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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-03-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00251

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00251


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Preventing accidents the goal for walkers, joggers, bicyclistsWhether jogging, walking or bicycle riding keep safety in the front of your minds. Per OPNAVINST 5100.12H, certain guidelines must be followed to ensure your safety and the safety of others. Jogging and walking should be done on sidewalks and bi cycle riding on bicycle paths to the greatest extent possible. Pedestrians and bicyclists should always be aware of auto trac. During times of restricted vis ibility, such as darkness, fog, or heavy rain, all eorts must be made to become more visible by wearing light-colored clothing, reective vests and other bright or lighted items. e use of ashlights can help individuals be more visible. Bicycles used between sunset and sunrise must be equipped with a lamp on front which has a white light visible for 500 feet to the front, and a red reector vis able 600 feet to the rear. e light may be a blinking or steady light. While bicycling, all personnel shall wear helmets approved by the Consumer Safety Product Commission, ANSI and Snell while riding anywhere on base. Only workers operating bi cycles in industrial areas that re quire the use of ANSI approved helmets for protection from falling and ying objects are al lowed to use hard hats, with chin straps, instead of bicycle helmets. Wearing of portable headphones, earphones or other lis tening devices while jogging, walking, bicycling or skating on roads and streets on Naval in stallations is prohibited. A road is dened as that part of a traf c way which includes both the roadway and any shoulder alongside the roadway. ese items may be used on bicycle paths as long as they are removed when crossing roads and streets. When operating a privately owned vehicle, it is your respon sibility to be mindful of pedestrians. You should approach cross walks with caution. Remember pedestrians have the right of way while crossing the street. Yield to pedestrians. Contact Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety with any questions or safety concerns at 5732525 or 5730414. THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Get the school skinny for National Teacher Day Page 9 Glasses gone S9 cellulose acetate spectacle frame is history Page 8 Earth Day Youth Center, Expo carry on tradition Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Rearming their partnership USS Alaska, St. Marys Elementary School continue relationshipe commanding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Blue) and the principal of St. Marys Elementary School rearmed the partnership between the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine crew and the Camden County school. Cmdr. Kevin Byrne, the commanding ocer of Alaskas blue crew, said he was proud his crew has held to their commit ment after the command ocially adopt ed the school in 2010. Our Sailors always come back [to the command] talking about how much fun it was reading and playing with the stu dents, Byrne said. Its a very reward ing experi ence for our Sailors and the students, and I hope to continue building that relation ship. Tom McClendon, the schools principal, said partnerships like this mean every thing to the school and the students. e Sailors come to our kindergarten and rst-grade classes to read and volunteer in engaging activities with our students every Friday, McClendon said. e children look forward to it. Some of the children here may not have a strong male mentor in their lives, so theyre the ones who really get some thing out of it. e school moved into its current build Pedestrian safety stressed at Kings Bay al-Qaida oshoots a dangerOcial warns as anniversary of bin Laden death nearsCore al-Qaida, the group led by Osama bin Laden, has been surpassed by its aliates as the biggest terrorist threat to the United States, a senior intelligence ocial said. With bin Ladens death, the global jihadist movement lost its most-iconic, most-eective and most-inspirational leader, Robert T. Cardillo, deputy director for intelligence integration with the Oce of the Director of National Intelligence, told reporters April 27. Bin Ladens death allowed alQaida second-in-command Ayman al Zawahiri to move up, but he has not changed the groups strategic direction and does not have the charisma to ap peal to new recruits, Car dillo said. Navy SEALs killed bin Laden in Pakistan on May 2, 2011. e al-Qaida oshoots alQaida in the Arabian Peninsula, al-Shabob in Somalia, al-Qaida in the Mahgreb will surpass the core al-Qaida remaining in Paki stan, Cardillo said. Each group will seek opportunities to strike Western interests in its operating area, but each group will have dif ferent intent and opportunity. e Arab Spring uprisings have inuenced the jihadist movement. e unrest and reduced security provides ter rorists more operating space as security services focus more on internal security and regime stability, Cardillo said. As new Middle East leaders address demands for partici pation in government, we as sess that core al-Qaida and the jihadist movement will suer a strategic setback in that the Arab Spring strikes at the very core of their jihadist narrative, he said. Al-Qaida believes in progress by violence, but the elections in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and the up-coming election in Libya re buke that assertion, he added. However, prolonged instabil ity or unmet promises by these new governments would give al-Qaida, its aliates and its allies more time to establish networks, gain support and potentially en gage in operations, he said. If we didnt get any help from the crew, we might have had to cut school days. Tom McClendon Principal, St. Marys Elementary school Services join forces to compete in 2012 Warrior GamesTeam Navy/Coast Guard has chosen which athletes will com pete for the title of Ultimate Champion during the 2012 War rior Games, going on through May 5, 2012. ey chose retired Navy Lt. John Edmonston and Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Chris Suter to compete in the para lympic-style pentathlon event, where athletes compete in cycling, shooting, swimming, and track and eld events, earning points in each event. e athlete who accumulates the most points is crowned the Ultimate Champion. Selection for the Ultimate Champion is not always an easy process. Just because an athlete does well in one sport doesnt make him [an ultimate champion] diversied across all sports, said Navy Safe Harbor adaptive sports coordinator David Pen nington, adding the ultimate athletes are We are not pulling out elite athletes from one sport, but looking for people who have the ability to do well in each event. As far as how the athletes are prepared for the challenge Pennington describes how the team coaches come together. All of the disciplines have their own coach. e individual team coaches encompass the ultimate athlete to help train, Pennington said. Rising to the challenge and representing the Navy/Coast Guard team has its responsibili ties. Edmonston, injured in a 2009 motorcycle accident, under stands the responsibility and the honor of being chosen the Ultimate Champion. Its a lot of work and train ing, and only two are picked, Edmonston said. e team leader thought enough of you to have the chance to win. Its kind of like being the [Most Valuable Player]. Navy, Coast Guard team up

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Tri-Base hoop tourney here May 5Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will host the annual Tri-Base Basketball Tournament this year. e tournament, between Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, begins at 9 a.m., Saturday, May 5 at the Fitness Complex main gym. Games con tinue until the champion is crowned. e event is free for all spectators, so come out and show your support as our Kings Bay teams squareo against the teams from Mayport and Jax.ShipShape weight loss begins May 10If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations. ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an eight-week nu trition and weight management course start ing 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 10. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 or 573-8626 for more informa tion on the program or to signup.Camden Co. burn ban extendede burn ban originally set on April 12 by local re ocials and Georgia Forestry has been extended indenitely. Weather conditions have not improved and the area has not had a signicant amount of rain to counter the low humidity and moderate winds. Ocials ask the public to suspend outdoor burning and be vigilant by reporting any outdoor burning to authorities. Conditions will be monitored and the public will be updated when the burn ban is lifted. Contact Camden County Fire Rescue Headquarters at (912) 729-3911 for questions. Base personnel having any questions contact NSB Kings Bay Fire Prevention at 573-9998.USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slide show and guest speak er. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Opera tion New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials.Exchange Site & Sound sale soonDuring the Navy Exchange semi-annual Sight and Sound sale May 15 to 29, customers can take advantage of a special program with the Military Star Card. Customers who pur chase an individual computer, TV, home the ater system or camera bundle valued at $699 or above using a Military Star Card will receive no down payment, no interest and no pay ments for a year and a half. Now hear this! A man who wants something will nd a way; a man who doesnt will nd an excuse. Stephan Dolley Jr.The benefits of exercise and daily physical activity are measurable and vast, yet according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 30 percent of adults get no exercise at all. e CDC cited some of the most common reasons adults give for not living active lifestyles, including not having enough time to exercise, lack of self-motivation, nding exercise boring or unenjoyable, lack of selfmanagement skills setting goals, tracking progress and more plus a lack of encouragement and support from family and friends. When one or more of these bar riers are present, it can be challenging to muster the motivation to incorporate exercise into our daily lives. However, concentrating your energy on overcoming whatever barriers you face will allow you to transcend the limitations that inhibit you from living a healthy and active lifestyle. In order to make time for exer cise, it is essential that you plan your week in advance, which will al low you to identify where and when you can complete your exercise sessions. Is it easier for you to exercise at home rst thing in the morning, when distrac tions are minimal? Or is going to the gym straight from work in the evening more realistic for you? You can even break your workouts into smaller sessions throughout the day. e important thing is to have a plan for your weekly workouts, schedule them like appointments that cannot be missed and make them manageable and attainable. If you lack self-motivation or have found exercise unenjoyable in the past, take some time to try new modes of exercise. If you have a treadmill that serves as a clothes rack, maybe you would nd it more motivating to exercise at the gym versus at home. By enlisting a workout buddy or joining an exer cise class, you also may feel more motivated by having others around to hold you accountable and create a more dynamic and fun environment for working out. Set yourself up for success by nding something you enjoy doing and that makes you feel good. is will allow you to fully receive both the physical and psychological benets that daily exercise provides. Once you have a plan of action that is realistic and achievable, spend some time dening your goals, determining how you will measure your progress and establishing a reward system to celebrate when you reach a goal. Managing your tness is an important part of the process that ensures you maintain your commitment long term. Build a support system by ex plaining to your family and friends your goals and reasons behind wanting to get t, and ask them for their encouragement and support. Find creative ways to incorporate tness into your social activities and develop new friendships with those who share your goals. Join an exercise group like a running or hiking club. When you know your personal barriers to exercise, you can identify ways to overcoming them and will nd it easier to incorporate tness into your daily life. Overcoming barriers to exercise Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator e Department of the Navy has launched a dedicated Web site to serve as an additional resource for the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative announced by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in March. e new Web site, located at www.21stcentury.navy.mil, features frequently asked questions, articles, blogs, and videos to update Sailors, Marines and their families on important policies and programs, which impact todays force. e 21st Century Sailor and Ma rine initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness. e programs are divided into ve areas: readiness, safety, physical tness, inclusion, and continuum of service. e Department of the Navy leadership wanted to take all of our ex isting personnel support programs, those in development and some new initiatives, and bring them to gether under the one umbrella of 21st Century Sailor and Marine in order to ensure every Sailor, Marine and their families have the tools they need to ensure they exceed and excel in the coming decade. is Web site is a one-stop shop for infor mation about these programs, said Juan M. Garcia, assistant Secretary of the Navy, Manpower and Reserve Aairs. e 21st Century Sailor and Ma rine Initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build re siliency and hone the most combateective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School pro gram. e Command Religious Pro gram of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS will begin Monday, May 14, and continue through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is lo cated across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Ter minal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Bud dies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament ac counts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His res urrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and re hearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command repre sentative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel of ce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities avail able. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bi ble Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Sky theme for summer bible school21st Century Initiative has Web site 21st Century Initiative

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay support group known as STEPS or Supporting and Training Exceptional Parents for Success, works to cre ate an environment where families with special needs can come together to share best practices, ask questions, identify local resources and nd emotional support from others familiar with the challenges of living as an exceptional family. roughout the year, STEPS host workshops to provide special needs families with information, training, and support. ursday, May 17, 2012 STEPS will host a free par ent seminar entitled, Au tism: Understanding Eec tive Behavioral Strategies. Board Certied Behav ioral Analyst Paul Napier will share with parents and caregivers simple but eective ways to address the behaviors of children living with autism. is workshop will focus on specic tools parents can use to help children with autism improve behaviors in both social and academic settings. Interested in attending? Need childcare? Simply register your intent to par ticipate and/or your need for childcare by e-mailing the installation School Li aison Ocer at clainetta. jeerson@navy.mi or calling (912) 573-8986 before Friday, May 11. e names, ages, and special needs of the chil dren will need to be pro vided in order to plan for appropriate childcare. Make your plans now to attend this important workshop. is workshop will be at the NSB Kings Bay Youth Center. No special base access is required to at tend this event. e Youth Center is lo cated just inside the Jack son Gate which is just past Crooked River Elementary School on Charlie Smith Highway Spur 40. Make the rst right turn onto USS Wahoo Avenue and proceed to the parking lot at the end of the street. Grab a notebook, a pencil, and make STEPS in the right direction. Autism workshop May 17 Tofalo guest at MOAA Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Subma rine Group 10, Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, and Mrs. Tofalo were guest at the April meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Association of America. Tofalo gave a visual pre sentation and spoke of the force missions of the submarine service and answered questions from the assembled group of active and former ocers representing all branches of the military. Kings Bay MOAA meets on the third Tuesday of each month. For member ship information, contact Capt. Tom Richter, USN, (Ret.) at 576-2906 or Cap tainTom@tds.net Riley honored by NMCRS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Community Planning Liaison Officer and Earth Day volunteer, Melinda NesSmith-Picard teaches how to make origami butterflies, April 24, as children at the Youth Center participate in various Earth Day-themed activities. NesSmith-Picard shows children how to fold the paper to make origami butterflies. A Youth Center child holds up her origami butterfly. Youth Center students make homemade birdfeeders out of pine cones and birdseed. Students work on an Earth Day-themed crossword puzzle at the Youth Center. Earth Day bags decorated by children. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay held an Earth Day Expo Thursday, April 19. The free event was in front of the Navy Exchange, featuring information booths, exhibits and Earth Day-themed activities for children and adults. e purpose was both a celebration and a time to educate ourselves on why it is so impor tant to preserve the resources we have, said Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Master Chief Jimmy Schubert. I think this is a great annual event to hold for the base and community. It just revisits areas that all of us can do our part in. Its a nice reminder. Information at the booths featured energy ef cient light bulbs and information on recycling. An exhibit on hybrid and electric cars featured an electric vehicle. White Oak Conservation Center and Crooked River State Park sta spoke about their facilities and the importance of education and awareness about the environment. e event also featured activities for children, such as bean planting, an Earth Day-themed crossword and a hands-on bird feeder making station. Individuals attending had the opportunity to do a little spring cleaning. E-Scraps recycling collected old electronic equipment that will be reused and recycled. e Camden County Sheris Oce collected old unused prescriptions. Due to the rain, the event was cut short. But that didnt stop volunteers from reaching out to the youths and conducting activities indoors the following week at the Youth Center. Students participated in the bean planting, a crossword puzzle, and made homemade bird feeders and origami butteries.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 5 ing two years ago in the middle of the school year. It was Alaskas blue crew that helped make that move, starting the partnership between the two local xtures. We simply would not have been able to make such a move without the help of Alaska, Mc Clendon said. If we didnt get any help from the crew, we might have had to cut school days. e Alaska really made all of this happen in the time that we were able to do it. Cathy Peterson, an Individual Educational Planning teacher at Saint Marys Elementary, said she is especially appre ciative of the subma rines support. ere are days when my students ask me when the Sailors are coming back, said Pe terson. ey know them by rst name and they love the time they get with them. Byrne, who has chil dren in the school dis trict himself, said many other school kids rec ognize his name when they realize what his last name is. My kids play baseball after school, so my name is on some of the papers their friends have, By rne said. When they eventually recognize my last name, theyll ask me if Im the guy who signed that paper hanging in the [schools] hallway. Its neat to be recog nized like that, but it also means the students re ally care about the time our Sailors spend with them. Sexual Assault Awareness Partners Chosen as the Ultimate Warrior merely a month ago, Edmonston has had to adjust his training style for the new events. Ive been pretty steady, but I changed it up. I made adjust ments to get ready, Edmonston said. Cycling is a chal lenge. But Edmonston feels the support from teammates and the coaching sta. I will be proud to win, but its really about the points for the team in the end, Edmon ston said. Suter is facing the challenge as a rst time Warrior Games athlete, as well as a competitor for Ultimate Champion. Suter has been a life-long athlete even after being di agnosed with Cushings Syn drome in December 2010. rough adversity, Suters positive attitude has helped to shape who he is and how he approaches challenges. It is what brought him to the Navy and is guiding him to pursue his dream of becoming a Navy SEAL. Do what you love, Suter said. As for participating in the 2012 Warrior Games and being chosen as the Ultimate War rior, Suter states it plainly, I like it, it is a good time. Suters anity for intense sports developed at the young age of ve when he rst began riding motocross and grew into an enjoyment of rugby, football, and boxing. It is my safe zone. Some people go for massages, I go for competition, Suter said. Eager for the competition, Suter is well aware of the abil ity of the other warriors, It is denitely a challenge. ere are a lot of good athletes out there Its the next level up. Seeing his own progress in cycling has helped him to focus on the challenge. I didnt like [cycling] at rst, he said. It was killing me. But while participating in a Ride 2 Recovery event, Suter watched how the teammates supported each other. e stronger riders pushed the weaker riders. Describing his rst and most challenging bike event, Suter wanted to give up. But when he looked back after feeling a push, he saw a double-ampu tee pushing him. Suter remembered thinking, I cant give up now. Suter is grateful for the chance the Navy Safe Harbor has given him and his team mates, to challenge himself and step up for the team. e Warrior Games is hosted by the U.S. Olympic Commit tees paralympics military program.WarriorThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, in stant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various des sert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the par enting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, April 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, May 15. For more information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employ ment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guaran tee a minimum of five partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Pre-marital workshop offered May 2The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. May 2. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 8, 15, 22 and 29. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain sup port from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contem plating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The semi nars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 21 to 24 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 15 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 29. For more information, call 573-4513. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. May 17. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sug gestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores with out asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 7, 14 and 21. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Returning to Children workshop May 17Children can feel the effects of deployment, too. Learn to rec ognize your childrens positive and negative behaviors in rela tion to the deployment, home coming and reintegration of their military parent. This class will be 10 to 11 a.m., May 17. Call 573-4512 to register and for more information.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 21The Ombudsman Assembly Fleet & Family Support Center workshops a CFC participant Provided as a public serviceWorking together for stronger,healthier babies marchofdimes.com 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Customer Appreciation Week is May 21 to 26. Morale, Wel fare and Recreation would like to thank all of its customers and show them how much they are appreciated. Every day dur ing the week of May 21 to 26, something great is happening. On Monday, May 21 at Trident Lakes Golf Club, a Two-Person Captains Choice Golf Tourna ment begins at 1 p.m. On Tues day, May 2, its Dollar Day with Dollar Bowling from 1 to 9 p.m. at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, plus Give It A Shine All Day at the MWR Car Wash with $1 per cycle. On Wednesday, May 23, there is a Concert in the Park with Josh Gracin Live from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., includes a complimentary lunch, Inatables and concert seating. On ursday, May 24, a Paintball Tourney is scheduled on the Adult Football Field at 5 p.m. Entry is free. Games are played 4-on-4. Next, on Friday, May 25, Child and Youth Programs Appreciates Parents Day has donuts, juice and fresh fruit from 6:30 to 9 a.m. at Child De velopment Center & Youth Center. Best of all is Saturday, May 26, with Summer Splash from noon to 4 p.m. at the Fitness Pool Complex, with free entry, music, games, prizes and food for purchase. Saturday evening is a free UFC Fight Night with Dos Santos v.s Overeem at 9 p.m. Big EZ Movie Zone. All events have more details on facebook. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. Now you wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representa tives, but it sure makes it a lot eas ier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Also sign up May 1 at 18 at ITT for chances to win some great prizes during Customer Appreciation Week on May 21 to 26. Sign up once each day. The prizes include World Quest Resort Orlando, Wet-N-Wild, Summer Waves, Pirates Dinner Show and a stay at Comfort Suites Maingate East Motherload of Comedy this event is at 8 p.m., Thursday, May 3. Its afree show at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Featured per formers are Chris Killian (www. ckcomedy.com) and Richie Holliday (www. richieholli day.com) For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served. Beverages will be available for purchase. Need more informa tion? Call (912) 573-4548. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanc tioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summer time bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Moms Bowl for Free From 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, May 13 all moms can bowl for free at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Shoes are not included. For more informa tion call (912) 573-9492. Swim Lessons Lessons begin May 21 at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense autho rized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Summer Camp at the Youth Center is for chil dren kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 23 through August 13. Signup is now for SAC and single/ dual military. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Jacksonville Giants Summer Youth Basketball Camp It runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 29 to June 1 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Children must bring lunch and beverage each day. Cost is $109 per player ages 8 to 18. Price includes an offi cial camp T-shirt, individ ual evaluations and a tick et to one of the first home games of the Giants in the 2012-13 season. Register at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through May 21. Late registration will be accepted if openings are available. Call the Youth Sports office at (912) 573-8202 for more information. Movie Under the Stars The Adventures of TinTin starts at dusk, about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 at the Youth Center Ballfields. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and the family and settle in for a great movie on the huge outdoor theater screen. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. May 5, 6 is Bolt; May 12, 13, Bedtime Stories; May 19, 20, The Muppets ; May 26, 27, Adventures of Tin-Tin. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-5734548.Camp signup starts Just for kids Appreciation Week coming Liberty call Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 7

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Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 21. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a success ful document for your post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., May 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writ ing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explana tion of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 17. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintain ing and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 14 to 17. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for May 9A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, May 9. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportu nities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family mem bers of relocating civil service per sonnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpInformation enables one stop shopping for IAs and their families. Representatives from PSD, medical and Fleet and Family will be available to answer questions and distribute resources. This one-stop shop is 9 to 11 a.m., May 16. Childcare is by registration only. Call 573-4513 for more information.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the mili tary lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and termi nology, and gives tools to access instal lation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, May 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family mem bers for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tailored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deployment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of operational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. This class is 6 to 8 p.m., May 22. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Raising Financially Fit Kids workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop is an interactive program designed for parents of children of all ages. Parents will explore their own financial habits and skills, and learn tech niques to teach their children sound finan cial management skills. Class is 9 to 11 a.m., May 23. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 7 to 11. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513.FFSC Boots get new glassese rumors are true the Coast Guard and its sister services have phased out the S9 cellulose ac etate spectacle frame. e S9s have been the eyewear of choice, or more accurately, the eye wear of issue, for all active duty and reserve person nel upon initial entry into the military since 1990. ats all changed now that the military has made the switch to a more hip ster-chic pair of glasses called the unisex black 5A frame, according to a U.S. Navy press release. e change stems from research conducted at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May and four other U.S. military training installations by the Mili tary Health Systems Opti cal Fabrication Enterprise and the Naval Ophthal mic Support and Training Activity in Yorktown, Va., which assessed the func tionality, durability and cosmetic appearance of various eyewear options. From this research, the new 5A frame was born, but Coast Guard civilian Kelly Mc Cabe, an Optometry Department employee at Health Services Worklife Detachment Cape May, was apprehensive when she rst saw the new glasses. e frames were much thinner with a hinge on the ear pieces, so we were a little concerned about the durability of the glass es in the basic training en vironment, said McCabe, who started issuing the 5A frames in January. How ever, weve been pleasant ly surprised because we havent had any recruits come back with broken frames. McCabe said theres a noticeable dierence in the recruits receptiveness during the issue of the new frames. She said even some active duty mem bers are getting the new 5A frames because they like the style. Active duty and reserve members with more than 30 days service have a broader choice of issued eye wear as part of the Frames of Choice Pro gram, but many are still gravitating toward the new 5A frames, which is exactly the goal of the new eye wear deployment. Service members have told us that they like the appearance of the new frame, said Capt. Matt Newton, commanding of cer of NOSTRA. Newton said he was condent the recruits would continue to use their glasses after boot camp. e recruits in Coast Guard Recruit Com pany Delta 186, the rst Coast Guard recruit train ing company to get issued the new frames, seemed to agree with Newton that the change from the S9, commonly referred to as BCGs or birth control glasses, was welcome by service members. I was pleasantly sur prised when I showed up to boot camp and got is sued the new glasses in stead of the BCGs, said Seaman Recruit Ryan Jackson, 24, of Dayton, Ohio. eyre as stylish as my civilian glasses and just as comfortable. e nicknames for the 5A frames are already starting to y, and eye wear-dependent recruits from Delta 186 shared some of the more popular names, which include Supermans, Buddy Hollys, Hipsters, Beat nicks and Clark Kents, just to name a few. If the nickname is any indicator of popularity, these recruits are lucky to have come in at the right time. e 5A Supermans have saved them from the fate of the unattering, in famous BCGs. Leathernecks tour Okinawa Treading where their grandfathers could have been 67 years ago, the Marines stood atop a hill overlooking the sweeping Okinawan landscape. e air had a tinge of semblance to times past, but now from mountaintop to coastline a busy in frastructure buzzed; great change from the war-torn elds of yesteryear. Marines with the Command Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked on a day-long Battle of Oki nawa tour throughout the southern part of the island, Apr. 17.e tour, held by Marine Corps Community Services, rst took the Marines to Ka kazu Ridge, which proved in the spring of 1945 to be one of the bloodiest spots on Okinawa for U.S. Army and Marine Corps forces. e Marines were able to view bullet-pocked walls, deteriorating Japa nese pill boxes and an en trance to the deadly Shuri lines, the Japaneses dugin network of heavily forti ed positions. Following a tour of the Battle of Okinawa museum aboard Camp Kinser, the tour headed further south to the Japanese Na val Underground Headquarters where Imperial Navy Vice Admiral Minoru Ota, the commander of Japanese Naval forces on Okinawa, lived and op erated out of during the battle. e Marines walked through the dank coral and limestone tunnels where a whirlwind of activity took place plot ting defensive strategies against the oncoming American forces. is tour is so unique in that were getting hands-on experiences and perspectives of the past enemy and where they were, said Sgt. John Schier, assistant team leader with CE, 31st MEU. To be able to be inside a tunnel or bunker of the enemy exactly where they stood realizing they might not make it out alive adds a certain thrill to the tour. During the tour, Chris Majewski, the guide, deliv ered information and sto ries about the battle with precision and fervor that allowed the participants to envision the divisions of Marines landing on the beaches and advancing up the hills into Japanese defenses. If youre going to be in the military but not know your history, youre going to fall short, said Majew ski. You can watch [HBO miniseries] e Pacic all day long, but to actually go to the sites and get bootson-the-ground experiences, it makes you better appreciate what our side went through. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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May 8 is National Teacher Day. In the s, my second grade teacher was Mrs. Lindberg. She told us that her husband was one of the Marines who raised the flag on Iwo Jima. I told my Marine vet dad, who he said he wasnt. It wasnt well known then that there were two flag raisings, as explained in Flags of Our Fathers. Fate made John Bradley, Renee Gagnon and Ira Hayes World War II icons. Chuck Lindberg is a footnote. Now thats a lesson. Pfc. Joel Santana Security Force Battalion New Brunswick, N.J. One thing I didnt like about some of my teachers is they did too much talking and not enough teaching. MA3 Lauren Atwood Security Force Battalion Aberdeen, Wash. I had a math teacher, Mr. Vulcom, who would come up with riddles to memorize equations and stamp assignments with a giant clam stamp. NNFB Troy McCracken USS West Virginia Blue Michigan Center, Mich. I was in band in high school, and my teacher was always very inspirational to me, even to this day. ET3 Dokyun Kim USS Wyoming Gold Palo Alto, Calif. I was a senior in high school. Math wasnt my best subject, but my teacher was like a mom to me and helped me a lot. PS1 Cynthia Rivera Fleet Logistics Command Jacksonville Accra, Ghana Dr. Butterscotch is an awesome instructor. He takes time before and after class to explain things. MM3 Zach Blakeman USS West Virginia Blue Rolling Prairie, Ind. I liked all my teachers. Probably the best one was my band teacher.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Explorer visits Navy ONR e famed ocean ex plorer and RMS Titanic discoverer visited the Of ce of Naval Research April 18 to discuss how hes using innovative tele-presence technology for both research and to energize youth about the sciences. Dr. Robert Ballard also known for locating several legendary shipwrecks as well as discov ering deep-water hydrothermal vents gave a presentation titled, e Development of Tele-pres ence Technology in Sup port of Ocean Exploration and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education. Seeking to make sea oor exploration more ecient, Ballard concep tualized the idea of telepresence, which uses advanced robotics and high-bandwidth, ship-toshore communications for autonomous exploration. His latest program leverages tele-presence and is funded through an ONR-sponsored grant, Us ing the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as a Platform to Pursue the Naval STEM Work Force Strategic Ap proach. e program employs a multi-step method to propel students into the na tions STEM professional pipeline. My passions are three things: developing advanced exploratory technology, thanks to [ONR]; using that technology to make discoveries; and then using the excitement of that exploration to turn kids on to science through the use of tele-presence technology Im after the jaw drop [reaction to the wonders of science], Bal lard said. For several decades, Ballard has fostered stu dents interest in STEM. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 9

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As Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit steamed south to New Orleans aboard the USS Wasp, many were adjusting to an aspect of the Marine Corps many know little about; life embarked on ship. Aboard ship, the day-to-day routine that many Marines are used to becomes something new and totally dierent from anywhere else, be it in garrison or deployed abroad. e narrow corridors and steep ladders that dene the interior of a ship are far from the biggest changes for many. For example, this is the furthest a number of the Marines have ever been out to sea. is is the rst time Ive been out on a real ship. Its kind of a surreal experience. When youre standing on the pier, its like, how does some thing this big oat, said Lance Cpl. Robert Sanders, a rieman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. e ship is nearly three football elds long at 844 feet and approxi mately 40,000 tons unloaded. Surrounded by miles and miles of empty oceans, some Marines are surprised by the calm. Its really peaceful out here. e waters nice, said Lance Cpl. Tyler Leishman, an ammo man with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. Its really pretty. Ive never been out so far before, said Lance Cpl. Dylan Swanzy, gunner with Com pany C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. Some are nding it harder to adjust, though. Lance Cpl. Trisha Hunter, intelligence analyst with the 26th MEU, misses using her cell phone and having easy access to In ternet service. Some are just adjusting to the dayto-day existence of the ship, with the ceaselessly moving decks and tight quarters in berthing or sleeping area. I thought itd be a lot more cramped. It could use a little more head room, but Ive slept in worse, Leishman said. Im used to having a three man room, not three bunk beds, said Sanders. For a few Marines, the back and forth movement of the ship can be more than a little nauseating. I got sick on the third day, but Ive been good since, said Cpl. Mark Gomez, maintenance management chief for the 26th MEU. I dont like the way the ship wobbles back and forth, said Hunter. You have to get used to the rock ing, so walking is kind of weird, Sanders said. However, for most, its a new ex perience, and a new facet to the Marine Corps that many didnt expect to see. Its a whole new world, said Lance Cpl. David Anzualda, data network technician for 26th MEU. For Sta Sgt. Vincento Perez, radio chief for the 26th MEU, this will be the fourth time aboard ship with a Marine expeditionary unit. is is a tradition. From a Marine Corps perspective, I take pride in being aboard a ship, Perez said. e 26th MEU was to pull into port aboard the USS Wasp April 17. Marines adapt to life on shipSince 1986, he has cre ated a series of education al outreach programs in STEM education that use tele-presence: the JASON Project, and Immersion Learning. Ballard is enthusiastic and knows how to cap ture the interest of young people and adults, said Joan Cleveland, acting deputy division director of ONRs Ocean Sensing and Systems Division. Oceanography is a good hook for getting students interest ed in science because they may be interested rst in a coral reef or a whale, but theyre going to have to learn some math and physics to pursue that in terest. Recently, Ballard ac quired E/V Nautilus and its advanced tele-pres ence technology to sup port the Americas Ocean Exploration program. e program uses the technology and E/V Nauti lus Corps of Explorationa group of superstar sci entists and engineers-to interest young people in STEM careers, as well as to discover deep-sea natural and cultural resources. e Corps of Explora tion sta serves as role models, mentors and guides for young people. eir goal is to make STEM seem more applicable to the real world and less intimidating so that students are inspired to view science careers as achievable. Our unique approach, our philosophy is, dont sell science, sell scien tists and engineers as role models, Ballard said. America, for better or for worse, is a star-based sys tem, and children will always go after stars as role models. Were selling role models that kids can emulate. A pioneering scientist who has been at the forefront of deep sub mergence technology for investigating deep-ocean regions, he has completed more than 130 deep-sea expeditions. rough Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutes Deep Submergence Labo ratory, he developed the remotely operated vehicle system Argo/Jason, which he used to locate the Titanic; the German battleship Bismarck, sunk dur ing World War II; and the passenger liner Lusitania, torpedoed and sunk dur ing World War I. Later, using ONRs breakthrough, small, manned submarine, Deep Submergence Vehicle Alvin, Ballard himself descended to the ocean oor to view the Titanic. Ballards association with ONR spans 45 years. It began when he became a scientic liaison ocer to ONRs Boston branch oce and was assigned to WHOI. He later created the Deep Submergence Labo ratory in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering at WHOI, serving as a senior scien tist. ONR provides the sci ence and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 30 coun tries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry part ners. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract per sonnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washing ton, D.C.Ballard 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Guided missile frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment recovered 89 bales of cocaine in sup port of Operation Martillo on April 20 in the Western Caribbean Sea. An SH-60B Sea Hawk assigned to Helicopter An ti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 Det. 3, embarked on board Elrod responded after receiving a transmis sion from a P-3 operated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40foot twin-engine vessels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the West ern Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subse quently jettisoned into the sea. e Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weigh ing 4,840 pounds, with an estimated value of more than $362 million. I am very proud of the teamwork and collaborative eort between the ship, our air detachment and our USCG Law En forcement Detachment, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, Elrods commanding ocer. Our mission is clear; to disrupt illicit track ing that jeopardizes the safety in the region and ul timately our own national security. is seizure is in addi tion to the 1,000 lbs. re covered by Elrod March 22. Operation Martillo Spanish for hammer is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation eort tar geting illicit tracking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participa tion is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command. Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coordinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational organized crime and the U.S. Central America Re gional Security Initia tive. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined fullspectrum military operations. It does so by providing principally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional secu rity and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. $362 mil in cocaine seized THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Navy College educational information

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 13 In conjunction with the 70th anniversary of the historic World War II aerial attack on To kyo, a day-long tribute to Alam eda-born and University of California-Berkeley graduate Gen. Jimmy Doolittle will take place at the USS Hornet Museum on May 5. e commemoration is a joint eort between the USS Hornet Museum in Alameda and e Jimmy Doolittle Air & Space Mu seum in Faireld, Calif. Although best known for planning and leading the raid over Tokyo during WWII, Doo little also was a leader in the advancement of aviation technology. Among his lifes accom plishments: Assisted in the development of the artificial horizon and directional gyroscopes. Flew the rst transcontinen tal ight in less than 24 hours in a De Havilland DH-4 at age 26. Became the rst pilot to y an airplane relying solely on ight instruments. Received his Bachelors of Arts from UC Berkeley and his Masters and doctorate from MIT. On April 18, 1942, then Lt. Col. Doolittle led his Doolittle Raid ers on an aerial attack of Japan. e Army Air Forces squadron consisted of 16 B-25 bombers, which took o from the aircraft carrier, Hornet (CV-8). Among the special guests pay ing tribute to Gen. Doolittle will be his son, John P. Doolittle, a retired Air Force Colonel, his granddaughter, Jonna Doo little Hoppes, and three surviv ing members of the Doolittles Raiders, who will share their memories of Doolittle and the rst-ever launch of Army bomb ers into combat o an aircraft carrier. We are extremely honored to be the host for this special tribute to Gen. Jimmy Doolit tle, said Randall Ramian, CEO of USS Hornet Museum. is special event also provides an opportunity for people to learn about the role the rst Hornet played in this historical event. Scheduled to attend are: Jonna Doolittle Hoppes A noted author and Doolittles granddaughter, Hoppes, will be giving a public presenta tion in the afternoon, after which she will sign her copies of her book Calculated Risk: The Extraordinary Life of Jimmy Doolittle. Hoppes is also the keynote speaker for the evening dinner event. Major Thomas Carson Griffin, Navigator, Plane 9 Grin was selected by Doolittle to go to the Pentagon to work on the maps to be used for the raid. Grin was forced to bail out over China and was rescued by Chinese civilians and returned to duty. Lt. Col. Edward Joseph Saylor, Engineer/gunner, Plane 15 While the squadron was being convoyed towards Japan on the Hornet CV-8, Saylor dis covered that one of his planes engines had a serious problem. Knowing that the standing order was to push any nonfunctional plane overboard, he rounded up a Navy maintenance crew and together they removed and rebuilt the engine in time for takeo. e plane carried the squadrons only doctor, which could have made a critical dif ference to the mission. Sta Sgt. David J. atcher, Engineer/gunner, Plane 7 e famous Ruptured Duck atcher saved and defended his crew after a near-fatal crash into the sea o the China coast. For his heroism, he was award ed the Silver Star. Following this mission, he served in North Africa and England until July 1945. Other special speakers in clude crewmen from the Hornet CV-8, including: Lt. Cmdr. Richard Nowatzki As a young seaman fresh out of boot camp, Nowatzki was as signed to the USS Hornet (CV-8) before it was commissioned and remained part of her crew until she was sunk in combat in Octo ber 1942. He will share his many fond memories of the Doolittle Raiders. Lt. j.g. Oral Moore Moore joined the Navy when he was 18 years old and was part of the original Hornet CV-8 crew. In April 1942, he watched as the 16 Army B-25s were craned onto the ships flight deck and later watched as Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle and his 79 Raiders took off on their secret mission. Individuals involved with the Raiders in China, including: Lt. Col. Chu Chen As a teenager he witnessed and was involved in the rescue of the Doolittle Raiders who were forced to bail-out of their planes on the night of April 18, 1942. He went on to join the Republic of China Air Force and became a pilot in the elite Black Bat Squadron during the Cold War. John Fu Author and son of Lt. General Fu, Kei-Chin, Chinese Commander who was responsible for building 5 run ways in China for the landing of the Doolittle Raiders B-25s on April 18, 1942. He is planning on giving a public presentation of his book Doolittles B-25 Raid in Chinese, in which he will pres ent a summary in English. Fu is the director of Allied, Republic of China Air Force Connection project team and is organiz ing descendants of Chinese involved in the rescue/evacuation of all Raiders. It has been 70 years since the air raid on Tokyo and we hope that a new generation will join us in remembering and learning about Jimmy Doolittle. He had a special connection to North ern California, said Major Gen eral U.S. Air Force (Ret.) omas Kane, Executive Director of the Jimmy Doolittle Air & Space Mu seum. We are very excited by the plans for a new museum in Solano County that will be dedi cated in his honor. He was a true pioneer in aviation history. Following the aerial attack, most of the B-25 crewmen who went down in China made it to safety with the help of Chinese civilians. However, the Chinese paid dearly for their assistance, as the Japanese killed an esti mated 250,000 civilians while searching for Doolittles men. Some of the descendants of the Chinese families who helped rescue the Doolittle Raiders are attending and speaking. e Hornet was attacked and sunk just six months after the fa mous Doolittle mission. Its successor, the USS Hornet (CV-12) is now berthed in Alameda. e USS Hornet advanced its predecessors tradition of great ness both in war and as the recovery ship for the Apollo 11 lunar mission and today houses one of the Bay Areas most famous military and space history museums. Doolittles World War II raid celebrated F-35C Lightning strike-ghter joins Eglin squadron Navy personnel are busy pre paring to teach the next gen eration of Sailors how to work with and y the newest military aircraft, the F-35C Lightening II Joint Strike Fighter, as Strike Fighter Squadron 101 (VFA-101) readied for its stand-up ceremo ny on Eglin Air Force Base May 1. e F-35 is a single seat, multirole ghter aircraft with the ca pability to perform ground at tack, reconnaissance, and air defense missions. e aircraft is in full produc tion at the Lockheed Martin plant in Fort Worth, Texas. e F-35 is designed to even tually replace the F/A-18 Hornet and AV-8B Harrier tactical ght er aircraft and was planned with a common design, but three unique service variants, to keep development, production, and operating costs down. is is brand new aircraft platform from tooth to tail, said Cmdr. Scott Kartvedt, com manding ocer of VFA-101. Were not parlaying o any Navy stealth legacy programs or support systems. is will be the rst new stealth and carrierbased tactical ghter aircraft since the introduction of the F/A-18 29 years ago. e original Fighter Squadron 101 (VF-101), nicknamed the Grim Reapers, was established May 1, 1952 and ew various models of ghter aircraft including the F-4 Phantom and F-14 Tomcat. With the retirement of the F-14, VF-101 was disestablished in 2005. To support the new Navy ver sion of the F-35, VFA-101 will be reestablished May 1 at a new hangar and training facility on Eglin AFB and will serve as the Fleet Replacement Squadron, training pilots and maintainers for the eet. e rst Sailors to help stand up VFA-101 will receive Plank Owner certicates for their assistance with the new aircraft, new training facilities and redesignated squadron. As per Navy tradition, plank owners are individuals who were members of the crew of a ship when that ship was placed in commission. Im learning a lot and really enjoy working with other ser vices, said Senior Chief Logis tics Specialist Mirtha Martinez, Material Control Department leading chief petty ocer for the squadron. Id love to come back in ve years and see the squadron fully functioning. Marine Col. Arthur Tomasset ti, vice commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing, said establishing a squadron to train and work with the F-35 aircraft has not been easy, but the leadership has taken charge and is working to wards building the best facilities possible to work with this new aircraft. e concept was simple; es tablish an initial training cen ter for pilots and maintainers for the F-35 weapon system, Tomassetti said. Bringing that concept to reality has been and will continue to be complicated and challenging. So the rst step is you start with the best people you can nd, put them together, and say go. Over the past twoand-one-half years, those care fully selected people have put together a strategy, developed plans, adapted to the dynamic and ever changing environment and schedule, and continued to track towards the goal of estab lishing a training center for F-35 pilots and maintainers. e mechanics of the Navy F-35 will initially be taught by Lockheed Martin personnel to Navy instructors, who will then begin teaching students after completing instructor certica tion. Students are expected to ar rive for maintenance instruc tion in 2015, with the rst F-35s scheduled for deployment 20172018. e Navys version of the F-35, the C model is distinct from the F-35A and F-35B ver sions with larger wing surfaces and reinforced landing gear for greater control in the demanding carrier take-o and landing environment. Sailors in the majority of avia tion rates are eligible to attend the F-35 course of instruction.



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Preventing accidents the goal for walkers, joggers, bicyclistsWhether jogging, walking or bicycle riding keep safety in the front of your minds. Per OPNAVINST 5100.12H, certain guidelines must be followed to ensure your safety and the safety of others. Jogging and walking should be done on sidewalks and bicycle riding on bicycle paths to the greatest extent possible. Pedestrians and bicyclists should always be aware of auto trac. During times of restricted visibility, such as darkness, fog, or heavy rain, all eorts must be made to become more visible by wearing light-colored clothing, reective vests and other bright or lighted items. e use of ashlights can help individuals be more visible. Bicycles used between sunset and sunrise must be equipped with a lamp on front which has a white light visible for 500 feet to the front, and a red reector visable 600 feet to the rear. e light may be a blinking or steady light. While bicycling, all personnel shall wear helmets approved by the Consumer Safety Product Commission, ANSI and Snell while riding anywhere on base. Only workers operating bicycles in industrial areas that require the use of ANSI approved helmets for protection from falling and ying objects are allowed to use hard hats, with chin straps, instead of bicycle helmets. Wearing of portable headphones, earphones or other listening devices while jogging, walking, bicycling or skating on roads and streets on Naval installations is prohibited. A road is dened as that part of a trafc way which includes both the roadway and any shoulder alongside the roadway. ese items may be used on bicycle paths as long as they are removed when crossing roads and streets. When operating a privately owned vehicle, it is your responsibility to be mindful of pedestrians. You should approach crosswalks with caution. Remember pedestrians have the right of way while crossing the street. Yield to pedestrians. Contact Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety with any questions or safety concerns at 5732525 or 5730414. THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Get the school skinny for National Teacher Day Page 9 Glasses gone S9 cellulose acetate spectacle frame is history Page 8 Earth Day Youth Center, Expo carry on tradition Page 4Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Rearming their partnership USS Alaska, St. Marys Elementary School continue relationshipe commanding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Blue) and the principal of St. Marys Elementary School rearmed the partnership between the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine crew and the Camden County school. Cmdr. Kevin Byrne, the commanding ocer of Alaskas blue crew, said he was proud his crew has held to their commitment after the command ocially adopted the school in 2010. Our Sailors always come back [to the command] talking about how much fun it was reading and playing with the students, Byrne said. Its a very rewarding experience for our Sailors and the students, and I hope to continue building that relation ship. Tom McClendon, the schools principal, said partnerships like this mean everything to the school and the students. e Sailors come to our kindergarten and rst-grade classes to read and volunteer in engaging activities with our students every Friday, McClendon said. e children look forward to it. Some of the children here may not have a strong male mentor in their lives, so theyre the ones who really get something out of it. e school moved into its current buildPedestrian safety stressed at Kings Bay al-Qaida oshoots a dangerOcial warns as anniversary of bin Laden death nearsCore al-Qaida, the group led by Osama bin Laden, has been surpassed by its aliates as the biggest terrorist threat to the United States, a senior intelligence ocial said. With bin Ladens death, the global jihadist movement lost its most-iconic, most-eective and most-inspirational leader, Robert T. Cardillo, deputy director for intelligence integration with the Oce of the Director of National Intelligence, told reporters April 27. Bin Ladens death allowed alQaida second-in-command Ayman al Zawahiri to move up, but he has not changed the groups strategic direction and does not have the charisma to ap peal to new recruits, Car dillo said. Navy SEALs killed bin Laden in Pakistan on May 2, 2011. e al-Qaida oshoots alQaida in the Arabian Peninsula, al-Shabob in Somalia, al-Qaida in the Mahgreb will surpass the core al-Qaida remaining in Paki stan, Cardillo said. Each group will seek opportunities to strike Western interests in its operating area, but each group will have dif ferent intent and opportunity. e Arab Spring uprisings have inuenced the jihadist movement. e unrest and reduced security provides terrorists more operating space as security services focus more on internal security and regime stability, Cardillo said. As new Middle East leaders address demands for participation in government, we assess that core al-Qaida and the jihadist movement will suer a strategic setback in that the Arab Spring strikes at the very core of their jihadist narrative, he said. Al-Qaida believes in progress by violence, but the elections in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and the up-coming election in Libya rebuke that assertion, he added. However, prolonged instabil ity or unmet promises by these new governments would give al-Qaida, its aliates and its allies more time to establish networks, gain support and potentially en gage in operations, he said. If we didnt get any help from the crew, we might have had to cut school days. Tom McClendon Principal, St. Marys Elementary school Services join forces to compete in 2012 Warrior GamesTeam Navy/Coast Guard has chosen which athletes will compete for the title of Ultimate Champion during the 2012 Warrior Games, going on through May 5, 2012. ey chose retired Navy Lt. John Edmonston and Aviation Machinists Mate 3rd Class Chris Suter to compete in the paralympic-style pentathlon event, where athletes compete in cycling, shooting, swimming, and track and eld events, earning points in each event. e athlete who accumulates the most points is crowned the Ultimate Champion. Selection for the Ultimate Champion is not always an easy process. Just because an athlete does well in one sport doesnt make him [an ultimate champion] diversied across all sports, said Navy Safe Harbor adaptive sports coordinator David Pennington, adding the ultimate athletes are We are not pulling out elite athletes from one sport, but looking for people who have the ability to do well in each event. As far as how the athletes are prepared for the challenge Pennington describes how the team coaches come together. All of the disciplines have their own coach. e individual team coaches encompass the ultimate athlete to help train, Pennington said. Rising to the challenge and representing the Navy/Coast Guard team has its responsibilities. Edmonston, injured in a 2009 motorcycle accident, understands the responsibility and the honor of being chosen the Ultimate Champion. Its a lot of work and training, and only two are picked, Edmonston said. e team leader thought enough of you to have the chance to win. Its kind of like being the [Most Valuable Player]. Navy, Coast Guard team up

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Tri-Base hoop tourney here May 5Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will host the annual Tri-Base Basketball Tournament this year. e tournament, between Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, begins at 9 a.m., Saturday, May 5 at the Fitness Complex main gym. Games continue until the champion is crowned. e event is free for all spectators, so come out and show your support as our Kings Bay teams squareo against the teams from Mayport and Jax.ShipShape weight loss begins May 10If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations. ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an eight-week nutrition and weight management course starting 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 10. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 or 573-8626 for more information on the program or to signup.Camden Co. burn ban extendede burn ban originally set on April 12 by local re ocials and Georgia Forestry has been extended indenitely. Weather conditions have not improved and the area has not had a signicant amount of rain to counter the low humidity and moderate winds. Ocials ask the public to suspend outdoor burning and be vigilant by reporting any outdoor burning to authorities. Conditions will be monitored and the public will be updated when the burn ban is lifted. Contact Camden County Fire Rescue Headquarters at (912) 729-3911 for questions. Base personnel having any questions contact NSB Kings Bay Fire Prevention at 573-9998.USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cookout at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slide show and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, or call (912) 882-4912 or (912) 269-5034.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials.Exchange Site & Sound sale soonDuring the Navy Exchange semi-annual Sight and Sound sale May 15 to 29, customers can take advantage of a special program with the Military Star Card. Customers who purchase an individual computer, TV, home theater system or camera bundle valued at $699 or above using a Military Star Card will receive no down payment, no interest and no payments for a year and a half. Now hear this! A man who wants something will nd a way; a man who doesnt will nd an excuse. Stephan Dolley Jr.The benefits of exercise and daily physical activity are measurable and vast, yet according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 30 percent of adults get no exercise at all. e CDC cited some of the most common reasons adults give for not living active lifestyles, including not having enough time to exercise, lack of self-motivation, nding exercise boring or unenjoyable, lack of selfmanagement skills setting goals, tracking progress and more plus a lack of encouragement and support from family and friends. When one or more of these barriers are present, it can be challenging to muster the motivation to incorporate exercise into our daily lives. However, concentrating your energy on overcoming whatever barriers you face will allow you to transcend the limitations that inhibit you from living a healthy and active lifestyle. In order to make time for exercise, it is essential that you plan your week in advance, which will allow you to identify where and when you can complete your exercise sessions. Is it easier for you to exercise at home rst thing in the morning, when distractions are minimal? Or is going to the gym straight from work in the evening more realistic for you? You can even break your workouts into smaller sessions throughout the day. e important thing is to have a plan for your weekly workouts, schedule them like appointments that cannot be missed and make them manageable and attainable. If you lack self-motivation or have found exercise unenjoyable in the past, take some time to try new modes of exercise. If you have a treadmill that serves as a clothes rack, maybe you would nd it more motivating to exercise at the gym versus at home. By enlisting a workout buddy or joining an exercise class, you also may feel more motivated by having others around to hold you accountable and create a more dynamic and fun environment for working out. Set yourself up for success by nding something you enjoy doing and that makes you feel good. is will allow you to fully receive both the physical and psychological benets that daily exercise provides. Once you have a plan of action that is realistic and achievable, spend some time dening your goals, determining how you will measure your progress and establishing a reward system to celebrate when you reach a goal. Managing your tness is an important part of the process that ensures you maintain your commitment long term. Build a support system by explaining to your family and friends your goals and reasons behind wanting to get t, and ask them for their encouragement and support. Find creative ways to incorporate tness into your social activities and develop new friendships with those who share your goals. Join an exercise group like a running or hiking club. When you know your personal barriers to exercise, you can identify ways to overcoming them and will nd it easier to incorporate tness into your daily life. Overcoming barriers to exercise Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator e Department of the Navy has launched a dedicated Web site to serve as an additional resource for the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative announced by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in March. e new Web site, located at www.21stcentury.navy.mil, features frequently asked questions, articles, blogs, and videos to update Sailors, Marines and their families on important policies and programs, which impact todays force. e 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness. e programs are divided into ve areas: readiness, safety, physical tness, inclusion, and continuum of service. e Department of the Navy leadership wanted to take all of our existing personnel support programs, those in development and some new initiatives, and bring them together under the one umbrella of 21st Century Sailor and Marine in order to ensure every Sailor, Marine and their families have the tools they need to ensure they exceed and excel in the coming decade. is Web site is a one-stop shop for information about these programs, said Juan M. Garcia, assistant Secretary of the Navy, Manpower and Reserve Aairs. e 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combateective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. Up, up, and away! is familiar phrase sets the tone the 2012 Vacation Bible School program. e Command Religious Program of the NSB Kings Bay Chapel invites your children to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School entitled Sky Everything is Possible with God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 25 to 29, at the chapel. Registration for VBS will begin Monday, May 14, and continue through Friday, June 15, in the main oce of the base chapel, which is located across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this high-ying adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS passengers arriving at the Sky Terminal where they will review their ight plans for the day. In Up and Away Sing and Playstudents will meet Bible Buddies like Pat the Bat and Scout the Eagle and learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs. Most importantly, they will learn that no matter what people do, no matter who they are and no matter how they feel they can always trust God. Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on New Testament accounts of faith in Christ. Students will study the life of Christ, His resurrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Wild Bible Adventures time, the videos adventures of Chatter the Chipmunk, and fun-lled outdoor activities like Skydiver, Parachute Protection and Cloud Movers. Of course, a high-ying VBS like this would not be complete without delicious snacks served from Skydive Diner. At the end of each day the VBS passengers will land back to the Sky terminal to sing more lively songs, review the days lesson, and rehearse the Bible verse of the day. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success, the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, pre-assemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is needed. Volunteers are encouraged to stop by the chapel ofce now and sign up for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Grab your boarding pass and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools thrilling ight through Gods Word to boundless limits of the Sky. Sky theme for summer bible school21st Century Initiative has Web site 21st Century Initiative

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay support group known as STEPS or Supporting and Training Exceptional Parents for Success, works to create an environment where families with special needs can come together to share best practices, ask questions, identify local resources and nd emotional support from others familiar with the challenges of living as an exceptional family. roughout the year, STEPS host workshops to provide special needs families with information, training, and support. ursday, May 17, 2012 STEPS will host a free parent seminar entitled, Au tism: Understanding Eective Behavioral Strategies. Board Certied Behavioral Analyst Paul Napier will share with parents and caregivers simple but eective ways to address the behaviors of children living with autism. is workshop will focus on specic tools parents can use to help children with autism improve behaviors in both social and academic settings. Interested in attending? Need childcare? Simply register your intent to participate and/or your need for childcare by e-mailing the installation School Liaison Ocer at clainetta. jeerson@navy.mi or calling (912) 573-8986 before Friday, May 11. e names, ages, and special needs of the children will need to be provided in order to plan for appropriate childcare. Make your plans now to attend this important workshop. is workshop will be at the NSB Kings Bay Youth Center. No special base access is required to attend this event. e Youth Center is located just inside the Jackson Gate which is just past Crooked River Elementary School on Charlie Smith Highway Spur 40. Make the rst right turn onto USS Wahoo Avenue and proceed to the parking lot at the end of the street. Grab a notebook, a pencil, and make STEPS in the right direction. Autism workshop May 17 Tofalo guest at MOAA Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group 10, Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, and Mrs. Tofalo were guest at the April meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Association of America. Tofalo gave a visual presentation and spoke of the force missions of the submarine service and answered questions from the assembled group of active and former ocers representing all branches of the military. Kings Bay MOAA meets on the third Tuesday of each month. For membership information, contact Capt. Tom Richter, USN, (Ret.) at 576-2906 or CaptainTom@tds.net Riley honored by NMCRS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Community Planning Liaison Officer and Earth Day volunteer, Melinda NesSmith-Picard teaches how to make origami butterflies, April 24, as children at the Youth Center participate in various Earth Day-themed activities. NesSmith-Picard shows children how to fold the paper to make origami butterflies. A Youth Center child holds up her origami butterfly. Youth Center students make homemade birdfeeders out of pine cones and birdseed. Students work on an Earth Day-themed crossword puzzle at the Youth Center. Earth Day bags decorated by children. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay held an Earth Day Expo Thursday, April 19. The free event was in front of the Navy Exchange, featuring information booths, exhibits and Earth Day-themed activities for children and adults. e purpose was both a celebration and a time to educate ourselves on why it is so important to preserve the resources we have, said Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Master Chief Jimmy Schubert. I think this is a great annual event to hold for the base and community. It just revisits areas that all of us can do our part in. Its a nice reminder. Information at the booths featured energy efcient light bulbs and information on recycling. An exhibit on hybrid and electric cars featured an electric vehicle. White Oak Conservation Center and Crooked River State Park sta spoke about their facilities and the importance of education and awareness about the environment. e event also featured activities for children, such as bean planting, an Earth Day-themed crossword and a hands-on bird feeder making station. Individuals attending had the opportunity to do a little spring cleaning. E-Scraps recycling collected old electronic equipment that will be reused and recycled. e Camden County Sheris Oce collected old unused prescriptions. Due to the rain, the event was cut short. But that didnt stop volunteers from reaching out to the youths and conducting activities indoors the following week at the Youth Center. Students participated in the bean planting, a crossword puzzle, and made homemade bird feeders and origami butteries.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 5 ing two years ago in the middle of the school year. It was Alaskas blue crew that helped make that move, starting the partnership between the two local xtures. We simply would not have been able to make such a move without the help of Alaska, McClendon said. If we didnt get any help from the crew, we might have had to cut school days. e Alaska really made all of this happen in the time that we were able to do it. Cathy Peterson, an Individual Educational Planning teacher at Saint Marys Elementary, said she is especially appreciative of the submarines support. ere are days when my students ask me when the Sailors are coming back, said Peterson. ey know them by rst name and they love the time they get with them. Byrne, who has children in the school district himself, said many other school kids recognize his name when they realize what his last name is. My kids play baseball after school, so my name is on some of the papers their friends have, Byrne said. When they eventually recognize my last name, theyll ask me if Im the guy who signed that paper hanging in the [schools] hallway. Its neat to be recognized like that, but it also means the students really care about the time our Sailors spend with them. Sexual Assault Awareness Partners Chosen as the Ultimate Warrior merely a month ago, Edmonston has had to adjust his training style for the new events. Ive been pretty steady, but I changed it up. I made adjustments to get ready, Edmonston said. Cycling is a challenge. But Edmonston feels the support from teammates and the coaching sta. I will be proud to win, but its really about the points for the team in the end, Edmonston said. Suter is facing the challenge as a rst time Warrior Games athlete, as well as a competitor for Ultimate Champion. Suter has been a life-long athlete even after being diagnosed with Cushings Syndrome in December 2010. rough adversity, Suters positive attitude has helped to shape who he is and how he approaches challenges. It is what brought him to the Navy and is guiding him to pursue his dream of becoming a Navy SEAL. Do what you love, Suter said. As for participating in the 2012 Warrior Games and being chosen as the Ultimate Warrior, Suter states it plainly, I like it, it is a good time. Suters anity for intense sports developed at the young age of ve when he rst began riding motocross and grew into an enjoyment of rugby, football, and boxing. It is my safe zone. Some people go for massages, I go for competition, Suter said. Eager for the competition, Suter is well aware of the ability of the other warriors, It is denitely a challenge. ere are a lot of good athletes out there Its the next level up. Seeing his own progress in cycling has helped him to focus on the challenge. I didnt like [cycling] at rst, he said. It was killing me. But while participating in a Ride 2 Recovery event, Suter watched how the teammates supported each other. e stronger riders pushed the weaker riders. Describing his rst and most challenging bike event, Suter wanted to give up. But when he looked back after feeling a push, he saw a double-amputee pushing him. Suter remembered thinking, I cant give up now. Suter is grateful for the chance the Navy Safe Harbor has given him and his teammates, to challenge himself and step up for the team. e Warrior Games is hosted by the U.S. Olympic Committees paralympics military program.WarriorThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, April 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, May 15. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation, set in a casual environment to discuss topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transition, employment and more. Learn more or contribute your knowledge. For additional information or to reg ister, call 573-4513.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Pre-marital workshop offered May 2The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. May 2. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 8, 15, 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 21 to 24 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 15 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 29. For more information, call 573-4513. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. May 17. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 7, 14 and 21. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Returning to Children workshop May 17Children can feel the effects of deployment, too. Learn to recognize your childrens positive and negative behaviors in relation to the deployment, homecoming and reintegration of their military parent. This class will be 10 to 11 a.m., May 17. Call 573-4512 to register and for more information.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 21The Ombudsman Assembly Fleet & Family Support Center workshops a CFC participantProvided as a public serviceWorking together for stronger,healthier babies marchofdimes.com 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Customer Appreciation Week is May 21 to 26. Morale, Welfare and Recreation would like to thank all of its customers and show them how much they are appreciated. Every day during the week of May 21 to 26, something great is happening. On Monday, May 21 at Trident Lakes Golf Club, a Two-Person Captains Choice Golf Tournament begins at 1 p.m. On Tuesday, May 2, its Dollar Day with Dollar Bowling from 1 to 9 p.m. at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, plus Give It A Shine All Day at the MWR Car Wash with $1 per cycle. On Wednesday, May 23, there is a Concert in the Park with Josh Gracin Live from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., includes a complimentary lunch, Inatables and concert seating. On ursday, May 24, a Paintball Tourney is scheduled on the Adult Football Field at 5 p.m. Entry is free. Games are played 4-on-4. Next, on Friday, May 25, Child and Youth Programs Appreciates Parents Day has donuts, juice and fresh fruit from 6:30 to 9 a.m. at Child Development Center & Youth Center. Best of all is Saturday, May 26, with Summer Splash from noon to 4 p.m. at the Fitness Pool Complex, with free entry, music, games, prizes and food for purchase. Saturday evening is a free UFC Fight Night with Dos Santos v.s Overeem at 9 p.m. Big EZ Movie Zone. All events have more details on facebook. ITT has a new home And a new automated phone system. Now you wont have to wait to get that price you need. You can talk to a customer service representa tives, but it sure makes it a lot eas ier for you. Call (912) 573-8888. Also sign up May 1 at 18 at ITT for chances to win some great prizes during Customer Appreciation Week on May 21 to 26. Sign up once each day. The prizes include World Quest Resort Orlando, Wet-N-Wild, Summer Waves, Pirates Dinner Show and a stay at Comfort Suites Maingate East Motherload of Comedy this event is at 8 p.m., Thursday, May 3. Its afree show at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Featured per formers are Chris Killian (www. ckcomedy.com) and Richie Holliday (www. richieholli day.com) For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served. Beverages will be available for purchase. Need more informa tion? Call (912) 573-4548. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summer time bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 573-9492. Moms Bowl for Free From 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, May 13 all moms can bowl for free at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Shoes are not included. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Swim Lessons Lessons begin May 21 at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense authorized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Summer Camp at the Youth Center is for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 23 through August 13. Signup is now for SAC and single/ dual military. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Jacksonville Giants Summer Youth Basketball Camp It runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 29 to June 1 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Children must bring lunch and beverage each day. Cost is $109 per player ages 8 to 18. Price includes an offi cial camp T-shirt, individ ual evaluations and a ticket to one of the first home games of the Giants in the 2012-13 season. Register at the Youth Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through May 21. Late registration will be accepted if openings are available. Call the Youth Sports office at (912) 573-8202 for more information. Movie Under the Stars The Adventures of TinTin starts at dusk, about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 at the Youth Center Ballfields. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and the family and settle in for a great movie on the huge outdoor theater screen. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. May 5, 6 is Bolt; May 12, 13, Bedtime Stories; May 19, 20, The Muppets ; May 26, 27, Adventures of Tin-Tin. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-5734548.Camp signup starts Just for kids Appreciation Week coming Liberty call Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 7

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Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 21. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a success ful document for your post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., May 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 17. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 14 to 17. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for May 9A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, May 9. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Individual Augmentee pre-deployment helpInformation enables one stop shopping for IAs and their families. Representatives from PSD, medical and Fleet and Family will be available to answer questions and distribute resources. This one-stop shop is 9 to 11 a.m., May 16. Childcare is by registration only. Call 573-4513 for more information.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, May 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tailored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deployment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of operational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. This class is 6 to 8 p.m., May 22. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Raising Financially Fit Kids workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop is an interactive program designed for parents of children of all ages. Parents will explore their own financial habits and skills, and learn tech niques to teach their children sound finan cial management skills. Class is 9 to 11 a.m., May 23. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 7 to 11. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513.FFSC Boots get new glassese rumors are true the Coast Guard and its sister services have phased out the S9 cellulose acetate spectacle frame. e S9s have been the eyewear of choice, or more accurately, the eyewear of issue, for all active duty and reserve personnel upon initial entry into the military since 1990. ats all changed now that the military has made the switch to a more hipster-chic pair of glasses called the unisex black 5A frame, according to a U.S. Navy press release. e change stems from research conducted at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May and four other U.S. military training installations by the Military Health Systems Optical Fabrication Enterprise and the Naval Ophthalmic Support and Training Activity in Yorktown, Va., which assessed the functionality, durability and cosmetic appearance of various eyewear options. From this research, the new 5A frame was born, but Coast Guard civilian Kelly Mc Cabe, an Optometry Department employee at Health Services Worklife Detachment Cape May, was apprehensive when she rst saw the new glasses. e frames were much thinner with a hinge on the ear pieces, so we were a little concerned about the durability of the glasses in the basic training environment, said McCabe, who started issuing the 5A frames in January. However, weve been pleasantly surprised because we havent had any recruits come back with broken frames. McCabe said theres a noticeable dierence in the recruits receptiveness during the issue of the new frames. She said even some active duty members are getting the new 5A frames because they like the style. Active duty and reserve members with more than 30 days service have a broader choice of issued eye wear as part of the Frames of Choice Program, but many are still gravitating toward the new 5A frames, which is exactly the goal of the new eyewear deployment. Service members have told us that they like the appearance of the new frame, said Capt. Matt Newton, commanding ofcer of NOSTRA. Newton said he was condent the recruits would continue to use their glasses after bootcamp. e recruits in Coast Guard Recruit Company Delta 186, the rst Coast Guard recruit training company to get issued the new frames, seemed to agree with Newton that the change from the S9, commonly referred to as BCGs or birth control glasses, was welcome by service members. I was pleasantly surprised when I showed up to boot camp and got issued the new glasses instead of the BCGs, said Seaman Recruit Ryan Jackson, 24, of Dayton, Ohio. eyre as stylish as my civilian glasses and just as comfortable. e nicknames for the 5A frames are already starting to y, and eyewear-dependent recruits from Delta 186 shared some of the more popular names, which include Supermans, Buddy Hollys, Hipsters, Beatnicks and Clark Kents, just to name a few. If the nickname is any indicator of popularity, these recruits are lucky to have come in at the right time. e 5A Supermans have saved them from the fate of the unattering, infamous BCGs. Leathernecks tour Okinawa Treading where their grandfathers could have been 67 years ago, the Marines stood atop a hill overlooking the sweeping Okinawan landscape. e air had a tinge of semblance to times past, but now from mountaintop to coastline a busy infrastructure buzzed; great change from the war-torn elds of yesteryear. Marines with the Command Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked on a day-long Battle of Okinawa tour throughout the southern part of the island, Apr. 17.e tour, held by Marine Corps Community Services, rst took the Marines to Kakazu Ridge, which proved in the spring of 1945 to be one of the bloodiest spots on Okinawa for U.S. Army and Marine Corps forces. e Marines were able to view bullet-pocked walls, deteriorating Japanese pill boxes and an entrance to the deadly Shuri lines, the Japaneses dugin network of heavily fortied positions. Following a tour of the Battle of Okinawa museum aboard Camp Kinser, the tour headed further south to the Japanese Naval Underground Headquarters where Imperial Navy Vice Admiral Minoru Ota, the commander of Japanese Naval forces on Okinawa, lived and operated out of during the battle. e Marines walked through the dank coral and limestone tunnels where a whirlwind of activity took place plotting defensive strategies against the oncoming American forces. is tour is so unique in that were getting hands-on experiences and perspectives of the past enemy and where they were, said Sgt. John Schier, assistant team leader with CE, 31st MEU. To be able to be inside a tunnel or bunker of the enemy exactly where they stood realizing they might not make it out alive adds a certain thrill to the tour. During the tour, Chris Majewski, the guide, delivered information and stories about the battle with precision and fervor that allowed the participants to envision the divisions of Marines landing on the beaches and advancing up the hills into Japanese defenses. If youre going to be in the military but not know your history, youre going to fall short, said Majewski. You can watch [HBO miniseries] e Pacic all day long, but to actually go to the sites and get bootson-the-ground experiences, it makes you better appreciate what our side went through. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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May 8 is National Teacher Day. In the s, my second grade teacher was Mrs. Lindberg. She told us that her husband was one of the Marines who raised the flag on Iwo Jima. I told my Marine vet dad, who he said he wasnt. It wasnt well known then that there were two flag raisings, as explained in Flags of Our Fathers. Fate made John Bradley, Renee Gagnon and Ira Hayes World War II icons. Chuck Lindberg is a footnote. Now thats a lesson. Pfc. Joel Santana Security Force Battalion New Brunswick, N.J. One thing I didnt like about some of my teachers is they did too much talking and not enough teaching. MA3 Lauren Atwood Security Force Battalion Aberdeen, Wash. I had a math teacher, Mr. Vulcom, who would come up with riddles to memorize equations and stamp assignments with a giant clam stamp. NNFB Troy McCracken USS West Virginia Blue Michigan Center, Mich. I was in band in high school, and my teacher was always very inspirational to me, even to this day. ET3 Dokyun Kim USS Wyoming Gold Palo Alto, Calif. I was a senior in high school. Math wasnt my best subject, but my teacher was like a mom to me and helped me a lot. PS1 Cynthia Rivera Fleet Logistics Command Jacksonville Accra, Ghana Dr. Butterscotch is an awesome instructor. He takes time before and after class to explain things. MM3 Zach Blakeman USS West Virginia Blue Rolling Prairie, Ind. I liked all my teachers. Probably the best one was my band teacher.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Explorer visits Navy ONR e famed ocean explorer and RMS Titanic discoverer visited the Ofce of Naval Research April 18 to discuss how hes using innovative tele-presence technology for both research and to energize youth about the sciences. Dr. Robert Ballard also known for locating several legendary shipwrecks as well as discovering deep-water hydrothermal vents gave a presentation titled, e Development of Tele-presence Technology in Support of Ocean Exploration and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education. Seeking to make sea oor exploration more ecient, Ballard conceptualized the idea of telepresence, which uses advanced robotics and high-bandwidth, ship-toshore communications for autonomous exploration. His latest program leverages tele-presence and is funded through an ONR-sponsored grant, Us ing the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as a Platform to Pursue the Naval STEM Work Force Strategic Approach. e program employs a multi-step method to propel students into the nations STEM professional pipeline. My passions are three things: developing advanced exploratory technology, thanks to [ONR]; using that technology to make discoveries; and then using the excitement of that exploration to turn kids on to science through the use of tele-presence technology Im after the jaw drop [reaction to the wonders of science], Ballard said. For several decades, Ballard has fostered students interest in STEM. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 9

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As Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit steamed south to New Orleans aboard the USS Wasp, many were adjusting to an aspect of the Marine Corps many know little about; life embarked on ship. Aboard ship, the day-to-day routine that many Marines are used to becomes something new and totally dierent from anywhere else, be it in garrison or deployed abroad. e narrow corridors and steep ladders that dene the interior of a ship are far from the biggest changes for many. For example, this is the furthest a number of the Marines have ever been out to sea. is is the rst time Ive been out on a real ship. Its kind of a surreal experience. When youre standing on the pier, its like, how does something this big oat, said Lance Cpl. Robert Sanders, a rieman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. e ship is nearly three football elds long at 844 feet and approximately 40,000 tons unloaded. Surrounded by miles and miles of empty oceans, some Marines are surprised by the calm. Its really peaceful out here. e waters nice, said Lance Cpl. Tyler Leishman, an ammo man with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. Its really pretty. Ive never been out so far before, said Lance Cpl. Dylan Swanzy, gunner with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. Some are nding it harder to adjust, though. Lance Cpl. Trisha Hunter, intelligence analyst with the 26th MEU, misses using her cell phone and having easy access to Internet service. Some are just adjusting to the dayto-day existence of the ship, with the ceaselessly moving decks and tight quarters in berthing or sleeping area. I thought itd be a lot more cramped. It could use a little more head room, but Ive slept in worse, Leishman said. Im used to having a three man room, not three bunk beds, said Sanders. For a few Marines, the back and forth movement of the ship can be more than a little nauseating. I got sick on the third day, but Ive been good since, said Cpl. Mark Gomez, maintenance management chief for the 26th MEU. I dont like the way the ship wobbles back and forth, said Hunter. You have to get used to the rocking, so walking is kind of weird, Sanders said. However, for most, its a new experience, and a new facet to the Marine Corps that many didnt expect to see. Its a whole new world, said Lance Cpl. David Anzualda, data network technician for 26th MEU. For Sta Sgt. Vincento Perez, radio chief for the 26th MEU, this will be the fourth time aboard ship with a Marine expeditionary unit. is is a tradition. From a Marine Corps perspective, I take pride in being aboard a ship, Perez said. e 26th MEU was to pull into port aboard the USS Wasp April 17. Marines adapt to life on shipSince 1986, he has created a series of educational outreach programs in STEM education that use tele-presence: the JASON Project, and Immersion Learning. Ballard is enthusiastic and knows how to capture the interest of young people and adults, said Joan Cleveland, acting deputy division director of ONRs Ocean Sensing and Systems Division. Oceanography is a good hook for getting students interested in science because they may be interested rst in a coral reef or a whale, but theyre going to have to learn some math and physics to pursue that interest. Recently, Ballard acquired E/V Nautilus and its advanced tele-presence technology to support the Americas Ocean Exploration program. e program uses the technology and E/V Nautilus Corps of Explorationa group of superstar scientists and engineers-to interest young people in STEM careers, as well as to discover deep-sea natural and cultural resources. e Corps of Exploration sta serves as role models, mentors and guides for young people. eir goal is to make STEM seem more applicable to the real world and less intimidating so that students are inspired to view science careers as achievable. Our unique approach, our philosophy is, dont sell science, sell scientists and engineers as role models, Ballard said. America, for better or for worse, is a star-based system, and children will always go after stars as role models. Were selling role models that kids can emulate. A pioneering scientist who has been at the forefront of deep submergence technology for investigating deep-ocean regions, he has completed more than 130 deep-sea expeditions. rough Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutes Deep Submergence Laboratory, he developed the remotely operated vehicle system Argo/Jason, which he used to locate the Titanic; the German battleship Bismarck, sunk during World War II; and the passenger liner Lusitania, torpedoed and sunk during World War I. Later, using ONRs breakthrough, small, manned submarine, Deep Submergence Vehicle Alvin, Ballard himself descended to the ocean oor to view the Titanic. Ballards association with ONR spans 45 years. It began when he became a scientic liaison ocer to ONRs Boston branch oce and was assigned to WHOI. He later created the Deep Submergence Laboratory in the Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering at WHOI, serving as a senior scientist. ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 30 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and more than 900 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,065 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.Ballard 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012

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Guided missile frigate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment recovered 89 bales of cocaine in support of Operation Martillo on April 20 in the Western Caribbean Sea. An SH-60B Sea Hawk assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 Det. 3, embarked on board Elrod responded after receiving a transmission from a P-3 operated by U.S. Customs Border Protection. Elrod joined in pursuit, along with authorities from Panama, as two 40foot twin-engine vessels tried to evade authorities in the waters of the Western Caribbean, resulting in the drugs being subsequently jettisoned into the sea. e Navy-Coast Guard response team recovered 89 bales of cocaine, weighing 4,840 pounds, with an estimated value of more than $362 million. I am very proud of the teamwork and collaborative eort between the ship, our air detachment and our USCG Law Enforcement Detachment, said Cmdr. Jack Killman, Elrods commanding ocer. Our mission is clear; to disrupt illicit tracking that jeopardizes the safety in the region and ultimately our own national security. is seizure is in addition to the 1,000 lbs. recovered by Elrod March 22. Operation Martillo Spanish for hammer is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation eort targeting illicit tracking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command. Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coordinated interagency regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transnational organized crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command joint and combined fullspectrum military operations. It does so by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. $362 mil in cocaine seized THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Navy College educational information

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 3, 2012 13 In conjunction with the 70th anniversary of the historic World War II aerial attack on Tokyo, a day-long tribute to Alameda-born and University of California-Berkeley graduate Gen. Jimmy Doolittle will take place at the USS Hornet Museum on May 5. e commemoration is a joint eort between the USS Hornet Museum in Alameda and e Jimmy Doolittle Air & Space Museum in Faireld, Calif. Although best known for planning and leading the raid over Tokyo during WWII, Doolittle also was a leader in the advancement of aviation technology. Among his lifes accomplishments: Assisted in the development of the artificial horizon and directional gyroscopes. Flew the rst transcontinental ight in less than 24 hours in a De Havilland DH-4 at age 26. Became the rst pilot to y an airplane relying solely on ight instruments. Received his Bachelors of Arts from UC Berkeley and his Masters and doctorate from MIT. On April 18, 1942, then Lt. Col. Doolittle led his Doolittle Raiders on an aerial attack of Japan. e Army Air Forces squadron consisted of 16 B-25 bombers, which took o from the aircraft carrier, Hornet (CV-8). Among the special guests paying tribute to Gen. Doolittle will be his son, John P. Doolittle, a retired Air Force Colonel, his granddaughter, Jonna Doolittle Hoppes, and three surviving members of the Doolittles Raiders, who will share their memories of Doolittle and the rst-ever launch of Army bombers into combat o an aircraft carrier. We are extremely honored to be the host for this special tribute to Gen. Jimmy Doolittle, said Randall Ramian, CEO of USS Hornet Museum. is special event also provides an opportunity for people to learn about the role the rst Hornet played in this historical event. Scheduled to attend are: Jonna Doolittle Hoppes A noted author and Doolittles granddaughter, Hoppes, will be giving a public presenta tion in the afternoon, after which she will sign her copies of her book Calculated Risk: The Extraordinary Life of Jimmy Doolittle. Hoppes is also the keynote speaker for the evening dinner event. Major Thomas Carson Griffin, Navigator, Plane 9 Grin was selected by Doolittle to go to the Pentagon to work on the maps to be used for the raid. Grin was forced to bail out over China and was rescued by Chinese civilians and returned to duty. Lt. Col. Edward Joseph Saylor, Engineer/gunner, Plane 15 While the squadron was being convoyed towards Japan on the Hornet CV-8, Saylor discovered that one of his planes engines had a serious problem. Knowing that the standing order was to push any nonfunctional plane overboard, he rounded up a Navy maintenance crew and together they removed and rebuilt the engine in time for takeo. e plane carried the squadrons only doctor, which could have made a critical difference to the mission. Sta Sgt. David J. atcher, Engineer/gunner, Plane 7 e famous Ruptured Duck atcher saved and defended his crew after a near-fatal crash into the sea o the China coast. For his heroism, he was awarded the Silver Star. Following this mission, he served in North Africa and England until July 1945. Other special speakers include crewmen from the Hornet CV-8, including: Lt. Cmdr. Richard Nowatzki As a young seaman fresh out of boot camp, Nowatzki was assigned to the USS Hornet (CV-8) before it was commissioned and remained part of her crew until she was sunk in combat in October 1942. He will share his many fond memories of the Doolittle Raiders. Lt. j.g. Oral Moore Moore joined the Navy when he was 18 years old and was part of the original Hornet CV-8 crew. In April 1942, he watched as the 16 Army B-25s were craned onto the ships flight deck and later watched as Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle and his 79 Raiders took off on their secret mission. Individuals involved with the Raiders in China, including: Lt. Col. Chu Chen As a teenager he witnessed and was involved in the rescue of the Doolittle Raiders who were forced to bail-out of their planes on the night of April 18, 1942. He went on to join the Republic of China Air Force and became a pilot in the elite Black Bat Squadron during the Cold War. John Fu Author and son of Lt. General Fu, Kei-Chin, Chinese Commander who was responsible for building 5 runways in China for the landing of the Doolittle Raiders B-25s on April 18, 1942. He is planning on giving a public presentation of his book Doolittles B-25 Raid in Chinese, in which he will present a summary in English. Fu is the director of Allied, Republic of China Air Force Connection project team and is organiz ing descendants of Chinese involved in the rescue/evacuation of all Raiders. It has been 70 years since the air raid on Tokyo and we hope that a new generation will join us in remembering and learning about Jimmy Doolittle. He had a special connection to Northern California, said Major General U.S. Air Force (Ret.) omas Kane, Executive Director of the Jimmy Doolittle Air & Space Museum. We are very excited by the plans for a new museum in Solano County that will be dedicated in his honor. He was a true pioneer in aviation history. Following the aerial attack, most of the B-25 crewmen who went down in China made it to safety with the help of Chinese civilians. However, the Chinese paid dearly for their assistance, as the Japanese killed an estimated 250,000 civilians while searching for Doolittles men. Some of the descendants of the Chinese families who helped rescue the Doolittle Raiders are attending and speaking. e Hornet was attacked and sunk just six months after the famous Doolittle mission. Its successor, the USS Hornet (CV-12) is now berthed in Alameda. e USS Hornet advanced its predecessors tradition of greatness both in war and as the recovery ship for the Apollo 11 lunar mission and today houses one of the Bay Areas most famous military and space history museums. Doolittles World War II raid celebrated F-35C Lightning strike-ghter joins Eglin squadron Navy personnel are busy preparing to teach the next generation of Sailors how to work with and y the newest military aircraft, the F-35C Lightening II Joint Strike Fighter, as Strike Fighter Squadron 101 (VFA-101) readied for its stand-up ceremony on Eglin Air Force Base May 1. e F-35 is a single seat, multirole ghter aircraft with the capability to perform ground attack, reconnaissance, and air defense missions. e aircraft is in full production at the Lockheed Martin plant in Fort Worth, Texas. e F-35 is designed to eventually replace the F/A-18 Hornet and AV-8B Harrier tactical ghter aircraft and was planned with a common design, but three unique service variants, to keep development, production, and operating costs down. is is brand new aircraft platform from tooth to tail, said Cmdr. Scott Kartvedt, commanding ocer of VFA-101. Were not parlaying o any Navy stealth legacy programs or support systems. is will be the rst new stealth and carrierbased tactical ghter aircraft since the introduction of the F/A-18 29 years ago. e original Fighter Squadron 101 (VF-101), nicknamed the Grim Reapers, was established May 1, 1952 and ew various models of ghter aircraft including the F-4 Phantom and F-14 Tomcat. With the retirement of the F-14, VF-101 was disestablished in 2005. To support the new Navy version of the F-35, VFA-101 will be reestablished May 1 at a new hangar and training facility on Eglin AFB and will serve as the Fleet Replacement Squadron, training pilots and maintainers for the eet. e rst Sailors to help stand up VFA-101 will receive Plank Owner certicates for their assistance with the new aircraft, new training facilities and redesignated squadron. As per Navy tradition, plank owners are individuals who were members of the crew of a ship when that ship was placed in commission. Im learning a lot and really enjoy working with other services, said Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Mirtha Martinez, Material Control Department leading chief petty ocer for the squadron. Id love to come back in ve years and see the squadron fully functioning. Marine Col. Arthur Tomassetti, vice commander of the 33rd Fighter Wing, said establishing a squadron to train and work with the F-35 aircraft has not been easy, but the leadership has taken charge and is working towards building the best facilities possible to work with this new aircraft. e concept was simple; establish an initial training center for pilots and maintainers for the F-35 weapon system, Tomassetti said. Bringing that concept to reality has been and will continue to be complicated and challenging. So the rst step is you start with the best people you can nd, put them together, and say go. Over the past twoand-one-half years, those carefully selected people have put together a strategy, developed plans, adapted to the dynamic and ever changing environment and schedule, and continued to track towards the goal of establishing a training center for F-35 pilots and maintainers. e mechanics of the Navy F-35 will initially be taught by Lockheed Martin personnel to Navy instructors, who will then begin teaching students after completing instructor certication. Students are expected to arrive for maintenance instruction in 2015, with the rst F-35s scheduled for deployment 20172018. e Navys version of the F-35, the C model is distinct from the F-35A and F-35B versions with larger wing surfaces and reinforced landing gear for greater control in the demanding carrier take-o and landing environment. Sailors in the majority of aviation rates are eligible to attend the F-35 course of instruction.