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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-24-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00254

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00254


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Trident Training Command held a change-of-command ceremony at the World War II Pavilion aboard Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay, May 18. Capt. Rodney Hutton relieved Capt. Ronald Melampy as the Kings Bay-based submarine training center commanding ocer at the time-honored Naval tradi tion. Melampy, who retired after the cer emony, reected on his 28-year-Navy career. It never ceases to amaze me how our organization our Navy never misses a beat when one of us departs, Melampy said. As leaders of men and women, many of us have had the privilege of sitting in the water and mak ing a bunch of waves as weve splashed around. But when we get out of the water, those waves quickly die down and sooner than you might think possible, time and our Navy have marched on without you. Ocean waves hitting against the rocky shore constant sustained, persistent chisel formations that stand the test of time. So too is the legacy of those who have served; to have chiseled the founda Capt. Rhett Jaehn at USS Georgia Golds conn USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Gold) held a changeof-command ceremony aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, May 18. Capt. Rhett Jaehn re lieved Capt. Michael Cockey as the Ohio-class guided missile submarine commanding ocer. Cockey, a Scituate, Mass. native, said his time aboard Georgia were some of the most reward ing years in his 26 years of Naval service. In the last 11 months, Georgia Gold has been 37 Sailors lost during Iraqi missile attack in gulf 25 years agoMore than 200 shipmates, friends and families lled the Mayport Memorial Park March 17, to pay their respects to the fallen crew of USS Stark (FFG 31) 25 years after the frigate was struck by an Iraqi missile while deployed in the Arabian Gulf. In the early morning hours of May 17, 1987, two Iraqi missiles struck the Naval Station May port-based frigate. Despite the severe damage inicted, the he roic eorts of Starks crew saved the ship. irty-seven Sailors lost their lives during the attack. Stark was decommissioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to preserve the tradi tion once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Com mandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Rear Adm. David M. omas Jr., commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic, served as guest speaker for the event. He was stationed at Mayport aboard Starks sister ship, USS Estocin (FFG 15), and talked about the reputation of Stark and its crew in the basin. Stark was the ship to beat, he told the crowd. Stark was awe Nam vet earns top medal42 years later, Leslie Sabo posthumously gets Medal of HonorPresident Barack Obama paid tribute May 16 to a man who died defending his fellow soldiers 42 years ago, and who the commander-in-chief said represents a generations honorable and undervalued service. During a White House cer emony, the president awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry, recognizing Army Spc. Leslie H. Sabo Jr., a rieman with the 101st Airborne Division who was killed in eastern Cambodia during the Vietnam War. Sabos widow, Rose Mary Sabo-Brown, accepted the award. His brother, George Sabo, also at tended the ceremony. Sabo is credited with saving the lives of several of his comrades in Company B, 3rd Battalion, 506th Infantry, when his platoon was ambushed near the Se San River in eastern Cambodia on May 10, 1970. Sabo shielded a comrade from an enemy grenade and si lenced a machine-gun bunker before he was killed. Some 50 American soldiers were nearly surrounded by some 100 North Vietnamese ghters, the president said, adding that other soldiers there that day re membered the enemy as ev erywhere behind trees [and] up in the tress, shooting down, Obama said. Les was in the rear, and he could have stayed there. But those ghters were unload ing on his brothers. e president described Sa bos last moments: Despite his wounds, despite the danger, Les lie did something extraordinary. He began to crawl straight toward an enemy bunker with machine guns blazing. [he] kept crawl ing, closer to that bunker, even as bullets hit the ground all around him. en he THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Memorial Day and the battles weve fought Page 9 Canny K-9s Meet IED detecting Ace, service dog Nathan Page 23 Go West USS Iowa finds final berth in Los Angeles Page 18Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay has two command changes Mayport ceremony remembers Stark SSBN 734 Gold Crew members take part in Navy Week 2012Nashville Navy Week 2012 kicked o May 7 with crew members of USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) on hand at the state capitol building. e Navy Week ran from May 7 to 13 in the capital city and wrapped up with the Great Tennessee Air Show fea turing the Navy Blue Angels. Navy Weeks are designed to showcase the Navy to lo USS Tennessee visits Nashville Capt. Rodney Hutton takes Trident Training Facility helm

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Save money on vacation this sum mer by using Navy Lodge facilities located around the world. Guests will save money compared to commercial hotels depending on where they stay. e Navy oers a variety of ac commodations to meet the needs of all summer vacationers, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands Di rector, Navy Lodge Program. Plus, staying at a Navy Lodge or other DoD lodging facility not only provides an outstanding value, it also oers the convenience of other base amenities, such as the NEX, the ITT ticket oce and MWR facilities. Navy Lodge guests will nd over sized rooms and suites, Internet access, cable TV with ShowTime, a DVD player and a kitchenette with microwave and utensils as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handicapped acces sible and non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges also oer guests a light breakfast in the morning, which will vary depending on the Navy Lodge. For an added convenience, dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight can stay at many Navy Lodges when traveling with its owners. For reservations, call (800) 6289466) or go on line at www.navylodge.com. Wherever your vacation takes you this year, remember the Navys lodging programs can help save you money. To get more information on other military lodging locations visit www.dodlodging.com. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesDuring the Navy Exchange semi-annual Sight and Sound sale through May 29, custom ers who purchase an individual computer, TV, home theater system or camera bundle valued at $699 or above using a Military Star Card will receive no down payment, no interest and no payments for a year and a half. Hurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonper ishable food and rst aid kits. For those cus tomers who are thinking of purchasing a gen erator, from May 30 to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Mili tary Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take ad vantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Opera tion New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Pursue a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org. Now hear this! Use Navy Lodge while on vacation Navy Lodge With the high cost of the summer vacation season right around the corner, Consumer Financial Pro tection Bureau leaders remind Sail ors to be wary of predatory lending practices. Holly Petraeus, assistant director of the CFPB Oce of Service Mem ber Aairs, said the number of ser vice members aected by predatory lending acts is hard to measure. It can be embarrassing to go and tell somebody that you got ripped o, Petraeus said. Its so common for Sailors to walk into [a nancial counselor] with signicant nancial problems that unfortunately have gotten really severe by the time they walk in and ask to see a counselor. Predatory loans are usually small, short-term arrangements designed to bridge cash-strapped borrowers until their next paycheck. However, they are expensive, high-interest loans that often cost $10 to $44 dollars per week per $100 dollars borrowed, plus fees. If a loan is not paid at the original payment due date and rolled-over multiple times, it can lead to a situation where most Sailors cannot pay o the loan. Financial diculties can threaten a service members security clear ance and career. Petraeus said ad dressing nancial issues openly can work to a Sailors advantage. Petraeus recently met with MidSouth and Navy Personnel Com mand leadership and spoke to Sail ors about how to make informed consumer decisions. She discussed the Military Lending Act, which pro vides some protection for active-duty service members, active National Guard or Reserve personnel, and their dependents against the type of predatory loans that are commonly found outside the gates of bases. Petraeus said service members may appeal to predatory lenders because they have a guaranteed source of income. e Military Lending Act caps payday loans, auto title loans, and tax refund anticipation loans to military on active duty and their de pendents at an annual rate of 36 per cent, Petraeus said. at sounds high, I know, but the average payday loan is actually about 390 percent. e Military Lending Act denes payday loans as loans of closed-end credit, 91 days or less, and less than $2,000 dollars. It denes auto title loans as loans of closed-end credit that are 181 days or less. e problem is that some folks have just changed the denition of their product enough to get outside of that law, Petraeus said. So youll see some sites online advertising that type of loan that will say right on there, were not subject to the Mili tary Lending Act because our loan is for more than 90 days. Sailors experiencing nancial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command nancial specialist to develop a budget and explore addi tional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief.Beware danger of predatory lenders Military Lending Act How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatali ties associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and conse quences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous condi tions unless personnel conscien tiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be re ported, no matter how small, to pre vent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the En terprise Safety Applications Man agement System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in report ing a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety of ce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Hurricane season is fast ap proaching. Many prepare for this, but what about tornadoes, ooding, house res, brush res or even family emergencies? One of the most important things to do for hurricane season or any di saster is to be prepared. Fleet and Family Support Centers will have a Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 6 and 2 to 4 p.m., June 12. ere, you will get im portant information and resources from FFSC, Naval Submarine Base Emergency Management, the Fire Department, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross, Camden County Emergency Man agement Agency, Balfour Beatty, Base Security and training and demonstration will be provided on the Navy Family Accountability Assess ment System. Once you have attended the Town Hall Meeting, you can make a thor ough assessment of what you need to prepare in case of a disaster. Get the whole family involved and come up with an emergency plan. Should a disaster situation occur, everyone will know what to do. Free childcare will be provided for active duty military for the June 6 session only. Register with the Child Development Center by June 1 at 573-9918. For additional information on the Ready Navy Emergency Prepared ness Town Hall Meeting, call 5734513.Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety Hurricane prep at June 1 town hall Fleet & Family Support

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 The Cockey family receives flowers from Capt. Michael Cockey. Capt. Rhett Jaehn, Georgia (Gold) commanding officer, departs. Capt. Michael Cockey arrives at the change of command. Capt. Emil Casciano, Submarine Learning Center command ing officer, congratulates Capt. Ronald Melampy. Capt. Ronald Melampy, left, receives his shadow box. Melampy retired from the Navy following the change of command. Capt. Rodney Hutton departs as TTF commanding officer. Capt. Ronald Melampy departs the May 18 ceremony. Capt. Ronald Melampys children receive gifts from their father. deployed for seven of them, Cockey said. My crew qualied 16 engineering watch supervisors, 39 Chiefs-of-the-watch, 37 damage control petty ocers, 17 diving ocers of the watch, used the checklist 5,376 times and 34 babies have been born since August 2010. Also, 49 of our crew members were born after January 1988, the time I joined the Navy. A third of our crew was born after I joined the Navy. at tells me its time to move on. Jaehn, a Centerville, Ohio native with 24 years of Naval experience and a previous command ing ocer of USS Tennessee (SSBN 724) (Gold), said submarining is a team sport and is looking forward to working with the Georgia Gold crew. Eugene Fluckey captured our [submarine Sailors] legacy when he stated, Serve your country well. Put more into life than you expect to get out of it. Drive yourself and lead others. Make others feel good about themselves; they will outperform your expectations and you will never lack for friends, Jaehn said. USS Georgia (SSGN 729) is the second U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the Nations fourth state.Cockey turns over command of SSGNtion of the next generation of warriors who will defend this great Nation. Our real and lasting impact is reected in the people weve had the privilege of calling ship mate, Melampy concluded. Hutton, a native of Shakopee, Minn., said his eyes were opened to the broad spectrum of what the military does day-to-day during his previous tour at Strategic Command. It [is] evident to me the critical role our SSBNs and SSGNs play in our national stragey, said Hutton. As a result, it become clear to me the importance of what we do here at TTF to enable those missions. We have a job to do. Without your eorts, these missions are at risk. Trident Training Facility with more than 520,000 square feet of classroom and oce space provides basic, advanced, functional, refresher and team training to Trident subma rine crew members and submarine support personnel, in order to increase and maintain the knowledge and prociency in specic skills and to provide specialized training.Melampy concludes 28 years of service

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 5 grabbed a grenade, and he pulled the pin. Sabos fellow troops have said he held the gre nade as long as he could, knowing it would take his own life, but knowing he could silence that bunker, Obama said. And he did. e day he died, Sabo was 22 years old, part of a campaign in Cambodia aimed at preventing North Vietnamese forces from launching Attacks into Vietnam from there. e Army told his Hun garian immigrant parents, his brother, and his bride of eight months all waiting for his return to Pennsylvania that he had been killed by an enemy sniper while on guard duty. Leslie Sabo left behind a wife who adored him, a brother who loved him, and parents who cher ished him, the president said. But for decades, they never knew that Les had died a hero this story was almost lost to history. ough Sabos leaders recommended him for the Medal of Honor after that days ghting, the paper work was never processed, Obama noted. Instead, another 101st Vietnam veteran, Alton Tony Mabb, discovered the award packet in 1999, during a visit to the Na tional Archives. Mabb sought to nd an swers, Obama said, and the result is that Today, four decades after Leslies sacrice, we can set the re cord straight. And this month, he not ed, the nation will begin to mark the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. e end of that war, the president said, was a time when, to our shame, our veterans did not always re ceive the respect and the thanks they deserved a mistake that must never be repeated. Vietnam veterans returning from war were called many things, Obama said, but there was only one thing they deserved to be called: American patriots. e commander-inchief then called for Sa bos comrades from Bravo Company to stand and be recognized. A group of mostly suit ed, largely gray-haired, middle-aged men rose in response.e audience, including First Lady Mi chelle Obama, Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panet ta and several military ser vice leaders, senators, representatives and friends of the Sabo family, then stood in a prolonged ova tion for the veterans. Obama said Sabos medal was bestowed on a single soldier for his singular courage, but it speaks to the service of an entire generation. e president said the families of those who serve also sacrice. We see the patriotism of our families who give our nation a piece of their heart, he said. On days such as this, we can pay tribute. Obama stood with his arm around Rose as they listened to the reading of the citation, and kissed her cheek after presenting her with the framed medal. e nations highest military honor, the Med al of Honor is awarded for risk of life in combat beyond the call of duty. Sabos medal is the 247th awarded, and the 155th presented posthumously, for action during the Viet nam War. cal and regional residents, giving them an idea of what their Navy does and why it is important. USS Tennessees Gold Crew Commanding Of cer Cmdr. Richard Dub nansky Jr. helped kick o the week with a live inter view with the local NBC aliate on the steps of the state capitol building. As the Commanding Ocer of the sixth ship to bear the name of the great state of Tennessee and on behalf of my crew with me here in Nashville, it has been a true honor to par ticipate in the Navy Week, Dubnansky said. In addition to crewmembers from USS Tennessee and the Blue An gels, the Navy brought assets like Explosive Ordnance Explosive Disposal Mobile Unit 2 to the Adventure Science Center in downtown Nashville, to show equipment and skills to young children and their parents. Tennessee and USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) Sailors visited Nash ville area schools and hospitals, as well as taking part in various commu nity service projects in the area. Navy Band Freedom and Navy Band Country Current also be made vis its to area high schools through Nashville and other venues. Nashville Navy Week is one of 15 Navy Weeks scheduled during 2012 helping to commemorate the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Nashville Marines with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa are getting a chance to reect back on the history, sacrice and legend that shrouds the bat tleelds of Belleau Wood. e series of classes were in preparation for the 94th-year anniversary of the battle with a Memorial Day ceremony in Aisne-Marne, France, slated for May 27. e Marines attending [the ceremony] will be more in formed and have a better under standing of where they are, said Sgt. Paul N. Calderon, the driver for the deputy commanding of cer, MARFOREUR. e classes were designed to inform Marines about the sacri ces of the Allied troops as they prepare to participate in a cer emony on the historic grounds of Belleau Wood over Memorial Day weekend. e Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment from Marine Barracks Washing ton, D.C., the USMC Fleet AntiTerrorism Security Company from Rota, Spain, and elements of the 5th and 6th Marine Regi ments and U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe, were all scheduled to attend. When you have the historic facts, walking through the bat tleeld doesnt just feel like a stroll in the woods anymore, said Calderon, who attended the ceremony last year. It really puts everything into perspec tive. e Battle for Belleau Wood was fought from June 1 to 26, 1918, in World War I during the German Spring Oensive. Belleau Wood is a 200-acre forest located by the Marne River, approximately 90 kilome ters north of Paris; a morsel of French territory that was contended for by the opposing Ger man forces due to its strategic location. e opposing troops launched a surprise-oensive and reached the bank of the Marne River at Chateau-ierry, which fell on the evening of June 1, 1918. In response, U.S. troops, consisting of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, marched more than 10 kilometers to plug the gap in the line by dawn. After weeks of heavy backand-forth battles between the Marines and Germans, often reduced to using bayonets and hand-to-hand combat, on June 26, the 3rd Battalion, 5th Ma rines attacked Belleau Wood and cleared the forest of the op position, ending one of the most ferocious battles the U.S. would ght during the war. Its interesting to see the leg ends meet the historical facts. We all know of Belleau Wood but dont always take the time to get a profound understanding of it, said the Orlando, Fla., native. Along with honoring the sac rices U.S. and French troops made during the First World War, the ceremony also com memorates the long, outstand ing friendship between France and the United States from World War I until the current war in Afghanistan. When youre at the Belleau Wood [ceremony], it really shows the strong friendship we have with the French that most Marines dont always think about, added Calderon. e Memorial Day celebration is an annual event that is hosted by the American Battle Monuments Commission at AisneMarne American Cemetery. e ABMC is the guardian of Americas overseas commemorative cemeteries and memo rials that honor the service, achievements and sacrices of U.S. Armed Forces. It makes you proud to stand in the lineage of these great war ghters. e Marines we learned about are part of the reason we have such a good reputation today. Marines study World War Is Belleau Wood battle e Defense Department is do ing everything possible to secure the return of an Army sergeant who has been in Taliban hands for nearly three years, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said May 10. During a Pentagon press confer ence, Panetta responded to ques tions about Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, whose parents have spoken with reporters this week about their sons captivity. e secretary said his heart goes out to the Bergdahl family. We certainly understand the concerns of the family, and we share the concerns about Bergdahl and the importance of getting him re turned, Panetta said. And were doing everything possible to try to see if we can make that happen. Bergdahl, 26, from Hailey, Idaho, has been missing since June 30, 2009, when his unit in Afghanistan noted his absence from roll-call. Bergdahl, who was a private rst class when he was captured, is as signed to 1st Battalion, 501st Infan try Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska. e Army has promoted him twice during his captivity. Bergdahl is the only U.S. service member known to be in enemy captivity. Asked whether Bergdahls return hinges on the release of some de tainees now held at the Guantana mo Bay detention facility in Cuba, the secretary said his position on transfers hasnt changed. I would only take [steps to trans fer detainees] in accordance with the law and the requirements of the law, and at this stage, frankly, there are no decisions that have been made with regards to that, Panetta said. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, said at the same press conference that he has met with members of the sergeants family in his oce and has corresponded with family mem bers several times. I understand their concerns. And I can assure you that we are doing everything in our power using our intelligence resources across the government to try to nd [him], the general said. Dempsey said Bergdahl wont be forgotten. Ill give you one vignette, he said. If you go to the [U.S. Central Command] command center confer ence room, theres [a] four-by-six foot poster of Bowe Bergdahl sitting in front of the podium to remind them, and therefore us, every day that he remains missing in action. I can assure you of that.Medal Soldier remains missing in Afghanistan

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What body of water is the largest system of fresh, surface water on Earth, containing roughly 21 per cent of the worlds supply? If you answered the Great Lakes, you are cor rect! e entire Great Lakes system is connected by a series of dams, lakes and rivers. You could travel on the Great Lakes starting at the city of Duluth, Minn., on Lake Superior and make it all the way to the Atlantic Ocean. e system was linked together when the Saint Lawrence Seaway was completed in 1959 and to day serves as a vital water way for our nation. is important water way recently served as a backdrop for Operation Spring Restore, an annual mission to verify and re place 1,281 aids to naviga tion throughout the Great Lakes region. e crews began work ing the operation in early March and are nearing completion with more than 80 percent of the aids already in place. After an unseasonably warm winter, were ahead of schedule, said Lt. j.g. David Lieberman, 9th Coast Guard District cut ter operations ocer. Its a good thing, too, because boaters are hitting the wa ter earlier than they tradi tionally would, and these aids are critical for safe navigation. is is a huge undertak ing, as the Coast Guard manages a total of 2,645 aids in the Great Lakes re gion. ese aids come in all shapes and sizes and include lighted structures, beacons, day markers, range lights, fog signals, landmarks and buoys. e aids to navigation system employs a simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers and light characteristics to mark navigable channels, wa terways and nearby ob structions. While they are simple shapes, they have a big job, allowing safe passage through the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway and facilitating mari time commerce. Spring Restores counterpart is Operation Fall Retrieve. Roughly half of the aids throughout the Great Lakes region were taken out of service for the winter months in order to minimize damage caused by ice and because of reduced vessel trac. Now that the aids have to go back in place, its an all hands on deck evolu tion. e 9th Coast Guard District utilizes six Coast Guard cutters, ve aids to navigation teams and ve small-boat stations. Each crew has a heavy lift and works around the clock to ensure the aids are exactly where they need to be. In fact, Coast Guard Cutter Buckthorn alone will set nearly 300 buoys. Besides Coast Guard crews, the Lamplight ers, a civilian group who manages aids in northern Minnesota, the Canadian Coast Guard and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Corporation assisted. e Coast Guard Auxiliary also helps with verication of pri vately owned aids in the region. Crews are almost four weeks ahead of schedule, due to an unusually light ice the past few months. With summer well on its way, crews are putting in long hours and using their technical expertise and initiative to get the job done. some. When we watched her sail o on deployment, [we watched the best of the basin go]. As word came of the sacrice ... those tales were told with a sense of pride as we read those words of heroism. omas said he was amazed at what a tight crew the Stark Sailors were and hoped that his own crew would emulate them. A highlight of the cer emony included the announcement that a por tion of Main Street on base and Mayport Road to Wonderwood Drive will be renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive. Following omas remarks, former Stark crew members Tim Martineau read the names of each crew member as the toll ing of USS Starks bell by Peter Weber rang through out the park followed by the laying of the wreath. e ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute and Taps to honor those who did not come home. Five Sailors assigned to Los Angeles-class at tack submarine USS Jack sonville (SSN 699) visited Jacksonville, Fla., May 9 to 14, during a namesake visit sponsored by Navy League Jacksonville. Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Cmdr. Nate Sukols, Chief of the Boat Command Master Chief (SS/DV) Roger Schneider, Electronics Technician 2nd Class Andrew Crips, Sonar Technician (Submarine) 3rd Class Davin Fields and Electricians Mate 3rd Class omas Rode spent the week meeting local ocials, vis iting local schools and enjoying various attractions throughout the Jacksonville area. Sukols said it was an honor to be represent his boat on such a visit. Its a tremendous privi lege to be here and have the opportunity to repre sent USS Jacksonville, he said. e city has been so supportive and its actually very humbling to be the center of attention like this. Were one of 18 sub marines in Pearl Harbor, so were not really used to it, but to come here and be treated so special is really incredibly humbling and we are very grateful to the city, the base and the Navy League. During the trip, Jackson ville Sailors visited First Coast High School and spoke to two Navy Junior Reserve Ocer Training Corps classes. At Oceanway Middle School, more than 900 students packed the gym nasium for a questionand-answer period that emphasized the impor tance of math and science and how it applies to their Navy careers. Its an important mes sage because math and science can be the build ing blocks of a successful career, Schneider said. e Sailors also conducted a number of other events in the local com munity, including visit to Wolfson Childrens Hospi tal and a service project at Ronald McDonald House where they crew spread mulch and worked to im prove the landscaping around the childrens play area. Seeing the Ronald Mc Donald House was inspiring because its a 100 percent volunteer eort, Crips said. at kind of thing is really the mark of a good society and the work those volunteers are putting in is a reection of the good will of the people in the Jacksonville com munity. While community projects were a large part of the trip, the Sailors also found time to enjoy some recreational activities in the Jacksonville area, in cluding a tour of Everbank Field, a Jacksonville Suns baseball game and a visit to the St. Augustine Alliga tor Farm. Sukols said the only down side to the trip was that he could not bring along more of his Sailors. Coast Guard returns buoys to Great LakesStark USS Jacksonvilles Sailors visit city 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Im fascinated by the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776, one of our first naval engage ments, but today somewhat forgotten. Americans, under Benedict Arnold, built a 15-vessel fleet on the lake to counter 25 prefabricated ships the British assembled for an invasion of New York from Canada. The Oct. 11 battle was tactically lost, but strategically succeeded in delaying the invasion force long enough that with winter approaching it had to retreat to Canada and await spring. MT3 Ricardo Calderon Trident Training Facility LaSalle, Ill. The Little Big Horn. Thats a lesson in ego. CS1 James Bryant Pirates Cove Galley Suffolk, Va. In Glory (The Battle of Fort Wagner) all those guys fought to the end for their country, and it didnt matter what color they were. ETC Samuel Beard USS Florida Gold Lafayette, Ga. The Battle of Flamborough. It was a Pyrrhic victory because we lost USS Bonhomme Richard but took HMS Serapis. Lance Cpl. Kelan Carnahan Security Force Battalion Enterprise, Ala. Pearl Harbor and how well we came back from it and persevered in World War II. MT3 Connor Shelton Trident Training Facility Sacramento, Calif. Gettysburg. Lees attack was bad because he was arrogant and the Union had the high ground. Pfc. Lukas Johnson Security Force Battalion Dalton, Ohio Belleau Wood. The Marines were outnumbered, gassed and lacked sleep. The Germans said they fought like hounds from hell and call them Devil Dogs . Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho St. Marys native Cpl. Ronald Smith received one of the nations most presti gious combat awards, the Bronze Star medal with combat distinguishing device, during a ceremony May 4 in front of fellow Marines of 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, after an 11-mile battalion hike at Camp LeJeune, N.C. Smith, a mortarman with Bravo Company, received the prestigious award for his heroic acts displayed July 26, 2011, when he saved an Afghan National Army soldiers life. e then-lance corporal left from his patrol base on the summer day, loaded with mortar rounds and his service rie, prepared for whatever his unit might encounter on patrol. He was the assistant mortar gunner charged with being the farthest rear security Marine alongside Mario, an Af ghan National Army soldier who Smith had come to call a friend. He was one of the few Afghans who really interacted with us, Smith said. He helped us cook dinner, played music for us, taught us Pashto and tried to learn English from us. Nobody could say his name, so we all just called him Mario. A detachment of Afghan National Army soldiers had been working along side the Marines of B Co. to eradicate the insurgency in an area called Trek Nawa when a reght broke out, putting two rounds in Marios leg. Toting his rie and a pack lled with Composi tion B, a heat and pressure sensitive military grade explosive, Smith lowcrawled under enemy re through 50 meters of foothigh poppy to assess Ma -St. Marys Marine honored THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 9

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Friday, May 25, Child and Youth Programs Appreciates Parents Day has donuts, juice and fresh fruit from 6:30 to 9 a.m. at Child Development Cen ter & Youth Center. Saturday evening is a free UFC Fight Night with Dos Santos v.s Overeem at 9 p.m. at the Big EZ Movie Zone. All events have more details on Facebook. Summer Splash 2012 Its noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 26, at the Fitness Pool Complex with free entry to the pool. Activities include Fruit Art Contest, Build a Boat, Pocket Scavenger Hunt, Limbo Contest, free popsicles, DJ, prizes and more. Food will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Swim Lessons Lessons are underway at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense autho rized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and priz es at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summer time bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Jacksonville Giants Summer Youth Basketball Camp runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 29 to June 1 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Children must bring lunch and beverage each day. Cost is $109 per player ages 8 to 18. Price includes camp T-shirt, individual evaluations and a ticket to one of the rst home games of the Giants in the 2012-13 season. Register at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through May 21. Late registration will be accepted if openings are available. Call the Youth Sports oce at (912) 573-8202 for more information. Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp Registration going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 11 to 15 for ages 13 to 18 and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child ages 7 to 18. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. Includes registration, instructions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. There is $10 off regis tration if two or more family members attend. All major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register now to June 4 for the June 11 to 15 camp and through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camps. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. May 26 ande 27, is Adventures of Tin-Tin If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548.Hoop camp May 29 Just for kids Summer Splash Saturday Liberty call rios injuries. Once he got hit, he was hobbling a little, but he was still up, said Smith, as he recalled the Afghan soldier who he risked his life for. When I realized he fell down, I went back and helped him over to a berm behind a pile of (harvest ed) poppy and started to treat him. I just remember thinking, I hope to God we dont start to take re from the opposite direc tion. Smith, who had been a mortarman for almost two years, responded to the casualty instinctively, as infantry Marines are trained to do. Once I crawled back to him after he got hit, ev erything was such a blur, Smith said. I just went into autopilot. My train ing kicked in, and I treated him with what I had and kept security until the (he licopter) got there. For his actions that day almost 10 months ago, Smith stood opposite Lt. Col. Tyler Zagurski, commanding ocer of 1st Bn., 9th Marines, to receive the prestigious award. Zagurski secured the medal below Smiths U.S. Marines nametape and spoke on Smiths behalf to the rest of the Walking Dead, as the unit is called. is award should show our junior Marines that their actions dont go unnoticed, he said. (en) Lance Corporal Smith faced a challenge that set a precedent for us as an institution that sug gests that even a Marine as junior as a lance corporal can take bold, decisive ac tion. e sweat-drenched Marines of the battalion took turns congratulating the newly awarded Ma rine. Afterward, the battalion was dismissed, leaving Smith to look back on his time in Afghanistan before enjoying the weekend with his friends. Ya know, I really be lieve that (1st Bn., 9th Marines,) has an angel, Smith said. Nobody in the battalion died on that tour, and that is because someone watched over us all.Marine e Defense Depart ments senior civilian and military ocer oered their perspectives May 12 on the ongoing unrest in Syria and the threat alQaida in the Arabian Pen insula poses in Yemen. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, told reporters dur ing a press conference that internal strife in Syria remains an issue of great concern. e Syrian peoples re volt against ruler President Bashar al-Assads regime began in early 2011. Since then, Assads military has battled rebel forces in sev eral cities. Estimates of those killed, both combatants and civilians, reach as high as 17,000-plus. e secretary acknowledged the cease-re nominally in place in Syria as part of former U.N. Secretary-General Ko Annans peace plan does not ap -Leaders mull Syria, Yemen 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Lessons of U.S. Civil War history were brought to life in the Pentagon April 12 during the rst of a se ries of historical presentations to be delivered to interested audiences in the U.S. militarys head quarters. Ethan Rafuse, professor of military history at the U.S. Army Command and Gen eral Sta College on Fort Leavenworth, Kan., deliv ered a lecture in the Pentagon auditorium in which he focused on the rst months of the Civil War. Rafuse is a recognized expert on the Civil War who has authored several books on various aspects of the conict. e lecture was open to anyone in the Pentagon who wished to attend, and it was webcast live on the Pentagon Channel. During his talk, Rafuse explored the ideas that drove strategy and tac tics on both sides of the war. He showed how the war was part of a larger sectional conict, and he explained that it was interpreted by leaders on both sides as a peoples contest. He also discussed the tripolarity of the strug gle, in which he showed how combatants and supporters on both sides strove to sway unaligned populace to their cause. Rafuse showed that U.S. Army Capt. Nathaniel Ly ons conventional victory over the pro-Confederate forces of the Missouri State Militia in May 1861 result ed in Missouris alignment with Union forces. e professor explained how this then helped drive President Abraham Lincolns advisors to push the idea of achieving a po litical result by scoring a quick conventional mili tary victory over the Confederates. e thought was that if the Union could defeat Confederate forces in a big battle, the South would lose the will to ght on, and the war could be con cluded quickly. Unfortunately, the Union was unable to achieve that victory dur ing First Manassas in July 1861, and the result was that war then raged and ravaged the country for another four years. During his presentation, Rafuse explained that the study of history is critical for military personnel and defense strategists, and he quoted a variety of leaders who hold or held this view. ese included Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, cur rent chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta; retired Ma rine Corps Lt. Gen. Paul K. Van Riper; the late Army Gen. George S. Patton Jr., one of the great leaders of World War II; the late President Harry S. Truman, commander in chief at the end of World War II and for the Korean War; and Napoleon Bonaparte, a professional soldier who became leader of a nation. Rafuse used a compli cated presentation slide from the Afghanistan con ict to illustrate the com plexities of war, and he drew attention to the similarities between the mul tidimensional, layered as pect of the current conict and that of the civil war. Nevertheless, he cautioned against drawing simplistic analogies from history and applying them to current situations. History doesnt repeat itself, but there are echoes that can inform thinking about situations, Rafuse said. He also noted that those looking to learn from history have the challenge of seeing the parallels that inform our thinking while also being sensitive to dif ferences that also shape our thoughts. In an interview with the Pentagon Channel con ducted after the lecture, Rafuse said the value of history is to broaden peo ples thinking thinking about context, the breadth of events, the depth of events, the larger context in which they take place to develop critical thinking skills and the framework for dealing with problems in the future. e speaker series is sponsored by a collaborative eort between the his tory oces of the secretary of defense, the Joint Sta and the military services. We plan to oer a presentation each month and cover a wide range of subjects related to military history, said Jon Homan, deputy chief historian in Oce of the Secretary of Defense, in a blog post in troducing the series. e concept for the se ries is simple identify interesting and relevant historical topics and nd a well-qualied and wellspoken historian to address them in a venue available to all person nel in the Pentagon (and hopefully well beyond), Homan said in the blog. e presentations will serve as professional military education (in ocial lingo), promote historical awareness among those charged with developing and inuencing national defense policy and strat egy, and also honor those who have served before us in defending the nation, he said. Civil War historian gives lesson from the past pear to be working. We continue to urge Assad to step down, that there must be a change there, Panetta said. eyve lost their legitimacy by the huge number of deaths that are taking place in Syria. He emphasized the United States continues to work with other nations to bring diplomatic and economic pressure on Assad. e goal, Panetta said, is to imple ment political reforms, have Assad step down and to try to return Syria to the Syrian people. Dempsey added he has consulted on the issue with his counterparts in Syrias neighbor nations. Two weeks ago, I was in Jordan, the chairman said. Today my Turkish counterpart is in the building, and were trying to gain a common understanding of where we think we are and where we think we might want to go. Jordan is very concerned about the potential for in creased refugees from the conict, Dempsey said. ats a concern that an individual country might have that wouldnt necessarily be ours, but its important to understand the complexity of the situation. Panetta said he has seen intelligence reports indicat ing an al-Qaida presence in Syria. Frankly, we dont have very good intelligence as to just exactly what their activities are, he said. e groups presence anywhere is a concern, he said, adding, We need to continue to do everything we can to determine what kind of inuence they are trying to exert there. Turning to Yemen, the secretary said DODs an nouncement earlier this week that U.S. military personnel are again training Yemeni forces does not mean U.S. ground forces are engaged there. Panetta noted the disclosure this week of a failed al-Qaida plot to attack a U.S. airliner. e attack was planned to happen in Yemen, which demonstrated that the Yemen-based al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula re mains a threat, he added. We will go after al-Qaida wherever they are and wherever they try to hide. And one of the places that they clearly are located is Yemen, he said. e United States does have operations there, and Yemeni ocials have been very cooperative in those activities, the secretary said. Our operations now are directed with the Yemenis going after al-Qaida, he said, adding there is no con sideration of U.S. military ground operations in Yemen. U.S. eorts to target al-Qaida leaders such as the Sept. 30 U.S. airstrike in Yemen that killed terrorist An war al-Awlaki have been very successful, he noted.Leaders THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 11

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More than 450 Sailors, and their friends and families, attended the advance screening of Universal Studios Battleship at Sharkey eater on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, April 28. Filming for the movie in Hawaii began in 2010 when hundreds of Hawaii-based Sailors, veterans and Navy ships played parts in the movie. e movie featured the capabilities of U.S. Navy destroyers and WW II veterans. In January 2010, even the Battleship Missouri Memorial sailed out to sea for some initial lming. We dont put enough attention with Naval Supply Systems Command, which over sees Navy postal opera tions, announced May 11, it is providing guidance to the eet about new United States Postal Service pro hibitions regarding lithi um batteries. According to the USPS announcement, beginning May 16, mail to or from APOs/FPOs are pro hibited from containing lithium or products containing lithium. e prohibition also ap plies to international mail. e prohibition is in eect pending further USPS review of investigations for safety. Customers should un derstand that postal clerks at these locations have been instructed to ques tion patrons and check customs labels for any declarations of lithium batteries or electronic equipment to determine whether lithium batteries are in the shipment, NAV SUP Navy Postal Subject Matter Expert Tom Rittle said. Upon identication of packages containing lithium batteries, custom ers will have the option to remove the batteries or not mail the package. e prohibition applies regardless of quantity, size, watt-hours, and whether the cells or bat teries are packed in equip ment, with equipment, or without equipment. For more information about the prohibition, see USPS Postal Bulletin 22336 at about.usps.com/postalbulletin/2012/pb22336/ pdf/pb22336.pdf. e NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission-to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warghter. NAV SUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and mili tary personnel oversee a diverse portfolio includ ing supply chain manage ment for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition part ners, supply operations, conventional ordnance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, security assistance, and quality of life issues for our naval forces, including food ser vice, postal services, Navy Exchanges, and movement of household goods. e NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps team forms a vast network of profes sionals who deliver unpar alleled products and ser vices to customers in the Fleet and across the world.Battery mailing nixed Sailors see movie preview 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employ ment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guaran tee a minimum of five partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 29. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from other new moms and dads, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Spouse appreciation Unemployed veterans ages 35 to 60 can apply for up to 12 months of paid training through a new program sponsored by the Departments of Labor and Veterans Aairs. e population the Vet erans Retraining Assis tance Program will serve is particularly in need, Cur tis L. Coy, the VAs deputy undersecretary for economic opportunity, said in an e-mail interview. Of about 900,000 U.S. veter ans who are unemployed, nearly two-thirds are be tween 35 and 60 years old, according to the Labor Department. e program was cre ated to provide assistance to unemployed veterans who are not covered by any of our education programs and need training or [an] education boost for todays high-demand oc cupations, Coy said. ey may have had entitlement to education benets at one time, but have either used them or the time frame to use them has passed, he add ed. is generous new benet geared toward this specic cohort of veterans provides them the oppor tunity to jump start a new career that they may not have otherwise been able to aord. e program, which be gan May 15, provides 12 months of training assis tance equal to the month ly full-time payment rate under the Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty program, which currently pays $1,473 per month. Participants must be enrolled in a community college or technical school program approved for VA benets. e program must lead to an associate degree, non-college degree or certicate. To qualify, a veteran also must: Be unemployed on the day of application; Have a discharge that is not dishonorable; Not be eligible for any other VA education benet program, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill or Montgomery GI Bill; Not receive VA com pensation for being unemployable; Not be enrolled in a federal or state job train ing program; and Pursue a program that leads to employment in one of 210 occupations the Labor Department desig nates as high-demand. e list of occupations, available on the VA Web site, includes jobs in con struction, machine operation, transportation, preschool education, health care and many other elds. e program will fund up to 45,000 participants between July 1 and Sept. 30, and an additional 54,000 participants from Oct. 1, 2012 through March 31, 2014. e retraining program is funded under the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011. our elders, in particular our veterans, said Peter Berg, the director of the movie. By far my favorite moment on Battleship is getting to meet these vet erans. Some of those guys are in their 90s, and they would come on board with the energy of a 20 year old. ey had all these stories. ey were having the best time. ey get to be on their ship. at was, by far, my career highlight. e cast including Peter Berg, Taylor Kitsch, Brook lyn Decker, Alexander Skarsgard, and Rihanna, were all at Sharkey eater to greet the audience. ere was a time when Hollywood didnt see eyeto-eye with the military, and I really think that time is no more, Berg said. I think that Soldiers feel it. Soldiers are coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan to a dierent reception then they did when they came back from Vietnam, and I think thats great. Im just glad to be able to do my part to pay respect. e movie also featured Col. Gregory Gadson, the Director of the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program, who is a Wounded Warrior himself. Gadson, who lost both his legs be cause of an improvised explosive device in 2007, practically played himself as Lt. Col. Mick Canales ghting aliens in the movie. I like to say that ghting aliens is no dierent than ghting a human, Gadson said. If youre ghting for your life, youre going to do whatever it takes to win. Gadson said he hopes the movie would also help all warriors, wounded or otherwise, and let them know that life can go on. Youve got to put be hind you whats happened in the past, Gadson said. When you have an op portunity to learn and to go through hard experiences, you can come out the other side and live a productive life. To prepare for her role in the movie, Rhianna en listed the help of Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jacque lyn Carrizosa, assigned aboard USS Ronald Rea gan (CVN 76) during the lming in 2010. She really helped me out, said Rihanna. I paid attention to her, ev erything about the way she dressed, the way she walked, her mannerisms, how she spoke, how col lected she was. at was very crucial to me playing this part. She was a pretty girl but very, very tough. Her demeanor was so qui et and sweet, and then you see her put on this uni form and she walks on the set, shes a whole dierent beast. She helps me as a friend but when she gets in her element shes very intimidating. During the lming, Rihanna and the the cast interacted with Sailors in Hawaii so the actors could better understand their roles in the movie. I was exposed to a lot of things that I didnt know about the Navy, just seeing their demeanor, where you lived, where you stayed, Rihanna said. I heard about how long you guys stayed at sea without your family. It really was an awakening for me. It made me appreciate what you guys do so much more. e lm opened in U.S. theaters on May 18. e movie is based on a board game of the same name. It is about how a eet of ships is forced to ght an armada of alien ships.Program aids unemployed veteransMovie THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans -WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, in stant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various des sert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 15

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e Navy formally trans ferred ownership of the historic battleship Iowa (BB 61) to the Pacic Bat tleship Center April 30. e transfer followed the completion of the National Environmental Policy Act and National Historic Preservation Act regulatory requirements. e ship donation con tract was signed in the Capitol Hill oce of Iowa Rep. Tom Latham, with Robert Kent, president of the Pacic Battleship Cen ter, signing for the donee and Vice Adm. W. Mark Skinner, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Navy (Re search, Development, and Acquisition), signing for the Navy. e ships tow to its new permanent home at the Port of Los Angeles will commence May 20, de parting the Port of Rich mond, Calif., where it has been undergoing repairs before formally opening as a museum July 4. Today marks the transi tion from the ships storied naval career to a brand new career as a museum and memorial that will serve for generations to come, Skinner said. I look for ward to seeing her brought back to life for public dis play, continuing to serve our country and its citizens in a new capacity. Iowa was the leader of a class of powerful and heavily armed fast battleships, the last of their type constructed for the Navy. Iowa transported President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic on the rst leg of his journey to conference with allied war leaders at Tehran, Iran, in 1943. Iowa served in fast carrier task forces in the Pacic Fleet and conducted shore bombardments during World War II and the Ko rean War. After two-and-a-half decades in mothballs, Iowa was modernized under the 1980s defense buildup and recommis sioned in April 1984. Iowa participated in U.S. Navy operations to protect Kuwaiti tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987 and 1988. A re in her second 16inch gun turret killed 47 crewmen on April 19, 1989, but Iowa was still able to deploy to Europe and the Mediterranean Sea in mid-year. Turret two remained unrepaired when she decommis sioned for the last time in October 1990. Iowa is the last of the four Iowa-class battleships to be donated. New Jersey (BB 62), located in Camden, N.J., was donat ed in 2000; Missouri (BB 63), located in Honolulu, Hawaii, was donated in 1998, and Wisconsin (BB 64), located in Norfolk, Va., was donated in 2009. e Navy donates his toric ships to promote public interest in the de fense of the nation, com memorate naval history and heritage, and to honor the men and women who built and sailed these ships.USS Iowa to become museum in Los Angeles 18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 23 Nathan begins service trainingPetty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal was on a security mission near the Iraqi Khawr Al Ama ya Oil Terminal in April 2004 when suicide bomb ers initiated a waterborne assault. He was severely wounded and later died from his injuries. Bruckenthal made the ultimate sacrice for his nation and his memory lives on in all those who serve in the Coast Guard. Paying tribute to Bruckenthals sacrice is the national program Veterans Moving Forward. e organization provides veterans with therapy and service dogs, and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. One such dogs name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Bruckenthal. Nathan, a golden retriever, is being trained by Cyndi Perry. is series, Life of a Service Dog, shares Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training. is is Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. Remember the East Coasts snowpocalypse in January 2011? Well, I was born, along with my brother and two sisters, in the wake of that storm. We are English Golden Retrievers, and at the time we had no idea what life held in store for us. All we really cared about was staying warm and getting fed. Jas mine, our attentive mom, took care of that. She smelled wonderful and was gentle, warm and always gave us full bellies. Mom was born in Canada youll want to remember that for a later story in my life and dad is from Maryland. We ate and slept, ate and slept. Life was good. After a while we had these new sensations. We could see and hear. It was a whole new world. Our rst human mom introduced us to all sorts of noises loud and soft, bells and whistles, sirens and jackhammers to get us used to what is out in the world. And the toys she let us play with! Balls, soft squeaky things, tubes to run through, ropes to tug. It was amazing. While we were not too steady on our paws, we enjoyed wrestling with one another, but it was all so exhausting. So we ate and slept, ate and slept. Oh yeah, we did what comes after eating too. My human parents introduced us to all man ner of new things. A ag apping in the wind can be a pretty scary thing at rst, crutches were not too bad and big cow bells that I could barely tug around. While we were all called puppy-puppy at rst, soon I had a name. ey called me Nathan. I was told it was after this really brave man who was killed serving his country. Nate was on a boat in the Persian Gulf when he intercepted a boat at tempting to launch a terrorist attack. I liked the name and try to live up to it every day. My sisters name is Lori. She was named in mem ory of Spc. Lori Piestewa, a heroic Army soldier who was mortally wounded when her convoy was ambushed while traveling in Iraq. We both feel very special and honored to names for these heroes. One day my brother and sister left with their new families, then it was Lori and I leaving the only home we had ever known. I thought I was going to be scared but it wasnt too bad as we traveled together, and we went with a lady who had come to see us several times. She brought us toys and let us wrestle and lay all over her. is lady became my best friend. When we were let out of our car kennel we saw a huge yard to play in. And there were some really big dogs the humans called horses. Gosh, could life be better than this? After a few days Lori left to live with another family to continue her training as an assistance dog. My life was not all play, but I have to tell you that even the work seemed like play. I got to go to work in the city with my human and be around her pack. I had to learn that no one could pet me or touch me unless I was sitting down. Isnt that just the most foolish thing? Sometimes I just dont get humans, for us dogs it is all about sning and touching and licking. We went to meetings where I had to be quiet and take naps under tables or desks. No problem. e rst time I saw a big re engine it was very loud but my handler said it was OK, so we just watched it go by. ere were times I had to walk over the metal grates whoa, dont look down but my handler walked over them with me and said it was okay. She kept saying I was learning to be a working dog. Because I am learning to be a service dog I get to be with my human handler 24 hours a day, seven days a week and go everywhere she goes. Check back soon as I share a story about visiting Washington D.C. A team of two jumped out of the vehicle as it came to a stop at a chokepoint on the road in Khan Neshin District, Afghanistan. While Ace, an improvised ex plosive device detection dog, wandered around the vehicle, Cpl. Sean Grady, Aces handler and a pointman with Echo Com pany, 1st Light Armored Recon naissance Battalion, began pre paring his sickle and combat metal detector. e pair then proceeded with what they do best: clearing a safe path for their fellow Marines. ey moved down the road in a carefully choreographed dance, methodically searching for the disguised and dangerous devices. Grady, a 27-year-old native of Otho, Iowa, launched Ace forward with an array of hand signals and verbal commands, while he swept the path with his CMD. Gradys choice to enlist in the Marine Corps was inuenced by the loss of a best friend, Sgt. Jon Bonnell, who sacriced his life in Al Anbar Province, Iraq in 2008 while serving with 1st Bat talion, 11th Marine Regiment. He was one of my best friends in high school, said Grady, who graduated with Bonnell from Fort Dodge Senior High School. Being the pointman for his platoon requires Grady to ef ciently utilize all of his tools. With his sickle, CMD, combat experience and Aces skills, a complete IED detection team is eectively leading the platoon. I volunteered to be a point man during this deployment, said Grady. e only thing I care about is keeping my Ma rines safe. Grady considers their tactical approach atypical. While most dog handlers are usually posi tioned farther back in a patrol, Grady saw that having Ace at the front of his platoon would greatly enhance their ability to nd IEDs. As a dog handler, most of the time were in the back of the pa trol, said Grady. ey only call us up when they see suspicious things on the road, or when the pointman needs to conrm something. I was a pointman on my last deployment, and I know the danger that comes with dealing with IEDs, and didnt want anyone else dealing with that, ex plained Grady, who previously served in Afghanistan in 2010. e teams unusual method has produced uncanny results, with their 16 IED nds since ar riving in southern Helmand in October 2011 being the highest of any IED detection team in the battalion. Ace has found ve IEDs, and also conrmed three suspicious hits, said Grady. Ive found seven during our time here. In addition to the tools of his trade, Grady credits tactical de cision games a basic skill set taught to all infantrymen for much of his success in Khan Neshin. In my head during a patrol, Ill go through my TDGs, ex plained Grady. I ask myself, If I was the Taliban, wheres the best place to put the IEDs? I would look around the area and focus my attention where I think the enemy would put the IED, he added. Grady recalled an incident, where he found an IED using lessons learned from conduct ing TDGs. He used his sickle to investigate what he gured was a suspicious spot on the road, and uncovered a bucket lled with 50 pounds of explosives. Grady and Ace have been teammates since July 2011, af ter Grady attended the Marine Corps dog handling course. He was amazed by Aces obedience and the skills he had acquired from training with K2 Solutions Inc., before they were partnered together. It blew my mind how disciplined Ace was, the amount of dierent explosive scents that he could recognized, and how useful his skill can be in the eld, Grady explained. Hes a superb dog and he helps me do my job, he added. I wasnt really aware of how amazing the Marine Corps dog handlers program is until I met Ace. Just as he was taught in boot camp and infantry training, Grady keeps his weapons, tools and skills well maintained. He stressed that constantly training Ace is what keeps him sharp and disciplined when they are out on patrol. We keep up with his obedi ence and reset training to make sure he keeps his skills and stays on his game, explained Grady. Its hard, because I want to love him as a pet but I have to treat him as tool as well, because of the skills he has, said Grady. Im constantly on that ne line of being his friend and master. As 1st LARs deployment comes to a close, Grady and Ace look to keep their platoons path home safe and IED free. Marine, best friend top IED detection team e chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta discussed the new national defense strategy and its core pillars in remarks at the na tions oldest international aairs think tank earlier this month. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey spoke at the Carnegie Endow ment for International Peace, founded in 1910 as a private, nonprot organization. Over the past months weve formulated what I guess is now being called a new defense strategy, Dempsey said. Its built on a [Quadrennial Defense Review], of course, but its new in several important ways. One of the aspects of the strat egy is rebalancing U.S. forces with emphasis on the AsiaPacic region. During a visit to NATO headquarters in Brussels last week, he said, he was asked with great interest what rebal ancing means. I suggested to them that its a process not a light switch. Well work our way into it, he said. It starts with intellectual bandwidth more than anything. We have to shift some of our in tellectual bandwidth and start to understand how rebalance ourselves so its not just about our resources, equipment or basing. Its about thinking, and we are beginning that process now. e chairman said the second pillar of the strategy, and one of its cornerstones, is building partners, and not because the United States will be doing less. Rather, he said, its because the world over the last decade or two has become a security paradox that has seen a prolif eration of capabilities and tech nologies to middleweight actors and nonstate actors. at he said, actually makes the world feel, and potentially be, more dangerous than any time I re member in uniform. Dempsey noted that he came into the Army in 1974. Its not a paradox that neces sarily has to be met with bigger military forces, he said. I think its a paradox that has to be met with dierent military forces. And among the things that will make that work [is] our ability to build on exist ing partner ships around the globe, notably the North Atlantic alliance, [and] others as well. Adversaries rarely mass against the United States and its allies any more, the general pointed out. ey decentralize, they network and they syndi cate, he said, making develop ment of emerging partnerships especially important now. Adversaries use 21st-century information technologies to syndicate groups of criminal actors, the chairman said -groups that come together based on moments in time when they want to nd a common purpose and pull apart otherwise. But we, the quintessential hierarchical institution on the face of the planet have to nd ways to be a network ourselves, he said. And that means a network of interagency partners internal to our government. e chairman conceded that building partnerships isnt an easy endeavor, and acknowl edged a need to improve pro cesses in intelligence sharing, technology transfer, foreign mil itary sales processes he said tend to somewhat hinder our ability to build partners. e nal aspect of the new strategy, Dempsey said, is the integration of capabilities the military didnt have 10 years ago, such as the cyber and spe cial operations capabilities and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technology that exist today. Other capabilities originally considered niche capabilities now are being integrated into conventional ways of operating, he noted. Weve moved now from writ ing our new strategy to beginning to challenge ourselves on what it will really take to do everything, he said. And the three things I mentioned here today to you really are the key to that endeavor. Strategy talk topic at oldest think tank Life of a Service Dog Part 1



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Trident Training Command held a change-of-command ceremony at the World War II Pavilion aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, May 18. Capt. Rodney Hutton relieved Capt. Ronald Melampy as the Kings Bay-based submarine training center commanding ocer at the time-honored Naval tradition. Melampy, who retired after the ceremony, reected on his 28-year-Navy career. It never ceases to amaze me how our organization our Navy never misses a beat when one of us departs, Melampy said. As leaders of men and women, many of us have had the privilege of sitting in the water and making a bunch of waves as weve splashed around. But when we get out of the water, those waves quickly die down and sooner than you might think possible, time and our Navy have marched on without you. Ocean waves hitting against the rocky shore constant sustained, persistent chisel formations that stand the test of time. So too is the legacy of those who have served; to have chiseled the foundaCapt. Rhett Jaehn at USS Georgia Golds conn USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Gold) held a changeof-command ceremony aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, May 18. Capt. Rhett Jaehn relieved Capt. Michael Cockey as the Ohio-class guided missile submarine commanding ocer. Cockey, a Scituate, Mass. native, said his time aboard Georgia were some of the most rewarding years in his 26 years of Naval service. In the last 11 months, Georgia Gold has been 37 Sailors lost during Iraqi missile attack in gulf 25 years agoMore than 200 shipmates, friends and families lled the Mayport Memorial Park March 17, to pay their respects to the fallen crew of USS Stark (FFG 31) 25 years after the frigate was struck by an Iraqi missile while deployed in the Arabian Gulf. In the early morning hours of May 17, 1987, two Iraqi missiles struck the Naval Station Mayport-based frigate. Despite the severe damage inicted, the heroic eorts of Starks crew saved the ship. irty-seven Sailors lost their lives during the attack. Stark was decommissioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to preserve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Rear Adm. David M. omas Jr., commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic, served as guest speaker for the event. He was stationed at Mayport aboard Starks sister ship, USS Estocin (FFG 15), and talked about the reputation of Stark and its crew in the basin. Stark was the ship to beat, he told the crowd. Stark was aweNam vet earns top medal42 years later, Leslie Sabo posthumously gets Medal of HonorPresident Barack Obama paid tribute May 16 to a man who died defending his fellow soldiers 42 years ago, and who the commander-in-chief said represents a generations honorable and undervalued service. During a White House ceremony, the president awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry, recognizing Army Spc. Leslie H. Sabo Jr., a rieman with the 101st Airborne Division who was killed in eastern Cambodia during the Vietnam War. Sabos widow, Rose Mary Sabo-Brown, accepted the award. His brother, George Sabo, also attended the ceremony. Sabo is credited with saving the lives of several of his comrades in Company B, 3rd Battalion, 506th Infantry, when his platoon was ambushed near the Se San River in eastern Cambodia on May 10, 1970. Sabo shielded a comrade from an enemy grenade and silenced a machine-gun bunker before he was killed. Some 50 American soldiers were nearly surrounded by some 100 North Vietnamese ghters, the president said, adding that other soldiers there that day remembered the enemy as everywhere behind trees [and] up in the tress, shooting down, Obama said. Les was in the rear, and he could have stayed there. But those ghters were unloading on his brothers. e president described Sabos last moments: Despite his wounds, despite the danger, Leslie did something extraordinary. He began to crawl straight toward an enemy bunker with machine guns blazing. [he] kept crawling, closer to that bunker, even as bullets hit the ground all around him. en he THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Memorial Day and the battles weve fought Page 9 Canny K-9s Meet IED detecting Ace, service dog Nathan Page 23 Go West USS Iowa finds final berth in Los Angeles Page 18Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay has two command changes Mayport ceremony remembers Stark SSBN 734 Gold Crew members take part in Navy Week 2012Nashville Navy Week 2012 kicked o May 7 with crewmembers of USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) on hand at the state capitol building. e Navy Week ran from May 7 to 13 in the capital city and wrapped up with the Great Tennessee Air Show featuring the Navy Blue Angels. Navy Weeks are designed to showcase the Navy to loUSS Tennessee visits Nashville Capt. Rodney Hutton takes Trident Training Facility helm

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Save money on vacation this summer by using Navy Lodge facilities located around the world. Guests will save money compared to commercial hotels depending on where they stay. e Navy oers a variety of accommodations to meet the needs of all summer vacationers, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands Director, Navy Lodge Program. Plus, staying at a Navy Lodge or other DoD lodging facility not only provides an outstanding value, it also oers the convenience of other base amenities, such as the NEX, the ITT ticket oce and MWR facilities. Navy Lodge guests will nd oversized rooms and suites, Internet access, cable TV with ShowTime, a DVD player and a kitchenette with microwave and utensils as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges also oer guests a light breakfast in the morning, which will vary depending on the Navy Lodge. For an added convenience, dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight can stay at many Navy Lodges when traveling with its owners. For reservations, call (800) 6289466) or go on line at www.navylodge.com. Wherever your vacation takes you this year, remember the Navys lodging programs can help save you money. To get more information on other military lodging locations visit www.dodlodging.com. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slideshow and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Navy Exchange offers valuesDuring the Navy Exchange semi-annual Sight and Sound sale through May 29, customers who purchase an individual computer, TV, home theater system or camera bundle valued at $699 or above using a Military Star Card will receive no down payment, no interest and no payments for a year and a half. Hurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and rst aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator, from May 30 to June 19, purchase any generator valued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for six months. From June 6 to July 10, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $249 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. e Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Pursue a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org. Now hear this! Use Navy Lodge while on vacation Navy Lodge With the high cost of the summer vacation season right around the corner, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau leaders remind Sailors to be wary of predatory lending practices. Holly Petraeus, assistant director of the CFPB Oce of Service Member Aairs, said the number of service members aected by predatory lending acts is hard to measure. It can be embarrassing to go and tell somebody that you got ripped o, Petraeus said. Its so common for Sailors to walk into [a nancial counselor] with signicant nancial problems that unfortunately have gotten really severe by the time they walk in and ask to see a counselor. Predatory loans are usually small, short-term arrangements designed to bridge cash-strapped borrowers until their next paycheck. However, they are expensive, high-interest loans that often cost $10 to $44 dollars per week per $100 dollars borrowed, plus fees. If a loan is not paid at the original payment due date and rolled-over multiple times, it can lead to a situation where most Sailors cannot pay o the loan. Financial diculties can threaten a service members security clearance and career. Petraeus said addressing nancial issues openly can work to a Sailors advantage. Petraeus recently met with MidSouth and Navy Personnel Command leadership and spoke to Sailors about how to make informed consumer decisions. She discussed the Military Lending Act, which provides some protection for active-duty service members, active National Guard or Reserve personnel, and their dependents against the type of predatory loans that are commonly found outside the gates of bases. Petraeus said service members may appeal to predatory lenders because they have a guaranteed source of income. e Military Lending Act caps payday loans, auto title loans, and tax refund anticipation loans to military on active duty and their dependents at an annual rate of 36 percent, Petraeus said. at sounds high, I know, but the average payday loan is actually about 390 percent. e Military Lending Act denes payday loans as loans of closed-end credit, 91 days or less, and less than $2,000 dollars. It denes auto title loans as loans of closed-end credit that are 181 days or less. e problem is that some folks have just changed the denition of their product enough to get outside of that law, Petraeus said. So youll see some sites online advertising that type of loan that will say right on there, were not subject to the Military Lending Act because our loan is for more than 90 days. Sailors experiencing nancial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command nancial specialist to develop a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief.Beware danger of predatory lenders Military Lending Act How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatalities associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and consequences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous conditions unless personnel conscientiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be reported, no matter how small, to prevent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in reporting a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety ofce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Hurricane season is fast approaching. Many prepare for this, but what about tornadoes, ooding, house res, brush res or even family emergencies? One of the most important things to do for hurricane season or any disaster is to be prepared. Fleet and Family Support Centers will have a Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 6 and 2 to 4 p.m., June 12. ere, you will get important information and resources from FFSC, Naval Submarine Base Emergency Management, the Fire Department, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, American Red Cross, Camden County Emergency Management Agency, Balfour Beatty, Base Security and training and demonstration will be provided on the Navy Family Accountability Assessment System. Once you have attended the Town Hall Meeting, you can make a thorough assessment of what you need to prepare in case of a disaster. Get the whole family involved and come up with an emergency plan. Should a disaster situation occur, everyone will know what to do. Free childcare will be provided for active duty military for the June 6 session only. Register with the Child Development Center by June 1 at 573-9918. For additional information on the Ready Navy Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting, call 5734513.Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety Hurricane prep at June 1 town hall Fleet & Family Support

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 The Cockey family receives flowers from Capt. Michael Cockey. Capt. Rhett Jaehn, Georgia (Gold) commanding officer, departs.Capt. Michael Cockey arrives at the change of command. Capt. Emil Casciano, Submarine Learning Center command ing officer, congratulates Capt. Ronald Melampy. Capt. Ronald Melampy, left, receives his shadow box. Melampy retired from the Navy following the change of command. Capt. Rodney Hutton departs as TTF commanding officer. Capt. Ronald Melampy departs the May 18 ceremony. Capt. Ronald Melampys children receive gifts from their father. deployed for seven of them, Cockey said. My crew qualied 16 engineering watch supervisors, 39 Chiefs-of-the-watch, 37 damage control petty ocers, 17 diving ocers of the watch, used the checklist 5,376 times and 34 babies have been born since August 2010. Also, 49 of our crewmembers were born after January 1988, the time I joined the Navy. A third of our crew was born after I joined the Navy. at tells me its time to move on. Jaehn, a Centerville, Ohio native with 24 years of Naval experience and a previous commanding ocer of USS Tennessee (SSBN 724) (Gold), said submarining is a team sport and is looking forward to working with the Georgia Gold crew. Eugene Fluckey captured our [submarine Sailors] legacy when he stated, Serve your country well. Put more into life than you expect to get out of it. Drive yourself and lead others. Make others feel good about themselves; they will outperform your expectations and you will never lack for friends, Jaehn said. USS Georgia (SSGN 729) is the second U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the Nations fourth state.Cockey turns over command of SSGNtion of the next generation of warriors who will defend this great Nation. Our real and lasting impact is reected in the people weve had the privilege of calling shipmate, Melampy concluded. Hutton, a native of Shakopee, Minn., said his eyes were opened to the broad spectrum of what the military does day-to-day during his previous tour at Strategic Command. It [is] evident to me the critical role our SSBNs and SSGNs play in our national stragey, said Hutton. As a result, it become clear to me the importance of what we do here at TTF to enable those missions. We have a job to do. Without your eorts, these missions are at risk. Trident Training Facility with more than 520,000 square feet of classroom and oce space provides basic, advanced, functional, refresher and team training to Trident submarine crew members and submarine support personnel, in order to increase and maintain the knowledge and prociency in specic skills and to provide specialized training.Melampy concludes 28 years of service

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 5 grabbed a grenade, and he pulled the pin. Sabos fellow troops have said he held the grenade as long as he could, knowing it would take his own life, but knowing he could silence that bunker, Obama said. And he did. e day he died, Sabo was 22 years old, part of a campaign in Cambodia aimed at preventing North Vietnamese forces from launching Attacks into Vietnam from there. e Army told his Hungarian immigrant parents, his brother, and his bride of eight months all waiting for his return to Pennsylvania that he had been killed by an enemy sniper while on guard duty. Leslie Sabo left behind a wife who adored him, a brother who loved him, and parents who cherished him, the president said. But for decades, they never knew that Les had died a hero this story was almost lost to history. ough Sabos leaders recommended him for the Medal of Honor after that days ghting, the paperwork was never processed, Obama noted. Instead, another 101st Vietnam veteran, Alton Tony Mabb, discovered the award packet in 1999, during a visit to the National Archives. Mabb sought to nd answers, Obama said, and the result is that Today, four decades after Leslies sacrice, we can set the record straight. And this month, he noted, the nation will begin to mark the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. e end of that war, the president said, was a time when, to our shame, our veterans did not always receive the respect and the thanks they deserved a mistake that must never be repeated. Vietnam veterans returning from war were called many things, Obama said, but there was only one thing they deserved to be called: American patriots. e commander-inchief then called for Sabos comrades from Bravo Company to stand and be recognized. A group of mostly suited, largely gray-haired, middle-aged men rose in response.e audience, including First Lady Michelle Obama, Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta and several military service leaders, senators, representatives and friends of the Sabo family, then stood in a prolonged ovation for the veterans. Obama said Sabos medal was bestowed on a single soldier for his singular courage, but it speaks to the service of an entire generation. e president said the families of those who serve also sacrice. We see the patriotism of our families who give our nation a piece of their heart, he said. On days such as this, we can pay tribute. Obama stood with his arm around Rose as they listened to the reading of the citation, and kissed her cheek after presenting her with the framed medal. e nations highest military honor, the Medal of Honor is awarded for risk of life in combat beyond the call of duty. Sabos medal is the 247th awarded, and the 155th presented posthumously, for action during the Vietnam War. cal and regional residents, giving them an idea of what their Navy does and why it is important. USS Tennessees Gold Crew Commanding Ofcer Cmdr. Richard Dubnansky Jr. helped kick o the week with a live interview with the local NBC aliate on the steps of the state capitol building. As the Commanding Ocer of the sixth ship to bear the name of the great state of Tennessee and on behalf of my crew with me here in Nashville, it has been a true honor to participate in the Navy Week, Dubnansky said. In addition to crewmembers from USS Tennessee and the Blue Angels, the Navy brought assets like Explosive Ordnance Explosive Disposal Mobile Unit 2 to the Adventure Science Center in downtown Nashville, to show equipment and skills to young children and their parents. Tennessee and USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) Sailors visited Nashville area schools and hospitals, as well as taking part in various community service projects in the area. Navy Band Freedom and Navy Band Country Current also be made visits to area high schools through Nashville and other venues. Nashville Navy Week is one of 15 Navy Weeks scheduled during 2012 helping to commemorate the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Nashville Marines with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa are getting a chance to reect back on the history, sacrice and legend that shrouds the battleelds of Belleau Wood. e series of classes were in preparation for the 94th-year anniversary of the battle with a Memorial Day ceremony in Aisne-Marne, France, slated for May 27. e Marines attending [the ceremony] will be more informed and have a better understanding of where they are, said Sgt. Paul N. Calderon, the driver for the deputy commanding ofcer, MARFOREUR. e classes were designed to inform Marines about the sacrices of the Allied troops as they prepare to participate in a ceremony on the historic grounds of Belleau Wood over Memorial Day weekend. e Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment from Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., the USMC Fleet AntiTerrorism Security Company from Rota, Spain, and elements of the 5th and 6th Marine Regiments and U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe, were all scheduled to attend. When you have the historic facts, walking through the battleeld doesnt just feel like a stroll in the woods anymore, said Calderon, who attended the ceremony last year. It really puts everything into perspective. e Battle for Belleau Wood was fought from June 1 to 26, 1918, in World War I during the German Spring Oensive. Belleau Wood is a 200-acre forest located by the Marne River, approximately 90 kilometers north of Paris; a morsel of French territory that was contended for by the opposing German forces due to its strategic location. e opposing troops launched a surprise-oensive and reached the bank of the Marne River at Chateau-ierry, which fell on the evening of June 1, 1918. In response, U.S. troops, consisting of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, marched more than 10 kilometers to plug the gap in the line by dawn. After weeks of heavy backand-forth battles between the Marines and Germans, often reduced to using bayonets and hand-to-hand combat, on June 26, the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines attacked Belleau Wood and cleared the forest of the opposition, ending one of the most ferocious battles the U.S. would ght during the war. Its interesting to see the legends meet the historical facts. We all know of Belleau Wood but dont always take the time to get a profound understanding of it, said the Orlando, Fla., native. Along with honoring the sacrices U.S. and French troops made during the First World War, the ceremony also commemorates the long, outstanding friendship between France and the United States from World War I until the current war in Afghanistan. When youre at the Belleau Wood [ceremony], it really shows the strong friendship we have with the French that most Marines dont always think about, added Calderon. e Memorial Day celebration is an annual event that is hosted by the American Battle Monuments Commission at AisneMarne American Cemetery. e ABMC is the guardian of Americas overseas commemorative cemeteries and memorials that honor the service, achievements and sacrices of U.S. Armed Forces. It makes you proud to stand in the lineage of these great war ghters. e Marines we learned about are part of the reason we have such a good reputation today. Marines study World War Is Belleau Wood battle e Defense Department is doing everything possible to secure the return of an Army sergeant who has been in Taliban hands for nearly three years, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said May 10. During a Pentagon press conference, Panetta responded to questions about Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, whose parents have spoken with reporters this week about their sons captivity. e secretary said his heart goes out to the Bergdahl family. We certainly understand the concerns of the family, and we share the concerns about Bergdahl and the importance of getting him returned, Panetta said. And were doing everything possible to try to see if we can make that happen. Bergdahl, 26, from Hailey, Idaho, has been missing since June 30, 2009, when his unit in Afghanistan noted his absence from roll-call. Bergdahl, who was a private rst class when he was captured, is assigned to 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska. e Army has promoted him twice during his captivity. Bergdahl is the only U.S. service member known to be in enemy captivity. Asked whether Bergdahls return hinges on the release of some detainees now held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in Cuba, the secretary said his position on transfers hasnt changed. I would only take [steps to transfer detainees] in accordance with the law and the requirements of the law, and at this stage, frankly, there are no decisions that have been made with regards to that, Panetta said. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, said at the same press conference that he has met with members of the sergeants family in his oce and has corresponded with family members several times. I understand their concerns. And I can assure you that we are doing everything in our power using our intelligence resources across the government to try to nd [him], the general said. Dempsey said Bergdahl wont be forgotten. Ill give you one vignette, he said. If you go to the [U.S. Central Command] command center conference room, theres [a] four-by-six foot poster of Bowe Bergdahl sitting in front of the podium to remind them, and therefore us, every day that he remains missing in action. I can assure you of that.Medal Soldier remains missing in Afghanistan

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What body of water is the largest system of fresh, surface water on Earth, containing roughly 21 percent of the worlds supply? If you answered the Great Lakes, you are correct! e entire Great Lakes system is connected by a series of dams, lakes and rivers. You could travel on the Great Lakes starting at the city of Duluth, Minn., on Lake Superior and make it all the way to the Atlantic Ocean. e system was linked together when the Saint Lawrence Seaway was completed in 1959 and today serves as a vital waterway for our nation. is important waterway recently served as a backdrop for Operation Spring Restore, an annual mission to verify and replace 1,281 aids to navigation throughout the Great Lakes region. e crews began working the operation in early March and are nearing completion with more than 80 percent of the aids already in place. After an unseasonably warm winter, were ahead of schedule, said Lt. j.g. David Lieberman, 9th Coast Guard District cutter operations ocer. Its a good thing, too, because boaters are hitting the water earlier than they traditionally would, and these aids are critical for safe navigation. is is a huge undertaking, as the Coast Guard manages a total of 2,645 aids in the Great Lakes region. ese aids come in all shapes and sizes and include lighted structures, beacons, day markers, range lights, fog signals, landmarks and buoys. e aids to navigation system employs a simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers and light characteristics to mark navigable channels, waterways and nearby obstructions. While they are simple shapes, they have a big job, allowing safe passage through the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway and facilitating maritime commerce. Spring Restores counterpart is Operation Fall Retrieve. Roughly half of the aids throughout the Great Lakes region were taken out of service for the winter months in order to minimize damage caused by ice and because of reduced vessel trac. Now that the aids have to go back in place, its an all hands on deck evolution. e 9th Coast Guard District utilizes six Coast Guard cutters, ve aids to navigation teams and ve small-boat stations. Each crew has a heavy lift and works around the clock to ensure the aids are exactly where they need to be. In fact, Coast Guard Cutter Buckthorn alone will set nearly 300 buoys. Besides Coast Guard crews, the Lamplighters, a civilian group who manages aids in northern Minnesota, the Canadian Coast Guard and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Corporation assisted. e Coast Guard Auxiliary also helps with verication of privately owned aids in the region. Crews are almost four weeks ahead of schedule, due to an unusually light ice the past few months. With summer well on its way, crews are putting in long hours and using their technical expertise and initiative to get the job done. some. When we watched her sail o on deployment, [we watched the best of the basin go]. As word came of the sacrice ... those tales were told with a sense of pride as we read those words of heroism. omas said he was amazed at what a tight crew the Stark Sailors were and hoped that his own crew would emulate them. A highlight of the ceremony included the announcement that a portion of Main Street on base and Mayport Road to Wonderwood Drive will be renamed USS Stark Memorial Drive. Following omas remarks, former Stark crew members Tim Martineau read the names of each crew member as the tolling of USS Starks bell by Peter Weber rang throughout the park followed by the laying of the wreath. e ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute and Taps to honor those who did not come home. Five Sailors assigned to Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) visited Jacksonville, Fla., May 9 to 14, during a namesake visit sponsored by Navy League Jacksonville. Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Cmdr. Nate Sukols, Chief of the Boat Command Master Chief (SS/DV) Roger Schneider, Electronics Technician 2nd Class Andrew Crips, Sonar Technician (Submarine) 3rd Class Davin Fields and Electricians Mate 3rd Class omas Rode spent the week meeting local ocials, visiting local schools and enjoying various attractions throughout the Jacksonville area. Sukols said it was an honor to be represent his boat on such a visit. Its a tremendous privilege to be here and have the opportunity to represent USS Jacksonville, he said. e city has been so supportive and its actually very humbling to be the center of attention like this. Were one of 18 submarines in Pearl Harbor, so were not really used to it, but to come here and be treated so special is really incredibly humbling and we are very grateful to the city, the base and the Navy League. During the trip, Jacksonville Sailors visited First Coast High School and spoke to two Navy Junior Reserve Ocer Training Corps classes. At Oceanway Middle School, more than 900 students packed the gymnasium for a questionand-answer period that emphasized the importance of math and science and how it applies to their Navy careers. Its an important message because math and science can be the building blocks of a successful career, Schneider said. e Sailors also conducted a number of other events in the local community, including visit to Wolfson Childrens Hospital and a service project at Ronald McDonald House where they crew spread mulch and worked to improve the landscaping around the childrens play area. Seeing the Ronald McDonald House was inspiring because its a 100 percent volunteer eort, Crips said. at kind of thing is really the mark of a good society and the work those volunteers are putting in is a reection of the good will of the people in the Jacksonville community. While community projects were a large part of the trip, the Sailors also found time to enjoy some recreational activities in the Jacksonville area, including a tour of Everbank Field, a Jacksonville Suns baseball game and a visit to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm. Sukols said the only down side to the trip was that he could not bring along more of his Sailors. Coast Guard returns buoys to Great LakesStark USS Jacksonvilles Sailors visit city 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Im fascinated by the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776, one of our first naval engage ments, but today somewhat forgotten. Americans, under Benedict Arnold, built a 15-vessel fleet on the lake to counter 25 prefabricated ships the British assembled for an invasion of New York from Canada. The Oct. 11 battle was tactically lost, but strategically succeeded in delaying the invasion force long enough that with winter approaching it had to retreat to Canada and await spring. MT3 Ricardo Calderon Trident Training Facility LaSalle, Ill. The Little Big Horn. Thats a lesson in ego. CS1 James Bryant Pirates Cove Galley Suffolk, Va. In Glory (The Battle of Fort Wagner) all those guys fought to the end for their country, and it didnt matter what color they were. ETC Samuel Beard USS Florida Gold Lafayette, Ga. The Battle of Flamborough. It was a Pyrrhic victory because we lost USS Bonhomme Richard but took HMS Serapis. Lance Cpl. Kelan Carnahan Security Force Battalion Enterprise, Ala. Pearl Harbor and how well we came back from it and persevered in World War II. MT3 Connor Shelton Trident Training Facility Sacramento, Calif. Gettysburg. Lees attack was bad because he was arrogant and the Union had the high ground. Pfc. Lukas Johnson Security Force Battalion Dalton, Ohio Belleau Wood. The Marines were outnumbered, gassed and lacked sleep. The Germans said they fought like hounds from hell and call them Devil Dogs. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho St. Marys native Cpl. Ronald Smith received one of the nations most prestigious combat awards, the Bronze Star medal with combat distinguishing device, during a ceremony May 4 in front of fellow Marines of 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, after an 11-mile battalion hike at Camp LeJeune, N.C. Smith, a mortarman with Bravo Company, received the prestigious award for his heroic acts displayed July 26, 2011, when he saved an Afghan National Army soldiers life. e then-lance corporal left from his patrol base on the summer day, loaded with mortar rounds and his service rie, prepared for whatever his unit might encounter on patrol. He was the assistant mortar gunner charged with being the farthest rear security Marine alongside Mario, an Afghan National Army soldier who Smith had come to call a friend. He was one of the few Afghans who really interacted with us, Smith said. He helped us cook dinner, played music for us, taught us Pashto and tried to learn English from us. Nobody could say his name, so we all just called him Mario. A detachment of Afghan National Army soldiers had been working alongside the Marines of B Co. to eradicate the insurgency in an area called Trek Nawa when a reght broke out, putting two rounds in Marios leg. Toting his rie and a pack lled with Composition B, a heat and pressure sensitive military grade explosive, Smith lowcrawled under enemy re through 50 meters of foothigh poppy to assess Ma-St. Marys Marine honored THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 9

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Friday, May 25, Child and Youth Programs Appreciates Parents Day has donuts, juice and fresh fruit from 6:30 to 9 a.m. at Child Development Center & Youth Center. Saturday evening is a free UFC Fight Night with Dos Santos v.s Overeem at 9 p.m. at the Big EZ Movie Zone. All events have more details on Facebook. Summer Splash 2012 Its noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 26, at the Fitness Pool Complex with free entry to the pool. Activities include Fruit Art Contest, Build a Boat, Pocket Scavenger Hunt, Limbo Contest, free popsicles, DJ, prizes and more. Food will be available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Coke Zero 400 at Daytona Tickets are available at ITT. On Fri., July 6, the Subway Jalapeno 250 is $24 general admis sion, $17 pre-race Fanzone pass. Children 12 & under are free general admission and in the Sprint Fanzone July 6. Saturday, July 7, its the Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola. From the Box Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Box, $70. All American Oer Reserved Seat, Weatherly or Roberts Tower $80. Sprint Fanzone (prerace Fanzone pass) $30. Child Seat general admission (13 & up) $11. Children 12 & under are $10 in all reserved seats. For more information call ITT at (912) 573-8888. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Swim Lessons Lessons are underway at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense authorized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summer time bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Join MWR on Facebook at mwrkingsbay Youll nd the latest information on trips, activities and events posted here. Look for posts and events from our Teen Center too. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. You wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representatives, but it sure makes it a lot easier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Jacksonville Giants Summer Youth Basketball Camp runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 29 to June 1 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Children must bring lunch and beverage each day. Cost is $109 per player ages 8 to 18. Price includes camp T-shirt, individual evaluations and a ticket to one of the rst home games of the Giants in the 2012-13 season. Register at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through May 21. Late registration will be accepted if openings are available. Call the Youth Sports oce at (912) 573-8202 for more information. Mike Johnsons Soccer T-N-T Training Camp Registration going on at the Youth Center for Soccer Camp, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 11 to 15 for ages 13 to 18 and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 25 to 29, for ages 7 to 12. Cost is $109 per child ages 7 to 18. Mini Camp for ages 5 and 6 is 5 to 7 p.m., June 25 to 29. Cost is $85. Includes registration, instructions, T-shirt, small bag and water bottle. There is $10 off registration if two or more family members attend. All major credit cards, checks and cash accepted Register now to June 4 for the June 11 to 15 camp and through June 18 for the June 25 to 29 camps. Sign up at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except weekends and holidays. For more information call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. May 26 ande 27, is Adventures of Tin-Tin If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548.Hoop camp May 29 Just for kids Summer Splash Saturday Liberty call rios injuries. Once he got hit, he was hobbling a little, but he was still up, said Smith, as he recalled the Afghan soldier who he risked his life for. When I realized he fell down, I went back and helped him over to a berm behind a pile of (harvested) poppy and started to treat him. I just remember thinking, I hope to God we dont start to take re from the opposite direction. Smith, who had been a mortarman for almost two years, responded to the casualty instinctively, as infantry Marines are trained to do. Once I crawled back to him after he got hit, everything was such a blur, Smith said. I just went into autopilot. My training kicked in, and I treated him with what I had and kept security until the (helicopter) got there. For his actions that day almost 10 months ago, Smith stood opposite Lt. Col. Tyler Zagurski, commanding ocer of 1st Bn., 9th Marines, to receive the prestigious award. Zagurski secured the medal below Smiths U.S. Marines nametape and spoke on Smiths behalf to the rest of the Walking Dead, as the unit is called. is award should show our junior Marines that their actions dont go unnoticed, he said. (en) Lance Corporal Smith faced a challenge that set a precedent for us as an institution that suggests that even a Marine as junior as a lance corporal can take bold, decisive action. e sweat-drenched Marines of the battalion took turns congratulating the newly awarded Marine. Afterward, the battalion was dismissed, leaving Smith to look back on his time in Afghanistan before enjoying the weekend with his friends. Ya know, I really believe that (1st Bn., 9th Marines,) has an angel, Smith said. Nobody in the battalion died on that tour, and that is because someone watched over us all.Marine e Defense Departments senior civilian and military ocer oered their perspectives May 12 on the ongoing unrest in Syria and the threat alQaida in the Arabian Peninsula poses in Yemen. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, told reporters during a press conference that internal strife in Syria remains an issue of great concern. e Syrian peoples revolt against ruler President Bashar al-Assads regime began in early 2011. Since then, Assads military has battled rebel forces in several cities. Estimates of those killed, both combatants and civilians, reach as high as 17,000-plus. e secretary acknowledged the cease-re nominally in place in Syria as part of former U.N. Secretary-General Ko Annans peace plan does not ap-Leaders mull Syria, Yemen 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Lessons of U.S. Civil War history were brought to life in the Pentagon April 12 during the rst of a series of historical presentations to be delivered to interested audiences in the U.S. militarys headquarters. Ethan Rafuse, professor of military history at the U.S. Army Command and Gen eral Sta College on Fort Leavenworth, Kan., deliv ered a lecture in the Pentagon auditorium in which he focused on the rst months of the Civil War. Rafuse is a recognized expert on the Civil War who has authored several books on various aspects of the conict. e lecture was open to anyone in the Pentagon who wished to attend, and it was webcast live on the Pentagon Channel. During his talk, Rafuse explored the ideas that drove strategy and tactics on both sides of the war. He showed how the war was part of a larger sectional conict, and he explained that it was interpreted by leaders on both sides as a peoples contest. He also discussed the tripolarity of the struggle, in which he showed how combatants and supporters on both sides strove to sway unaligned populace to their cause. Rafuse showed that U.S. Army Capt. Nathaniel Lyons conventional victory over the pro-Confederate forces of the Missouri State Militia in May 1861 resulted in Missouris alignment with Union forces. e professor explained how this then helped drive President Abraham Lincolns advisors to push the idea of achieving a political result by scoring a quick conventional military victory over the Confederates. e thought was that if the Union could defeat Confederate forces in a big battle, the South would lose the will to ght on, and the war could be concluded quickly. Unfortunately, the Union was unable to achieve that victory during First Manassas in July 1861, and the result was that war then raged and ravaged the country for another four years. During his presentation, Rafuse explained that the study of history is critical for military personnel and defense strategists, and he quoted a variety of leaders who hold or held this view. ese included Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, current chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta; retired Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Paul K. Van Riper; the late Army Gen. George S. Patton Jr., one of the great leaders of World War II; the late President Harry S. Truman, commander in chief at the end of World War II and for the Korean War; and Napoleon Bonaparte, a professional soldier who became leader of a nation. Rafuse used a complicated presentation slide from the Afghanistan conict to illustrate the complexities of war, and he drew attention to the similarities between the multidimensional, layered aspect of the current conict and that of the civil war. Nevertheless, he cautioned against drawing simplistic analogies from history and applying them to current situations. History doesnt repeat itself, but there are echoes that can inform thinking about situations, Rafuse said. He also noted that those looking to learn from history have the challenge of seeing the parallels that inform our thinking while also being sensitive to dif ferences that also shape our thoughts. In an interview with the Pentagon Channel conducted after the lecture, Rafuse said the value of history is to broaden peoples thinking thinking about context, the breadth of events, the depth of events, the larger context in which they take place to develop critical thinking skills and the framework for dealing with problems in the future. e speaker series is sponsored by a collaborative eort between the his tory oces of the secretary of defense, the Joint Sta and the military services. We plan to oer a presentation each month and cover a wide range of subjects related to military history, said Jon Homan, deputy chief historian in Oce of the Secretary of Defense, in a blog post introducing the series. e concept for the series is simple identify interesting and relevant historical topics and nd a well-qualied and wellspoken historian to address them in a venue available to all personnel in the Pentagon (and hopefully well beyond), Homan said in the blog. e presentations will serve as professional military education (in ocial lingo), promote historical awareness among those charged with developing and inuencing national defense policy and strategy, and also honor those who have served before us in defending the nation, he said. Civil War historian gives lesson from the past pear to be working. We continue to urge Assad to step down, that there must be a change there, Panetta said. eyve lost their legitimacy by the huge number of deaths that are taking place in Syria. He emphasized the United States continues to work with other nations to bring diplomatic and economic pressure on Assad. e goal, Panetta said, is to implement political reforms, have Assad step down and to try to return Syria to the Syrian people. Dempsey added he has consulted on the issue with his counterparts in Syrias neighbor nations. Two weeks ago, I was in Jordan, the chairman said. Today my Turkish counterpart is in the building, and were trying to gain a common understanding of where we think we are and where we think we might want to go. Jordan is very concerned about the potential for increased refugees from the conict, Dempsey said. ats a concern that an individual country might have that wouldnt necessarily be ours, but its important to understand the complexity of the situation. Panetta said he has seen intelligence reports indicating an al-Qaida presence in Syria. Frankly, we dont have very good intelligence as to just exactly what their activities are, he said. e groups presence anywhere is a concern, he said, adding, We need to continue to do everything we can to determine what kind of inuence they are trying to exert there. Turning to Yemen, the secretary said DODs announcement earlier this week that U.S. military personnel are again training Yemeni forces does not mean U.S. ground forces are engaged there. Panetta noted the disclosure this week of a failed al-Qaida plot to attack a U.S. airliner. e attack was planned to happen in Yemen, which demonstrated that the Yemen-based al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula remains a threat, he added. We will go after al-Qaida wherever they are and wherever they try to hide. And one of the places that they clearly are located is Yemen, he said. e United States does have operations there, and Yemeni ocials have been very cooperative in those activities, the secretary said. Our operations now are directed with the Yemenis going after al-Qaida, he said, adding there is no consideration of U.S. military ground operations in Yemen. U.S. eorts to target al-Qaida leaders such as the Sept. 30 U.S. airstrike in Yemen that killed terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki have been very successful, he noted.Leaders THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 11

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More than 450 Sailors, and their friends and families, attended the advance screening of Universal Studios Battleship at Sharkey eater on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, April 28. Filming for the movie in Hawaii began in 2010 when hundreds of Hawaii-based Sailors, veterans and Navy ships played parts in the movie. e movie featured the capabilities of U.S. Navy destroyers and WW II veterans. In January 2010, even the Battleship Missouri Memorial sailed out to sea for some initial lming. We dont put enough attention with Naval Supply Systems Command, which oversees Navy postal operations, announced May 11, it is providing guidance to the eet about new United States Postal Service prohibitions regarding lithium batteries. According to the USPS announcement, beginning May 16, mail to or from APOs/FPOs are prohibited from containing lithium or products containing lithium. e prohibition also ap plies to international mail. e prohibition is in eect pending further USPS review of investigations for safety. Customers should understand that postal clerks at these locations have been instructed to question patrons and check customs labels for any declarations of lithium batteries or electronic equipment to determine whether lithium batteries are in the shipment, NAVSUP Navy Postal Subject Matter Expert Tom Rittle said. Upon identication of packages containing lithium batteries, customers will have the option to remove the batteries or not mail the package. e prohibition applies regardless of quantity, size, watt-hours, and whether the cells or batteries are packed in equipment, with equipment, or without equipment. For more information about the prohibition, see USPS Postal Bulletin 22336 at about.usps.com/postalbulletin/2012/pb22336/ pdf/pb22336.pdf. e NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission-to deliver sustained global logistics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warghter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfolio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply operations, conventional ordnance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, security assistance, and quality of life issues for our naval forces, including food service, postal services, Navy Exchanges, and movement of household goods. e NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps team forms a vast network of professionals who deliver unparalleled products and services to customers in the Fleet and across the world.Battery mailing nixed Sailors see movie preview 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 29. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from other new moms and dads, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Spouse appreciation Unemployed veterans ages 35 to 60 can apply for up to 12 months of paid training through a new program sponsored by the Departments of Labor and Veterans Aairs. e population the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program will serve is particularly in need, Curtis L. Coy, the VAs deputy undersecretary for economic opportunity, said in an e-mail interview. Of about 900,000 U.S. veterans who are unemployed, nearly two-thirds are between 35 and 60 years old, according to the Labor Department. e program was created to provide assistance to unemployed veterans who are not covered by any of our education programs and need training or [an] education boost for todays high-demand occupations, Coy said. ey may have had entitlement to education benets at one time, but have either used them or the time frame to use them has passed, he added. is generous new benet geared toward this specic cohort of veterans provides them the opportunity to jump start a new career that they may not have otherwise been able to aord. e program, which began May 15, provides 12 months of training assistance equal to the monthly full-time payment rate under the Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty program, which currently pays $1,473 per month. Participants must be enrolled in a community college or technical school program approved for VA benets. e program must lead to an associate degree, non-college degree or certicate. To qualify, a veteran also must: Be unemployed on the day of application; Have a discharge that is not dishonorable; Not be eligible for any other VA education benet program, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill or Montgomery GI Bill; Not receive VA compensation for being unemployable; Not be enrolled in a federal or state job training program; and Pursue a program that leads to employment in one of 210 occupations the Labor Department designates as high-demand. e list of occupations, available on the VA Web site, includes jobs in construction, machine operation, transportation, preschool education, health care and many other elds. e program will fund up to 45,000 participants between July 1 and Sept. 30, and an additional 54,000 participants from Oct. 1, 2012 through March 31, 2014. e retraining program is funded under the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011. our elders, in particular our veterans, said Peter Berg, the director of the movie. By far my favorite moment on Battleship is getting to meet these veterans. Some of those guys are in their 90s, and they would come on board with the energy of a 20 year old. ey had all these stories. ey were having the best time. ey get to be on their ship. at was, by far, my career highlight. e cast including Peter Berg, Taylor Kitsch, Brooklyn Decker, Alexander Skarsgard, and Rihanna, were all at Sharkey eater to greet the audience. ere was a time when Hollywood didnt see eyeto-eye with the military, and I really think that time is no more, Berg said. I think that Soldiers feel it. Soldiers are coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan to a dierent reception then they did when they came back from Vietnam, and I think thats great. Im just glad to be able to do my part to pay respect. e movie also featured Col. Gregory Gadson, the Director of the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program, who is a Wounded Warrior himself. Gadson, who lost both his legs be cause of an improvised explosive device in 2007, practically played himself as Lt. Col. Mick Canales ghting aliens in the movie. I like to say that ghting aliens is no dierent than ghting a human, Gadson said. If youre ghting for your life, youre going to do whatever it takes to win. Gadson said he hopes the movie would also help all warriors, wounded or otherwise, and let them know that life can go on. Youve got to put behind you whats happened in the past, Gadson said. When you have an opportunity to learn and to go through hard experiences, you can come out the other side and live a productive life. To prepare for her role in the movie, Rhianna enlisted the help of Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jacquelyn Carrizosa, assigned aboard USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during the lming in 2010. She really helped me out, said Rihanna. I paid attention to her, everything about the way she dressed, the way she walked, her mannerisms, how she spoke, how collected she was. at was very crucial to me playing this part. She was a pretty girl but very, very tough. Her demeanor was so quiet and sweet, and then you see her put on this uniform and she walks on the set, shes a whole dierent beast. She helps me as a friend but when she gets in her element shes very intimidating. During the lming, Rihanna and the the cast interacted with Sailors in Hawaii so the actors could better understand their roles in the movie. I was exposed to a lot of things that I didnt know about the Navy, just seeing their demeanor, where you lived, where you stayed, Rihanna said. I heard about how long you guys stayed at sea without your family. It really was an awakening for me. It made me appreciate what you guys do so much more. e lm opened in U.S. theaters on May 18. e movie is based on a board game of the same name. It is about how a eet of ships is forced to ght an armada of alien ships.Program aids unemployed veteransMovie THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans -WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 15

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e Navy formally transferred ownership of the historic battleship Iowa (BB 61) to the Pacic Battleship Center April 30. e transfer followed the completion of the National Environmental Policy Act and National Historic Preservation Act regulatory requirements. e ship donation contract was signed in the Capitol Hill oce of Iowa Rep. Tom Latham, with Robert Kent, president of the Pacic Battleship Center, signing for the donee and Vice Adm. W. Mark Skinner, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Navy (Research, Development, and Acquisition), signing for the Navy. e ships tow to its new permanent home at the Port of Los Angeles will commence May 20, departing the Port of Richmond, Calif., where it has been undergoing repairs before formally opening as a museum July 4. Today marks the transi tion from the ships storied naval career to a brand new career as a museum and memorial that will serve for generations to come, Skinner said. I look for ward to seeing her brought back to life for public dis play, continuing to serve our country and its citizens in a new capacity. Iowa was the leader of a class of powerful and heavily armed fast battleships, the last of their type constructed for the Navy. Iowa transported President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic on the rst leg of his journey to conference with allied war leaders at Tehran, Iran, in 1943. Iowa served in fast carrier task forces in the Pacic Fleet and conducted shore bombardments during World War II and the Korean War. After two-and-a-half decades in mothballs, Iowa was modernized under the 1980s defense buildup and recommissioned in April 1984. Iowa participated in U.S. Navy operations to protect Kuwaiti tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987 and 1988. A re in her second 16inch gun turret killed 47 crewmen on April 19, 1989, but Iowa was still able to deploy to Europe and the Mediterranean Sea in mid-year. Turret two remained unrepaired when she decommissioned for the last time in October 1990. Iowa is the last of the four Iowa-class battleships to be donated. New Jersey (BB 62), located in Camden, N.J., was donated in 2000; Missouri (BB 63), located in Honolulu, Hawaii, was donated in 1998, and Wisconsin (BB 64), located in Norfolk, Va., was donated in 2009. e Navy donates historic ships to promote public interest in the defense of the nation, commemorate naval history and heritage, and to honor the men and women who built and sailed these ships.USS Iowa to become museum in Los Angeles 18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 24, 2012 23 Nathan begins service trainingPetty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal was on a security mission near the Iraqi Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal in April 2004 when suicide bombers initiated a waterborne assault. He was severely wounded and later died from his injuries. Bruckenthal made the ultimate sacrice for his nation and his memory lives on in all those who serve in the Coast Guard. Paying tribute to Bruckenthals sacrice is the national program Veterans Moving Forward. e organization provides veterans with therapy and service dogs, and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. One such dogs name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Bruckenthal. Nathan, a golden retriever, is being trained by Cyndi Perry. is series, Life of a Service Dog, shares Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training. is is Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. Remember the East Coasts snowpocalypse in January 2011? Well, I was born, along with my brother and two sisters, in the wake of that storm. We are English Golden Retrievers, and at the time we had no idea what life held in store for us. All we really cared about was staying warm and getting fed. Jasmine, our attentive mom, took care of that. She smelled wonderful and was gentle, warm and always gave us full bellies. Mom was born in Canada youll want to remember that for a later story in my life and dad is from Maryland. We ate and slept, ate and slept. Life was good. After a while we had these new sensations. We could see and hear. It was a whole new world. Our rst human mom introduced us to all sorts of noises loud and soft, bells and whistles, sirens and jackhammers to get us used to what is out in the world. And the toys she let us play with! Balls, soft squeaky things, tubes to run through, ropes to tug. It was amazing. While we were not too steady on our paws, we enjoyed wrestling with one another, but it was all so exhausting. So we ate and slept, ate and slept. Oh yeah, we did what comes after eating too. My human parents introduced us to all manner of new things. A ag apping in the wind can be a pretty scary thing at rst, crutches were not too bad and big cow bells that I could barely tug around. While we were all called puppy-puppy at rst, soon I had a name. ey called me Nathan. I was told it was after this really brave man who was killed serving his country. Nate was on a boat in the Persian Gulf when he intercepted a boat attempting to launch a terrorist attack. I liked the name and try to live up to it every day. My sisters name is Lori. She was named in memory of Spc. Lori Piestewa, a heroic Army soldier who was mortally wounded when her convoy was ambushed while traveling in Iraq. We both feel very special and honored to names for these heroes. One day my brother and sister left with their new families, then it was Lori and I leaving the only home we had ever known. I thought I was going to be scared but it wasnt too bad as we traveled together, and we went with a lady who had come to see us several times. She brought us toys and let us wrestle and lay all over her. is lady became my best friend. When we were let out of our car kennel we saw a huge yard to play in. And there were some really big dogs the humans called horses. Gosh, could life be better than this? After a few days Lori left to live with another family to continue her training as an assistance dog. My life was not all play, but I have to tell you that even the work seemed like play. I got to go to work in the city with my human and be around her pack. I had to learn that no one could pet me or touch me unless I was sitting down. Isnt that just the most foolish thing? Sometimes I just dont get humans, for us dogs it is all about sning and touching and licking. We went to meetings where I had to be quiet and take naps under tables or desks. No problem. e rst time I saw a big re engine it was very loud but my handler said it was OK, so we just watched it go by. ere were times I had to walk over the metal grates whoa, dont look down but my handler walked over them with me and said it was okay. She kept saying I was learning to be a working dog. Because I am learning to be a service dog I get to be with my human handler 24 hours a day, seven days a week and go everywhere she goes. Check back soon as I share a story about visiting Washington D.C. A team of two jumped out of the vehicle as it came to a stop at a chokepoint on the road in Khan Neshin District, Afghanistan. While Ace, an improvised explosive device detection dog, wandered around the vehicle, Cpl. Sean Grady, Aces handler and a pointman with Echo Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, began preparing his sickle and combat metal detector. e pair then proceeded with what they do best: clearing a safe path for their fellow Marines. ey moved down the road in a carefully choreographed dance, methodically searching for the disguised and dangerous devices. Grady, a 27-year-old native of Otho, Iowa, launched Ace forward with an array of hand signals and verbal commands, while he swept the path with his CMD. Gradys choice to enlist in the Marine Corps was inuenced by the loss of a best friend, Sgt. Jon Bonnell, who sacriced his life in Al Anbar Province, Iraq in 2008 while serving with 1st Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment. He was one of my best friends in high school, said Grady, who graduated with Bonnell from Fort Dodge Senior High School. Being the pointman for his platoon requires Grady to efciently utilize all of his tools. With his sickle, CMD, combat experience and Aces skills, a complete IED detection team is eectively leading the platoon. I volunteered to be a pointman during this deployment, said Grady. e only thing I care about is keeping my Marines safe. Grady considers their tactical approach atypical. While most dog handlers are usually positioned farther back in a patrol, Grady saw that having Ace at the front of his platoon would greatly enhance their ability to nd IEDs. As a dog handler, most of the time were in the back of the patrol, said Grady. ey only call us up when they see suspicious things on the road, or when the pointman needs to conrm something. I was a pointman on my last deployment, and I know the danger that comes with dealing with IEDs, and didnt want anyone else dealing with that, explained Grady, who previously served in Afghanistan in 2010. e teams unusual method has produced uncanny results, with their 16 IED nds since arriving in southern Helmand in October 2011 being the highest of any IED detection team in the battalion. Ace has found ve IEDs, and also conrmed three suspicious hits, said Grady. Ive found seven during our time here. In addition to the tools of his trade, Grady credits tactical decision games a basic skill set taught to all infantrymen for much of his success in Khan Neshin. In my head during a patrol, Ill go through my TDGs, explained Grady. I ask myself, If I was the Taliban, wheres the best place to put the IEDs? I would look around the area and focus my attention where I think the enemy would put the IED, he added. Grady recalled an incident, where he found an IED using lessons learned from conducting TDGs. He used his sickle to investigate what he gured was a suspicious spot on the road, and uncovered a bucket lled with 50 pounds of explosives. Grady and Ace have been teammates since July 2011, after Grady attended the Marine Corps dog handling course. He was amazed by Aces obedience and the skills he had acquired from training with K2 Solutions Inc., before they were partnered together. It blew my mind how disciplined Ace was, the amount of dierent explosive scents that he could recognized, and how useful his skill can be in the eld, Grady explained. Hes a superb dog and he helps me do my job, he added. I wasnt really aware of how amazing the Marine Corps dog handlers program is until I met Ace. Just as he was taught in boot camp and infantry training, Grady keeps his weapons, tools and skills well maintained. He stressed that constantly training Ace is what keeps him sharp and disciplined when they are out on patrol. We keep up with his obedience and reset training to make sure he keeps his skills and stays on his game, explained Grady. Its hard, because I want to love him as a pet but I have to treat him as tool as well, because of the skills he has, said Grady. Im constantly on that ne line of being his friend and master. As 1st LARs deployment comes to a close, Grady and Ace look to keep their platoons path home safe and IED free. Marine, best friend top IED detection team e chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta discussed the new national defense strategy and its core pillars in remarks at the nations oldest international aairs think tank earlier this month. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey spoke at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, founded in 1910 as a private, nonprot organization. Over the past months weve formulated what I guess is now being called a new defense strategy, Dempsey said. Its built on a [Quadrennial Defense Review], of course, but its new in several important ways. One of the aspects of the strategy is rebalancing U.S. forces with emphasis on the AsiaPacic region. During a visit to NATO headquarters in Brussels last week, he said, he was asked with great interest what rebalancing means. I suggested to them that its a process not a light switch. Well work our way into it, he said. It starts with intellectual bandwidth more than anything. We have to shift some of our intellectual bandwidth and start to understand how rebalance ourselves so its not just about our resources, equipment or basing. Its about thinking, and we are beginning that process now. e chairman said the second pillar of the strategy, and one of its cornerstones, is building partners, and not because the United States will be doing less. Rather, he said, its because the world over the last decade or two has become a security paradox that has seen a proliferation of capabilities and technologies to middleweight actors and nonstate actors. at he said, actually makes the world feel, and potentially be, more dangerous than any time I remember in uniform. Dempsey noted that he came into the Army in 1974. Its not a paradox that neces sarily has to be met with bigger military forces, he said. I think its a paradox that has to be met with dierent military forces. And among the things that will make that work [is] our ability to build on exist ing partner ships around the globe, notably the North Atlantic alliance, [and] others as well. Adversaries rarely mass against the United States and its allies any more, the general pointed out. ey decentralize, they network and they syndicate, he said, making development of emerging partnerships especially important now. Adversaries use 21st-century information technologies to syndicate groups of criminal actors, the chairman said -groups that come together based on moments in time when they want to nd a common purpose and pull apart otherwise. But we, the quintessential hierarchical institution on the face of the planet have to nd ways to be a network ourselves, he said. And that means a network of interagency partners internal to our government. e chairman conceded that building partnerships isnt an easy endeavor, and acknowledged a need to improve processes in intelligence sharing, technology transfer, foreign military sales processes he said tend to somewhat hinder our ability to build partners. e nal aspect of the new strategy, Dempsey said, is the integration of capabilities the military didnt have 10 years ago, such as the cyber and special operations capabilities and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technology that exist today. Other capabilities originally considered niche capabilities now are being integrated into conventional ways of operating, he noted. Weve moved now from writing our new strategy to beginning to challenge ourselves on what it will really take to do everything, he said. And the three things I mentioned here today to you really are the key to that endeavor. Strategy talk topic at oldest think tank Life of a Service Dog Part 1