches, in addition to more than 14,000 graves at the U.S. Soldiers and Airmens Home National Cemetery in Washington, D.C., an Army cemetery for residents of the Armed Forces Retirement HomeWashington. Old Guard sentinels also placed four ags at the Tomb of the Unknowns. e Old Guards commander, Army Col. Dave When I was a kid get ready for a lecture we had potato chips. If you wanted something different, you stuck one in French onion dip, the only kind of dip then, or ate a corn chip or cheese puff. We didnt have a gazillion flavors of chips. But then science went to work. Today we have it all, from massappeal flavors like ranch or sour cream and onion, to exotics like prawn or loaded baked potato. I like garlic and Parmesan cheese. Ill pass on dill pickle. Patty Ivey Family member Los Angeles The best is sea salt and back pepper. I dont like barbecue. MASN Alicia Mayhew Security Force Battalion Pine Bluff, Ark. I personally like vegetar ian chips and I cant stand pizza-flavored chips. Ensign Jared Pitts Submarine Group 10 Birmingham, Ala. My favorite is salt and vinegar. My least favorite is unsalted. MASN Tyler Higginbotham Security Force Battalion Birmingham, Ala. I like original nacho cheese (tortilla chips) and I despise cheeseburger flavor. MM2 William Rose USS Wyoming Blue Houston I like jalapeno ched dar (cheese puffs) and I havent had any flavors that are terrible. ET2 James Langan Trident Training Facility Albuquerque, N.M. The best is cheddar cheese and baked is the worst.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Department of Defense, assignment policy changes aecting the as signment of Navy women to formerly closed posi tions will be implemented May 14. e changes will open an additional 14,325 posi tions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those positions, the Navy will open 60 medi cal ocer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman rst class positions for the as signment of women in Marine Corps ground combat element battalions. e secretary of defense has said this is the beginning, not the end, of a process, said Acting Un der Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney. e department intends to continue to remove bar riers that prevent service members from serving in any capacity in which they qualify. e 60 new Navy posi tions open to the assignment of women include 18 medical ocer positions, 19 chaplain ocer positions and 23 chief and petty ocer rst class hos pital corpsman positions. e Navy has always been committed to pur suing the elimination of gender-restricted policies where feasible while maintaining force readiness, said Lt. Maura Betts, director of the Oce of Womens Policy. e changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Denition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Con gress, could not be imple mented without a Con gressionally-mandated notication period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-location restrictions. When implemented, oc cupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimination of the co-location exclusion has no impact to the Navy, as current policy does not restrict the assignment of women based on co-loca tion. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. e ve percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, River ine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compli ance with direct ground combat rule.Billets open for women Secretary of the Army John McHugh visited the Naval Postgraduate School, May 21, to learn more about research conducted by the university and to see the academic programs military ocers take part in. McHugh and his sta began the after noon by receiving a command brief from NPS President Dan Oliver and key faculty members. e group was briefed on the development of the universitys new cyber secu rity degree program. e Naval Postgraduate School is an important place to the Army, and we need to make sure we are taking full ad vantage of it, said McHugh during the command brieng. e joint approach to training at the graduate and post graduate level is impressive and I have an enormous respect for the work that is being done here. I want to know how the Army can help your eorts. Dr. Cynthia Irvine, director of the uni versitys Cyber Academic Group deliv ered an overview of the NPS masters degree focused on cyber systems and op erations. Were here to focus on maximizing cy berspace operational eectiveness, and were very excited [about] the programs in this eld of study that we are oering our students, said Irvine during her presentation. Noting the gap of cyber prociencies between senior and junior service mem bers, McHugh applauded university ef forts in the area of cyber security and specically the eorts targeting senior enlisted sailors and soldiers, who will be allowed to enter the newly formed pro gram in upcoming aca demic quarters. Interestingly, Ive noticed how much of a gap exists between our junior and senior en listed soldiers in knowl edge of the cyber world, McHugh noted. Its crucial that we get these senior enlisted soldiers the foundations they need to succeed. Upon conclusion of the command and cyber operations brief, McHugh and his sta were joined by local Congressman Rep. Sam Farr for a tour of the universitys Common Operational Research Environment lab. e CORE lab, an ongoing center of study under the universitys Defense Analysis department, is predominantly attended by Army ocers focusing on data, information technologies and theo ries applicable to irregular warfare. I briefed the Secretary on the CORE lab, which is embedded in the Defense Analysis department, said Dr. Sean Ever ton, co-director of the CORE lab. We train students, most of whom are Army, how to fuse cutting edge methodologies, such as social network analysis and geo spatial analysis, to real world situations, so that they can gain a better understand ing of the operating environment. McHugh ended the visit with a brief ing on a current research project that uses smartphone technology to collect and analyze information on improvised explosive device networks. I appreciate all that youre doing in this important eld of study, McHugh told the students. is is really fascinat ing stu, and it demonstrates the ines capable reality of what the future holds. Army boss pays Navy visit Service pays tribute to fallen Service members participated in a Me morial Day observance at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Riverside Park May 28 as part of Fleet Week New York 2012 and the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. e observance included performanc es from the U.S. Coast Guard Band and New York Scottish Pipes and Drums, a wreath-laying ceremony and remarks from New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; Rear Adm. Daniel A. Nep tun, commander, Coast Guard District 1; Capt. Justine Cabulong, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan; and Cmdr. Laura Bender, chaplain of Wounded Warrior Regiment. Today we pause to reect on the ser vice and sacrice of all our great men and women, and honor the memory of those who have passed and those who have THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Anders, was with his troops as they placed the ags, which are uniformly centered and situated one boot-length back from the headstone. Anders placed ags in Arlingtons Section 60, where some 12,000 service members whod served in Iraq and Afghanistan are buried, in addition to many warghters from World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars. I started in the rows of soldiers I served with and knew personally, Anders said, motioning toward a ag hed just placed on the grave of a soldier he served with twice rst, at Fort Benning, Ga., and later, in Afghanistan, in 2007. Anders said his fa ther, and his great uncle who died in combat dur ing World War II, also are buried at Arlington. is is like a family cemetery, he said. Its a sad place but very [com forting]. Old Guard soldiers feel honored by the rituals they perform, Anders said. Were the only unit that does it, and we are very proud of that, the colonel said. Airman prevents tragedy While preparing for her night shift, Air Force Senior Airman Lanea Trevino no ticed something odd about the shower stall next to hers. e shower supplies, visible through the half-opened curtain, had remained untouched for the entire time she had been there. It was strange, Trevino said. I had seen nobody else in the facility so it was odd that an entire set of supplies would be left. While some might dismiss the empty shower stall and shower supplies as a case of forgetfulness, Trevino decided to walk through the facility to be sure. After noticing an occupied female toilet stall, Trevino knocked on the door and asked the person inside if she had left her show er supplies. ere was no response. I immediately began to worry, Tre vino said. I could see that she was in the stall but wasnt moving. Trevino reached her hand under the stall and shook the girls leg but there was no response. She quickly peeked un der the stall and noticed the airman was unconscious. Taking immediate action, she ran to the nearest trailer and told the rst person she saw to call emergency re sponders. My rst instinct was to get help, Trev ino said. I couldnt tell if she was breath ing or not but I knew that she would need additional medical assistance either way and ran to get it. Fearing the worst, she grabbed a male, who had been walking by on his way to lunch to help her get the unconscious in dividual out of the stall. e door had been locked from the inside and the only way into the stall was to climb over top of it. e male lifted her over the stall and she opened the door from the inside. Using a reman carry, Trevino dragged the unresponsive female out of the stall and laid her at on the ground. Moments later, paramedics from the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group ar rived on scene and begin caring for the individual, who was later diagnosed with severe dehydration. Being vigilant and watching out for fel low wingman is the responsibility of all airmen, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. William Harner, 379th Air Expeditionary Wings command chief. Trevino displayed the ethos we ex pect from all our Air Force teammates, Harner said. She paid attention to her surroundings, noticed that something was not right, and acted accordingly. Her vigilance yielded a life or death result. Heat-related injuries can include dizziness, confusion, heavy breathing or un consciousness, Trevino said. Its our duty to look out for each other, she said, especially in the summertime when the heat takes its toll on your body. anks to Trevinos actions the service member is due to make a full recovery. I would expect anyone else to do the same for me, Trevino said. As airmen in the U.S. Air Force, we are part of a unique family and you never have to have a reason to look out for your family members. China Marine tells tale Every Marine a rieman. Regardless of military occupational specialty, Marines throughout histo ry trained to ght, defend and carry out the duties of an infantryman should their country call. For members of the Fourth Marine Regiment Band, e Last China Band, this call to arms became their new persona on Dec. 8, 1942. Donald L. Versaw, a retired Marine Corps master sergeant and Bloomington, Neb., native, marched with his fellow Marines in the Fourth Marine Regi ment Band, originally stationed in Shanghai, China, in 1941. We performed various concerts for the troops scattered around the city, Versaw said. We played in parades and ceremonies for international settle ments. Our purpose was to keep Americas best foot forward among the inter national community. Amid the threat of an impending world war, the entire band was with drawn on orders from Headquarters Marine Corps and was relocated to the U.S. Naval Station at Olongapo, Philippine Islands. We left Shanghai playing, Versaw said. e last time I ever played in the band was November 1941. We never had a chance to unpack our instruments; we never performed as a band again, but we stayed together. While in the Philip pines, a day ahead of the U.S., Versaw recalled lis tening to a sailors radio in the middle of the night on Dec. 8, 1941, and hear ing the terrible words: Pearl Harbor has been hit. Nearly the entire eet had been knocked out by the Japanese. It was very hard for us to believe, Versaw said. War had begun. As morning came, the band Marines laid down their instruments and took up their ries. e Musicians of the 4th Marine Band now made up the 3rd Pla toon, Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Reg iment. In the Marine Corps, youre Marines rst, Ver saw said. Everything else is secondary. e band members turned infantrymen took defensive positions along the Olongapo coast in preparation against a beachfront attack. Once the threat of such an attack subsided, the ghting bandsmen moved to the tip of the Bataan Peninsula, near Corregidor, the site of the ter rible Bataan Death March, which took place a few short months later, Versaw continued. While the regiment was spread over the island to resist further attacks from the sea, most of the enemy action had come in the form of artillery re, Ver saw recalled. e band platoon was fortunate in that it was positioned where it didnt have to come in direct contact with the enemy, Versaw said. We just took a heck of a beating. We had to stay in our ghting holes all the time. ings had begun to take a terrible turn for the worse for the band. Sev enty years ago, on May 6, 1942, the entire band pla toon was taken as prison ers of war. e island was sur rendered to the Japanese to prevent the wholesale slaughter of the refugees and wounded in the un derground hospitals, Ver saw said. It seemed to our commander that it was the more humane thing to do. [It] turned out that the war for us had just begun. Our battle with the enemy was survivorship. It was a long three-and-a-half years before we were liberated. Captured Marines were transported on the so apt ly-named Hell Ships. Comparable to the packed freight cars of the holocaust, more than 1,000 POWs were stued into the hull of the Nissyo Maru, a Japanese vessel. e tightly-packed hu man cargo suered from sweltering heat, unsanitary conditions, exhaus tion, thirst and hunger. Seventeen agonizing days later, the ship laid an chor in the dock of Moji, Kyushu, Japan. e POWs were then transported by train and foot to the coal-mining city of Futase in Fukuoka province. My seniors and [noncommissioned ocers] gave me a lot of encour agement, Versaw said. It was very depressing. We didnt know what would happen to us day-byday, hour-by-hour. You just got up in the morn ing, counted your bones, checked yourself out and hoped you didnt get in any trouble that day. [You would hope] you wouldnt get beat up or abused. You wondered if you would nd something to eat. e POWs worked more than 11 hours a day, seven days a week, for pennies a day. ree-and-a-half years later, the POWs were lib erated following the end of the war. e Marines took over a month to return stateside, returning to a long anticipated home coming. After his return to the states, Versaw was years out of practice on the French horn and decided to make a lateral move into another MOS. He pursued a career in photography and videography, in the eld of Com bat Camera. He served as an instructor of Basic Still Photography at the former Navy Photography School in Pensacola, Fla. Following his retirement from the Marine Corps, Versaw made a ca reer in the aerospace in dustry, working on space programs such as the Sat urn and Apollo missions, as well as the moon land ing mission. Versaw also served ve years in civil service through the Army Corps of Engineers and the Air Force as a photographer respectively. It wasnt until years after his retirement that he was recognized for his sac rice during World War II. Versaw was decorated with a POW medal by the commanding ocer of Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, Calif. Music continues to be a part of his life through the Marine Corps Musicians Association. He recently attended the 27th annual MCMA dinner in San Diego as a distinguished guest. Just being in the same room as him gives me goose bumps, said fellow MCMA member William F. Schnell, a retired mas ter gunnery sergeant, tuba player and an Avon Lake, Ohio, native. I dont know how many people know about [the band POWs], even Marines today. Just to know a bandsman went through that, like he did, is amazing. As the last surviving member of the Last China Band, Versaws legacy as well as the bands contin ues in his books, Mikado no Kyaku (Guest of the Emperor) and e Last China Band. e Defense Depart ment believes recent inci dents in which members of the Afghan National Security Forces have at tacked their coalition trainers are individual acts of grievance, a senior DOD spokesman said re cently. Its often dicult to determine the exact motiva tion behind an attackers crime because they are, very often, killed in the act, Navy Capt. John Kir by, deputy assistant secre tary of defense for media operations, told reporters at the Pentagon. Kirby said these types of attacks have only been tracked since 2007. Fiftyseven such attacks, he added, have occurred dur ing this time. Based on the limited evidence that we have been able to collect, we believe that less than half, somewhere in the neigh borhood of three to four out of every 10 [attacks] is inspired, or resourced, or planned or executed by the Taliban or Taliban sympathizers, he said. In other words, that its related to an inltration attempt. Kirby said it may not even be adeliberateinl tration, but a legitimate soldier or police ocer [who] turned Taliban. Yet, the majority of at tacks, he said, are acts of individual grievance. You know how seriously aairs of honor are to the Afghan people, Kirby said. We believe, again, that most of these [attacks] are acted out as an act of honor for most of them representing a griev ance of some sort. e spokesman said Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of International Security Assistance Forces in Af ghanistan, believes the recent video of U.S. Marines urinating on the bodies of Taliban inspired at least one attack. Regardless of the motivations, Kirby emphasized the attacksleave lasting impressions on the fami lies of the service members whove been killed. We believe the major ity of all of them are indi vidual acts of grievance, but look, that doesnt lessen the pain for family members who suer from this, he said. It doesnt lessen the importance of it whether its an act of inl tration or not. Its an issue that were taking very, very serious ly, Kirby added. But we dont believe the major ity of them are Taliban in spired, resource planned [or] executed. British Army Lt. Gen. Adrian Bradshaw, ISAFs deputy commander, told Pentagon reporters dur ing a May 9 video teleconference from Kabul that Afghanistans National Army and police force are working to root out this problem with great deter mination. Weve had several hun dred National Directorate of Security counterintelli gence operatives now join the Afghan National Army on attachment, Bradshaw told reporters. ey are embedded down to bat talion level, and they are carrying out rigorous counterintelligence operations. e commanders are taking great note of where their people go on leave [and] whether their families have come under pressure. e British general said the vetting process for Afghan army and police recruits has been rened and theres also retro spective vetting of people in the force with a ruth less approach to those members displaying signs of enemy complicity.So a number of eective measures have been taken, and we continue to bear down on this problem very seriously indeed, Bradshaw said.Reasons for attacks unclearFlags given their lives to defend our nation, Bloomberg said. is holiday I think should remind us of the incredible debt that we owe every American who serves in our armed forces because they have stood where others could not, they have done what others did not, and they have earned not just our respect, but our grati tude and our support as well. Bloomberg placed the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial wreath at the portal of the monument on behalf of the city of New York. Following the mayors remarks, Retired Brig. Gen. omas Prin cipe, New York Army National Guard announced each of the veterans, heritage and memorial organizations that also placed wreaths at the monument to pay tribute to the sacrice of those who have served in the armed forces and those who have paid the ultimate sacrice to protect the freedom of Americans. In eight months of the Revolutionary War, 55 Americans died every month. During the Korean War, there were over 900 Americans dying every month. Dur ing 90 months of the Vietnam War, there were over 500 Americans dying every month. During four years of World War II, that number grew to more than 6,600 Americans dying in combat every month. Since 1775, over 848,000 Soldiers, Sail ors, Marines, Airmen and Coast Guards men have made the ultimate sacrice in combat, Neptun said. ey were hus bands, they were wives, they were moth ers, they were fathers, sons and daughters (who) died in combat for their nation, for their service and for their comrades and really for us. Most of them were young, just beginning their lifelong journey into adulthood. e Soldiers and Sailors Monument stands above the Hudson River in River side Park. Service

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While the Atlantic hur ricane season doesnt of cially start until June 1, scientists at the Climate Prediction Center are pre dicting moderate chances for a tropical depression or a storm to form in the Caribbean during the next two weeks. e chances of an early storm are a perfect re minder to start disaster preparations in your home and local community. When it comes to hur ricane response and preparedness the Coast Guard works closely with local, state and federal agencies like the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But there is also another important member of our hurricane preparedness team. at important member is you. e most valuable thing you can do is to stay in formed and be prepared. If you are just starting out in learning about disaster preparedness, take a look at Ready.gov. Some of their top tips include: Build an emergency kit and make a family com munications plan. Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact so family members have a single point of contact. Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your homes vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind. Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circum stances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community. Learn community hur ricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine plac es to meet and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate. Also, dont forget to make a plan for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate. Use a NOAA weath er radio. Remember to replace its battery every six months, as you do with your smoke detectors. Check your insurance coverage. Flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance. A great resource is the National Flood Insurance Program. With your family and community prepared, dont forget about getting information on the weath er itself. Some of the most up-to-date information on hurricanes comes from NOAA. NOAAS National Hur ricane Center helps you follow storms, determine when and where they will make landfall and will even send you alerts and warnings if youre in harms way. Also, both NOAA and FEMA oer social media tools allowing you to ac cess critical information before, during and after a hurricane or storm. So dont forget to plug in and download these impor tant apps. Lastly, friends, neigh bors and colleagues are more likely to prepare for disasters when they see those around them pre pare, so inspire them to act by being an example yourself. e rst step you can take is to Pledge to Pre pare. e resources you will receive once doing so provide tools for making your family and commu nity, safer, more resilient and better prepared. Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal was on a security mission near the Iraqi Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in April 2004 when suicide bombers initiated a waterborne assault. He was severely wounded and later died from his injuries. Bruckenthal made the ultimate sacrice for his nation and his memory lives on in all those who serve in the Coast Guard. Paying tribute to Bruckenthals sacrice is the national program Veterans Moving Forward. e organization provides veterans with therapy and service dogs, and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assis tance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. One such dogs name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Bruck enthal. Nathan, a golden re triever, is being trained by Cyndi Perry. is series, Life of a Service Dog, shares Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training. is is Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. Last time we met, I told you about where I was born and how I found myself at my new home with my human and her pack. A lot of my time is spent travel ing to new places and be ex posed to new sites and sounds. Well, one of the rst places I was able to travel to was our nations capital, Washington, D.C. It was amazing to view the city from my puppy perspec tive as I got to see so many shiny monuments and buildings. I even got to visit one of the most important buildings in our country, the Capitol. I was in awe of the building as it sym bolizes the great nation our service members protect and defend. We took the metro train to Capitol Hill, which rocked me to sleep. e secu rity guards in the building were great. e smiled at me and let me walk through this frame later I was told it was a metal de tector all by myself and wait for them to tell me I was OK. Of course, I knew I was OK. My trip to Capitol Hill was to meet Congressman Walter Jones. He has been working to educate others about what ser vice dogs can do for wounded warriors, allowing service dogs from Iraq and Afghanistan to re turn home with their handlers, creating a memorial to military service dogs and supporting the eort allowing the Department of Veterans Aairs to assist vet erans with the costs of service dogs, not just guide dogs. While I was just a puppy dur ing my visit, it makes me happy to know others realize how important it is to support our vet erans. Whenever I think of the service and sacrice of all veter ans, I am reminded of who I was named after, Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. e congressman was very nice to me and he even let me lay on his special North Carolina rug. He had to run, something about a vote, so we sat in his oce with some of his sta. e sta really liked me and I liked them. After a while I got a little bored so I took out a book on politics to read. Congressman Jones came back, and we talked and he held and cradled me. I have since been invited back several times to spend time on the Hill. Once he even showed me a letter written by Petty Ocer Bruck enthals father. It was so excit ing because I had no idea about who Nates father was. I could detect his scent on the letter and it was a comforting scent. Being in our nations capitol, meeting those who support vet erans and the scent of Nathans father inspired me. I knew I had to study hard, learn a lot and practice being a good service dog so I could help a wounded soldier someday. Check back soon as I share a story about my trip to the Big Apple. Service dog Nathan goes to Washington D.C. Life of a Service Dog Part 2 Its time to prepare for this years hurricane season Commander, Navy Installations Command announced a new part nership with Universal Class Library Edition, a powerful new online con tinuing education service designed for use by pa trons of public libraries and now available to Navy Sailors and their families across the eet. By logging onto Navy Knowledge Online Navy library patrons can utilize Universal Class growing catalog of more than 540 courses and join the more than 300,000 students around the world who have beneted from Universal Class instructional technologies. e Navy/Universal Class partnership will enable Sailors and their families to take courses in everything from Exercise and Fitness, to Entrepreneurship, Arts and Music, Home and Garden Care, Cooking, Computers and Technology, Health and Medicine, Homeschooling, Job Assistance, Law and Legal, Parenting and Family, Pet and Animal Care and hundreds more, said Nellie Mott, Navy General Library Program Manager, were very ex cited for this new program and all it oers to the eet. e Universal Class program utilizes and array of learning modules; from real instructors guiding the learning, to engag ing video-based lessons, a collaborative learning environment, graded les son tests, certicates of achievement and Continuing Education Units available for selected courses. Sailors and their families will be able to enjoy an engaging and measur able learning experience that helps them master and document their educational goals. Navy Library patrons may register for a Univer sal Class account by Logging into NKO at www. nko.navy.mil. Click on the Reference heading in the upper left part of the screen. en click on eLibrary Education and nally click on the Uni versal Class Logo. Once registered, users can ac cess Universal Class from home, school, or any Inter net connected computer. e Navy Library Ser vice was established in 1919 in order to support base libraries around the world and participate in the initial outtting of shipboard libraries across the eet. For more information about Universal Class and the Navys Library Service, contact the Navy General Library Program at nglp@ navy.mil or visit www. cnic.navy.mil to learn more about Commander, Navy Installations Commands products and ser vices.Navy Library oers Universal Class THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012



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Dempsey reects on dayJoint chiefs chair notes sacrices past and presentIn a round of Memorial Day television interviews Monday, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta urged Americans to reect on the meaning of this national holiday, a message underscored by the on-going mission in Afghanistan as well as fresh reminders of the militarys obligation to be ready to respond if called upon. I would ask people to take a solemn moment at some point Two USS Wyoming ocers participate in discussions e Navy Memorials Naval Heritage Center hosted a roundtable discussion May 24 in Washington, D.C., to discuss the status of the Navys submarine force. e panel answered questions from civilian and military media on issues like the importance of junior ocers on subs and gender integration within the submarine community. Its very challenging being a junior ocer on board [a submarine], said Lt. j.g. Maxwell Mayer, operations ocer aboard USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). Were out there as one of the largest nuclear forces, and were there 24 hours a day, ready and deterring other countries from doing bad things. e leadership and responsibility opportunities you get are unmatched. Roundtable members acknowledged that teamwork and professionalism are vital in succeeding in the submarine eld. To be a submariner takes a lot of tenacity, integrity and courage, said Lt. j.g. Vanessa Esch, electrical assistant aboard USS Ohio (SSGN 726). Every single one of us is responsible for a vital part of our submarine. e standards that we set as a community make me proud to be a part of this community. e submarine force is one of many platforms the Navy has at its disposal, but it oers the unique option of providing our national decision makers with the full range of operational choices, from undetectable clandestine maneuvers to fullon attack. Were all Sailors, she said. We go to work, we do our job and do it well, whether its above the sea or under it, said Lt. j.g. Emma Larenes, supply ocer on board USS Wyoming. [However, submarine] training is so rigorous and dierent than any other community that it kind of sets us apart. e majority of the media interest at the roundtable focused on the recent gender inteTHEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope The best and worst in chip flavoring Page 9 Josh Gracin Country star plays at MWR concert Page 4 Remember Old Guard decorates for Memorial Day Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com MMST earns Kimball Award Kings Bay unit rst in Coast Guard to repeat honor e crewmembers assigned to Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay are now considered among the Coast Guard elite after receiving the prestigious Sumner I. Kimball Readiness Award for two consecutive years. e unit accepted the award from Captain Je Novotny, Deployable Operations Group Deputy Commander May 22. e MSST unit underwent a meticulous review in March by an independent Coast Guard Standardization team. e team measured the units ability to carry out its multiple missions. Units that not only meet, but far exceed all requirements, receive the Kimball Award. I view the receipt of this award as a total team eort, said Cmdr. Matthew Baer, Kings Bay Maritime Safety and Security Team commanding ocer. By winning this award two years in a row, it proves that our unit is not only committed to earning a level of excellence but also committed to sustaining it. Tobe able to earn the Kimball Award ittakes a combination of good test scores, great condition of the vessels, excellent performance of underway drills, a successful and progressive unit training program, survival systems readiness and good administrative work by all members. Failure in any one of these areas will likely prevent a unit from achieving this award. Overall the unit achieved a score of 46 out of 50 possible Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, USS Tennessee receive honors for 2012e Secretary of the Navy has selected the 2012 Safety Excellence Award recipients who will be honored at a ceremony July 11 at the Navy Memorial Heritage Center eater in Washington, D.C. Each year, the Secretary of the Navy bestows the Safety Excellence Award upon those Navy and Marine Corps commands who achieved exceptional and sustained safety performance during the previous year. Under Secretary of the Navy Robert O. Work, will present 19 Safety Excellence Awards: Industrial, Category A NAVFAC Northwest; Industrial, Category B Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF JRMC); Industrial, Category C Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow; Non-Industrial, Category A Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Non-Industrial, Category B Naval Air Station Lemoore; Non-Industrial, Category C Naval Base Ventura County; Fleet Operational/Fleet Support Safety awards earned USS Tennessee docks at NSB Kings Bay. Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber101 Days of Summer Naval Heritage Center has roundtable on sub eet

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesHurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Pursue a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Commander, Navy Installations Command, announced the phased Navy-wide release of the Housing Early Application Tool beginning May 1. is Web-based tool will allow Sailors and their families to apply for housing online from any computer. HEAT makes the Navy house hunting process smoother and less stressful for our Sailors and their families, said Vice Adm. William French, commander, Navy Installations Command. By providing the early housing application online, Sailors and their spouses can use HEAT to review housing and community information, and make an informed decision on a home before receiving their permanent change of station orders. HEAT utilizes authoritative systems to reduce the amount of personal information and to steam line the online process. HEAT can be securely accessed from any computer with an internet connection. Service members or their spouses can use HEAT prior to receiving PCS orders to request information about community housing or check on their eligibility for military and privatized housing. ey also may submit HEAT requests to multiple Installations if they are not sure where they may be stationed next. Our goal with HEAT is to reach out to Sailors early in the PCS process to reduce stress and provide proactive support when moving from one duty station to another, said Corky Vazquez, CNIC Housing Program Manager. With HEAT, Sailors and their families are able to make contact with our Navy Housing Service Centers and Privatization Partners to discuss their housing needs and learn about their housing options at any time. HEAT makes it easy to connect with our housing professionals and make informed decisions before even having orders. HEAT will be deployed Navy-wide by Navy Region according to the following schedule: Naval District Washington, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic and Navy Region Midwest began May 1, Navy Region Southwest began May 8, Navy Region Southeast began May 15, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Asia beginning May 22, Navy Region Hawaii beginning May 29, Navy Region Japan, Navy Region Korea and Singapore Area Coordinator beginning June 8, Joint Region Marianas beginning June 15. HEAT will be implemented by region and will be Navy-wide by June 30. To access HEAT and for more information about when your base will have HEAT, visit www.cnic.navy. mil/HEAT. Housing application tool is on-line Hurricane season is fast approaching. Many prepare for this, but what about tornadoes, ooding, house res, brush res or even family emergencies? One of the most important things to do for hurricane season or any disaster is to be prepared. Fleet and Family Support Centers will have a Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 6 and 2 to 4 p.m., June 12. ere, you will get important information and resources from FFSC, Naval Submarine Base Emergency Management, the Fire Department, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross, Camden County Emergency Management Agency, Balfour Beatty, Base Security and training and demonstration will be provided on the Navy Family Accountability Assessment System. Once you have attended the Town Hall Meeting, you can make a thorough assessment of what you need to prepare in case of a disaster. Get the whole family involved and come up with an emergency plan. Should a disaster situation occur, everyone will know what to do. Free childcare will be provided for active duty military for the June 6 session only. Register with the Child Development Center by June 1 at 573-9918. For additional information on the Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting, call 5734513.Hurricane prep at June 1 town hall Fleet & Family Support Health is the thing that makes you feel that now is the best time of the year. Franklin P. AdamsWith the school year drawing to a close and summer right around the corner, now is the perfect time to start planning some ways that you and your family can stay active and fit over the summer months. Although you already may be dreaming about vacations, cookouts and lazy summer days, if you forego your tness regimen or fail to keep a balanced diet, by fall you could be left with some undesirable results. ere is no such thing as taking a vacation from tness. So if you have a busy summer ahead, plan for the disruption in your normal routine by coming up with creative ways to work tness in. A summer vacation does not need to end with feelings of guilt about overindulging and avoiding exercise. You can maintain your healthy lifestyle and still enjoy time away by staying conscious of what you eat and balancing it with a little planned physical activity each day you are away. For example, take a jump rope and a resistance band for a simple and quick workout that you could do right in your hotel room. Play games with your kids that involve exercise, such as soccer or softball on the beach. Or plan activities such as hiking or kayaking that have the workout built right in. Do some kind of activity each day that you nd enjoyable and fun so that you wont mind doing it. If you are an outdoor exerciser, dont let the heat of summer keep you from working out. Move indoors. Use it as an opportunity to try something new. Check out the group tness classes at the gym or pick up swimming as a way to stay cool and t. When attending or hosting a summer cookout, prepare a healthy dish or two, and choose it over the other unhealthy alternatives. As much as possible, avoid drinking your calories by choosing water or unsweetened beverages over alcoholic drinks and soda. Finally, shift your focus by spending time socializing or playing games versus hanging out by the picnic tables full of food. Whether at home or away on vacation, I encourage you to nd ways to make tness fun for you and your entire family this summer. With a little creative planning and commitment to staying t, an active and healthy lifestyle can be enjoyed year-round.Avoiding the lazy days this summer Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Installations Command e summer months herald the busiest move season of the year as hundreds of thousands of Department of Defense and Coast Guard servicemen and women receive orders to new assignments across the nation and worldwide. Naval Supply Systems Command Global Logistics Support Household Goods Assistant Program Manager Andrea Gergen advises those transferring to book their moves early. e period of May 15 and August 31 is the annual peak move season, Gergen said. Gergen advises that movers should give their Household Goods oces a minimum of three weeks lead time or more to initiate an effective, smoother move experience. DoD and the USCG book an estimated 225,000 household goods shipments each summer, Gergen said. In addition to these moves, many federal civilian employees also choose to schedule their moves during the summer, since most schools are out of session and the relocation will be less disruptive for children. Service members who are faced with trying to move during this bottleneck period might nd themselves with fewer options if they wait too long to book a move date. Gergen suggested that families be exible with their moving dates, plan ahead, and recognize that now is the time to get rid of unwanted items to reduce their shipments weight. No one wants to get a bill for being overweight on their shipment, Gergen said. Summer is peak season for moving Naval Supply

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NAVADMIN 164/12, released May 18, announced the chief of naval operations approval of a number of changes to uniforms and uniform wear policy. ese uniform changes are the direct result of Sailor and leadership feedback, said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director, Military Personnel Plans and Policy. Updating Navy uniforms is part of outtting the 21st Century Sailor, ensuring our Sailors have practical uniforms they want and that represent our proud naval heritage while reecting advances in clothing technology and design. An improved design of the male E1-E6 Service Dress Blue Uniform, incorporating a side zipper on the jumper and a hidden center zipper on the trousers, is approved. e uniform is scheduled to begin distribution in October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, and Fleet availability is expected by October 2018. Specic details regarding eet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. e E1-E6 mens and womens Service Dress White jumper approved design improvements include incorporating a side zipper, front and rear yoke, Navy blue piping on the ap and sleeve cus with Navy blue piping and button fasteners. Introduction of the new E1 to E6 SDW will begin October 2015, at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes. Fleet roll out will begin by October 2018. Specic details regarding Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. e contemporary design for Service Dress Khaki is approved for optional wear. Detailed guidance on the occasion for wear and Fleet availability will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. A number of changes to the Navy ight suit occasion and manner of wear are contained in the NAVADMIN, including changes to the approved colors for undershirts and aligning the manner of wear of the one-piece ight suit with the Navy Working Uniform Type I. Among the changes to NWU policy approved in the NAVADMIN is the option to wear a nametape on the left shoulder pocket ap of the NWU Type I Parka, beginning July, 17. ese nametapes will be purchased at the Sailors expense during the optional period. Nametapes will become mandatory Oct 1, 2013. Sailors will receive a clothing replacement allowance to help purchase one additional nametape for the parka. Other changes to the NWU policy include the approval to wear as an optional item a nylon webbing rigger belt and NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers. e optional rigger belt will be a one and three-fourth inch wide, one-piece adjustable nylon webbing, metal or plastic buckle. Belts worn by E-1 through E-6 personnel will be black, while belts worn by E-7 and above will be tan/khaki. Sailors will be able to buy the NWU pattern foul weather Gore-Tex trousers for wear during inclement weather to and from home and work. Personally purchased trousers will not be worn to perform ocial or assigned duties. e trousers will be available for purchase at selected Navy Exchange Uniform Centers, on-line and 1-800 call centers beginning Oct. 1. e NAVADMIN includes a list of additional commands authorized to wear the NWU Type III (Woodland) for daily and deployment and deployment training wear, as well as further guidance on approval authority for the wear of this uniform. Fleet Commanders will now be the authorizing authority for wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment work up/training. When not in a deployment or pre-deployment training status, personnel will wear the NWU Type I or service uniform as appropriate. In June 2013, an optional redesigned khaki maternity blouse with adjustable waist tabs and slightly shorter length will be available in regular and long sizes. e blouse will become a mandatory, as needed, item in 2015. e NAVADMIN also approved several insignia and badge additions and changes including standardizing the design and reducing the number of Navy Security Forces Identication badges from eight to three badges: U.S. Navy Security Forces, U.S. Navy Corrections Specialist and U.S. Navy Masterat-Arms. A Strategic Sealift Ofcer Warfare Insignia for wear by ocers who have successfully completed the qualication requirements will be available May 2013. e United States Cyber Command identication badge is authorized to be worn by ocers and enlisted assigned to USCYBERCOM beginning July 17. Also beginning July 17, the Marine Corps Combatant Diver breast insignia is authorized for wear on Navy uniforms by Sailors that successfully meet all qualication requirements stipulated in MILPERSMAN article 1220-101. Illustrations of the new uniform items and insignia, as well as instructions on how to submit uniform changes to the Uniform Board, can be found on the Navy Uniform Matters Oce Web site at www. public.navy.mil/bupersnpc/support/uniforms/ pages/default2.aspx. New uniform regs issuedService members have two options for moving their household goods. ey can choose a govern ment-arranged move, in which a contractor packs and ships their household goods, or they may per form a Personally Procured Move formerly known as a DITY move, where the customer arranges to rent a truck or trailer, or uses their own vehicle to move their items. For more information on either option and to start the move process, customers should go to www.move.mil. For questions or concerns about moving customers may e-mail householdgoods@navy.mil for assistance or contact their local personal property shipping oce.Move Navy implementation of Department of Defense policy allowing Reservists to carry over leave earned during an active duty period to a later active duty period was announced in NAVADMIN 163/12, May 18. Reserve Sailors may now earn and carry over up to 60 days of accrued leave. Additionally, as part of the 2010 National Defense Authorization Act, all service members may carry over up to 75 days if the leave was accrued between Oct. 1, 2008 and Sept. 30, 2013. If serving in a combat tax exclusion zone, active duty and Reserve Sailors may be eligible to carry over up to 120 days of accrued leave. Reservists desiring leave carry-over must sign a Page 13 documenting the leave carried over at their Personnel Support Detachment at the time of separation from an active duty period. Service members who choose to sell back carried over leave may do so at separation from their next active duty period, separation from the service (unless discharged under other than honorable conditions) or upon retirement. e new leave carryover changes are being updated to reect the current MILPERSMAN articles that apply (1050-060, 1050-070 and 7220-340). For more information, read NAVADMIN 163/12 or contact your servicing PSD.Policy for carry-over leave changed THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 The crowd settles in as Josh Gracin and his band begin playing. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeffrey Pafford welcomes country singer and Marine veteran Josh Gracin to MWRs Concert In The Park, May 23. Josh GracinGracin and his lead guitarist, right, captivate the crowd with their performance. Enthusiastic fans get comfortable for the free concert. The event was sponsored by Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and Recreation and was part of its Customer Appreciation Week. Children of all ages enjoyed singing along and dancing to the music.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 5 points. Most notably, MSST Kings Bay received zero discrepancies during an extensive review of all its personnel protective equipment and rescue and survival systems gear. e great thing about this award is it is not an individual award, its a team and unit award, said Capt. Je Novotny, Deployable Operations Group Deputy Commander. It it is a true reection of your exceptional performance and attention to detail that you all attain each and every day. Kimball was the general superintendent of the Revenue Marine Bureau from 1871 to 1878, which evolved into the U.S. Life Saving Service, a predecessor to the modern day Coast Guard. Kimball is credited for putting the service on the road to professionalism by dening and heavily enforcing the fundamentals of training and equipment.Kimball e Oce of Naval Research took some of its hottest technologies and hands-on science activities to the city that never sleeps during Fleet Week New York May 23 to 30, a free event open to the public. is is a great opportunity to connect with others across the maritime family and with New Yorkers to show how ONRs work is improving their armed forces capabilities and national security, said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder. We thank New York for showing its appreciation to those who serve and honoring the heroes whove made the ultimate sacrice. ONR had exhibits on Piers 86 and 92. At Pier 92, ONR featured some of its cuttingedge technologies. Making its rst Fleet Week appearance was the new F/A-18E/F Super Hornet ight simulator. Visitors can tried piloting a virtual F/A-18 featuring newly developed ight control software that aids landing aboard aircraft carriers. Other featured technologies included: Catapult Capacity Selector Valve Calculator a handheld electronic device with custom software that allows flight deck officers to accurately and quickly compute the proper catapult setting for aircraft carrier launches Fuel Cell Vehicle this automotive technology runs on hydrogenpowered fuel cells rather than a standard internal combustion engine, producing zero emissions Ground Unmanned Support Surrogate Vehicle an unmanned vehicle designed to re-supply troops, reduce the loads carried by Marines and provide an immediate means for evacuating combat casualties Improved Flight Deck Uniform includes new, safer head protection; a more durable, quickdrying and comfortable jersey a coat that acts as a flotation device in emergencies; and trousers with secure pockets and an improved fit Modular Advanced Armed Robotic System a remotely operated unmanned ground vehicle that can provide remote targeting and weapons engagement, as well as advanced intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance Multiple Weapon Control Sight an infantry weapon fire control unit that mounts to the side of numerous weapon systems to provide ballistic fire control with a range knob and lightemitting diode (LED) display screen Octavia a mobile, dexterous, social robot that moves on wheels and can express humanlike facial expressions, gesture with its hands and move objects At Pier 86, next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, ONR displayed two of its projectbased educational outreach tools: SeaPerch and Physics of Sail. Visitors took part in the SeaPerch national, curriculum-based STEM education program by driving the underwater remotely operated vehicle. Physics of Sail gave attendees the opportunity to construct boats from aluminum foil, Popsicle sticks and paper sails and race them across a pool to test construction and design. Since 1984, Fleet Week New York has served as the citys celebration of the sea services. According to organizers, the event provides an opportunity for the citizens of New York City and the surrounding area to meet Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen and view some of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guards latest capabilities. e event also includes military demonstrations and displays, as well as tours of some participating ships. ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 30 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.Fleet Week focus on tech Prosthetics help wounded walk againMarine Corps Cpl. Garrett Carnes was on a clearing mission in Afghanistans southern Helmand province in February when he stepped on a pressure plate that exploded and cost him both legs. Two months later, the former squad leader was tted with prosthetic legs one with the X2 microprocessor power knee, and the new combination of a bionic foot and ankle at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center here. Carnes, 22, called his rst steps motivating. e gift of being able to walk so soon exceeded his expectations. Mentally, it feels good to get back on my feet, he said, taking steps on a slightly elevated ramp with parallel bars to grasp. Its a little awkward, like a baby whos learning to walk. Such steps are taken every day at Walter Reeds prosthetics gait lab, where rapidly changing technology is giving activeduty service members the chance to walk again and, in some cases, return to duty, said Dr. Charles Scoville, chief of amputee services in the orthopedics and rehabilitation department. First considered impossible to design, the X2 and higher grade X3 knees have provided a new way of life for above-theknee amputees, Scoville said. New microprocessors have ve sensors, compared with the original C-Leg, which had two. Now, a combination of gyroscopes, accelerators and hydraulics provide the knee with greater stability, mobility and versatility by recognizing actions, ofcials said. e multiple sensors can determine when the wearer wants to sit down or go up and down ramps and stairs, all without presetting the limb with a remote device, as required by the former technology. e rst prosthetic limbs, Scoville said, had mechanical knees that were neither limber nor conducive to the warghter. e wearer had to swing the leg outward and project himself forward to walk. e Biom ankle a combination foot and ankle prosthetic that works with the X2 or X3 knee and is specically designed for returning warghters is the newest device that enables exibility. Scoville describes the knee and ankle/ foot combination as more intuitive than older versions. It does the work for you, he said. By replacing the once-rigid prostheses, the new, lighter and user-friendly limbs allow enough exibility to stand on one leg, and step or walk backward without falling, he said. Army Sta Sgt. Billy Costello demonstrated his knee, foot and ankle exibility by sitting on the oor and stretching to pull his foot toward him. He also lost a leg by stepping on an improvised explosive device while on a clearance mission. We had just taken out 19 IEDs, he said. I found one more the hard way. Costello was another patient who progressed faster than his doctors expected. Soon to be discharged, he is an intern at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Va. and plans to enter the National Guard when he returns to North Carolina. I still want to support the guys, he said, adding that he would deploy if his medical condition allows it, but quickly added he doesnt want to be a liability to his unit. e vast majority of patients wont return to active duty, Scoville said. Our goal is to bring them totheir highest level of function. Scoville said 1,453 troops with severe limb loss have been tted with prostheses since December 2001 and of those, some 300 service members returned to duty, with 53 redeploying to Iraq and Afghanistan. We view patients as tactical athletes, Scoville said. ey dont have an o-season and they dont know when their next game will be. Marine Corps Cpl. Rory Hammill plans to resume his active lifestyle once hes discharged from active-duty. Before an accident in Marja, Afghanistan claimed one of his legs, he was a runner, snowboarder and surfer, all of which he hopes to resume he said, close to the level of ability he once had. ese service members are just a few of the 200-250 patients who are tted with prosthetic limbs each month at Walter Reed, said David Laufer, chief of orthotics and prosthetics services. By contrast, he added, the civilian sector produces about the same number per year.In addition to limbs, the lab also creates hands that can move ngers, with such dexterity that they can operate a computer mouse and perform other daily tasks. Designing and developing hands is the labs niche, Laufer said, noting that work is ongoing to enable hands to act intuitively like ankles, feet and knees. Far fewer hands are made in the lab than legs. e standard of care is shifting, Scoeld said. Its made a signicant impact on the wounded warriors who live with these advances. We want people to know were restoring their lives. To help Sailors defeat small boat threats and aerial targets without using bullets, the Oce of Naval Research wants to develop a solid-state laser weapon prototype that will demonstrate multi-mission capabilities aboard a Navy ship, ocials announced May 8. We believe its time to move forward with solidstate lasers and shift the focus from limited demonstrations to weapon prototype development and related technology advancement, said Peter Morrison, program ocer of the Solid-State Laser Technology Maturation program. ONR will host an industry day, May 16, to provide the research and development community with information about the program. A Broad Agency Announcement is expected to be released thereafter to solicit proposals and bids. e Navys long history of advancing directed-energy technology has yielded kilowatt-scale lasers capable of being employed as weapons. Among the programs, the Maritime Laser Demonstration developed a proof-of-concept technology that was tested at sea aboard a decommissioned Navy ship. e demonstrator was able to disable a small boat target. Another program, the ONR eyeing laser weapon prototype

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 during the day to remember exactly what we are celebrating and that is were celebrating our freedom, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told NBCs Today show from the Pentagon. e freedom that was purchased by more than two million men and women throughout the course of our history and, of course, more than 64-hundred or so in the past 10 years alone. On multiple morning news programs, questioning quickly turned to the war in Afghanistan, with Dempsey saying he denes progress there as having Afghans able to provide for their own security and governance. Success in Afghanistan will be when the Afghan Security Forces are capable of maintaining stability inside their own country and the central government of Afghanistan is able to provide governance. I think that has always been the denition of success both in Iraq and Afghanistan, he told CNNs Starting Point. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. June 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, June 4, 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered June 6The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 19Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Spouse Indoctrination class meets June 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 26. To register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 to 7 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., June 20. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 5. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 7A job search workshop will be June 7, 10 a.m. to noon June 7. it provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 14.Financial planning for deployment June 6This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 6. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., June 7. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the information and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, June 21. For more information and to register, call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Child abuse prevention gration of the submarine force. It was a smooth transition, Mayer said. e dynamic may be dierent, but the overall mission and goal hasnt changed. We all have a very high standard of professionalism and we take pride in that. e Department of the Navy announced its decision to allow women to serve on submarines when then Secretary of Defense Robert Gates formally presented a letter to congressional leaders Feb. 19, 2010. e document informed leadership the DoNs desire to reverse the policy prohibiting women from serving on subs. Submarines are designed to dominate both the littorals and deep oceans and serve as a valuable asset in supporting the core capabilities of Maritime Strategy: sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security and deterrence.FleetMemorial

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Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes with adult summer bowling leagues. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gam ing room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp is going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp. Sessions are 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 11 to 15 for ages 13 to 18 and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child ages 7 to 18. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. Includes registration, instructions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. ere is $10 o registration if two or more family members attend. Major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register now to June 4 for the June 11 to 15 camp and through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camps. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912573-4548.Soccer camp coming Just for kids Bowling leagues running Liberty call Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 7

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Laser Weapon System, demonstrated a similar ability to shoot down four small unmanned test aircraft. e SSL-TM program builds upon ONRs directed-energy developments and knowledge gained from other laser research initiatives, including the MK 38 Tactical Laser Demonstration tested at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. All of these eorts could help the Department of the Navy become the rst of the armed forces to deploy high-energy laser weapons. ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning plus an additional 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C. Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island; Large Deck Combatant USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76); Surface Combatant USS Lake Champlain (CG 57); Amphibious USS Green Bay (LPD 20); Submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734); Auxiliary USNS Grasp (T-ARS 51); Marine Corps Active Duty Aviation Marine Attack Squadron 223; Navy Active Duty Aviation Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 77 Saberhawks; Marine Corps Reserve Aviation Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 773; Navy Reserve Aviation Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 57 Conquistadors; Training Aviation Training Squadron 10 Wildcats; Safety Integration in Acquisition NAVSEA Shallow Water Combat Submersible Team; and, the Emerging Center of Excellence U.S. Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A), Naval Sea Systems Command, NOSSA, and USFOR-A Systems Safety.SafetyLaser Parks worth visitAsk people what their all-time favorite family vacation has been and chances are goodnational parks will bein most of the answers. I dont have any science to back that up, but I have been struck by the number of people who recollect their best memories of family bonding in places like Yellowstone, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon. Somehow, even traveling for hours in a cramped car with cranky kids seems to vanish from the memories of those who have experienced Americas most magnicent places. From the peaks of Alaskas Denali to the lowlands of Floridas Everglades, the National Park Servicess 397 national parks and many thousands of historical and archaeological sites and wetlands were each brought into the federal system because they are the best of the best those places deemed worthy of protecting for everyone to see. ats exactly what Interiour Secretary Ken Salazar had in mind when he announced recently that the $80 annual pass for all the national parks and public lands will be waived for active-duty military members and their dependents, starting May 19, Armed Forces Day. Salazar said he hopes military members and their families will visit the parks and public lands for fun, rest and relaxation, family bonding, and to experience those places America holds dear. As the Interior secretary said, these are the very places they not only defend, but that they own. e World War II generation had a close connection to the parks, National Park Service Director John Jarvis said, because some military training was done there such as when the 10th Moutain Division trained on Mount Ramier in Washington and some places were reserved for a time only for returning service members and their families. Also, the federal government then made a push to improve the parks and add infrastructure for the returning warriors. If you talk to folks of that generation, they came back, had kids, got in the station wagon, and did the national park tours, Jarvis said. Ocials hope todays generation of troops and families make the same connections. And with national parks 84 million acres of land and 4.5 million acres of oceans, lakes and reservoirs in every state except Delaware, many are just a day trip, or less, away. So, why wait? Play hooky on your Saturday chores, let the kids miss soccer practice, pry the electronics out of their hands, and hop in the SUV. ose mountain trails, battleelds, nature preserves and historic homes are just around the corner. Navy unmanned aircraft will be able to distinguish small pirate boats from other vessels when an Ofce of Naval Researchfunded sensor starts airborne tests this summer, ocials said April 5. Called the Multi-Mode Sensor Seeker, the sensor is a mix of high-denition cameras, mid-wave infrared sensors and laser-radar technology. It will be placed on a robotic helicopter called Fire Scout. Carrying advanced automatic target recognition software, the sensor prototype will allow Fire Scout to autonomously identify small boats on the water, reducing the workload of Sailors operating it from control stations aboard Navy ships. Sailors who control robotic systems can become overloaded with data, often sifting through hours of streaming video searching for a single ship, said Ken Heeke, program ofcer in ONRs Naval Air Warfare and Weapons Department. e automatic target recognition software gives Fire Scout the ability to distinguish target boats in congested coastal waters using LADAR, and it sends that information to human operators, who can then analyze those vessels in a 3-D picture. Navy-developed target recognition algorithms aboard Fire Scout will ex ploit the 3-D data collected by the LADAR, utilizing a long-range, high-res, eyesafe laser. e software compares the 3-D imagery to vessel templates or schematics stored in the systems memory. e 3-D data gives you a leg up on target identication, said Dean Cook, principal investigator for the MMSS program at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division. Infrared and visible cameras produce 2-D pictures, and objects in them can be dicult to automatically identify. With LADAR data, each pixel corresponds to a 3-D point in space, so the automatic target recognition algorithm can calculate the dimensions of an object and compare them to those in a database. e algorithms have been successfully tested in shore-based systems against vessels at sea. e software is being integrated into a BRITE Star II turret by a team from NAWCWD, Raytheon, FLIR Systems, BAE Systems and Utah State University for airborne testing aboard a manned test helicopter. e ight assessment will be conducted against groups of approximately seven small boats in a military sea range o the California coast later this summer. Sensors to go on Fire Scout 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012

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Army puts ags in ArlingtonMore than 1,200 soldiers with the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, e Old Guard, gathered at Arlington National Cemetery May 25 to place miniature American ags on each of its gravesites and niches for the annual Flags In ritual thats been performed just before each Memorial Day for 64 years. e Old Guard, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, is the Armys ceremonial unit and has honored Americans buried at the cemetery with the Flags In commemoration every year since 1948. e regiments troops placed the ags on nearly 260,000 gravesites and 22,000 niches, in addition to more than 14,000 graves at the U.S. Soldiers and Airmens Home National Cemetery in Washington, D.C., an Army cemetery for residents of the Armed Forces Retirement HomeWashington. Old Guard sentinels also placed four ags at the Tomb of the Unknowns. e Old Guards commander, Army Col. Dave When I was a kid get ready for a lecture we had potato chips. If you wanted something different, you stuck one in French onion dip, the only kind of dip then, or ate a corn chip or cheese puff. We didnt have a gazillion flavors of chips. But then science went to work. Today we have it all, from massappeal flavors like ranch or sour cream and onion, to exotics like prawn or loaded baked potato. I like garlic and Parmesan cheese. Ill pass on dill pickle. Patty Ivey Family member Los Angeles The best is sea salt and back pepper. I dont like barbecue. MASN Alicia Mayhew Security Force Battalion Pine Bluff, Ark. I personally like vegetar ian chips and I cant stand pizza-flavored chips. Ensign Jared Pitts Submarine Group 10 Birmingham, Ala. My favorite is salt and vinegar. My least favorite is unsalted. MASN Tyler Higginbotham Security Force Battalion Birmingham, Ala. I like original nacho cheese (tortilla chips) and I despise cheeseburger flavor. MM2 William Rose USS Wyoming Blue Houston I like jalapeno cheddar (cheese puffs) and I havent had any flavors that are terrible. ET2 James Langan Trident Training Facility Albuquerque, N.M. The best is cheddar cheese and baked is the worst.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Department of Defense, assignment policy changes aecting the assignment of Navy women to formerly closed positions will be implemented May 14. e changes will open an additional 14,325 positions to women across the Department of Defense. Of those positions, the Navy will open 60 medical ocer, chaplain, chief hospital corpsman and hospital corpsman rst class positions for the assignment of women in Marine Corps ground combat element battalions. e secretary of defense has said this is the beginning, not the end, of a process, said Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jo Ann Rooney. e department intends to continue to remove barriers that prevent service members from serving in any capacity in which they qualify. e 60 new Navy positions open to the assignment of women include 18 medical ocer positions, 19 chaplain ocer positions and 23 chief and petty ocer rst class hospital corpsman positions. e Navy has always been committed to pursuing the elimination of gender-restricted policies where feasible while maintaining force readiness, said Lt. Maura Betts, director of the Oce of Womens Policy. e changes to the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Denition and Assignment Rule, announced Feb. 9 in a report to Congress, could not be implemented without a Congressionally-mandated notication period, which has now expired. A second change adopted in the exception addresses former co-location restrictions. When implemented, occupations will no longer be closed to women solely because the positions are required to be co-located with direct ground combat units. However, elimination of the co-location exclusion has no impact to the Navy, as current policy does not restrict the assignment of women based on co-location. Currently, 95 percent of Navy billets are open to women. e ve percent of closed billets include submarines for enlisted women, and SEALs, Riverine squadrons and Marine Corps support in compliance with direct ground combat rule.Billets open for women Secretary of the Army John McHugh visited the Naval Postgraduate School, May 21, to learn more about research conducted by the university and to see the academic programs military ocers take part in. McHugh and his sta began the afternoon by receiving a command brief from NPS President Dan Oliver and key faculty members. e group was briefed on the development of the universitys new cyber security degree program. e Naval Postgraduate School is an important place to the Army, and we need to make sure we are taking full advantage of it, said McHugh during the command brieng. e joint approach to training at the graduate and postgraduate level is impressive and I have an enormous respect for the work that is being done here. I want to know how the Army can help your eorts. Dr. Cynthia Irvine, director of the universitys Cyber Academic Group delivered an overview of the NPS masters degree focused on cyber systems and operations. Were here to focus on maximizing cyberspace operational eectiveness, and were very excited [about] the programs in this eld of study that we are oering our students, said Irvine during her presentation. Noting the gap of cyber prociencies between senior and junior service members, McHugh applauded university efforts in the area of cyber security and specically the eorts targeting senior enlisted sailors and soldiers, who will be allowed to enter the newly formed program in upcoming academic quarters. Interestingly, Ive noticed how much of a gap exists between our junior and senior enlisted soldiers in knowledge of the cyber world, McHugh noted. Its crucial that we get these senior enlisted soldiers the foundations they need to succeed. Upon conclusion of the command and cyber operations brief, McHugh and his sta were joined by local Congressman Rep. Sam Farr for a tour of the universitys Common Operational Research Environment lab. e CORE lab, an ongoing center of study under the universitys Defense Analysis department, is predominantly attended by Army ocers focusing on data, information technologies and theories applicable to irregular warfare. I briefed the Secretary on the CORE lab, which is embedded in the Defense Analysis department, said Dr. Sean Everton, co-director of the CORE lab. We train students, most of whom are Army, how to fuse cutting edge methodologies, such as social network analysis and geospatial analysis, to real world situations, so that they can gain a better understanding of the operating environment. McHugh ended the visit with a briefing on a current research project that uses smartphone technology to collect and analyze information on improvised explosive device networks. I appreciate all that youre doing in this important eld of study, McHugh told the students. is is really fascinating stu, and it demonstrates the inescapable reality of what the future holds. Army boss pays Navy visit Service pays tribute to fallen Service members participated in a Memorial Day observance at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Riverside Park May 28 as part of Fleet Week New York 2012 and the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. e observance included performances from the U.S. Coast Guard Band and New York Scottish Pipes and Drums, a wreath-laying ceremony and remarks from New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; Rear Adm. Daniel A. Neptun, commander, Coast Guard District 1; Capt. Justine Cabulong, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan; and Cmdr. Laura Bender, chaplain of Wounded Warrior Regiment. Today we pause to reect on the service and sacrice of all our great men and women, and honor the memory of those who have passed and those who have THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Anders, was with his troops as they placed the ags, which are uniformly centered and situated one boot-length back from the headstone. Anders placed ags in Arlingtons Section 60, where some 12,000 service members whod served in Iraq and Afghanistan are buried, in addition to many warghters from World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars. I started in the rows of soldiers I served with and knew personally, Anders said, motioning toward a ag hed just placed on the grave of a soldier he served with twice rst, at Fort Benning, Ga., and later, in Afghanistan, in 2007. Anders said his father, and his great uncle who died in combat during World War II, also are buried at Arlington. is is like a family cemetery, he said. Its a sad place but very [comforting]. Old Guard soldiers feel honored by the rituals they perform, Anders said. Were the only unit that does it, and we are very proud of that, the colonel said. Airman prevents tragedy While preparing for her night shift, Air Force Senior Airman Lanea Trevino noticed something odd about the shower stall next to hers. e shower supplies, visible through the half-opened curtain, had remained untouched for the entire time she had been there. It was strange, Trevino said. I had seen nobody else in the facility so it was odd that an entire set of supplies would be left. While some might dismiss the empty shower stall and shower supplies as a case of forgetfulness, Trevino decided to walk through the facility to be sure. After noticing an occupied female toilet stall, Trevino knocked on the door and asked the person inside if she had left her shower supplies. ere was no response. I immediately began to worry, Trevino said. I could see that she was in the stall but wasnt moving. Trevino reached her hand under the stall and shook the girls leg but there was no response. She quickly peeked under the stall and noticed the airman was unconscious. Taking immediate action, she ran to the nearest trailer and told the rst person she saw to call emergency responders. My rst instinct was to get help, Trevino said. I couldnt tell if she was breathing or not but I knew that she would need additional medical assistance either way and ran to get it. Fearing the worst, she grabbed a male, who had been walking by on his way to lunch to help her get the unconscious individual out of the stall. e door had been locked from the inside and the only way into the stall was to climb over top of it. e male lifted her over the stall and she opened the door from the inside. Using a reman carry, Trevino dragged the unresponsive female out of the stall and laid her at on the ground. Moments later, paramedics from the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group arrived on scene and begin caring for the individual, who was later diagnosed with severe dehydration. Being vigilant and watching out for fellow wingman is the responsibility of all airmen, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. William Harner, 379th Air Expeditionary Wings command chief. Trevino displayed the ethos we expect from all our Air Force teammates, Harner said. She paid attention to her surroundings, noticed that something was not right, and acted accordingly. Her vigilance yielded a life or death result. Heat-related injuries can include dizziness, confusion, heavy breathing or unconsciousness, Trevino said. Its our duty to look out for each other, she said, especially in the summertime when the heat takes its toll on your body. anks to Trevinos actions the service member is due to make a full recovery. I would expect anyone else to do the same for me, Trevino said. As airmen in the U.S. Air Force, we are part of a unique family and you never have to have a reason to look out for your family members. China Marine tells tale Every Marine a rieman. Regardless of military occupational specialty, Marines throughout history trained to ght, defend and carry out the duties of an infantryman should their country call. For members of the Fourth Marine Regiment Band, e Last China Band, this call to arms became their new persona on Dec. 8, 1942. Donald L. Versaw, a retired Marine Corps master sergeant and Bloomington, Neb., native, marched with his fellow Marines in the Fourth Marine Regiment Band, originally stationed in Shanghai, China, in 1941. We performed various concerts for the troops scattered around the city, Versaw said. We played in parades and ceremonies for international settlements. Our purpose was to keep Americas best foot forward among the international community. Amid the threat of an impending world war, the entire band was withdrawn on orders from Headquarters Marine Corps and was relocated to the U.S. Naval Station at Olongapo, Philippine Islands. We left Shanghai playing, Versaw said. e last time I ever played in the band was November 1941. We never had a chance to unpack our instruments; we never performed as a band again, but we stayed together. While in the Philippines, a day ahead of the U.S., Versaw recalled listening to a sailors radio in the middle of the night on Dec. 8, 1941, and hearing the terrible words: Pearl Harbor has been hit. Nearly the entire eet had been knocked out by the Japanese. It was very hard for us to believe, Versaw said. War had begun. As morning came, the band Marines laid down their instruments and took up their ries. e Musicians of the 4th Marine Band now made up the 3rd Platoon, Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment. In the Marine Corps, youre Marines rst, Versaw said. Everything else is secondary. e band members turned infantrymen took defensive positions along the Olongapo coast in preparation against a beachfront attack. Once the threat of such an attack subsided, the ghting bandsmen moved to the tip of the Bataan Peninsula, near Corregidor, the site of the terrible Bataan Death March, which took place a few short months later, Versaw continued. While the regiment was spread over the island to resist further attacks from the sea, most of the enemy action had come in the form of artillery re, Versaw recalled. e band platoon was fortunate in that it was positioned where it didnt have to come in direct contact with the enemy, Versaw said. We just took a heck of a beating. We had to stay in our ghting holes all the time. ings had begun to take a terrible turn for the worse for the band. Seventy years ago, on May 6, 1942, the entire band platoon was taken as prisoners of war. e island was surrendered to the Japanese to prevent the wholesale slaughter of the refugees and wounded in the underground hospitals, Versaw said. It seemed to our commander that it was the more humane thing to do. [It] turned out that the war for us had just begun. Our battle with the enemy was survivorship. It was a long three-and-a-half years before we were liberated. Captured Marines were transported on the so aptly-named Hell Ships. Comparable to the packed freight cars of the holocaust, more than 1,000 POWs were stued into the hull of the Nissyo Maru, a Japanese vessel. e tightly-packed human cargo suered from sweltering heat, unsanitary conditions, exhaustion, thirst and hunger. Seventeen agonizing days later, the ship laid anchor in the dock of Moji, Kyushu, Japan. e POWs were then transported by train and foot to the coal-mining city of Futase in Fukuoka province. My seniors and [noncommissioned ocers] gave me a lot of encouragement, Versaw said. It was very depressing. We didnt know what would happen to us day-byday, hour-by-hour. You just got up in the morning, counted your bones, checked yourself out and hoped you didnt get in any trouble that day. [You would hope] you wouldnt get beat up or abused. You wondered if you would nd something to eat. e POWs worked more than 11 hours a day, seven days a week, for pennies a day. ree-and-a-half years later, the POWs were liberated following the end of the war. e Marines took over a month to return stateside, returning to a long anticipated homecoming. After his return to the states, Versaw was years out of practice on the French horn and decided to make a lateral move into another MOS. He pursued a career in photography and videography, in the eld of Combat Camera. He served as an instructor of Basic Still Photography at the former Navy Photography School in Pensacola, Fla. Following his retirement from the Marine Corps, Versaw made a career in the aerospace industry, working on space programs such as the Saturn and Apollo missions, as well as the moon landing mission. Versaw also served ve years in civil service through the Army Corps of Engineers and the Air Force as a photographer respectively. It wasnt until years after his retirement that he was recognized for his sacrice during World War II. Versaw was decorated with a POW medal by the commanding ocer of Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, Calif. Music continues to be a part of his life through the Marine Corps Musicians Association. He recently attended the 27th annual MCMA dinner in San Diego as a distinguished guest. Just being in the same room as him gives me goose bumps, said fellow MCMA member William F. Schnell, a retired master gunnery sergeant, tuba player and an Avon Lake, Ohio, native. I dont know how many people know about [the band POWs], even Marines today. Just to know a bandsman went through that, like he did, is amazing. As the last surviving member of the Last China Band, Versaws legacy as well as the bands continues in his books, Mikado no Kyaku (Guest of the Emperor) and e Last China Band. e Defense Department believes recent incidents in which members of the Afghan National Security Forces have attacked their coalition trainers are individual acts of grievance, a senior DOD spokesman said recently. Its often dicult to determine the exact motivation behind an attackers crime because they are, very often, killed in the act, Navy Capt. John Kirby, deputy assistant secretary of defense for media operations, told reporters at the Pentagon. Kirby said these types of attacks have only been tracked since 2007. Fiftyseven such attacks, he added, have occurred during this time. Based on the limited evidence that we have been able to collect, we believe that less than half, somewhere in the neighborhood of three to four out of every 10 [attacks] is inspired, or resourced, or planned or executed by the Taliban or Taliban sympathizers, he said. In other words, that its related to an inltration attempt. Kirby said it may not even be adeliberateinltration, but a legitimate soldier or police ocer [who] turned Taliban. Yet, the majority of attacks, he said, are acts of individual grievance. You know how seriously aairs of honor are to the Afghan people, Kirby said. We believe, again, that most of these [attacks] are acted out as an act of honor for most of them representing a grievance of some sort. e spokesman said Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of International Security Assistance Forces in Afghanistan, believes the recent video of U.S. Marines urinating on the bodies of Taliban inspired at least one attack. Regardless of the motivations, Kirby emphasized the attacksleave lasting impressions on the families of the service members whove been killed. We believe the majority of all of them are individual acts of grievance, but look, that doesnt lessen the pain for family members who suer from this, he said. It doesnt lessen the importance of it whether its an act of inltration or not. Its an issue that were taking very, very seriously, Kirby added. But we dont believe the majority of them are Taliban inspired, resource planned [or] executed. British Army Lt. Gen. Adrian Bradshaw, ISAFs deputy commander, told Pentagon reporters during a May 9 video teleconference from Kabul that Afghanistans National Army and police force are working to root out this problem with great determination. Weve had several hundred National Directorate of Security counterintelligence operatives now join the Afghan National Army on attachment, Bradshaw told reporters. ey are embedded down to battalion level, and they are carrying out rigorous counterintelligence operations. e commanders are taking great note of where their people go on leave [and] whether their families have come under pressure. e British general said the vetting process for Afghan army and police recruits has been rened and theres also retrospective vetting of people in the force with a ruthless approach to those members displaying signs of enemy complicity.So a number of eective measures have been taken, and we continue to bear down on this problem very seriously indeed, Bradshaw said.Reasons for attacks unclearFlags given their lives to defend our nation, Bloomberg said. is holiday I think should remind us of the incredible debt that we owe every American who serves in our armed forces because they have stood where others could not, they have done what others did not, and they have earned not just our respect, but our gratitude and our support as well. Bloomberg placed the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial wreath at the portal of the monument on behalf of the city of New York. Following the mayors remarks, Retired Brig. Gen. omas Principe, New York Army National Guard announced each of the veterans, heritage and memorial organizations that also placed wreaths at the monument to pay tribute to the sacrice of those who have served in the armed forces and those who have paid the ultimate sacrice to protect the freedom of Americans. In eight months of the Revolutionary War, 55 Americans died every month. During the Korean War, there were over 900 Americans dying every month. During 90 months of the Vietnam War, there were over 500 Americans dying every month. During four years of World War II, that number grew to more than 6,600 Americans dying in combat every month. Since 1775, over 848,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen and Coast Guardsmen have made the ultimate sacrice in combat, Neptun said. ey were husbands, they were wives, they were mothers, they were fathers, sons and daughters (who) died in combat for their nation, for their service and for their comrades and really for us. Most of them were young, just beginning their lifelong journey into adulthood. e Soldiers and Sailors Monument stands above the Hudson River in Riverside Park. Service

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While the Atlantic hurricane season doesnt ofcially start until June 1, scientists at the Climate Prediction Center are predicting moderate chances for a tropical depression or a storm to form in the Caribbean during the next two weeks. e chances of an early storm are a perfect reminder to start disaster preparations in your home and local community. When it comes to hurricane response and preparedness the Coast Guard works closely with local, state and federal agencies like the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But there is also another important member of our hurricane preparedness team. at important member is you. e most valuable thing you can do is to stay informed and be prepared. If you are just starting out in learning about disaster preparedness, take a look at Ready.gov. Some of their top tips include: Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact so family members have a single point of contact. Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your homes vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind. Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community. Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine plac es to meet and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate. Also, dont forget to make a plan for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate. Use a NOAA weath er radio. Remember to replace its battery every six months, as you do with your smoke detectors. Check your insurance coverage. Flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance. A great resource is the National Flood Insurance Program. With your family and community prepared, dont forget about getting information on the weather itself. Some of the most up-to-date information on hurricanes comes from NOAA. NOAAS National Hurricane Center helps you follow storms, determine when and where they will make landfall and will even send you alerts and warnings if youre in harms way. Also, both NOAA and FEMA oer social media tools allowing you to access critical information before, during and after a hurricane or storm. So dont forget to plug in and download these important apps. Lastly, friends, neighbors and colleagues are more likely to prepare for disasters when they see those around them prepare, so inspire them to act by being an example yourself. e rst step you can take is to Pledge to Prepare. e resources you will receive once doing so provide tools for making your family and community, safer, more resilient and better prepared. Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal was on a security mission near the Iraqi Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in April 2004 when suicide bombers initiated a waterborne assault. He was severely wounded and later died from his injuries. Bruckenthal made the ultimate sacrice for his nation and his memory lives on in all those who serve in the Coast Guard. Paying tribute to Bruckenthals sacrice is the national program Veterans Moving Forward. e organization provides veterans with therapy and service dogs, and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. One such dogs name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Bruckenthal. Nathan, a golden retriever, is being trained by Cyndi Perry. is series, Life of a Service Dog, shares Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training. is is Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. Last time we met, I told you about where I was born and how I found myself at my new home with my human and her pack. A lot of my time is spent traveling to new places and be exposed to new sites and sounds. Well, one of the rst places I was able to travel to was our nations capital, Washington, D.C. It was amazing to view the city from my puppy perspective as I got to see so many shiny monuments and buildings. I even got to visit one of the most important buildings in our country, the Capitol. I was in awe of the building as it symbolizes the great nation our service members protect and defend. We took the metro train to Capitol Hill, which rocked me to sleep. e security guards in the building were great. e smiled at me and let me walk through this frame later I was told it was a metal detector all by myself and wait for them to tell me I was OK. Of course, I knew I was OK. My trip to Capitol Hill was to meet Congressman Walter Jones. He has been working to educate others about what service dogs can do for wounded warriors, allowing service dogs from Iraq and Afghanistan to return home with their handlers, creating a memorial to military service dogs and supporting the eort allowing the Department of Veterans Aairs to assist veterans with the costs of service dogs, not just guide dogs. While I was just a puppy during my visit, it makes me happy to know others realize how important it is to support our veterans. Whenever I think of the service and sacrice of all veterans, I am reminded of who I was named after, Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. e congressman was very nice to me and he even let me lay on his special North Carolina rug. He had to run, something about a vote, so we sat in his oce with some of his sta. e sta really liked me and I liked them. After a while I got a little bored so I took out a book on politics to read. Congressman Jones came back, and we talked and he held and cradled me. I have since been invited back several times to spend time on the Hill. Once he even showed me a letter written by Petty Ocer Bruckenthals father. It was so exciting because I had no idea about who Nates father was. I could detect his scent on the letter and it was a comforting scent. Being in our nations capitol, meeting those who support veterans and the scent of Nathans father inspired me. I knew I had to study hard, learn a lot and practice being a good service dog so I could help a wounded soldier someday. Check back soon as I share a story about my trip to the Big Apple. Service dog Nathan goes to Washington D.C. Life of a Service Dog Part 2 Its time to prepare for this years hurricane season Commander, Navy Installations Command announced a new partnership with Universal Class Library Edition, a powerful new online continuing education service designed for use by patrons of public libraries and now available to Navy Sailors and their families across the eet. By logging onto Navy Knowledge Online Navy library patrons can utilize Universal Class growing catalog of more than 540 courses and join the more than 300,000 students around the world who have beneted from Universal Class instructional technologies. e Navy/Universal Class partnership will enable Sailors and their families to take courses in everything from Exercise and Fitness, to Entrepreneurship, Arts and Music, Home and Garden Care, Cooking, Computers and Technology, Health and Medicine, Homeschooling, Job Assistance, Law and Legal, Parenting and Family, Pet and Animal Care and hundreds more, said Nellie Mott, Navy General Library Program Manager, were very excited for this new program and all it oers to the eet. e Universal Class program utilizes and array of learning modules; from real instructors guiding the learning, to engaging video-based lessons, a collaborative learning environment, graded lesson tests, certicates of achievement and Continuing Education Units available for selected courses. Sailors and their families will be able to enjoy an engaging and measurable learning experience that helps them master and document their educational goals. Navy Library patrons may register for a Univer sal Class account by Logging into NKO at www. nko.navy.mil. Click on the Reference heading in the upper left part of the screen. en click on eLibrary Education and nally click on the Uni versal Class Logo. Once registered, users can ac cess Universal Class from home, school, or any Inter net connected computer. e Navy Library Service was established in 1919 in order to support base libraries around the world and participate in the initial outtting of shipboard libraries across the eet. For more information about Universal Class and the Navys Library Service, contact the Navy General Library Program at nglp@ navy.mil or visit www. cnic.navy.mil to learn more about Commander, Navy Installations Commands products and services.Navy Library oers Universal Class THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 31, 2012