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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-19-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00249

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00249


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PAGE 1

Exhibits to be set up at Navy Exchange Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will hold an Earth Day Expo outside of the Navy Exchange on ursday, April 19. e expo is open to any one with base access and will run from noon to 4 p.m. Displays will highlight programs such as the base-wide recycling initiative, the bases ongoing initiative to switch from gas powered transportation ve hicles to electric powered, Youth Center programs such as the Garden, Earth, Naturalists Club and more. We are very excited about this event this year, said Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Master Chief Jimmy Schubert. It is imperative that we educate our service mem bers, families and base employ ees on the importance of pre serving our environment. Outside vendors with envi ronmental programs also will have displays. e event will include free giveaways, hands-on earth friendly activities and other fun activities for all ages of children and adults. Trident Ret Facility, with the help of Camden County Sher is Department and Recycling E-Scrap, will be collecting old unused prescription medica tions and used electronic equip ment. Any item using electricity that either plugs into the wall or uses batteries can be turned in for recycling free of charge, with the exception of tube-type televisions, which will have a at disposal fee of $20. Capt. Christopher Harkins relieves Capt. Eric HollowaySubmarine Squadron Twenty held a change-of-command ceremony aboard Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay, April 13. Capt. Christo pher L. Harkins relieved Capt. Eric Holloway as the Submarine Squad ron Twenty commodore. After receiving an introduc tion from Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, Holloway said he con siders the last year-and-a-half the pinnacle of his 25-year ca reer. What I will remember from my time here is not the individ ual successes and achievements of the crew, the inspections or the awards, Holloway said. It will be the people and the cama raderie, which are the foundation of our mission success. After Hollo way took command of the squadron in August 2010, the Powder Springs, Ga., native led his squadron of six Ohio-class bal listic missile submarines and 12 crews through 21 strategic deterrent patrols, 12 tactical evalu ations, nine engineering exami nations, seven nuclear weapons inspections and 15 supply inspections. For all of these external inNavy College survey criticalMilitary, spouse, civilian input will steer future options e Navy College Oce is now conducting its triennial education survey online. e survey will identify what higher education services Kings Bays active duty military members want both in the pres ent and in the future. It also will identify how the cur rent on-base schools and represen tatives are performing in providing their ser vices such as educational counseling, administrative ac cess, course oerings. e survey also will gather in formation on what active duty, spouses, civilian employees and local military retirees need to serve them in the future. e NCO requires everyones input to ensure it has the right information to nd the right schools, oering the right de grees and classes, at the right time, by the right delivery meth od for your needs and desires, while giving you the most credit for past schools and military training, and all for the right price. e survey can be accessed via the Internet from any computer. e Web address is pro vided through the following measures: Active duty Every com mand is being given one Web site handout per person. Ask your command master chief, chief of the boat or executive officer for more information. You can use a shipmates hand out to access the Web site. Spouses Every home in base housing is being given a Web site handout. April 28 and 29, every Navy Exchange and commissary patron is being given a handout. Come by the NCO for one and education info. Kings Bay Civilian Employees Same as for active duty. Ask you supervisor for more infor THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Our panel of animal experts speaks out Page 9 Anniversary A look at the sub forces celebration of 112 years Pages 6, 7 Camden visit The leadership council tours NSB Kings Bay Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com e vision for the 21st Century Assistant Secretary of Navy calls on NSB Kings Bay to discuss new initiativeAssistant Secretary of the Navy for Man power and Reserve Aairs visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay April 10 to host a town hall for service members stationed aboard the base. Juan M. Garcia III addressed more than 400 Sailors and Marines attending, dis cussing topics of important to many, including enlisted retention boards, tuition assistance and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. At a time of enormous change in the Navy and Marine Corps which includes a new budget, a new national defense strategy and signicant personnel policy changes, we need to address some pos sible misperceptions, give you the ground truth as we know it and hopefully allevi ate some anxiety, Garcia said. Second, were here to introduce this group of folks to the new 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative. More than anything, were here to thank you for the incredible work youre doing. e 21st Century Sailor and Marine Ini tiative has ve core areas: safety, physical tness, inclusion, readiness and continu um of service. ough Garcia addressed each of these topics, he focused on sub marine forces readiness and mission capabilities. From integrating female Sailors into the submarine force to tobacco cessation in all submarines, and the recent successful submerged launch of an unarmed Trident Sub Squadron 20 changes command ... Your ships collectively were found to be at or above fleet standards an impressive 95 percent of the time. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group Ten Sub Force onboard Earth Day Expo set for April 19

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Oce posted the new Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide on the NADAP Web site, of cials said April 5. e Navys zero-tolerance policy towards drug use is a key contribu tor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. is initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Ma rine personal readiness and build resiliency. e operating guide provides commands easy access to the proce dures of synthetic drug testing, said Dorice Favorite, director, NADAP. It is important that the samples are collected, documented and processed correctly. e operating guide will help units do that. Navy announced it would begin testing for synthetic drugs in NAV ADMIN 082/12, released March 12. According to the NAVADMIN, this testing is separate and distinct from the urinalysis program directed by OPNAVINST 5350.4D. Commanders may take appropri ate actions related to health, safety, and security based on a positive re sult. During scal year 2012 the Navy will invest $1.73 million to test for synthetic chemical compounds and expects to increase that amount to $2.9 million in scal year 2013. Synthetic chemical compound drug use impacts a Sailors career, their family life and overall well-be ing while also impacting Fleet readi ness. If a Sailor makes a poor choice and uses these types of drugs, they need to know there will be conse quences, emphasized Favorite. Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, including the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds, such as Spice, Favorite said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss begins May 10If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations. ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an eight-week nu trition and weight management course start ing 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 10. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 or 573-8626 for more informa tion on the program or to signup.USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to cel ebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Mary lands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cook-out at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slide show and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, (912) 882-4912 or (912) 2695034.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be avail able for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. Changes are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts custom er service policy changes to protect the commissary benet. e average coupon user might not notice the policy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary benet primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big us ers of coupons, as evidenced by De CAs consistent ranking among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemptions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon ac ceptance policy, it has been posted on the agencys Web site www.commissaries.com and on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/YourCommis ary. Key changes, which go into eect May 1, include: Gift cards will be issued to a customer in conjunction with cash whenever a transaction total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the transaction results in a neg ative balance) Gift cards will be issued to cus tomers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally pur chased with gift cards Gift cards will be issued to cus tomers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented Clarication for in-stances of suspected privilege abuse Update to the coupon accep tance policy that claries dot-scan barcode requirements and PIN requirements for unique number ing, that photocopies and counter feit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English e changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with oth er retailers practices and ensures DeCAs cash ow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benet that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover cer tain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. ese changes are in the best interest of all con cerned to help ensure that coupons continue to be a great source of sav ings for our customers. DeCA operates a worldwide chain of commissaries providing groceries to military personnel, retirees and their families in a safe and secure shopping environment. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5 percent sur charge, which covers the costs of building new commissaries and modernizing existing ones. Shop pers save an average of 32 percent on their purchases compared to commercial prices savings amounting to thousands of dollars annually. A core military family support ele ment, and a valued part of military pay and benets, commissaries con tribute to family readiness, enhance the quality of life for Americas military and their families, and help recruit and retain the best and bright est men and women to serve their country.Commissary changes coupon policy Camden County Fire Rescue announced that it is re cruiting volunteer reghters to be a part of the depart ment. e volunteer reghter program will be used to aug ment existing personnel to meet the needs of the com munity now and in the future. Recently, during an evaluation by the department, it was concluded that the current stang levels needed to be increased to meet future requirements set forth by the Insurance Services Oce. I am excited about getting the community involved with their re department, Camden County Fire Chief Dennis Gailey said. I really think this community cares about each other and that will prove to be a vital compo nent of the program. Visit the program Web site at www.co.camden.ga.us/ volunteer for the most current information. Contact Fire Rescue Headquarters at (912) 729-3911 for questions about this program.County seeks volunteer reghters Personnel Command Synthetic drug testing guide available

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Motivate yourself by getting startedMedically H-capped wins titleOur inaugural season of the Greybeard 30-and-over basketball came to an end March 29 in a seesaw title bout between two great contenders. Medically Handicapped of Medical won a tight 53-52 battle over e Fly Guys of Haz Mat in the championship game. ere were ve teams in the league, which was a great number for the rst season. e Bricklayers, Young at Heart and e Young Old Timers were the others. e league was started to give over-age-30 players an opportunity to participate competitively in a lunch-time league. It is setup in a 4-on-4 format with eight minute quar ters. ere are specic adaptations to the NCAA rules which makes the league very eective and ecient. I believe the league was a great success, and I look forward to getting it started up again. From the feedback I have received, I know that participants enjoyed it very much, and I hope to get more par ticipation the next time around. anks to all of my Greybeard participants, and I look forward to seeing you all out on the court again soon. Instead of giving myself reasons why I cant, I give myself reasons why I can. Anonymous I was teaching a class a few weeks ago about the basic principles of fitness. We discussed the recommended amount of cardiovascular exer cise, at least 150 minutes per week, coupled with strength training at least two days per week. We discussed the importance of flexibility training and increased daily activity. We talked about how exercise and a balanced diet go handin-hand and how through dedicated effort, anyone can achieve and maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle. When I asked the group if they had any questions, one gentle man asked, So, how do we nd the motivation to incorporate all this exer cise into our lives? I paused to think about how to answer him and quickly realized that his question presented a key piece of the puzzle, because without motivation, the likelihood of adopting healthy lifestyle habits is slim. It takes a high level of motivation to start an exercise program, and it takes even more to continue it long term. I do not think motivation can be taught. Rather the individual must have some intrinsic desire to exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet. It is unfor tunate that all too often we wait until we are negatively impacted by our unhealthy choices before we initiate change in our lives. Undesirable consequences can certainly generate the motivation needed to make a change. Similarly, desirable results once you commit to an exercise program will serve as motivators to continue. Sometimes, by simply getting started you will nd the motivation you seek. Once you start on exer cise program, you should be prepared for lapses in your motivation. ere will be times when you fall o the wagon or fall short of your goals. ere will be dis tractions and obstacles to overcome, and unforeseen circumstances to deal with. You will not be fully motivated all of the time, but being conscience of when your motivation starts to dwindle will allow you to make some changes to give it a boost. For example, changing up your routine, downloading some new workout music, buying a new exercise outt, training for an athletic event, or setting new goals can build momentum, helping you to break through the road blocks. Motivation is not always easy to nd. Sometimes you have to get started exercising even before motivation has kicked in. But once you do, it will not be long before you see and feel the rewards of tness. Having a strategy for staying motivated is essential, as is having a exible routine that allows you to make tness a priority and incorporate it into your everyday life. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Intramural Sports By Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator Sailors in the information systems technician and cryptologic technician networks ratings will have the opportunity to apply for enrollment in a cyber masters degree program at Naval Postgraduate School, according to NAVADMIN 117/12, re leased April 5. IT and CTN Sailors selected for the 12-month, Navy-funded program will be assigned as full time students at NPS starting in September 2012. Upon completion of the program, Sailors will re ceive a Master of Science degree in Cyber Systems and Operations: Security and Technology. Cyber security is an area of critical importance to our Navy and our nation, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk. Cyber expertise is essential in assuring the Navys warf ighting superiority across the full spectrum of opera tions. With this program, we are preparing our Sail ors to bring these ever-im portant capabilities to the Fleet. e Navy will select up to ve active duty and fulltime support Sailors to en roll in the program. Applicants must be an E-6 or above, possess a bachelor of science de gree in a relevant techni cal eld, hold or be eli gible for a TS/SCI security clearance, and be eligible for CONUS/shore assign ment between April and December 2012. NAVADMIN 117/12 out lines full eligibility criteria. Additionally, Sailors selected for the program will incur a ve-year active service obligation upon enrollment. After completion of their degree, Sailors will be as signed based on the needs of the Navy, with priority given to the National Se curity Agency, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Information Operations Command, and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command. Sailors interested in applying for this degree program should forward a written request via their commanding ocer by May 15. Additionally, Sailors must be conditionally ac cepted by NPS in order to be eligible. Detailed ap plication instructions are contained in the NAVAD MIN. Naval Postgraduate School education oppor tunities support the per sonal and professional growth of Sailors making them invaluable assets to the Navy. Navy needs cyber Sailors THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Theresa Farrell detonates a bomb at the Explosive Ordnance Disposal range. The Camden Leadership group poses for a picture at the Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic missile display at the end of the tour. Senior Chief Kevin Braun of Explosive Ordnance Disposal talks to the group about the various equipment used in the field. Camden Leadership visits Kings BayChief Michael Brandon explains the purpose and mission of the military working dog unit. Sgt. Thomas Browning from the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion observes Camden Leadership members, Dr. John Sheils and Sue Matricia as they shoot 9mm pistols at the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer. MA2 Theophilus Simmons watches as his military working dog K9 partner Don attacks MA3 Wesley Rodriguez. Photos by Kelly Wirfel

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Marines gathered in the Steel City for the National Society of Black Engineers 38th Annual Convention, establishing a gateway into the NSBE commu nity and strengthening the Corps connection with the American people. Although the partner ship between the two or ganizations is relatively young, the Corps pres ence during last months convention was power fully felt and appreciated. Any time you have a chance to work with peo ple who have such a profound impact on our daily lives its a great thing, said Dr. Carl B. Mack, NSBE Executive Director. Although the relationship is denitely in its infancy, the Marines have stepped up in huge ways to assist us in leading these young people in things like our Summer Engineering Ex perience for Kids. eyve proven they want to help us inuence this genera tion to pursue excellence. e Marine Corps will partner with NSBEs SEEK camp in San Diego this summer, to help expose African American kids to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathemat ics programs. Weve found something good here, said Maj. Gen. Melvin Spiese, Dep uty Commanding Gener al, I Marine Expeditionary Force; and Commanding General, 1st Marine Ex peditionary Brigade. e SEEK camp this summer will be a perfect chance to further entrench ourselves in this community. Master Sgt. Erica James, Marine Forces Reserve equal opportunity advisor, said she was humbled and honored to be a part of the NSBE event and to have the chance to inspire future leaders. I am amazed every time I speak to our young people, James said. I want them to know that not only are they speak ing, but I am listening and hearing. Sometimes that makes the dierence. No one should ever feel they are not good enough. ey should be continuously empowered with condence in what they have to oer. roughout the week, attendees had several op portunities to engage with Marines. ese included the Pre-College Initiative Graduating Senior Awards Banquet where Marines opened the oor for high school seniors to discuss leadership opportunities and service as important attributes in success; a Marine Corps booth at the NSBE career fair; and dur ing Spieses participation with a board of panelists discussing the importance of diversity and inclusion within business strategy. Overall, all Marines had one theme in mind pro fessional development and leadership. Marines also shared information about Marine Corps values and char acter. In fact, a Marine no longer in uniform even stepped up to share her story of success. Spiese was the senior Marine in attendance at this years NSBE confer ence. As he engaged stu dents at the PCI Graduating Seniors Awards Banquet, he focused on the goal of continuing to excel. e most important message Id like to pass on is for them to continue to excel, Spiese said. Every one of them has chosen an extremely dicult path in the things theyre pursu ing for their futures. ey need to stay on that path of challenging themselves. In doing that, they prove that they have what it takes to succeed. ese are the kind of young people wed like to lead our Marines. spections your ships collectively were found to be at or above eet standards an impressive 95-percent of the time, Tofalo said. A single Trident submarine is the sixth largest nuclear nation in the world all by itself. What all of you do here is so vitally impor tant, and the Submarine Squadron 20 team under Commodore Holloways leadership is squarely at the center this impressive mission. Submarine Squadron Twenty is responsible for the maintenance and op erations of ve Ohio-class ballistic missile subma rines; USS Alaska (SSBN 732), USS Tennessee (SSBN 734), USS Maryland (SSBN 738), USS Rhode Is land (SSBN 740) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). Rear Adm. John Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a sexual assault awareness proclamation onboard Naval Air Station Jackson ville, April 9. e decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual As sault Awareness Month and emphasizes the re gions commitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program. e signing coincides with National Sexual As sault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. e Navys Sexual As sault Prevention and Re sponse Program provides an opportunity for our in stallations to raise aware ness and to promote the prevention of sexual violence, Scorby said. Sex ual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communicate that we will not tolerate it. Prevention of sexual assault is every ones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE credential ing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual as sault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault aware ness and prevention ef forts, Mooney said. e Secretary of the Navy es tablished the Sexual As sault Prevention and Re sponse Oce in 2009 and it has signicantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAP RO hosted a SAPR summit with the primary focus of raising leaderships aware ness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention eorts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention eorts will have a signicant im pact on the eectiveness of the Navys overall ef forts. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual as sault, the Navy SAPR pro gram also focuses on sup porting victims. e Navy oers a variety of support services, including clini cal counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR vic tim advocate line. ese numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator located at the Fleet and Family Support Center to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at (877) 995-5247 or viawww. safehelpline.org. To nd out more about the Navys SAPR program, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit cnic. navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/Fleetand FamilyReadiness/Fami lyReadiness/FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ SexualAssaultPrevention andResponse/index.htm. Sailors of the Quarter Southeast Region targets sexual assault Squadron Marines meet Black Engineers

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mation. Retirees Same as for spouses, via the Navy Exchange and commis sary April 28 and 29. Come by the NCO for a copy and more information on education opportunities. e survey will take just a few minutes to com plete, can be accessed from any computer and is anonymous. We can track what groups want what degrees, but all comments are sep arated from any identify ing information, and no names are required. All information pro vided is anonymous and everyones participation is very much needed to en sure we have the right mix of quality, degrees, classes and modes of learning aboard Kings Bay. Navy bought John Hollands submarine April 11, 1900 e submarine force was born April 11, 1900 when the U.S. Navy bought the sub mersible Holland VI from John Holland. Since that historic day, undersea warf ighters and submarines have used forti tude and creativity to sustain their supe riority beneath the sea and develop the force into the indispensable asset that patrols world-wide today. As submariners celebrate their birth day around the world this month, they honor the heroes on eternal patrol and those who have served past and present. Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell, command er, Submarine Force U.S. Pacic Fleet, understands the value of submariners. For 112 years, the broad military advantages created by undersea conceal ment have resulted in a wide range of undersea platforms and missions that have enhanced our national security, Caldwell said. roughout history, what has re mained constant is the bold character of submariners. roughout the last 11 decades, submariners have advanced through four generations. e rst generation produced eet boats with the speed, endurance, weap ons and payload that wou0ld make the submarine a warghting platform. e second generation, dened by World War II heroes, made a decisive dierence in the war and dominated the seas which set high standards of perfor mance. e third generation of undersea war fare during the Cold War was dened by the advent of nuclear power in weap ons and propulsion. is advanced technology prevented a nuclear world war and secured the na tions interests. e current generation of submari ners, Generation IV, is being dened by the increase of long-range precision sen sors and weapons. Todays submariners stay ahead of these threats and work hard to preserve their superiority in the undersea environment with the help of the Design for Undersea Warfare a guiding document which articulates how undersea warf ighters provide Ready Forces, Eective Employment, and Future Forces. Vice Adm. John M. Richardson, com mander, Submarine Forces, recognizes the hard, outstanding work of submari ners and their families. I am incredibly proud of each and every member of the undersea warfare team, including our families who sacrice along with us, Richardson said. Just as earlier generations did before us, we fourth gen eration undersea warriors will be ready to surge to any crisis rst to arrive and last to leave. Let it always be a comforting reassurance to our friends and the worst nightmare for our enemies to know that the U.S. Submarine Force is on the job. Todays submarine force consists of 53 attack, 14 ballistic-missile and four guided-missile submarines that enable the Navy and the nation to win wars, deter wars, defeat terrorists, and ease disasters. Happy birthday U.S. Submarine Force and congratulations on 112 years of rich success running silent through history and running deep into the future. USS Holland was rst USS Holland, a 64-ton experimen tal submarine, was built at Elizabethport, New Jersey, to the design of sub marine pioneer John P. Holland. Its construction was a private ven ture of the John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co., and represented an alter native to the joint Navy-Holland venture that produced the unsuc cessful submarine Plunger of 1895. Launched in mid-May 1897 and completed early in the following year, Holland ran extensive trials during 1898 and 1899, undergoing constant modication as experience was gained with her. As a very interested party, the Navy followed the new submarines activities closely and, in April 1900, purchased it with funds provided under an 1896 authorization. Placed in commission as USS Hol land in October 1900, she was towed from Newport, Rhode Island, to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. With the exception of some four months at Newport in mid-1901, she primarily operated in the Chesa peake Bay area on training and de velopmental duty for the rest of the decade, based initially at Annapolis and, after mid-1905, at Norfolk, Va. Holland was always an experi mental vessel, though she was the Navys rst reasonably satisfactory submarine and a great achievement in the development of undersea warfare. New submarines were soon pro duced that overcame many of her deciencies, and by 1910 she was thoroughly obsolete. USS Holland was stricken from the Navy Register in November of that year and sold for scrapping in June 1913. Throughout history, what has remained constant is the bold character of submariners. Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell Commander, Sub Force PacificSubmarine Force marks 112th anniversary Survey e chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba took exception with defense lawyers character izations of proceedings on the base as being done without the protections of the U.S. Constitution. Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins told a small news conference at the base that the reformed military commissions provide the protections of the U.S. Constitution and will fol low the procedures of U.S. federal courts and military courts martials. All ocials in the fed eral government have an obligation within their areas of responsibility to help fulll these requirements, which are among the fundamental guarantees of fairness and justice demanded by our values, Martins said. Martins spoke at the conclusion of a hearing on motions made for the trial of alleged Cole bombing mastermind Abd al-Ra him Hussein Mohammed Abdu al-Nashiri. e bombing killed 17 U.S. sailors and wounded 39 in Aden, Yemen in Oc tober 2000. Al-Nashiri is charged with capital crimes and could be put to death if found guilty. is tinges every decision the commission makes. Defense motions ques tioned the prosecution on constitutional grounds, including that the charges violate the equal protec tion clause, that it was charging him under an ex post facto law, and that it was a bill of attainder. Trial judge Army Col. James Pohl denied all. He further denied a request for all documents given to the defense team be trans lated into Arabic. ere are more than 70,000 pages to date. e judge granted more time for the defense to present him with a theory of the case, their request for a Yemeni investigator, letters asking for Yemeni evidence and a motion asking for the amount of money and resources the government has expend ed on this prosecution. Martins said the scene in the Guantanamo Bay courtroom proved the ad versarial nature of Ameri can jurisprudence was alive and healthy in the reformed military com missions program. Contrary to dark sug gestions of some whose minds appear already made up to oppose military commissions regardless of how they are con ducted, these protections are implemented by ocers, I submit, are worthy of the public trust, Mar tins said. In the news conference, Martins listed the rights Al-Nashiri has. e de fendant is innocent until proven guilty. He has the right to present evidence, the right to cross-examine witnesses and compel the appearance of witnesses in his defense. e U.S. government has provided more than $100,000 to fund defense requests, which include a full time investigator, a translator and four lawyers two military and two civilian.Cole bombing trial stays at Gitmo court 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Submariners past and present, and distin guished guests gathered at the National Cemetery of the Pacic in Honolulu April 11, to commemorate 112 years of submarine service. e event was spon sored by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Bown Base Subvets. USSVI was founded in 1965 by a group of U.S. World War II submarine veterans. e submarine force was born April 11, 1900, when the U.S. Navy bought the submersible Holland VI from John Holland. Todays submarine force consists of 53 attack, 14 ballistic-missile and four guided-missile submarines that enable the Navy and the nation to win wars, deter wars, defeat terror ists and ease disasters. roughout the years many submariners made history, became heroes and paid the ultimate sac rice for their country. Today we are going to remember our shipmates and gather strength in knowing all they sacri ced and all they accomplished, said Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell, com mander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. As we gather here at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacic, we remember those who have been hon ored at memorial ceremo nies here, and we remem ber those who lay here in their nal resting place. Among the souls here are those who served in all branches of our Armed Forces. Among the souls here are those who served in all facets of our Navy. Among the souls here are those who went down to the sea in submarines. And on our 112th birth day, it is tting to remem ber all who have gone before and to remember those who rest here,. Following his remarks a rededication of the sub marine memorial plaque took place. e plaque honors the contribution of the many men and wom en who served with and supported the submarine force during the last 112 years as well as the 52 sub marines that are on eter nal patrol. e plaque rededication has been an April 11 an nual event sponsored by USSVI Bown Base Sub vets since the dedication in April 2000. It is a great honor to be here today as it is ev ery April 11th, to remem ber and pay tribute to the greatest submarine force in the world, said retired Master Chief Electricians Mate Chris Cunha, USS VI Bown Base Subvets. e submarine memorial plaque means so much to submariners, active duty and retired, that this ceremony is very neces sary and will continue for many years to come. A special bell tolling ceremony commenced to perpetuate the memory of the submariners and the 52 submarines lost in World War II and since. Each submarine name was acknowledged followed by a bell toll in re membrance of their sacri ces for our nation. A 21-gun salute fol lowed by the playing of Taps and retiring of the colors closed out the cer emony. Ceremony honors day II D5 missile aboard USS Tennessee (SSB 734), Gar cia said the force already is leading the way in many of the areas covered by the 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative. e Navy is executing an incredibly broad mis sion set, Garcia said. In one week, the submarine force helped in Operation Tomodachi to prevent an apocalyptic meltdown of a nuclear reactor in Ja pan. USS Florida was o the coast of Libya during Operation Odyssey Dawn to stop a ruthless dictator from massacring his own people. Two submarines were sent to the polar cap to understand the implications of global warming. No other Navy in the world has the skill or ability to do this at one time. Cpl. Joshua Derrick of Kings Bays Marine Corps Security Force Battalion said the town hall was posi tive and did put to rest many of his concerns, primarily about retirement benets. Hearing that current active-duty Marines will receive a grandfather clause to their retirement benets is a huge relief to me and my family, Der rick said. If the retirement pay was changed from what I was initially prom ised, it would make me give some serious thought to leaving the Corps when its time to re-enlist. Machinists Mate 2nd Class Rodney Burnett of USS Maryland (SSBN 738) said he appreciated Garcia tak ing time to discuss the future goals and plans of the Navy based on the lessons learned from the last decade. e initiatives in the 21st century model helped in my decision to re-enlist recently, said Burnett, who had read about the initiative before recom mitting to the Navy. Ive been in since 2008, and the Navy is a long-term ca reer option for me, so Im very interested in the ben ets and compensations the Navy can oer me. e 21st Century Sail or and Marine Initiative consolidates a set of ob jectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most combat-eective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.Garcia THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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I had the chance to tour the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian Clinic last week. Its a great place with a really great staff. Naturally, the conversation rolled around to one of my favorites, animals. I just had to know what was the favorite animal of each member of the clinics staff. Me? Well, I cant decide if I like dogs or cats more. I love chickens, pigs and shrimp for my own selfish reasons. For this, Ill say hummingbirds. Its always a pleasant diver sion when a hummingbird visits the feeder on my deck. Major Chris Corrie Veterinarian Daytona Beach, Fla. I grew up with dogs, cats, snakes and taran tulas and have rehabbed wildlife. I like them all. Michelle Lee Noska Animal Health Technician Saugus, Mass. A Thoroughbred, because theyre a foun dation breed and very talented. Dr. Jennifer Bolduc Veterinarian Auburn, Maine A cat. They each have their own unique personality. Crystal Williamson Animal Health Technician Dover, Del. A Great Dane. I love them because theyre gentle giants and extremely loyal. PFC. Brianne Gossman NAF employee supervisor Forest City, Iowa A German Shepherd. Theyre intelligent, friendly and make good working or family dogs. Cassie Harwood Receptionist Shelby, Ohio A Quarter Horse. Theyre versatile and you can use them for rodeos and bar rel racing.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Com mand ocials acknowl edged April 12 that U.S. sys tems detected and tracked a launch of a North Korean TaepoDong-2 missile. e missile was tracked on a southerly launch over the Yellow Sea, said a state ment issued from Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Initial indications are that the missiles rst stage fell into the sea 102.5 miles west of Seoul, South Ko rea, the statement says. e other two stages were assessed to have failed and no debris fell on land. At no time were the missile or resulting debris a threat, it says. Despite the failure of its attempted missile launch, White House Press Secretary Jay Car ney said in a statement to night, North Koreas pro vocative action threatens regional security, violates international law and con travenes its own recent commitments. e action is not surpris ing given North Koreas pattern of aggressive be havior, he added, but any missile activity by North Korea is of concern to the international community. A spokesman for the Korean Committee for Space Technology announced March 16 that North Ko rea would launch a longrange Unha-3 rocket be tween April 12 and 16. He said the rocket would carry a North Ko rean-made Kwangmyongsong-3 polar-orbiting observation satellite to mark the 100th birthday of the late President Kim Il Sung on April 15. North Korean missile tracked THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your chil dren? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partic ipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 24. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separat ing, retiring or contemplating leav ing the military that provides infor mation on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retire ment. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 23The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs will be at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 23. For more information, con tact at 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an inter active program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher education, focusing on financial aid resources, college sav ings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 25. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guide lines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is 9 a.m. to noon, April 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is host ing Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and sup port the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of every day life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples abil ity to understand one another bet ter and communicate on a more intimate level. This new class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 27. To register call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets April 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are avail able to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speak ers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 26. To regis ter, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 25Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 25. It can help you identify the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transi tion, employment and more. If you want to learn more or contribute your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional infor mation or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more infor mation, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or class room and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presenta tions to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty per sonnel. FFSC workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Information, Tickets and Travel has moved. Check out the new location at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Adven ture Center, which is home to Navy Outdoor Recreation and ITT. Everyone is invited to at tend an open house 2 to 5 p.m., ursday, April 26. ere will be giveaways, vendors and dis counts on all rental items. Need more in formation? Call (912) 573-2289 or (912) 573-8103. Motherload of Comedy this event is at 8 p.m., Thursday, May 3. Its afree show at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Featured per formers are Chris Killian (www. ckcomedy.com) and Richie Holliday (www.richieholliday. com) For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served. Beverages will be avail able for purchase. Need more information? Call (912) 5734548. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 5739492. Moms Bowl for Free From 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, May 13all moms, young and old, can bowl for free at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Shoes are not included. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Swim Lessons Lessons begin May 14 at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense autho rized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Un der the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great mov ie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Its for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 23 through August 13. Signup began now for SAC and sin gle/dual military. A morn ing snack, lunch and after noon snack will be provided. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon, April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids ITTs open house April 26 Liberty call THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13 College classes helpful A Sailor from Naval Air Station Jacksonville is tak ing advantage of the many opportunities for higher education oered by the Navy. Aviation Boatswains Mate 1st Class Nnamdi Emenogu has only four classes left to complete before earning his bachelors degree in Public Health from the American Military University. Emenogu has been in the Navy for a little more than nine years and said his chain of command has always supported his pur suit of educational goals and helped him to keep on course. Emenogu had not tak en any classes before he joined the Navy and cred its all of his success to the programs available to Sail ors through the Navy Col lege Program. I knew that the Navy provided great schooling opportunities without the hassle of student loans, Emenogu said. I just had to get it done. e Navy College Pro grams mission is to pro vide continual academic support to Sailors while they pursue a technical or college degree, regardless of their location or duty station. I started o taking Navy College Program for Aoat College Education cours es while at sea, and when I needed a greater variety of courses the Navy Col lege Oce helped me dis cover tuition assistance, Emenogu said. Vicki OToole, director of the Navy College Oce NAS Jacksonville, helped guide Emenogu down the appropriate path towards his ultimate goal of earning a degree. ABH1 [Emenogu] is a wonderful example of a Sailor who sets a goal and who pays attention to what is available through the Navy College Oce to develop himself person ally and professionally, OToole said. While maintaining a 3.74 grade point average, Emenogu was awarded Naval Air Station Jackson ville Sailor of the Year hon ors and promoted to the rank of rst class petty of cer. It has taken him less time to earn a degree be cause he used his Sailor/ Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript, or SMART. SMART documents the amount of American Council on Education col lege credit recommended for military training and occupational experience that Sailors receive through their career. SMART is an academically accepted record that is validated by ACE with the primary purpose of helping service members obtain college credit for their military experience. Emenogu said through SMART, he obtained 12 college credits toward completion of his degree. Lots of time and mon ey was saved, he said. I didnt have to take four classes because it was al ready in my record, so I absolutely recommend taking advantage of the program. Petty Ocer Emenogus o duty edu cation has directly con tributed to the readiness of NAS Jacksonvilles Air Operations Department, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael Chan, NAS Jacksonville operations ocer. It has made him a better Sailor, and more importantly a better leader. is sets the example for his peers and junior Sailors. He con veys the message that its possible to earn a degree while still performing their duties at a high level. As a leader and mentor, completing his degree will only reinforce the impor tance and need for higher education. Emenogu said he will later pursue a masters. I feel a great sense of accomplishment and I see myself as a role model for those Sailors who think the task is too daunting to tackle. I have no intention of stopping here. Once I earn my bachelors, my next step will be enrolling into a masters program, Emenogu said. I recom mend that all Sailors take advantage of these great opportunities oered by the Navy to further their education. He said hopes to mo tivate fellow Sailors to advance their careers through education. Professionally, earning a degree creates more opportunities for a diverse career path, Emenogu said. I would like to be come a commissioned ocer in the Navy and some day become a public health ocial in the civil ian sector. Dr. Mary Redd-Clary, director of the Navy Col lege Program at the Center for Personal and Profes sional Development, said it is common for Sailors to join the Navy without any higher education but with the goal of working toward a degree while in the ser vice. At any given time, approximately 20 percent of active duty Sailors are using a Navy College Pro gram resource to help fund their education goals, she said. To help Sailors maximize their education benets, Navy College Program education pro fessionals advise Sail ors on programs such as tuition assistance and SMART. A Sailors local Navy College Oce, or the Vir tual Education Center, is a great resource for helping plan out his or her edu cation journey. is plan includes a review of the SMART and development of an Individual Education Plan tailored to them, she said. CPPDs volun tary education program is a conduit for equipping Sailors with strong analytical skills, the ability to make informed decisions, and avenues to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. Were dedicated to helping each and every Sailor develop to his or her full est potential. e world today is less violent but also more dan gerous than at any other time inhuman history, the nations senior military of cer told a Harvard Uni versity audience April 13. at counterintuitive combination of peace and potential conict is the essence of what I like to call the security para dox, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, told the audience attending a John F. Kennedy School of Government forum in Cambridge, Mass. Although geopolitical trends are ushering in greater levels of peace and stability worldwide, destructive technologies are available to a wider and more disparate pool of adversaries, Dempsey said. In the past, the gen eral noted, it took a nations power to create a national security threat: industrial progress fueled the world wars, and the threat of mutually assured destruction between superpowers kept the Cold War from getting too hot. Today, the same rise in global trade and information technology that has increased cooperation and cut violence between nations also has put 21st century weapons in reach of smaller groups, the chairman said. More people have the ability to harm us or deny us the ability to act than at any point in my life and thats the security para dox, he said. While in the past only the United States could drop a bomb down a chimney, now dozens of middleweight militaries around the world have that [precision munitions] capability, he said. Potential adversaries now can buy o-theshelf more than 90 per cent of the components needed to build an elec tronic warfare system. at creates a risk to the very systems that provide our battleeld edge: our computer networks, our sensors, and our preci sion navigation ability, he said. Cyber attack is an other evolving threat that doesnt require a large military to launch it. With the right comput er virus, a single person can disrupt life for an entire city, and potentially even our entire nation, he added. The mes sage is that the margin of error is growing smaller, the chairman warned. e U.S. military must counter these new and elusive threats even as its budget shrinks. e Defense Department strategy balances cost, force struc ture, mission and risk. e strategy aims for a force with fewer service mem bers, greater agility and more powerful technol ogy, he added. e Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps need to meld serviceunique strengths to build capabilities that dont exist unless theyre com bined, the general said. e force will be region ally postured but globally networked, scaled and scoped to demand. e security paradox presents a dicult chal lenge, Dempsey said. But challenges are nothing new to this nation, he said. We have adapted and re-invented ourselves many times throughout our history. United State faces security paradox



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Exhibits to be set up at Navy Exchange Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will hold an Earth Day Expo outside of the Navy Exchange on ursday, April 19. e expo is open to anyone with base access and will run from noon to 4 p.m. Displays will highlight programs such as the base-wide recycling initiative, the bases ongoing initiative to switch from gas powered transportation vehicles to electric powered, Youth Center programs such as the Garden, Earth, Naturalists Club and more. We are very excited about this event this year, said Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Master Chief Jimmy Schubert. It is imperative that we educate our service members, families and base employees on the importance of preserving our environment. Outside vendors with environmental programs also will have displays. e event will include free giveaways, hands-on earth friendly activities and other fun activities for all ages of children and adults. Trident Ret Facility, with the help of Camden County Sheris Department and Recycling E-Scrap, will be collecting old unused prescription medications and used electronic equipment. Any item using electricity that either plugs into the wall or uses batteries can be turned in for recycling free of charge, with the exception of tube-type televisions, which will have a at disposal fee of $20. Capt. Christopher Harkins relieves Capt. Eric HollowaySubmarine Squadron Twenty held a change-of-command ceremony aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, April 13. Capt. Christo pher L. Harkins relieved Capt. Eric Holloway as the Submarine Squad ron Twenty commodore. After receiving an introduction from Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, Holloway said he considers the last year-and-a-half the pinnacle of his 25-year career. What I will remember from my time here is not the individual successes and achievements of the crew, the inspections or the awards, Holloway said. It will be the people and the camaraderie, which are the foundation of our mission success. After Hollo way took command of the squadron in August 2010, the Powder Springs, Ga., native led his squadron of six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and 12 crews through 21 strategic deterrent patrols, 12 tactical evaluations, nine engineering examinations, seven nuclear weapons inspections and 15 supply inspections. For all of these external inNavy College survey criticalMilitary, spouse, civilian input will steer future options e Navy College Oce is now conducting its triennial education survey online. e survey will identify what higher education services Kings Bays active duty military members want both in the present and in the future. It also will identify how the current on-base schools and represen tatives are performing in providing their services such as educational counseling, administrative access, course oerings. e survey also will gather information on what active duty, spouses, civilian employees and local military retirees need to serve them in the future. e NCO requires everyones input to ensure it has the right information to nd the right schools, oering the right degrees and classes, at the right time, by the right delivery method for your needs and desires, while giving you the most credit for past schools and military training, and all for the right price. e survey can be accessed via the Internet from any computer. e Web address is provided through the following measures: Active duty Every command is being given one Web site handout per person. Ask your command master chief, chief of the boat or executive officer for more information. You can use a shipmates handout to access the Web site. Spouses Every home in base housing is being given a Web site handout. April 28 and 29, every Navy Exchange and commissary patron is being given a handout. Come by the NCO for one and education info. Kings Bay Civilian Employees Same as for active duty. Ask you supervisor for more inforTHEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Our panel of animal experts speaks out Page 9 Anniversary A look at the sub forces celebration of 112 years Pages 6, 7 Camden visit The leadership council tours NSB Kings Bay Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com e vision for the 21st Century Assistant Secretary of Navy calls on NSB Kings Bay to discuss new initiativeAssistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Aairs visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay April 10 to host a town hall for service members stationed aboard the base. Juan M. Garcia III addressed more than 400 Sailors and Marines attending, discussing topics of important to many, including enlisted retention boards, tuition assistance and the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. At a time of enormous change in the Navy and Marine Corps which includes a new budget, a new national defense strategy and signicant personnel policy changes, we need to address some possible misperceptions, give you the ground truth as we know it and hopefully alleviate some anxiety, Garcia said. Second, were here to introduce this group of folks to the new 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative. More than anything, were here to thank you for the incredible work youre doing. e 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative has ve core areas: safety, physical tness, inclusion, readiness and continuum of service. ough Garcia addressed each of these topics, he focused on submarine forces readiness and mission capabilities. From integrating female Sailors into the submarine force to tobacco cessation in all submarines, and the recent successful submerged launch of an unarmed Trident Sub Squadron 20 changes command ... Your ships collectively were found to be at or above fleet standards an impressive 95 percent of the time. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group Ten Sub Force onboard Earth Day Expo set for April 19

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Oce posted the new Synthetic Drug Testing Operating Guide on the NADAP Web site, ofcials said April 5. e Navys zero-tolerance policy towards drug use is a key contributor to the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine. is initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness and build resiliency. e operating guide provides commands easy access to the procedures of synthetic drug testing, said Dorice Favorite, director, NADAP. It is important that the samples are collected, documented and processed correctly. e operating guide will help units do that. Navy announced it would begin testing for synthetic drugs in NAVADMIN 082/12, released March 12. According to the NAVADMIN, this testing is separate and distinct from the urinalysis program directed by OPNAVINST 5350.4D. Commanders may take appropriate actions related to health, safety, and security based on a positive result. During scal year 2012 the Navy will invest $1.73 million to test for synthetic chemical compounds and expects to increase that amount to $2.9 million in scal year 2013. Synthetic chemical compound drug use impacts a Sailors career, their family life and overall well-being while also impacting Fleet readiness. If a Sailor makes a poor choice and uses these types of drugs, they need to know there will be consequences, emphasized Favorite. Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, including the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds, such as Spice, Favorite said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss begins May 10If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations. ShipShape is your answer. ShipShape is an eight-week nutrition and weight management course starting 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 10. Take the next step and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 or 573-8626 for more information on the program or to signup.USS Maryland marks 20 in JuneJoin past and present crew members to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the USS Marylands (SSBN 738) commissioning, June 13 to 17, with the following schedule of events: Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. casual meet and greet at the NEW Wee Pub, in the Kings Bay Shopping plaza to the Left of Goodys. ursday, June 14 6 p.m. poolside cook-out at Cumberland Inn & Suites. Friday, June 15 6 p.m. dinner at Borrell Creek restaurant. Slide show and guest speaker. Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. submarine tour, subject to change. For more information, contact Ed Caudill at Chaser1@tds.net, (912) 882-4912 or (912) 2695034.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. Changes are on the way in how commissaries handle coupons and product returns without receipts, among other things, as the Defense Commissary Agency enacts customer service policy changes to protect the commissary benet. e average coupon user might not notice the policy changes because they are aimed at preventing possible misuse of the commissary benet primarily using coupons to get large amounts of cash back, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Commissary shoppers are big users of coupons, as evidenced by DeCAs consistent ranking among the top 10 grocery retailers in coupon redemptions over the past several years. Commissaries welcome coupon usage, and to acquaint customers with the changes in the coupon acceptance policy, it has been posted on the agencys Web site www.commissaries.com and on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/YourCommis ary. Key changes, which go into eect May 1, include: Gift cards will be issued to a customer in conjunction with cash whenever a transaction total reflects $25 or more is owed to the customer due to coupon overages (when the face value of the coupon exceeds the selling price of the item purchased and the transaction results in a negative balance) Gift cards will be issued to customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is presented showing the merchandise was originally pur chased with gift cards Gift cards will be issued to customers, in conjunction with cash, for refunds of $25 or more when a receipt is not presented Clarication for in-stances of suspected privilege abuse Update to the coupon accep tance policy that claries dot-scan barcode requirements and PIN requirements for unique number ing, that photocopies and counterfeit coupons are not accepted, and that coupons must be printed in English e changes harness the scope of the new commissary gift card, which has been in use since last summer. Available only in denominations of $25 and $50, issuing gift cards as an alternative to paying out large sums of cash brings DeCA in line with other retailers practices and ensures DeCAs cash ow is not adversely impacted. Amounts under $25 will be in cash. Commissaries are providers of a benet that sell groceries at cost, and using the gift cards to cover certain refunds and coupon overages discourages practices contrary to DeCAs mission, Jeu noted. We value coupon usage because it helps our customers boost their savings, Jeu said. ese changes are in the best interest of all concerned to help ensure that coupons continue to be a great source of savings for our customers. DeCA operates a worldwide chain of commissaries providing groceries to military personnel, retirees and their families in a safe and secure shopping environment. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5 percent surcharge, which covers the costs of building new commissaries and modernizing existing ones. Shoppers save an average of 32 percent on their purchases compared to commercial prices savings amounting to thousands of dollars annually. A core military family support element, and a valued part of military pay and benets, commissaries contribute to family readiness, enhance the quality of life for Americas military and their families, and help recruit and retain the best and brightest men and women to serve their country.Commissary changes coupon policy Camden County Fire Rescue announced that it is recruiting volunteer reghters to be a part of the department. e volunteer reghter program will be used to augment existing personnel to meet the needs of the community now and in the future. Recently, during an evaluation by the department, it was concluded that the current stang levels needed to be increased to meet future requirements set forth by the Insurance Services Oce. I am excited about getting the community involved with their re department, Camden County Fire Chief Dennis Gailey said. I really think this community cares about each other and that will prove to be a vital component of the program. Visit the program Web site at www.co.camden.ga.us/ volunteer for the most current information. Contact Fire Rescue Headquarters at (912) 729-3911 for questions about this program.County seeks volunteer reghters Personnel Command Synthetic drug testing guide available

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Motivate yourself by getting startedMedically H-capped wins titleOur inaugural season of the Greybeard 30-and-over basketball came to an end March 29 in a seesaw title bout between two great contenders. Medically Handicapped of Medical won a tight 53-52 battle over e Fly Guys of Haz Mat in the championship game. ere were ve teams in the league, which was a great number for the rst season. e Bricklayers, Young at Heart and e Young Old Timers were the others. e league was started to give over-age-30 players an opportunity to participate competitively in a lunch-time league. It is setup in a 4-on-4 format with eight minute quarters. ere are specic adaptations to the NCAA rules which makes the league very eective and ecient. I believe the league was a great success, and I look forward to getting it started up again. From the feedback I have received, I know that participants enjoyed it very much, and I hope to get more participation the next time around. anks to all of my Greybeard participants, and I look forward to seeing you all out on the court again soon. Instead of giving myself reasons why I cant, I give myself reasons why I can. Anonymous I was teaching a class a few weeks ago about the basic principles of fitness. We discussed the recommended amount of cardiovascular exercise, at least 150 minutes per week, coupled with strength training at least two days per week. We discussed the importance of flexibility training and increased daily activity. We talked about how exercise and a balanced diet go handin-hand and how through dedicated effort, anyone can achieve and maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle. When I asked the group if they had any questions, one gentleman asked, So, how do we nd the motivation to incorporate all this exercise into our lives? I paused to think about how to answer him and quickly realized that his question presented a key piece of the puzzle, because without motivation, the likelihood of adopting healthy lifestyle habits is slim. It takes a high level of motivation to start an exercise program, and it takes even more to continue it long term. I do not think motivation can be taught. Rather the individual must have some intrinsic desire to exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet. It is unfortunate that all too often we wait until we are negatively impacted by our unhealthy choices before we initiate change in our lives. Undesirable consequences can certainly generate the motivation needed to make a change. Similarly, desirable results once you commit to an exercise program will serve as motivators to continue. Sometimes, by simply getting started you will nd the motivation you seek. Once you start on exercise program, you should be prepared for lapses in your motivation. ere will be times when you fall o the wagon or fall short of your goals. ere will be distractions and obstacles to overcome, and unforeseen circumstances to deal with. You will not be fully motivated all of the time, but being conscience of when your motivation starts to dwindle will allow you to make some changes to give it a boost. For example, changing up your routine, downloading some new workout music, buying a new exercise outt, training for an athletic event, or setting new goals can build momentum, helping you to break through the road blocks. Motivation is not always easy to nd. Sometimes you have to get started exercising even before motivation has kicked in. But once you do, it will not be long before you see and feel the rewards of tness. Having a strategy for staying motivated is essential, as is having a exible routine that allows you to make tness a priority and incorporate it into your everyday life. Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Intramural Sports By Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator Sailors in the information systems technician and cryptologic technician networks ratings will have the opportunity to apply for enrollment in a cyber masters degree program at Naval Postgraduate School, according to NAVADMIN 117/12, released April 5. IT and CTN Sailors selected for the 12-month, Navy-funded program will be assigned as full time students at NPS starting in September 2012. Upon completion of the program, Sailors will receive a Master of Science degree in Cyber Systems and Operations: Security and Technology. Cyber security is an area of critical importance to our Navy and our nation, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk. Cyber expertise is essential in assuring the Navys warfighting superiority across the full spectrum of operations. With this program, we are preparing our Sailors to bring these ever-important capabilities to the Fleet. e Navy will select up to ve active duty and fulltime support Sailors to enroll in the program. Applicants must be an E-6 or above, possess a bachelor of science degree in a relevant technical eld, hold or be eligible for a TS/SCI security clearance, and be eligible for CONUS/shore assignment between April and December 2012. NAVADMIN 117/12 outlines full eligibility criteria. Additionally, Sailors selected for the program will incur a ve-year active service obligation upon enrollment. After completion of their degree, Sailors will be assigned based on the needs of the Navy, with priority given to the National Security Agency, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet, Navy Information Operations Command, and Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command. Sailors interested in applying for this degree program should forward a written request via their commanding ocer by May 15. Additionally, Sailors must be conditionally accepted by NPS in order to be eligible. Detailed application instructions are contained in the NAVADMIN. Naval Postgraduate School education opportunities support the personal and professional growth of Sailors making them invaluable assets to the Navy. Navy needs cyber Sailors THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Theresa Farrell detonates a bomb at the Explosive Ordnance Disposal range. The Camden Leadership group poses for a picture at the Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic missile display at the end of the tour. Senior Chief Kevin Braun of Explosive Ordnance Disposal talks to the group about the various equipment used in the field. Camden Leadership visits Kings BayChief Michael Brandon explains the purpose and mission of the military working dog unit. Sgt. Thomas Browning from the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion observes Camden Leadership members, Dr. John Sheils and Sue Matricia as they shoot 9mm pistols at the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer. MA2 Theophilus Simmons watches as his military working dog K9 partner Don attacks MA3 Wesley Rodriguez. Photos by Kelly Wirfel

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 5 Marines gathered in the Steel City for the National Society of Black Engineers 38th Annual Convention, establishing a gateway into the NSBE community and strengthening the Corps connection with the American people. Although the partnership between the two organizations is relatively young, the Corps presence during last months convention was powerfully felt and appreciated. Any time you have a chance to work with people who have such a profound impact on our daily lives its a great thing, said Dr. Carl B. Mack, NSBE Executive Director. Although the relationship is denitely in its infancy, the Marines have stepped up in huge ways to assist us in leading these young people in things like our Summer Engineering Experience for Kids. eyve proven they want to help us inuence this generation to pursue excellence. e Marine Corps will partner with NSBEs SEEK camp in San Diego this summer, to help expose African American kids to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics programs. Weve found something good here, said Maj. Gen. Melvin Spiese, Deputy Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force; and Commanding General, 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade. e SEEK camp this summer will be a perfect chance to further entrench ourselves in this community. Master Sgt. Erica James, Marine Forces Reserve equal opportunity advisor, said she was humbled and honored to be a part of the NSBE event and to have the chance to inspire future leaders. I am amazed every time I speak to our young people, James said. I want them to know that not only are they speaking, but I am listening and hearing. Sometimes that makes the dierence. No one should ever feel they are not good enough. ey should be continuously empowered with condence in what they have to oer. roughout the week, attendees had several opportunities to engage with Marines. ese included the Pre-College Initiative Graduating Senior Awards Banquet where Marines opened the oor for high school seniors to discuss leadership opportunities and service as important attributes in success; a Marine Corps booth at the NSBE career fair; and during Spieses participation with a board of panelists discussing the importance of diversity and inclusion within business strategy. Overall, all Marines had one theme in mind professional development and leadership. Marines also shared information about Marine Corps values and character. In fact, a Marine no longer in uniform even stepped up to share her story of success. Spiese was the senior Marine in attendance at this years NSBE confer ence. As he engaged stu dents at the PCI Graduating Seniors Awards Banquet, he focused on the goal of continuing to excel. e most important message Id like to pass on is for them to continue to excel, Spiese said. Every one of them has chosen an extremely dicult path in the things theyre pursuing for their futures. ey need to stay on that path of challenging themselves. In doing that, they prove that they have what it takes to succeed. ese are the kind of young people wed like to lead our Marines. spections your ships collectively were found to be at or above eet standards an impressive 95-percent of the time, Tofalo said. A single Trident submarine is the sixth largest nuclear nation in the world all by itself. What all of you do here is so vitally important, and the Submarine Squadron 20 team under Commodore Holloways leadership is squarely at the center this impressive mission. Submarine Squadron Twenty is responsible for the maintenance and operations of ve Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines; USS Alaska (SSBN 732), USS Tennessee (SSBN 734), USS Maryland (SSBN 738), USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). Rear Adm. John Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a sexual assault awareness proclamation onboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville, April 9. e decree proclaims April as NRSE Sexual Assault Awareness Month and emphasizes the regions commitment to the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program. e signing coincides with National Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which runs through the end of April. e Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program provides an opportunity for our installations to raise awareness and to promote the prevention of sexual violence, Scorby said. Sexual assault is a crime that erodes our operational readiness and leaders at all levels of the chain of command need to communicate that we will not tolerate it. Prevention of sexual assault is everyones duty. According to Julie Mooney, NRSE credentialing and program specialist, the region recorded 103 reports of sexual assault in 2011 and 118 in 2010. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault awareness and prevention efforts, Mooney said. e Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Oce in 2009 and it has signicantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the primary focus of raising leaderships awareness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention eorts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention eorts will have a signicant impact on the eectiveness of the Navys overall efforts. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. e Navy oers a variety of support services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advocate line. ese numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator located at the Fleet and Family Support Center to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at (877) 995-5247 or viawww. safehelpline.org. To nd out more about the Navys SAPR program, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit cnic. navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/Fleetand FamilyReadiness/Fami lyReadiness/FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ SexualAssaultPrevention andResponse/index.htm. Sailors of the Quarter Southeast Region targets sexual assault Squadron Marines meet Black Engineers

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mation. Retirees Same as for spouses, via the Navy Exchange and commis sary April 28 and 29. Come by the NCO for a copy and more information on education opportunities. e survey will take just a few minutes to complete, can be accessed from any computer and is anonymous. We can track what groups want what degrees, but all comments are separated from any identifying information, and no names are required. All information provided is anonymous and everyones participation is very much needed to ensure we have the right mix of quality, degrees, classes and modes of learning aboard Kings Bay. Navy bought John Hollands submarine April 11, 1900 e submarine force was born April 11, 1900 when the U.S. Navy bought the submersible Holland VI from John Holland. Since that historic day, undersea warfighters and submarines have used fortitude and creativity to sustain their superiority beneath the sea and develop the force into the indispensable asset that patrols world-wide today. As submariners celebrate their birthday around the world this month, they honor the heroes on eternal patrol and those who have served past and present. Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell, commander, Submarine Force U.S. Pacic Fleet, understands the value of submariners. For 112 years, the broad military advantages created by undersea conceal ment have resulted in a wide range of undersea platforms and missions that have enhanced our national security, Caldwell said. roughout history, what has remained constant is the bold character of submariners. roughout the last 11 decades, submariners have advanced through four generations. e rst generation produced eet boats with the speed, endurance, weapons and payload that wou0ld make the submarine a warghting platform. e second generation, dened by World War II heroes, made a decisive dierence in the war and dominated the seas which set high standards of performance. e third generation of undersea warfare during the Cold War was dened by the advent of nuclear power in weapons and propulsion. is advanced technology prevented a nuclear world war and secured the nations interests. e current generation of submariners, Generation IV, is being dened by the increase of long-range precision sensors and weapons. Todays submariners stay ahead of these threats and work hard to preserve their superiority in the undersea environment with the help of the Design for Undersea Warfare a guiding document which articulates how undersea warfighters provide Ready Forces, Eective Employment, and Future Forces. Vice Adm. John M. Richardson, commander, Submarine Forces, recognizes the hard, outstanding work of submariners and their families. I am incredibly proud of each and every member of the undersea warfare team, including our families who sacrice along with us, Richardson said. Just as earlier generations did before us, we fourth generation undersea warriors will be ready to surge to any crisis rst to arrive and last to leave. Let it always be a comforting reassurance to our friends and the worst nightmare for our enemies to know that the U.S. Submarine Force is on the job. Todays submarine force consists of 53 attack, 14 ballistic-missile and four guided-missile submarines that enable the Navy and the nation to win wars, deter wars, defeat terrorists, and ease disasters. Happy birthday U.S. Submarine Force and congratulations on 112 years of rich success running silent through history and running deep into the future. USS Holland was rst USS Holland, a 64-ton experimental submarine, was built at Elizabethport, New Jersey, to the design of sub marine pioneer John P. Holland. Its construction was a private venture of the John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co., and represented an alternative to the joint Navy-Holland venture that produced the unsuccessful submarine Plunger of 1895. Launched in mid-May 1897 and completed early in the following year, Holland ran extensive trials during 1898 and 1899, undergoing constant modication as experience was gained with her. As a very interested party, the Navy followed the new submarines activities closely and, in April 1900, purchased it with funds provided under an 1896 authorization. Placed in commission as USS Holland in October 1900, she was towed from Newport, Rhode Island, to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. With the exception of some four months at Newport in mid-1901, she primarily operated in the Chesapeake Bay area on training and developmental duty for the rest of the decade, based initially at Annapolis and, after mid-1905, at Norfolk, Va. Holland was always an experimental vessel, though she was the Navys rst reasonably satisfactory submarine and a great achievement in the development of undersea warfare. New submarines were soon produced that overcame many of her deciencies, and by 1910 she was thoroughly obsolete. USS Holland was stricken from the Navy Register in November of that year and sold for scrapping in June 1913. Throughout history, what has remained constant is the bold character of submariners. Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell Commander, Sub Force PacificSubmarine Force marks 112th anniversary Survey e chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba took exception with defense lawyers characterizations of proceedings on the base as being done without the protections of the U.S. Constitution. Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins told a small news conference at the base that the reformed military commissions provide the protections of the U.S. Constitution and will follow the procedures of U.S. federal courts and military courts martials. All ocials in the federal government have an obligation within their areas of responsibility to help fulll these requirements, which are among the fundamental guarantees of fairness and justice demanded by our values, Martins said. Martins spoke at the conclusion of a hearing on motions made for the trial of alleged Cole bombing mastermind Abd al-Rahim Hussein Mohammed Abdu al-Nashiri. e bombing killed 17 U.S. sailors and wounded 39 in Aden, Yemen in October 2000. Al-Nashiri is charged with capital crimes and could be put to death if found guilty. is tinges every decision the commission makes. Defense motions questioned the prosecution on constitutional grounds, including that the charges violate the equal protection clause, that it was charging him under an ex post facto law, and that it was a bill of attainder. Trial judge Army Col. James Pohl denied all. He further denied a request for all documents given to the defense team be translated into Arabic. ere are more than 70,000 pages to date. e judge granted more time for the defense to present him with a theory of the case, their request for a Yemeni investigator, letters asking for Yemeni evidence and a motion asking for the amount of money and resources the government has expended on this prosecution. Martins said the scene in the Guantanamo Bay courtroom proved the adversarial nature of American jurisprudence was alive and healthy in the reformed military commissions program. Contrary to dark suggestions of some whose minds appear already made up to oppose military commissions regardless of how they are conducted, these protections are implemented by ocers, I submit, are worthy of the public trust, Martins said. In the news conference, Martins listed the rights Al-Nashiri has. e defendant is innocent until proven guilty. He has the right to present evidence, the right to cross-examine witnesses and compel the appearance of witnesses in his defense. e U.S. government has provided more than $100,000 to fund defense requests, which include a full time investigator, a translator and four lawyers two military and two civilian.Cole bombing trial stays at Gitmo court 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Submariners past and present, and distinguished guests gathered at the National Cemetery of the Pacic in Honolulu April 11, to commemorate 112 years of submarine service. e event was sponsored by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Bown Base Subvets. USSVI was founded in 1965 by a group of U.S. World War II submarine veterans. e submarine force was born April 11, 1900, when the U.S. Navy bought the submersible Holland VI from John Holland. Todays submarine force consists of 53 attack, 14 ballistic-missile and four guided-missile submarines that enable the Navy and the nation to win wars, deter wars, defeat terrorists and ease disasters. roughout the years many submariners made history, became heroes and paid the ultimate sacrice for their country. Today we are going to remember our shipmates and gather strength in knowing all they sacriced and all they accomplished, said Rear Adm. Frank Caldwell, commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. As we gather here at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacic, we remember those who have been honored at memorial ceremonies here, and we remember those who lay here in their nal resting place. Among the souls here are those who served in all branches of our Armed Forces. Among the souls here are those who served in all facets of our Navy. Among the souls here are those who went down to the sea in submarines. And on our 112th birthday, it is tting to remember all who have gone before and to remember those who rest here,. Following his remarks a rededication of the submarine memorial plaque took place. e plaque honors the contribution of the many men and women who served with and supported the submarine force during the last 112 years as well as the 52 submarines that are on eternal patrol. e plaque rededication has been an April 11 annual event sponsored by USSVI Bown Base Subvets since the dedication in April 2000. It is a great honor to be here today as it is every April 11th, to remember and pay tribute to the greatest submarine force in the world, said retired Master Chief Electricians Mate Chris Cunha, USSVI Bown Base Subvets. e submarine memorial plaque means so much to submariners, active duty and retired, that this ceremony is very necessary and will continue for many years to come. A special bell tolling ceremony commenced to perpetuate the memory of the submariners and the 52 submarines lost in World War II and since. Each submarine name was acknowledged followed by a bell toll in remembrance of their sacrices for our nation. A 21-gun salute followed by the playing of Taps and retiring of the colors closed out the ceremony. Ceremony honors day II D5 missile aboard USS Tennessee (SSB 734), Garcia said the force already is leading the way in many of the areas covered by the 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative. e Navy is executing an incredibly broad mission set, Garcia said. In one week, the submarine force helped in Operation Tomodachi to prevent an apocalyptic meltdown of a nuclear reactor in Japan. USS Florida was o the coast of Libya during Operation Odyssey Dawn to stop a ruthless dictator from massacring his own people. Two submarines were sent to the polar cap to understand the implications of global warming. No other Navy in the world has the skill or ability to do this at one time. Cpl. Joshua Derrick of Kings Bays Marine Corps Security Force Battalion said the town hall was posi tive and did put to rest many of his concerns, primarily about retirement benets. Hearing that current active-duty Marines will receive a grandfather clause to their retirement benets is a huge relief to me and my family, Derrick said. If the retirement pay was changed from what I was initially promised, it would make me give some serious thought to leaving the Corps when its time to re-enlist. Machinists Mate 2nd Class Rodney Burnett of USS Maryland (SSBN 738) said he appreciated Garcia tak ing time to discuss the future goals and plans of the Navy based on the lessons learned from the last decade. e initiatives in the 21st century model helped in my decision to re-enlist recently, said Burnett, who had read about the initiative before recommitting to the Navy. Ive been in since 2008, and the Navy is a long-term career option for me, so Im very interested in the benets and compensations the Navy can oer me. e 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-eective force in the history of the Navy and Marine Corps.Garcia THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 7

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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I had the chance to tour the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian Clinic last week. Its a great place with a really great staff. Naturally, the conversation rolled around to one of my favorites, animals. I just had to know what was the favorite animal of each member of the clinics staff. Me? Well, I cant decide if I like dogs or cats more. I love chickens, pigs and shrimp for my own selfish reasons. For this, Ill say hummingbirds. Its always a pleasant diver sion when a hummingbird visits the feeder on my deck. Major Chris Corrie Veterinarian Daytona Beach, Fla. I grew up with dogs, cats, snakes and tarantulas and have rehabbed wildlife. I like them all. Michelle Lee Noska Animal Health Technician Saugus, Mass. A Thoroughbred, because theyre a foundation breed and very talented. Dr. Jennifer Bolduc Veterinarian Auburn, Maine A cat. They each have their own unique personality. Crystal Williamson Animal Health Technician Dover, Del. A Great Dane. I love them because theyre gentle giants and extremely loyal. PFC. Brianne Gossman NAF employee supervisor Forest City, Iowa A German Shepherd. Theyre intelligent, friendly and make good working or family dogs. Cassie Harwood Receptionist Shelby, Ohio A Quarter Horse. Theyre versatile and you can use them for rodeos and barrel racing.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Com mand ocials acknowl edged April 12 that U.S. sys tems detected and tracked a launch of a North Korean TaepoDong-2 missile. e missile was tracked on a southerly launch over the Yellow Sea, said a state ment issued from Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Initial indications are that the missiles rst stage fell into the sea 102.5 miles west of Seoul, South Korea, the statement says. e other two stages were assessed to have failed and no debris fell on land. At no time were the missile or resulting debris a threat, it says. Despite the failure of its attempted missile launch, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said in a statement tonight, North Koreas provocative action threatens regional security, violates international law and contravenes its own recent commitments. e action is not surpris ing given North Koreas pattern of aggressive be havior, he added, but any missile activity by North Korea is of concern to the international community. A spokesman for the Korean Committee for Space Technology announced March 16 that North Korea would launch a longrange Unha-3 rocket between April 12 and 16. He said the rocket would carry a North Korean-made Kwangmyongsong-3 polar-orbiting observation satellite to mark the 100th birthday of the late President Kim Il Sung on April 15. North Korean missile tracked THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 24. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 23The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs will be at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 23. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher education, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 25. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guide lines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is 9 a.m. to noon, April 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is host ing Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This new class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 27. To register call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets April 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speak ers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 26. To register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 25Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 25. It can help you identify the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regarding the military lifestyle, education, transi tion, employment and more. If you want to learn more or contribute your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional infor mation or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more infor mation, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presenta tions to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Information, Tickets and Travel has moved. Check out the new location at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Adventure Center, which is home to Navy Outdoor Recreation and ITT. Everyone is invited to attend an open house 2 to 5 p.m., ursday, April 26. ere will be giveaways, vendors and discounts on all rental items. Need more information? Call (912) 573-2289 or (912) 573-8103. Motherload of Comedy this event is at 8 p.m., Thursday, May 3. Its afree show at the Big EZ Sports Zone. Featured performers are Chris Killian (www. ckcomedy.com) and Richie Holliday (www.richieholliday. com) For adults 18 and older. Light hors doeuvres will be served. Beverages will be available for purchase. Need more information? Call (912) 5734548. Summer Fun Youth Leagues The league starts Thursday, May 31 and runs through Thursday, August 2 at RackN-Roll Lanes. Bowling is from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per week which includes shoe rental. Its a fun, non-sanctioned, 10-week league for children ages 5 to 18. There will be a party and prizes at the end of the season. So sign-up for some summer fun. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Adult Summer Bowling League Enjoy some summertime bowling at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. For sign-up information contact the lanes at (912) 5739492. Moms Bowl for Free From 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, May 13all moms, young and old, can bowl for free at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. Shoes are not included. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Swim Lessons Lessons begin May 14 at the Kings Bay Pool Complex. The cost is $40 per military, retirees and their family members and civilian Department of Defense authorized patrons and their family members. Or, the cost is $75 for five one-on-one lessons that are private. Register at the Fitness Complex Customer Service counter. Payment is due at time of registration. For more information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Under the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great movie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Its for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 23 through August 13. Signup began now for SAC and single/dual military. A morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon, April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids ITTs open house April 26 Liberty call THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 19, 2012 13 College classes helpful A Sailor from Naval Air Station Jacksonville is taking advantage of the many opportunities for higher education oered by the Navy. Aviation Boatswains Mate 1st Class Nnamdi Emenogu has only four classes left to complete before earning his bachelors degree in Public Health from the American Military University. Emenogu has been in the Navy for a little more than nine years and said his chain of command has always supported his pursuit of educational goals and helped him to keep on course. Emenogu had not taken any classes before he joined the Navy and credits all of his success to the programs available to Sailors through the Navy College Program. I knew that the Navy provided great schooling opportunities without the hassle of student loans, Emenogu said. I just had to get it done. e Navy College Programs mission is to provide continual academic support to Sailors while they pursue a technical or college degree, regardless of their location or duty station. I started o taking Navy College Program for Aoat College Education courses while at sea, and when I needed a greater variety of courses the Navy College Oce helped me discover tuition assistance, Emenogu said. Vicki OToole, director of the Navy College Oce NAS Jacksonville, helped guide Emenogu down the appropriate path towards his ultimate goal of earning a degree. ABH1 [Emenogu] is a wonderful example of a Sailor who sets a goal and who pays attention to what is available through the Navy College Oce to develop himself personally and professionally, OToole said. While maintaining a 3.74 grade point average, Emenogu was awarded Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sailor of the Year honors and promoted to the rank of rst class petty ofcer. It has taken him less time to earn a degree because he used his Sailor/ Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript, or SMART. SMART documents the amount of American Council on Education college credit recommended for military training and occupational experience that Sailors receive through their career. SMART is an academically accepted record that is validated by ACE with the primary purpose of helping service members obtain college credit for their military experience. Emenogu said through SMART, he obtained 12 college credits toward completion of his degree. Lots of time and money was saved, he said. I didnt have to take four classes because it was already in my record, so I absolutely recommend taking advantage of the program. Petty Ocer Emenogus o duty education has directly contributed to the readiness of NAS Jacksonvilles Air Operations Department, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael Chan, NAS Jacksonville operations ocer. It has made him a better Sailor, and more importantly a better leader. is sets the example for his peers and junior Sailors. He conveys the message that its possible to earn a degree while still performing their duties at a high level. As a leader and mentor, completing his degree will only reinforce the importance and need for higher education. Emenogu said he will later pursue a masters. I feel a great sense of accomplishment and I see myself as a role model for those Sailors who think the task is too daunting to tackle. I have no intention of stopping here. Once I earn my bachelors, my next step will be enrolling into a masters program, Emenogu said. I recommend that all Sailors take advantage of these great opportunities oered by the Navy to further their education. He said hopes to motivate fellow Sailors to advance their careers through education. Professionally, earning a degree creates more opportunities for a diverse career path, Emenogu said. I would like to become a commissioned ocer in the Navy and some day become a public health ocial in the civilian sector. Dr. Mary Redd-Clary, director of the Navy College Program at the Center for Personal and Professional Development, said it is common for Sailors to join the Navy without any higher education but with the goal of working toward a degree while in the service. At any given time, approximately 20 percent of active duty Sailors are using a Navy College Program resource to help fund their education goals, she said. To help Sailors maximize their education benets, Navy College Program education professionals advise Sailors on programs such as tuition assistance and SMART. A Sailors local Navy College Oce, or the Virtual Education Center, is a great resource for helping plan out his or her education journey. is plan includes a review of the SMART and development of an Individual Education Plan tailored to them, she said. CPPDs voluntary education program is a conduit for equipping Sailors with strong analytical skills, the ability to make informed decisions, and avenues to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. Were dedicated to helping each and every Sailor develop to his or her fullest potential. e world today is less violent but also more dangerous than at any other time inhuman history, the nations senior military ofcer told a Harvard University audience April 13. at counterintuitive combination of peace and potential conict is the essence of what I like to call the security paradox, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, told the audience attending a John F. Kennedy School of Government forum in Cambridge, Mass. Although geopolitical trends are ushering in greater levels of peace and stability worldwide, destructive technologies are available to a wider and more disparate pool of adversaries, Dempsey said. In the past, the general noted, it took a nations power to create a national security threat: industrial progress fueled the world wars, and the threat of mutually assured destruction between superpowers kept the Cold War from getting too hot. Today, the same rise in global trade and information technology that has increased cooperation and cut violence between nations also has put 21st century weapons in reach of smaller groups, the chairman said. More people have the ability to harm us or deny us the ability to act than at any point in my life and thats the security paradox, he said. While in the past only the United States could drop a bomb down a chimney, now dozens of middleweight militaries around the world have that [precision munitions] capability, he said. Potential adversaries now can buy o-theshelf more than 90 percent of the components needed to build an electronic warfare system. at creates a risk to the very systems that provide our battleeld edge: our computer networks, our sensors, and our precision navigation ability, he said. Cyber attack is another evolving threat that doesnt require a large military to launch it. With the right computer virus, a single person can disrupt life for an entire city, and potentially even our entire nation, he added. The mes sage is that the margin of error is growing smaller, the chairman warned. e U.S. military must counter these new and elusive threats even as its budget shrinks. e Defense Department strategy balances cost, force structure, mission and risk. e strategy aims for a force with fewer service members, greater agility and more powerful technology, he added. e Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps need to meld serviceunique strengths to build capabilities that dont exist unless theyre combined, the general said. e force will be regionally postured but globally networked, scaled and scoped to demand. e security paradox presents a dicult challenge, Dempsey said. But challenges are nothing new to this nation, he said. We have adapted and re-invented ourselves many times throughout our history. United State faces security paradox