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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-12-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00248

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00248


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No deaths reported but some hospitalized A senior Navy ocer ex pressed his concern for the community and thanked emergency responders following the April 6 crash in Virginia Beach, Va., of a two-seater F/A-18D Hornet air craft assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 106. Both aircrew safely ejected from the aircraft, ocials said. e crews squadron is based at nearby Naval Air Station Oceana. e Navy is coordinating with local authorities, ocials said. My thoughts and prayers are with our citizens and families who have been impacted by the tragic crash today in Virginia Beach by an aircraft from NAS Oceana, Navy Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command based at Norfolk, Va., said in a statement issued April 6. I deeply regret that some in our community have lost their homes, and I, like many, pray for the well-being of all, Harvey added. Initial reports indicate that at approximately 12:05 p.m., the jet crashed just after takeo at a lo cation just o of the base. News reports also say the stricken jet struck some apartment buildings located near the base. Reports say several civilians were being treated at a local medical center. In his statement, Harvey ex pressed his gratitude to the citi zens of Virginia Beach and the Mayfair Mews Apartments, as well as Virginia Beachs rst re sponders for their immediate and heroic response to take care of our aircrew after they ejected and all at the scene of the mis hap. Harvey said all resources are being made available to the City of Virginia Beach as we all deal with the impacts and recovery from this terrible mishap. We will continue to work di rectly with the City of Virginia Beach and continue to provide all possible assistance, the ad miral added. Harvey said a complete in vestigation into the cause of the crash will be made. He also pledged to share all information we have as soon as we are able to do so. VFA-106 serves as the East Coast Fleet Replacement Squadron. e units mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 replacement pilots and weapon sys tems ocers to support eet commitments. U.S. is world leader in helping distressed mariners under seasAt least 44 countries oper ate more than 400 submarines worldwide. e sophisticated safety measures in modern submarines and rigorous crew training re duce the risk of a serious mishap to an extremely low level, but nothing can reduce it to zero. Every submarine runs some small risk of a disabling casualty due to collision, ooding, equip ment failure, etc. If a disabled sub has an escape trunk and bottoms in less than 600 feet of water, the surviving crew can, at least theoretically, escape to the surface without outside rescue. But even at depths of less than 600 feet, it is preferable to rescue the surviving crew of a bottomed submarine if possible. All sub mariners are therefore interest ed in a robust rescue capability. e United States elded the worlds rst submarine rescue system in the early 1930s. e Submarine Rescue Chamber, essentially a diving bell with special hatches and a downhaul system for mating with a sub marine, could rescue personnel from submarines in shallow water down to about 850 feet. e SRC proved its worth in 1939 by bringing up 33 survivors in four sorties to USS Squalus (SS 192), which had sunk o the New Hampshire coast. e Navys current SRC diers little from the original one. In 1963, USS resher (SSN 593) sank o New Hampshire in much deeper water with the loss of all hands. Although she passed crush depth long before reaching bot tom, her loss highlighted the requirement for a deep-diving rescue system to close the gap between the shallow reach of the SRC and the depth at which a modern submarine could sur vive. For timely rescue in distant waters, the new system had to be transportable by air. e highly maneuverable Deep Submer gence Rescue Vehicle developed to meet these requirements could be own to a friendly sea port in the vicinity of an accident and loaded aboard a surface support ship or one of several THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Is your pet peeve people with pet peeves? Page 9 Play sports Check out the Kings Bay Intramural Sports lineup Page 9 Golden Eggs See who won prizes in the Easter Egg Hunt Page 11Navy sub rescue capability spans globe Happy Easter! The Easter Bunny made a special appearance Saturday, April 7, at the Youth Center to the cheers of hundreds of children. The volunteer workers from the Child Development and Youth Centers hid hundreds of eggs at the front lawn and baseball fields there, and the children were let loose to gather as many eggs as they could fit in their basket. More photos on Page 11. Photo by Scott Bassett/NSB Public Affairs Officer F-18 Hornet crashes in Virginia BeachCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com It ruins life for everyoneSAPR Rep James E. Williams has seen it happen to one Sailor e command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response rep resentative aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) witnessed first-hand how a sexual assault impacted the life of one young female Sailor. Informa tion Sys tems Technician Chief Megan C. Gibbs spoke about how the young Sailor had been fright

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First Lady Michelle Obama an nounced a new hiring eort intend ed to deliver thousands of portable, exible job opportunities to military spouses and veterans in the coming years. Eleven companies have pledged more than 15,000 jobs for military spouses and veterans, the rst lady said April 4, noting the vast majority of these jobs can be accomplished from home. is commitment will make a huge dierence for military spous es, Obama said during a teleconfer ence announcing the initiative. Were working hard on their be half because were proud of them, the rst lady said. Having an op portunity to have a decent job is one of the most important ways we can support these families. is new eort will oer spouses thousands of athome employment opportunities in areas such as customer support and telemar keting, as well as jobs that are physically locat ed near military installations, a White House news release said. Nearly two dozen contact cen ters which oer family-friendly scheduling, growth opportunities and the ability to transfer seamlessly from one center to another have committed to hiring spouses. ese companies and their job opportunities will be integrated into the Defense Departments Military Spouse Employment Partnership, the release said. MSEP is an eort in which more than 100 private-sector companies have committed to a fo cused eort on military spouse em ployment. e rst lady noted the value of exible, portable jobs for military spouses, who must balance work and home life with military-related demands. Portability enables spous es to move without the stress of nd ing a new job at each new location, the rst lady said, noting military families are 10 times more likely to move across state lines than civilian families. And exible work hours of fer a better work-life balance, par ticularly for spouses caring for chil dren or elderly parents. Also on the call, Air Force wife Dawn Shaer recounted the chal lenges that drove her to nd the atwork exibility she needed. Shaer started out as a veterinary technician, but was unable to nd work in her eld after she and her husband, Air Force Sta Sgt. Travis Shaer, moved from Guam to White THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! e rst wealth is health. Ralph Waldo EmersonA few weeks ago, when the record-highest lottery payout was nearing the deadline to purchase a ticket, swarms of people lined up at gas stations and conve nience stores with the hope of pick ing the lucky numbers. As I saw and heard about the in credible ticket sales and learned about how many people were cross ing borders into states where they could purchase tickets, I started to think about the investment of not only nancial magnitude, but of time, energy and motivation that all these people were making. I was intrigued and wondered, why is it that people can so easily invest in something that they have a one in 176 million chance of winning, yet are resistant to make an investment in such a sure thing as their health? I will admit, $656 million would make most peoples lives a heck of a lot better, bringing them nancial freedom, early retirement and a life of luxury if they wish. But instead of trying to defy the long odds, doesnt it make more sense to put our eorts towards something that we know for certain can improve the quality of our life? If as many people could grow as excited and as motivated about living a healthier lifestyle as the number of people who purchased a ticket for that jackpot, there wouldnt just be three winners, there would be thousands. I could ask you how winning millions of dollars would change your life. I am sure you could provide me with a long list of what you would do with that kind of money. But because that fantasy remains well, a fantasy, I would rather have you ponder this notion ... how would being healthy and t, having more condence and energy, and feeling good about your health and your body change your life? e odds are in our favor when it comes to making an investment in our health. It is one of the few things we actually have a great deal of control over. Yes, it requires sacrice, commitment, motivation and a willingness to maintain a healthy lifestyle, but the results can be life-changing and exceedingly rewarding. So you can wait around for the next big jackpot and gamble for a better life. Or you can start taking action today and invest in your health, ensuring a better life. I guarantee this will be one bet you wont regret.Invest in health for a better life Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Volunteer income tax help offeredNavy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax provides a self-help oce including software and computers to aid service members, retir ees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, near the Per sonnel Support Detachment and open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers assist with ling if needed. Appointments are not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be avail able for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Rodeo April 13, 14 in Kingslande rst annual Equine Rescue Rodeo of South Georgia will be at 7:30 p.m., April 13 and 14 on Georgia 40 in Kingsland, across from K_ Mart-Publix shopping center. Admission is $15 for adults, $7 children 5 to 12 and free under 5. Military riders can compete for free with a military ID. All proceeds benet Equine Rescue of South Georgia. Call (912) 285-0133 for more information.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. New jobs to open for military spouses Before today is over, ve children will die from being abused. At least two of them will be babies, less than a year old. e other three probably havent yet celebrated their fth birthday. e blue ribbon symbolizes the more than 5.2 million children re ported abused each year to Child Protective Services throughout the United States. In 1982, by presidential procla mation, April was declared Child Abuse Prevention Month. Since that time, child abuse and neglect awareness activities have been promoted across the country during this month. In the spring of 1989, a Virginia grandmother began the blue ribbon campaign as a tribute to her grand son. e three-year-old died at the hands of his mothers abusive boy friend. e grandmother tied a blue ribbon to the antenna of her car as a way to remember him and to alert her community to the tragedy of child abuse. Since then, concerned citizens all over the country have worn the blue ribbon as a symbol of the need to prevent child abuse and neglect. A blue ribbon is the international symbol for Child Abuse Prevention. e color blue was chosen to repre sent the bruised and battered bodies of the thousands of children that are abused everyday. It serves as a constant reminder that all of us have a responsibility to help keep children safe. Many times children grow up in an abusive environment and eventually become abusing parents. Without appropriate education on positive ways to parent, child abuse will continue to escalate. It is up to us as a society to increase public awareness that child abuse exists and that it can be prevented through education. Join the ght against child abuse. Get your blue ribbon today. e Blue Ribbon Mission is to: Encourage community and indi vidual involvement in recognizing and preventing child abuse and neglect. Educate families, children, neighbors, organizations and com munities on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Assist families in achieving healthy parenting practices through education and resources. Empower individuals to inter vene in abuse and neglect situations when appropriate. How you can help prevent child abuse and neglect: Educate yourself on the facts and causes of child abuse and neglect in Camden County. Volunteer at an organization that helps families and children. Mentor a child who may be at risk of being abused or neglected. Take a parenting class. Invite another parent to join you. Give support to a mother, father or caregiver experiencing stress. Write letters to elected representatives in support of parent educa tion and child abuse prevention. Arrange for a speaker at your organization or workplace to help educate others and spread the word about child abuse and neglect and how to keep kids safe. Help spread our child abuse pre vention and healthy parenting mes sage. Blue Ribbons ght child abuse, neglect Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Month Activities Friday, April 13 Dr. Barbara Craig, MD, director of Armed Forces Center for Child Protection will conduct a one-day work shop on Navigating Child Abuse Assessments: An Integrative Approach at the Kings Bay Conference Center. CEUs will be awarded. A $20 conference fee applies. Pre-registration required Contact Sallie Galyean, FFSC, at 573-0997. Wednesday, April 18 Stewards of Children is a public education program designed to educate adults on how to prevent, recognize and respond responsibly to child sexual abuse workshop. The workshop will be held at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact Sallie Galyean, FFSC, 573-0997, for additional information. 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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man Air Force Base, Mo. Wanting time at home with their baby daughter, Shaer found a job as an athome customer service pro fessional, which oers her portability and exibility. She now provides cus tomer service to some of the largest companies in the world, she said. I absolutely love what I do. Military spouses shoulder a signicant burden, Obama noted. ey move frequently, take on ad ditional responsibilities during deployment all while balancing the de mands of family, careers and community. But while challenging, a military lifestyle also equips spouses with a vast array of in-demand job skills, the rst lady said. eyre able to trouble shoot a variety of situa tions, manage schedules and deal with changing circumstances all qualities any employer would value, she noted. e rst lady praised the companies that have stepped up to support spouses and veterans. Companies are not just telling military families we are inspired by them, Obama said, eyre backing it up with meaningful, concrete action. Companies key com mitments include: Alpine Access has pledged to recruit, train and hire more than 3,000 military-connect ed Americans over the next two years. The company also will launch TalentSprout, an online portal with skill-building and job training curricu lum. These career and personal development courses will be offered free-of-charge to qualified members of the armed forces and to their eligible spouses and caregivers. Arise Virtual Solutions Inc. plans to add 10,000 new independent busi ness and client services professionals from mili tary families over the next several years. Arise also intends to develop spe cial programs to create awareness among military spouses and veterans. DialAmerica aims to increase the number of military-aliated employees to make up 20 percent of its workforce by 2014. Etech Global Services has committed to hiring a minimum of 200 military spouses and veterans in next two years. Hilton Hotels employs nearly 800 military-related employees at their hotels and oces around the globe. In partnership with Recruit Military and other community-based organizations, Hilton Worldwide is pledging another 3.5 percent of their Hilton@ Home call center posi tions to military spouses through 2014. Prosperity America intends to hire 50 more vet erans and military spouses. Quality Contact Solutions is creating 150 work-at-home businessto-business marketing and communication jobs for military spouses over the next two years. ese jobs will be in the health care and telecommunications industries. Agility Marketing is planning to add 100 jobs for military spouses and veter ans over the next two years. QCSS Inc. will ensure a minimum of 10 percent of the forecasted 200 new hires from now through 2014 will be veterans and their families. SP Data intends to add more than 150 jobs for mil itary spouses and veterans over the next two years. Veteran Call Center, LLC plans to create an addition al 1,000 jobs for military spouses and veterans over the next two years.Jobs THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Activities included coloring, dancing and a popcorn party. A child meets a mascot. Students participate in various activities during the Walk, Roll and Stroll. Participants stop for a photo before they begin the Fleet and Family Support Center-sponsored parade. Children from the Child Development Center and Youth Center lead the way as they begin the Walk, Roll and Stroll. Children color to bring awareness to child abuse prevention. Pre-K students cheer as they wrap up the parade. Preventing Child Abuse Photos by Anali Aguilar and Kelly Wirfel

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 5 nuclear submarines specially modied to serve as mother submarines. e DSRVs global reach opened up unprecedented opportunities for inter national cooperation. In an early step toward interoperability, Britain and France also modied some submarines to serve as DSRV MOSUBs. In 1986, the North Atlantic Treaty Orga nization sponsored the rst Exercise Sorbet Royal, a multinational exercise focused on ensuring a practical capabil ity to cooperate in all aspects of submarine rescue. e United States entered into agree ments with other countries to provide rescue services in the event of a submarine accident. Under these agreements, the Navy began to conduct inspections to ensure that other navies submarines were capable of DSRV and SRC rescue. e Navy also began to survey airports, roads and seaports to document the most ecient path for delivering a rescue ve hicle and thus minimize the time-to-rstrescue. NATO established the Submarine Es cape and Rescue Working Group as a forum for working out issues such as making equipment interoperable and establishing common doctrine. Like the Sorbet Royal exercises, the SMERWG was open not just to NATO member nations, but to any country invited by NATO or a NATO member. In 2001, another grouping, the Asia-Pacic Submarine Confer ence, began to meet annually to discuss submarine operations in the Pacic and Indian Ocean regions. APSC discussions defaulted to submarine escape and rescue when few other topics could be identied that all partici pants would talk about. e August 2000 loss of the Russian submarine Kursk provided fresh impetus for multinational coordination and col laboration in submarine rescue. In 2003, NATO established the International Submarine Escape and Rescue Li aison Oce to operate under the SMER WGs authority as a clearing house for escape and rescue information, includ ing facilitating rescue eorts. Hosted by Allied Submarine Com mand in Norfolk, Va., and staed by experts from the U.S. and other NATO countries as well as two billets for nonNATO nations ISMERLOs main focus is a collaborative Web site where partici pating countries can share information about rescue capabilities and activities, discuss new initiatives, and quickly facili tate a multinational rescue in the event of a submarine sinking. In 2008, the U.S. Navy replaced the ag ing DSRVs with the Submarine Rescue Diving and Recompression System. Whereas the DSRVs had to wait for one of the few MOSUBs to reach the general vi cinity of a submarine casualty, the SRDRS could operate from any vessel of oppor tunity or any naval auxiliary or commer cial oshore support vessel with the deck space and strength to support the SRDRS equipment. Most regions of the world have ships that can serve as VOOs. e SRDRS consists of three elements. e rst is the Atmospheric Dive Sys tem 2000, a manned, one-atmosphere dive suit for inspecting a bottomed sub marine and clearing escape hatches down to 2,000 feet. e second is the Pressurized Res cue Module named Falcon a tethered, remotely operated rescue vehicle launched and piloted from the deck of a VOO. e PRM can rescue 16 sailors per trip down to 2,000 feet. e third element, scheduled to be come operational in 2014, is a transferunder-pressure capability consisting of a deck transfer lock that can mate with the PRM, receive Sailors exposed to high pressure, and transfer them to a decom pression chamber without exposing them to normal atmospheric pressure. e Navy team that keeps U.S. subma rine rescue systems on call around the clock is the San Diego-based Deep Sub mergence Unit, which includes not only active-duty personnel, but also reservists, contractors and government civilians. In fact, more than half the DSU sta are reservists. e Submarine Escape and Rescue Review Group, which supports the DSU, is chaired by Commodore, Submarine Development Squadron Five, and includes representatives from the DSU, the Atlantic and Pacic submarine com mands, OPNAV, the Naval Sea Systems Command, ISMERLO, the Naval Subma rine School and the Naval Medical Sub marine Research Lab. Like the DSRV before it, the SRDRS serves as the focal point for submarine rescue agreements with partner coun tries, which provide dedicated rescue ships or VOOs, transportation from qual ied airports and seaports, or other sup port the participants deem appropriate. More than 20 such agreements are now in eect or under discussion. e goal is to load submarine rescue assets aboard aircraft at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, transport them to the location of a distressed sub marine, and make them ready for res cueall within 72 hours of notication. e U.S. routinely participates in ex ercises designed to sharpen skills and accustom participants to working with personnel of other nationalities. e larg est is the NATO-sponsored Exercise Bold Monarch, formerly called Sorbet Royal, which takes place every three years. In the words of NATOs invitation to prospective 2011 participants, Bold Monarch demonstrates that NATO, in participation with submarine operating nations, can cooperate in lifesaving operations from a distressed submarine, in cluding all medical aspects involved. Ships, submarines and rescue sys tems from 14 nations took part in Bold Monarch 2008, while 26 countries sent observers. Submarines from the Nether lands, Norway, and Poland worked with rescue systems provided by three other countries. e U.S. rescue system was air lifted into the theater, providing considerable practice in the associated logistics. e U.S. PRM Falcon rescued over 200 person nel in 13 sorties to bottomed submarines. Most of the 29 ag-level dignitaries who visited the exercise got to experi ence being rescued, including a French three-star rescued by a Russian system from a Norwegian sub. e Pacic region exercise is called Pa cic Reach, the regular participants being Australia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and the United States. Singapore, which hosted the rst Pacic Reach in 2000, also hosted the most recent one in August 2010. irteen countries sent observers in 2010, among them China, India, Indo nesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, South Africa, ailand, and Vietnam. Japanese, Singaporean, and Korean submarines worked with rescue systems from the U.S. and Singapore. e United States and Singapore also provided, respectively, the rescue and salvage ships USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) and MV Swift Rescue. ened of the repercussions should anyone found out, and she was embarrassed that it had happened. She didnt know who to turn to, and worst of all, she didnt think anyone would believe her. She became withdrawn, and afterwards, she chose to leave the Navy upon completion of her rst tour. For Gibbs, spreading awareness of sexual assault is a cause she strives to take to the deckplates to prevent stories like this from ever happening again. Along with Gibbs, service members from all branches of the United States military have banded together in solidarity to rec ognize Sexual Assault Awareness Month. e goal of SAAM is to reduce sexual assault through direct and sustained engagement of all hands. From placing teal ribbons and posters around the ship, to conducting training and counseling, Sailors aboard the James E. Williams are actively participating in the eort to raise awareness of the impact sexual as sault has on both the individual and the crew. As SAPR representatives, we provide immediate assis tance to sexually-assaulted victims, Gibbs said. We provide them with resources, medical care, and proper reporting. While response is necessary in dealing with the fallout of sexual assault, SAPR representatives incorporate a va riety of training aids to educate the crew on what sexual assault is, how it can thwart the mission, and what resources are available to victims. We use Powerpoint presentations, scenario cards, and training videos, Gibbs said. ese are just a few of the methods we have to reach the crew. Gibbs hopes these training aids also help reduce and prevent sexual assault from occurring. Some people have it stuck in their mind that because she didnt say no, or the person was asking for it, that the perpetrator feels its acceptable to engage in sexual acts with the victim, said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ashley R. omson, a SAPR victim advocate aboard James E. Williams. But is really comes down to no means no, because without consent its sexual assault. omson stresses that the individual assaulted is not the only one aected. It puts a strain on both the victim and the command, omson said. e command might lose the Sailors in volved, or it can cause people to become mentally unt to do their job. e eects of sexual assault can erode operational readiness and create a tense and high-pressure work place, which can lead to a breakdown in performance. It makes people worry that it can happen to them; their shipmates, their friends, and they can be constant ly uneasy about what happened to them, or they can breakdown and shut everything out, omson said. By making the program noticeable around the com mand through yers, sexual assault ribbons, and by pro viding resources for the crew, SAPR advocates work to prevent sexual assault and ensure victims receive the proper attention, omson said. Servicemembers are taught to take care of each oth er, Gibbs said. We are here to accomplish our mission, and sexual assault terribly hinders that. SAPRRescue

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Coast Guard saves yachtmen An announcement was heard aboard Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf: is is the XO coming to you from the pilot house happy April 1st Bertholf Weve been diverted and directed to make best speed to a vessel in distress No joke! As the executive ocer aboard Bertholf over the past two years, Ive had the great fortune of seeing this platform answer the call time after time. Our recent search and rescue case was no excep tion demonstrating the remarkable capabilities that our national security cut ter brings to the ght. It was a dark and stormy Saturday night. Bertholf was on patrol o the Cali fornia coast when we received a call diverting us to the northwest for a sailing vessel that had suered serious personnel injuries after being tossed about by some monstrous waves. All that lay between us and the distressed vessel was 300 nautical miles and a low pressure system har boring 40 to 50-knot winds and 20 to 30-foot seas. Bertholf landed a Jay hawk helicopter out of Air Station San Diego and then proceeded overnight into the next day directly into the heart of the storm. While unthinkable in our nearly 50-year-old high-endurance cutter, we proceeded with a medium range helicopter secure on our large ight deck mak ing full speed dead into the 20-foot seas. e national security cutters speed of service, sea-keeping and reliability are unlike any other ship in Coast Guard inventory. e Bertholf, in this case, proved an extreme endur ance cutter giving us the ability to travel twice as fast in howling gale while car rying a larger helicopter that could y twice as far a quantum leap forward for safety of life at sea. After punching through the storm, we were able to nd a eeting pocket of fair weather on the back side, allowing us to launch our helicopter towards the sailing vessel while continuing at full speed towards the vessel ourselves. e helicopter crew ar rived on scene and at tempted to lower a rescue swimmer, who was tempo rarily hung up in the rigging of the sailing vessel due to the stormy seas and the tight area in which to de scend on the racing yacht. At this point, given Ber tholfs proximity to the sailing vessel, the hoist attempt was aborted after weighing the risks as we closed and assessed we were able to launch our response boat. e size of Bertholf not only provided the neces sary speed and sea-keep ing abilities, but also a great lee when the going gets tough to allow the tough to get going. Bertholf maneuvered up swell from the sailing vessel and launched our response boat. Once the response boat was away, Bertholf was able to keep station to provide a bit of a lee for the sailing vessel to aord our small boat crew the opportunity to move in for the rescue. Once the small boat was back aboard Bertholf, we were able to assess the pa tients condition and de termined we could safely transport them back to port aboard the ship. Upon return to home port the following day, we transferred the patients ashore and were surprised at all the media attention the case had received. Marine earns Silver Star e parade deck at San Mateo was lled with Marines March 29, as Sgt. Ryan T. Sotelo, a San Mateo, Calif. native, was awarded the Silver Star. He was honored for the actions he took as a squad leader with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment while deployed to Sangin District, Afghan istan, in support of Opera tion Enduring Freedom. Maj. Gen. Ronald L. Bai ley, commanding general, 1st Marine Division, pre sented the medal to Sotelo, who is now a scout sniper with Battalion Landing Team 3/5, 15th Marine Ex peditionary Unit. e Silver Star Medal is the United States third highest award for combat valor and is fth in the precedence of military awards. It was humbling when the general pinned on the star, said Sotelo. When we perform out in country we dont do it for metals, we do it for the Marine on the right and left of us. On Nov. 25, 2010, Sote los squad was ambushed in an open eld with ma chinegun and small arms re, killing the platoon commander. Without hesitation, Sotelo took charge of the unit and moved them to a nearby canal. He then sprinted through heavy re across open ground to retrieve the body of his fallen lieu tenant. With the defensive po sition now unreachable because of intense small arms re, he called in supporting arms to cover the squads movement to a nearby compound. As in surgents began to assault the position, he fearlessly led his squad as they re pelled the enemy. When one enemy com batant began to re on an exposed Marine, Sotelo closed in on the insurgent and killed him with a gre nade. As soon as we got across, we got lit up and engaged in every direction, said Cpl. Jose Launder, Company K, 3rd Bn., 5th Marines. So telo just ran over and threw a grenade. After a reinforcing Ma rine unit was pinned down by heavy re from the insurgents, Sotelo again dis regarded his own safety to engage the enemy machinegun with rie, nally calling in an air strike that silenced the enemy re. I think a lot of us are here because of his actions that day, added Launder. Realizing that his situa tion was dire, Sotelo lead a ghting withdrawal more than 600 meters through enemy re to bring his squad back to friendly lines and safety. Sergeant Sotelo will continue serving his country as he prepares for the 15th MEUs upcoming deployment scheduled for this summer. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. April 19. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention April 16safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A train ing lasting about three hours, safeTALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connect ed to helpers who are prepared to provide first aid interven tions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, April 16. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 17Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. April 19. Registration is required. For more informa tion, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 17 and 24. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Car-buying strategies examined April 16This two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the impor tant dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and highpressure sales tactics. This train ing is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. Registration is recom mended. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 23The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs will be at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 23. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 25. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and sup port the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relation ship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This new class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 27. To register call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets April 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 26. To register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 25Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 25. It can help you identify the feelings anger hides and explore behav iors helpful in resolving issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is 9 a.m. to noon, April 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more or contribute your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center takes most of its work shops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 7

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, in stant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various des sert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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I agree with all the answers below. But I am seldom really annoyed. I surprised myself recently when I blurted out to a chief, Blow your nose! I didnt really mean to do it, is just kinda came out. He was doing something I call snot sucking. When I used to do this as a child, my mother would always come running with a tissue, cover my nose with it and order me to, Blow! It was her pet peeve. I guess somewhere right now my mom is laughing. They say we all turn into our parents eventually. CS1 Kevin Calliste NSB Barracks Washington, D.C. When people, based on other peoples opinion, think somebody is no good. Elizabeth Watson Family member Mason, Tenn. The invisible dividing line between officers and enlisted. ET1 Kevin Plyler USS Tennessee Gold Lancaster, S.C. People who waste their own and other peoples time. Lance Cpl. Brandon Damiani Security Force Battalion Cutchogue, N.Y. Getting used to the heat down here. CS2 Nicholas Vermenlen NSB Kings Bay Ira, Mich. My only pet peeve is a dirty sink. Stacey Nichols Retired Navy Atlanta One of them is not making the bed after you get up. I cant stand a dirty bedroom.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Signal processing Courtney Abbott and Kyle Terry from the traveling show Sex Signals end their presentation in front of a laughing crowd of Sailors and Marines stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, April 5. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Sex Signals is one of the non-traditional training presentations scheduled at the base. Navy photo by MC1 James KimberAs society becomes increasingly fastpaced and busy, I believe par ticipating in some form of recreation becomes more impor tant. Recreation oers individuals an escape from day-to-day routine and the opportunity to engage in intrinsically satisfying activities. I consider myself lucky to be able to oer individuals the means to participate in these recreational activities. I believe that oering a variety of well-planned sports and activities can improve the morale and the health of the individuals participating in the programs. As the Adult Sports Coor dinator at Kings Bay, my goal is to oer programsPlaying sports for the love of it Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 9

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As U.S., NATO and Af ghan ocials discuss the future of night raids in Af ghanistan, the raids are ef fective and Afghan forces participate in the planning of every night operation, a senior Defense Depart ment ocial said in Wash ington, D.C., April 3. [Night raids have] been a concern of the Afghan govern ment for some time, George Little, acting assistant secretary of defense for public af fairs, said in a news con ference. We recognize that. We recognize the ef fectiveness, as well, that night operations have had over time. NATO and U.S. ocials contend that conducting night operations reduces the danger to civilians while keeping pressure on insurgents. International Security Assistance Force ocials in the Afghan capital of Kabul say 85 percent of night operations occur without a shot being red, and only about 1 percent of night operations have led to civilian casualties. Still, night operations are a bone of contention for the Afghan government, and the coalition is working with the government to assuage their con cerns, Little said. We believe were mak ing progress in heading to ward an agreement on this and a broad range of other issues, he added. ISAF forces are working hand in hand with our Afghan partners on night opera tions, and they are highly eective. Al-Qaida is smaller and has been hurt badly by continued U.S. and coalition attacks, but it remains a danger, Little said. e important thing to remember about al-Qaida is that even though they may be smaller than some other groups in the region, its about their objectives, he said. And even though they are dam aged from serious pres sure thats been brought to bear against them, one of their objectives remains to attack the United States and our allies. So we have to keep the pressure up. We have to make sure that they dont have the ability to strike us again. Little stressed that Af ghan national security forces are making progress. About 330,000 Af ghan soldiers and police are serving today, a number headed to 352,000 this summer. eyre doing great work, on their own and with us and with our allies, Little said. Iran can put end to economic pressureU.S., Afghanistan negotiate on night raids WASHINGTON, April 5, 2012 Economic and diplomatic sanctions are biting Iran, but Iranian government leaders can stop the pain by ending their nuclear weapons program, a senior Penta gon ocial said April 5. Our assessment of the program remains the same. We are very concerned about where they might be headed, said George Little, acting as sistant secretary of defense for public aairs. An Iran with a nuclear weapon is unacceptable. e United States has made that point crystal clear that all options are on the table to prevent Iran from developing that capability, Little said in a meeting with reporters. We dont know, at this stage, whether they have made the decision to proceed with the develop ment of a nuclear weapon, he said. It would be unacceptable if they do move forward. American experts are working to discern just what Iranian leaders have decided. Our government has been very clear about what needs to happen, Little said. If Iran gives up its nuclear program, he noted, the country can rejoin the community of nations. Little said Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta believes the sanctions are working. that inspire the Kings Bay population to interact socially through healthy competition, all the while adhering to the code of sportsmanship. I want to promote a sense of community and respect among all participants. e overall goal of participation should be forming new friendships through sports and being active, not simply winning a game or a trophy. is philosophy sometimes gets lost, as the very na ture of sports is competition and everyone wants the spoils that accompany victory. My hope is that the thirst for the trophy does not overshadow the true purpose of recreational activities. Use recreation to enrich your life and make new connections, rather than transform it into a source of stress with a primary focus on winning. Sports 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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April is the Month of the Mili tary Child, so celebrate at the free Kidsfest 2012, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at Under e Pines Park and the Tennis Court area. Food will be avail able for purchase. Free cotton candy, Mobil Gaming System, Laser Tag, Fun Zone and Sports Zone. Also, face-painting, bal loon artist and wax hands. Demonstrations by Lisa Allen, Tai Kwon Do and the Mad Scientist. For more information call (912) 573-4564. New lap swim hours at the Kings Bay Pool Lap swim hours are being re-adjusted to better serve active duty mem bers. The new hours started April 2. Morning lap swim is 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Active duty has pri ority. Lunch lap swim is 11 a.m. to noon for active duty only. Open lap swim is noon to 1 p.m. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Information, Tickets and Travel in a new location Look for ITT at the Outdoor Adventure Center when the two share a building in April. ITT has information, travel destina tions and tickets for most area attractions plus more. Check us out for holiday destinations and vouchers for hotels in Orlando and other areas of the U.S. For more info call (912) 573-2289. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Un der the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great mov ie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompa nied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 6 Rio; April 7 and 8 Hop April 9 Tangled, April 14 and 15 Gnomeo & Juliet, April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids Kidsfest fun this Saturday Liberty call 212242A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Wildfire Prevention Newspaper B&W WFPA03-N-01263-D Your Name Here13 x 21 85 line screen digital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:212242 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012



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No deaths reported but some hospitalized A senior Navy ocer expressed his concern for the community and thanked emergency responders following the April 6 crash in Virginia Beach, Va., of a two-seater F/A-18D Hornet aircraft assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 106. Both aircrew safely ejected from the aircraft, ocials said. e crews squadron is based at nearby Naval Air Station Oceana. e Navy is coordinating with local authorities, ocials said. My thoughts and prayers are with our citizens and families who have been impacted by the tragic crash today in Virginia Beach by an aircraft from NAS Oceana, Navy Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command based at Norfolk, Va., said in a statement issued April 6. I deeply regret that some in our community have lost their homes, and I, like many, pray for the well-being of all, Harvey added. Initial reports indicate that at approximately 12:05 p.m., the jet crashed just after takeo at a location just o of the base. News reports also say the stricken jet struck some apartment buildings located near the base. Reports say several civilians were being treated at a local medical center. In his statement, Harvey expressed his gratitude to the citizens of Virginia Beach and the Mayfair Mews Apartments, as well as Virginia Beachs rst responders for their immediate and heroic response to take care of our aircrew after they ejected and all at the scene of the mishap. Harvey said all resources are being made available to the City of Virginia Beach as we all deal with the impacts and recovery from this terrible mishap. We will continue to work directly with the City of Virginia Beach and continue to provide all possible assistance, the admiral added. Harvey said a complete investigation into the cause of the crash will be made. He also pledged to share all information we have as soon as we are able to do so. VFA-106 serves as the East Coast Fleet Replacement Squadron. e units mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 replacement pilots and weapon systems ocers to support eet commitments. U.S. is world leader in helping distressed mariners under seasAt least 44 countries operate more than 400 submarines worldwide. e sophisticated safety measures in modern submarines and rigorous crew training reduce the risk of a serious mishap to an extremely low level, but nothing can reduce it to zero. Every submarine runs some small risk of a disabling casualty due to collision, ooding, equipment failure, etc. If a disabled sub has an escape trunk and bottoms in less than 600 feet of water, the surviving crew can, at least theoretically, escape to the surface without outside rescue. But even at depths of less than 600 feet, it is preferable to rescue the surviving crew of a bottomed submarine if possible. All submariners are therefore interested in a robust rescue capability. e United States elded the worlds rst submarine rescue system in the early 1930s. e Submarine Rescue Chamber, essentially a diving bell with special hatches and a downhaul system for mating with a submarine, could rescue personnel from submarines in shallow water down to about 850 feet. e SRC proved its worth in 1939 by bringing up 33 survivors in four sorties to USS Squalus (SS 192), which had sunk o the New Hampshire coast. e Navys current SRC diers little from the original one. In 1963, USS resher (SSN 593) sank o New Hampshire in much deeper water with the loss of all hands. Although she passed crush depth long before reaching bottom, her loss highlighted the requirement for a deep-diving rescue system to close the gap between the shallow reach of the SRC and the depth at which a modern submarine could survive. For timely rescue in distant waters, the new system had to be transportable by air. e highly maneuverable Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle developed to meet these requirements could be own to a friendly seaport in the vicinity of an accident and loaded aboard a surface support ship or one of several THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Is your pet peeve people with pet peeves? Page 9 Play sports Check out the Kings Bay Intramural Sports lineup Page 9 Golden Eggs See who won prizes in the Easter Egg Hunt Page 11Navy sub rescue capability spans globe Happy Easter! The Easter Bunny made a special appearance Saturday, April 7, at the Youth Center to the cheers of hundreds of children. The volunteer workers from the Child Development and Youth Centers hid hundreds of eggs at the front lawn and baseball fields there, and the children were let loose to gather as many eggs as they could fit in their basket. More photos on Page 11. Photo by Scott Bassett/NSB Public Affairs Officer F-18 Hornet crashes in Virginia BeachCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com It ruins life for everyoneSAPR Rep James E. Williams has seen it happen to one Sailor e command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response representative aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) witnessed first-hand how a sexual assault impacted the life of one young female Sailor. Informa tion Systems Technician Chief Megan C. Gibbs spoke about how the young Sailor had been fright

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First Lady Michelle Obama announced a new hiring eort intended to deliver thousands of portable, exible job opportunities to military spouses and veterans in the coming years. Eleven companies have pledged more than 15,000 jobs for military spouses and veterans, the rst lady said April 4, noting the vast majority of these jobs can be accomplished from home. is commitment will make a huge dierence for military spouses, Obama said during a teleconference announcing the initiative. Were working hard on their behalf because were proud of them, the rst lady said. Having an opportunity to have a decent job is one of the most important ways we can support these families. is new eort will oer spouses thousands of athome employment opportunities in areas such as customer support and telemarketing, as well as jobs that are physically located near military installations, a White House news release said. Nearly two dozen contact centers which oer family-friendly scheduling, growth opportunities and the ability to transfer seamlessly from one center to another have committed to hiring spouses. ese companies and their job opportunities will be integrated into the Defense Departments Military Spouse Employment Partnership, the release said. MSEP is an eort in which more than 100 private-sector companies have committed to a focused eort on military spouse employment. e rst lady noted the value of exible, portable jobs for military spouses, who must balance work and home life with military-related demands. Portability enables spouses to move without the stress of nding a new job at each new location, the rst lady said, noting military families are 10 times more likely to move across state lines than civilian families. And exible work hours offer a better work-life balance, particularly for spouses caring for children or elderly parents. Also on the call, Air Force wife Dawn Shaer recounted the challenges that drove her to nd the atwork exibility she needed. Shaer started out as a veterinary technician, but was unable to nd work in her eld after she and her husband, Air Force Sta Sgt. Travis Shaer, moved from Guam to White THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! e rst wealth is health. Ralph Waldo EmersonA few weeks ago, when the record-highest lottery payout was nearing the deadline to purchase a ticket, swarms of people lined up at gas stations and convenience stores with the hope of picking the lucky numbers. As I saw and heard about the incredible ticket sales and learned about how many people were crossing borders into states where they could purchase tickets, I started to think about the investment of not only nancial magnitude, but of time, energy and motivation that all these people were making. I was intrigued and wondered, why is it that people can so easily invest in something that they have a one in 176 million chance of winning, yet are resistant to make an investment in such a sure thing as their health? I will admit, $656 million would make most peoples lives a heck of a lot better, bringing them nancial freedom, early retirement and a life of luxury if they wish. But instead of trying to defy the long odds, doesnt it make more sense to put our eorts towards something that we know for certain can improve the quality of our life? If as many people could grow as excited and as motivated about living a healthier lifestyle as the number of people who purchased a ticket for that jackpot, there wouldnt just be three winners, there would be thousands. I could ask you how winning millions of dollars would change your life. I am sure you could provide me with a long list of what you would do with that kind of money. But because that fantasy remains well, a fantasy, I would rather have you ponder this notion ... how would being healthy and t, having more condence and energy, and feeling good about your health and your body change your life? e odds are in our favor when it comes to making an investment in our health. It is one of the few things we actually have a great deal of control over. Yes, it requires sacrice, commitment, motivation and a willingness to maintain a healthy lifestyle, but the results can be life-changing and exceedingly rewarding. So you can wait around for the next big jackpot and gamble for a better life. Or you can start taking action today and invest in your health, ensuring a better life. I guarantee this will be one bet you wont regret.Invest in health for a better life Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Volunteer income tax help offeredNavy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax provides a self-help oce including software and computers to aid service members, retirees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, near the Personnel Support Detachment and open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers assist with ling if needed. Appointments are not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Rodeo April 13, 14 in Kingslande rst annual Equine Rescue Rodeo of South Georgia will be at 7:30 p.m., April 13 and 14 on Georgia 40 in Kingsland, across from K_ Mart-Publix shopping center. Admission is $15 for adults, $7 children 5 to 12 and free under 5. Military riders can compete for free with a military ID. All proceeds benet Equine Rescue of South Georgia. Call (912) 285-0133 for more information.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. New jobs to open for military spouses Before today is over, ve children will die from being abused. At least two of them will be babies, less than a year old. e other three probably havent yet celebrated their fth birthday. e blue ribbon symbolizes the more than 5.2 million children reported abused each year to Child Protective Services throughout the United States. In 1982, by presidential proclamation, April was declared Child Abuse Prevention Month. Since that time, child abuse and neglect awareness activities have been promoted across the country during this month. In the spring of 1989, a Virginia grandmother began the blue ribbon campaign as a tribute to her grandson. e three-year-old died at the hands of his mothers abusive boyfriend. e grandmother tied a blue ribbon to the antenna of her car as a way to remember him and to alert her community to the tragedy of child abuse. Since then, concerned citizens all over the country have worn the blue ribbon as a symbol of the need to prevent child abuse and neglect. A blue ribbon is the international symbol for Child Abuse Prevention. e color blue was chosen to represent the bruised and battered bodies of the thousands of children that are abused everyday. It serves as a constant reminder that all of us have a responsibility to help keep children safe. Many times children grow up in an abusive environment and eventually become abusing parents. Without appropriate education on positive ways to parent, child abuse will continue to escalate. It is up to us as a society to increase public awareness that child abuse exists and that it can be prevented through education. Join the ght against child abuse. Get your blue ribbon today. e Blue Ribbon Mission is to: Encourage community and individual involvement in recognizing and preventing child abuse and neglect. Educate families, children, neighbors, organizations and communities on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Assist families in achieving healthy parenting practices through education and resources. Empower individuals to intervene in abuse and neglect situations when appropriate. How you can help prevent child abuse and neglect: Educate yourself on the facts and causes of child abuse and neglect in Camden County. Volunteer at an organization that helps families and children. Mentor a child who may be at risk of being abused or neglected. Take a parenting class. Invite another parent to join you. Give support to a mother, father or caregiver experiencing stress. Write letters to elected representatives in support of parent education and child abuse prevention. Arrange for a speaker at your organization or workplace to help educate others and spread the word about child abuse and neglect and how to keep kids safe. Help spread our child abuse prevention and healthy parenting message. Blue Ribbons ght child abuse, neglect Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Month Activities Friday, April 13 Dr. Barbara Craig, MD, director of Armed Forces Center for Child Protection will conduct a one-day work shop on Navigating Child Abuse Assessments: An Integrative Approach at the Kings Bay Conference Center. CEUs will be awarded. A $20 conference fee applies. Pre-registration required Contact Sallie Galyean, FFSC, at 573-0997. Wednesday, April 18 Stewards of Children is a public education program designed to educate adults on how to prevent, recognize and respond responsibly to child sexual abuse workshop. The workshop will be held at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact Sallie Galyean, FFSC, 573-0997, for additional information. 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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man Air Force Base, Mo. Wanting time at home with their baby daughter, Shaer found a job as an athome customer service pro fessional, which oers her portability and exibility. She now provides customer service to some of the largest companies in the world, she said. I absolutely love what I do. Military spouses shoulder a signicant burden, Obama noted. ey move frequently, take on additional responsibilities during deployment all while balancing the demands of family, careers and community. But while challenging, a military lifestyle also equips spouses with a vast array of in-demand job skills, the rst lady said. eyre able to troubleshoot a variety of situations, manage schedules and deal with changing circumstances all qualities any employer would value, she noted. e rst lady praised the companies that have stepped up to support spouses and veterans. Companies are not just telling military families we are inspired by them, Obama said, eyre backing it up with meaningful, concrete action. Companies key commitments include: Alpine Access has pledged to recruit, train and hire more than 3,000 military-connect ed Americans over the next two years. The company also will launch TalentSprout, an online portal with skill-building and job training curriculum. These career and personal development courses will be offered free-of-charge to qualified members of the armed forces and to their eligible spouses and caregivers. Arise Virtual Solutions Inc. plans to add 10,000 new independent busi ness and client services professionals from mili tary families over the next several years. Arise also intends to develop spe cial programs to create awareness among military spouses and veterans. DialAmerica aims to increase the number of military-aliated employees to make up 20 percent of its workforce by 2014. Etech Global Services has committed to hiring a minimum of 200 military spouses and veterans in next two years. Hilton Hotels employs nearly 800 military-related employees at their hotels and oces around the globe. In partnership with Recruit Military and other community-based organizations, Hilton Worldwide is pledging another 3.5 percent of their Hilton@ Home call center positions to military spouses through 2014. Prosperity America intends to hire 50 more vet erans and military spouses. Quality Contact Solutions is creating 150 work-at-home businessto-business marketing and communication jobs for military spouses over the next two years. ese jobs will be in the health care and telecommunications industries. Agility Marketing is planning to add 100 jobs for military spouses and veter ans over the next two years. QCSS Inc. will ensure a minimum of 10 percent of the forecasted 200 new hires from now through 2014 will be veterans and their families. SP Data intends to add more than 150 jobs for mil itary spouses and veterans over the next two years. Veteran Call Center, LLC plans to create an addition al 1,000 jobs for military spouses and veterans over the next two years.Jobs THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Activities included coloring, dancing and a popcorn party. A child meets a mascot. Students participate in various activities during the Walk, Roll and Stroll. Participants stop for a photo before they begin the Fleet and Family Support Center-sponsored parade. Children from the Child Development Center and Youth Center lead the way as they begin the Walk, Roll and Stroll. Children color to bring awareness to child abuse prevention.Pre-K students cheer as they wrap up the parade. Preventing Child Abuse Photos by Anali Aguilar and Kelly Wirfel

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 5 nuclear submarines specially modied to serve as mother submarines. e DSRVs global reach opened up unprecedented opportunities for international cooperation. In an early step toward interoperability, Britain and France also modied some submarines to serve as DSRV MOSUBs. In 1986, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization sponsored the rst Exercise Sorbet Royal, a multinational exercise focused on ensuring a practical capability to cooperate in all aspects of submarine rescue. e United States entered into agreements with other countries to provide rescue services in the event of a submarine accident. Under these agreements, the Navy began to conduct inspections to ensure that other navies submarines were capable of DSRV and SRC rescue. e Navy also began to survey airports, roads and seaports to document the most ecient path for delivering a rescue vehicle and thus minimize the time-to-rstrescue. NATO established the Submarine Escape and Rescue Working Group as a forum for working out issues such as making equipment interoperable and establishing common doctrine. Like the Sorbet Royal exercises, the SMERWG was open not just to NATO member nations, but to any country invited by NATO or a NATO member. In 2001, another grouping, the Asia-Pacic Submarine Conference, began to meet annually to discuss submarine operations in the Pacic and Indian Ocean regions. APSC discussions defaulted to submarine escape and rescue when few other topics could be identied that all participants would talk about. e August 2000 loss of the Russian submarine Kursk provided fresh impetus for multinational coordination and collaboration in submarine rescue. In 2003, NATO established the International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Oce to operate under the SMERWGs authority as a clearing house for escape and rescue information, including facilitating rescue eorts. Hosted by Allied Submarine Command in Norfolk, Va., and staed by experts from the U.S. and other NATO countries as well as two billets for nonNATO nations ISMERLOs main focus is a collaborative Web site where participating countries can share information about rescue capabilities and activities, discuss new initiatives, and quickly facilitate a multinational rescue in the event of a submarine sinking. In 2008, the U.S. Navy replaced the aging DSRVs with the Submarine Rescue Diving and Recompression System. Whereas the DSRVs had to wait for one of the few MOSUBs to reach the general vi cinity of a submarine casualty, the SRDRS could operate from any vessel of oppor tunity or any naval auxiliary or commer cial oshore support vessel with the deck space and strength to support the SRDRS equipment. Most regions of the world have ships that can serve as VOOs. e SRDRS consists of three elements. e rst is the Atmospheric Dive System 2000, a manned, one-atmosphere dive suit for inspecting a bottomed submarine and clearing escape hatches down to 2,000 feet. e second is the Pressurized Rescue Module named Falcon a tethered, remotely operated rescue vehicle launched and piloted from the deck of a VOO. e PRM can rescue 16 sailors per trip down to 2,000 feet. e third element, scheduled to become operational in 2014, is a transferunder-pressure capability consisting of a deck transfer lock that can mate with the PRM, receive Sailors exposed to high pressure, and transfer them to a decompression chamber without exposing them to normal atmospheric pressure. e Navy team that keeps U.S. submarine rescue systems on call around the clock is the San Diego-based Deep Submergence Unit, which includes not only active-duty personnel, but also reservists, contractors and government civilians. In fact, more than half the DSU sta are reservists. e Submarine Escape and Rescue Review Group, which supports the DSU, is chaired by Commodore, Submarine Development Squadron Five, and includes representatives from the DSU, the Atlantic and Pacic submarine commands, OPNAV, the Naval Sea Systems Command, ISMERLO, the Naval Submarine School and the Naval Medical Submarine Research Lab. Like the DSRV before it, the SRDRS serves as the focal point for submarine rescue agreements with partner countries, which provide dedicated rescue ships or VOOs, transportation from qualied airports and seaports, or other support the participants deem appropriate. More than 20 such agreements are now in eect or under discussion. e goal is to load submarine rescue assets aboard aircraft at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, transport them to the location of a distressed submarine, and make them ready for rescueall within 72 hours of notication. e U.S. routinely participates in exercises designed to sharpen skills and accustom participants to working with personnel of other nationalities. e largest is the NATO-sponsored Exercise Bold Monarch, formerly called Sorbet Royal, which takes place every three years. In the words of NATOs invitation to prospective 2011 participants, Bold Monarch demonstrates that NATO, in participation with submarine operating nations, can cooperate in lifesaving operations from a distressed submarine, including all medical aspects involved. Ships, submarines and rescue systems from 14 nations took part in Bold Monarch 2008, while 26 countries sent observers. Submarines from the Netherlands, Norway, and Poland worked with rescue systems provided by three other countries. e U.S. rescue system was airlifted into the theater, providing considerable practice in the associated logistics. e U.S. PRM Falcon rescued over 200 personnel in 13 sorties to bottomed submarines. Most of the 29 ag-level dignitaries who visited the exercise got to experience being rescued, including a French three-star rescued by a Russian system from a Norwegian sub. e Pacic region exercise is called Pacic Reach, the regular participants being Australia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and the United States. Singapore, which hosted the rst Pacic Reach in 2000, also hosted the most recent one in August 2010. irteen countries sent observers in 2010, among them China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, South Africa, ailand, and Vietnam. Japanese, Singaporean, and Korean submarines worked with rescue systems from the U.S. and Singapore. e United States and Singapore also provided, respectively, the rescue and salvage ships USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) and MV Swift Rescue. ened of the repercussions should anyone found out, and she was embarrassed that it had happened. She didnt know who to turn to, and worst of all, she didnt think anyone would believe her. She became withdrawn, and afterwards, she chose to leave the Navy upon completion of her rst tour. For Gibbs, spreading awareness of sexual assault is a cause she strives to take to the deckplates to prevent stories like this from ever happening again. Along with Gibbs, service members from all branches of the United States military have banded together in solidarity to recognize Sexual Assault Awareness Month. e goal of SAAM is to reduce sexual assault through direct and sustained engagement of all hands. From placing teal ribbons and posters around the ship, to conducting training and counseling, Sailors aboard the James E. Williams are actively participating in the eort to raise awareness of the impact sexual assault has on both the individual and the crew. As SAPR representatives, we provide immediate assis tance to sexually-assaulted victims, Gibbs said. We provide them with resources, medical care, and proper reporting. While response is necessary in dealing with the fallout of sexual assault, SAPR representatives incorporate a variety of training aids to educate the crew on what sexual assault is, how it can thwart the mission, and what resources are available to victims. We use Powerpoint presentations, scenario cards, and training videos, Gibbs said. ese are just a few of the methods we have to reach the crew. Gibbs hopes these training aids also help reduce and prevent sexual assault from occurring. Some people have it stuck in their mind that because she didnt say no, or the person was asking for it, that the perpetrator feels its acceptable to engage in sexual acts with the victim, said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ashley R. omson, a SAPR victim advocate aboard James E. Williams. But is really comes down to no means no, because without consent its sexual assault. omson stresses that the individual assaulted is not the only one aected. It puts a strain on both the victim and the command, omson said. e command might lose the Sailors involved, or it can cause people to become mentally unt to do their job. e eects of sexual assault can erode operational readiness and create a tense and high-pressure workplace, which can lead to a breakdown in performance. It makes people worry that it can happen to them; their shipmates, their friends, and they can be constantly uneasy about what happened to them, or they can breakdown and shut everything out, omson said. By making the program noticeable around the command through yers, sexual assault ribbons, and by providing resources for the crew, SAPR advocates work to prevent sexual assault and ensure victims receive the proper attention, omson said. Servicemembers are taught to take care of each other, Gibbs said. We are here to accomplish our mission, and sexual assault terribly hinders that. SAPRRescue

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Coast Guard saves yachtmen An announcement was heard aboard Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf: is is the XO coming to you from the pilot house happy April 1st Bertholf Weve been diverted and directed to make best speed to a vessel in distress No joke! As the executive ocer aboard Bertholf over the past two years, Ive had the great fortune of seeing this platform answer the call time after time. Our recent search and rescue case was no exception demonstrating the remarkable capabilities that our national security cutter brings to the ght. It was a dark and stormy Saturday night. Bertholf was on patrol o the Cali fornia coast when we received a call diverting us to the northwest for a sailing vessel that had suered serious personnel injuries after being tossed about by some monstrous waves. All that lay between us and the distressed vessel was 300 nautical miles and a low pressure system harboring 40 to 50-knot winds and 20 to 30-foot seas. Bertholf landed a Jayhawk helicopter out of Air Station San Diego and then proceeded overnight into the next day directly into the heart of the storm. While unthinkable in our nearly 50-year-old high-endurance cutter, we proceeded with a medium range helicopter secure on our large ight deck making full speed dead into the 20-foot seas. e national security cutters speed of service, sea-keeping and reliability are unlike any other ship in Coast Guard inventory. e Bertholf, in this case, proved an extreme endur ance cutter giving us the ability to travel twice as fast in howling gale while car rying a larger helicopter that could y twice as far a quantum leap forward for safety of life at sea. After punching through the storm, we were able to nd a eeting pocket of fair weather on the backside, allowing us to launch our helicopter towards the sailing vessel while continuing at full speed towards the vessel ourselves. e helicopter crew ar rived on scene and at tempted to lower a rescue swimmer, who was tempo rarily hung up in the rigging of the sailing vessel due to the stormy seas and the tight area in which to de scend on the racing yacht. At this point, given Bertholfs proximity to the sailing vessel, the hoist attempt was aborted after weighing the risks as we closed and assessed we were able to launch our response boat. e size of Bertholf not only provided the necessary speed and sea-keeping abilities, but also a great lee when the going gets tough to allow the tough to get going. Bertholf maneuvered up swell from the sailing vessel and launched our response boat. Once the response boat was away, Bertholf was able to keep station to provide a bit of a lee for the sailing vessel to aord our small boat crew the opportunity to move in for the rescue. Once the small boat was back aboard Bertholf, we were able to assess the patients condition and determined we could safely transport them back to port aboard the ship. Upon return to homeport the following day, we transferred the patients ashore and were surprised at all the media attention the case had received. Marine earns Silver Star e parade deck at San Mateo was lled with Marines March 29, as Sgt. Ryan T. Sotelo, a San Mateo, Calif. native, was awarded the Silver Star. He was honored for the actions he took as a squad leader with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment while deployed to Sangin District, Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Maj. Gen. Ronald L. Bailey, commanding general, 1st Marine Division, presented the medal to Sotelo, who is now a scout sniper with Battalion Landing Team 3/5, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. e Silver Star Medal is the United States third highest award for combat valor and is fth in the precedence of military awards. It was humbling when the general pinned on the star, said Sotelo. When we perform out in country we dont do it for metals, we do it for the Marine on the right and left of us. On Nov. 25, 2010, Sotelos squad was ambushed in an open eld with machinegun and small arms re, killing the platoon commander. Without hesitation, Sotelo took charge of the unit and moved them to a nearby canal. He then sprinted through heavy re across open ground to retrieve the body of his fallen lieutenant. With the defensive position now unreachable because of intense small arms re, he called in supporting arms to cover the squads movement to a nearby compound. As insurgents began to assault the position, he fearlessly led his squad as they repelled the enemy. When one enemy com batant began to re on an exposed Marine, Sotelo closed in on the insurgent and killed him with a gre nade. As soon as we got across, we got lit up and engaged in every direction, said Cpl. Jose Launder, Company K, 3rd Bn., 5th Marines. So telo just ran over and threw a grenade. After a reinforcing Marine unit was pinned down by heavy re from the insurgents, Sotelo again disregarded his own safety to engage the enemy machinegun with rie, nally calling in an air strike that silenced the enemy re. I think a lot of us are here because of his actions that day, added Launder. Realizing that his situation was dire, Sotelo lead a ghting withdrawal more than 600 meters through enemy re to bring his squad back to friendly lines and safety. Sergeant Sotelo will continue serving his country as he prepares for the 15th MEUs upcoming deployment scheduled for this summer. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. April 19. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention April 16safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A training lasting about three hours, safeTALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connected to helpers who are prepared to provide first aid interven tions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, April 16. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 17Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. April 19. Registration is required. For more informa tion, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 17 and 24. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Car-buying strategies examined April 16This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and highpressure sales tactics. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 23The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs will be at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 23. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 25. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This new class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 27. To register call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets April 26The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 26. To register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 25Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 25. It can help you identify the feelings anger hides and explore behav iors helpful in resolving issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is 9 a.m. to noon, April 25. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more or contribute your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center takes most of its workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 7

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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I agree with all the answers below. But I am seldom really annoyed. I surprised myself recently when I blurted out to a chief, Blow your nose! I didnt really mean to do it, is just kinda came out. He was doing something I call snot sucking. When I used to do this as a child, my mother would always come running with a tissue, cover my nose with it and order me to, Blow! It was her pet peeve. I guess somewhere right now my mom is laughing. They say we all turn into our parents eventually. CS1 Kevin Calliste NSB Barracks Washington, D.C. When people, based on other peoples opinion, think somebody is no good. Elizabeth Watson Family member Mason, Tenn. The invisible dividing line between officers and enlisted. ET1 Kevin Plyler USS Tennessee Gold Lancaster, S.C. People who waste their own and other peoples time. Lance Cpl. Brandon Damiani Security Force Battalion Cutchogue, N.Y. Getting used to the heat down here. CS2 Nicholas Vermenlen NSB Kings Bay Ira, Mich. My only pet peeve is a dirty sink. Stacey Nichols Retired Navy Atlanta One of them is not making the bed after you get up. I cant stand a dirty bedroom.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Signal processing Courtney Abbott and Kyle Terry from the traveling show Sex Signals end their presentation in front of a laughing crowd of Sailors and Marines stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, April 5. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Sex Signals is one of the non-traditional training presentations scheduled at the base. Navy photo by MC1 James KimberAs society becomes increasingly fastpaced and busy, I believe participating in some form of recreation becomes more important. Recreation oers individuals an escape from day-to-day routine and the opportunity to engage in intrinsically satisfying activities. I consider myself lucky to be able to oer individuals the means to participate in these recreational activities. I believe that oering a variety of well-planned sports and activities can improve the morale and the health of the individuals participating in the programs. As the Adult Sports Coordinator at Kings Bay, my goal is to oer programsPlaying sports for the love of it Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports Coordinator THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 9

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As U.S., NATO and Afghan ocials discuss the future of night raids in Afghanistan, the raids are effective and Afghan forces participate in the planning of every night operation, a senior Defense Department ocial said in Washington, D.C., April 3. [Night raids have] been a concern of the Afghan govern ment for some time, George Little, acting assistant secretary of defense for public affairs, said in a news conference. We recognize that. We recognize the effectiveness, as well, that night operations have had over time. NATO and U.S. ocials contend that conducting night operations reduces the danger to civilians while keeping pressure on insurgents. International Security Assistance Force ocials in the Afghan capital of Kabul say 85 percent of night operations occur without a shot being red, and only about 1 percent of night operations have led to civilian casualties. Still, night operations are a bone of contention for the Afghan government, and the coalition is working with the government to assuage their concerns, Little said. We believe were making progress in heading toward an agreement on this and a broad range of other issues, he added. ISAF forces are working hand in hand with our Afghan partners on night operations, and they are highly eective. Al-Qaida is smaller and has been hurt badly by continued U.S. and coalition attacks, but it remains a danger, Little said. e important thing to remember about al-Qaida is that even though they may be smaller than some other groups in the region, its about their objectives, he said. And even though they are damaged from serious pressure thats been brought to bear against them, one of their objectives remains to attack the United States and our allies. So we have to keep the pressure up. We have to make sure that they dont have the ability to strike us again. Little stressed that Afghan national security forces are making progress. About 330,000 Afghan soldiers and police are serving today, a number headed to 352,000 this summer. eyre doing great work, on their own and with us and with our allies, Little said. Iran can put end to economic pressureU.S., Afghanistan negotiate on night raids WASHINGTON, April 5, 2012 Economic and diplomatic sanctions are biting Iran, but Iranian government leaders can stop the pain by ending their nuclear weapons program, a senior Pentagon ocial said April 5. Our assessment of the program remains the same. We are very concerned about where they might be headed, said George Little, acting assistant secretary of defense for public aairs. An Iran with a nuclear weapon is unacceptable. e United States has made that point crystal clear that all options are on the table to prevent Iran from developing that capability, Little said in a meeting with reporters. We dont know, at this stage, whether they have made the decision to proceed with the development of a nuclear weapon, he said. It would be unacceptable if they do move forward. American experts are working to discern just what Iranian leaders have decided. Our government has been very clear about what needs to happen, Little said. If Iran gives up its nuclear program, he noted, the country can rejoin the community of nations. Little said Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta believes the sanctions are working. that inspire the Kings Bay population to interact socially through healthy competition, all the while adhering to the code of sportsmanship. I want to promote a sense of community and respect among all participants. e overall goal of participation should be forming new friendships through sports and being active, not simply winning a game or a trophy. is philosophy sometimes gets lost, as the very nature of sports is competition and everyone wants the spoils that accompany victory. My hope is that the thirst for the trophy does not overshadow the true purpose of recreational activities. Use recreation to enrich your life and make new connections, rather than transform it into a source of stress with a primary focus on winning. Sports 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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April is the Month of the Military Child, so celebrate at the free Kidsfest 2012, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at Under e Pines Park and the Tennis Court area. Food will be available for purchase. Free cotton candy, Mobil Gaming System, Laser Tag, Fun Zone and Sports Zone. Also, face-painting, balloon artist and wax hands. Demonstrations by Lisa Allen, Tai Kwon Do and the Mad Scientist. For more information call (912) 573-4564. New lap swim hours at the Kings Bay Pool Lap swim hours are being re-adjusted to better serve active duty members. The new hours started April 2. Morning lap swim is 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Active duty has priority. Lunch lap swim is 11 a.m. to noon for active duty only. Open lap swim is noon to 1 p.m. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Information, Tickets and Travel in a new location Look for ITT at the Outdoor Adventure Center when the two share a building in April. ITT has information, travel destinations and tickets for most area attractions plus more. Check us out for holiday destinations and vouchers for hotels in Orlando and other areas of the U.S. For more info call (912) 573-2289. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Under the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great movie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompa nied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 6 Rio; April 7 and 8 Hop April 9 Tangled, April 14 and 15 Gnomeo & Juliet, April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids Kidsfest fun this Saturday Liberty call 212242A01NOTE TO PUB:DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY.NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Wildfire Prevention Newspaper B&W WFPA03-N-01263-D Your Name Here13 x 21 85 line screen digital files at Schawk:(212) 689-8585 Ref#:212242 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012 11

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 12, 2012