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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-05-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00247

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00247


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PAGE 1

Rear Adm. Prindle spreads message at NSB Kings Bay Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, commander, Naval Safety Cen ter, met with service members and civilian motorcyclists, command Motorcycle Safety Repre sentatives and safety profession als Oct. 19 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e purpose of his visit was to discuss the variety of motorcycle safety issues that service mem bers continuously face, both on and o duty. Representatives and guests from each command at Kings Bay were able to participate in the meeting. ey provided in put, suggestions and asked Prin dle questions about motorcycle safety. The prima ry dis cus sion points focused on risk man age ment and training for motorcycle rid ers. From my perspective, safety is a mindset, you must under stand the risks, Prindle said. Our ultimate goal is zero preventable mishaps. A preventable mishap is one that you should have seen coming. rough ef fective risk management, you safely manage your way through the task, or you decide that its too risky to safely execute. When you truly under stand your environ ment, you should be able to at tain zero preventable mishaps. e Naval Safety Center reported that 16 Sailors died in oduty motorcycle crashes in scal year 2011, slightly more than the previous year. Nine of those rid ers had taken the required basic motorcycle safety course, but only three had taken the followup sport bike training course, which is also mandatory. Safety center experts say the tragic total might have been lowered had those service members taken the additional training. Our main focus this year is to close the training gap, Prindle said. We want to provide good professional training, so you can all be good, professional riders. e bottom line is, training saves lives. Fleet & Family active combating violence Womens organized protests against violence began in the late 1970s in England with Take Back the Night marches. ese women-only protests emerged in direct response to the violence that women en countered as they walked the streets at night. Activities became more co ordinated and soon developed into a movement that extended to the United States. In 1978, the rst Take Back the Night events in the America were held in San Francisco and New York City. Over time, sexual assault awareness activities expanded to include the issue of sexual violence against men and mens participation in ending sexual violence. By the early 1980s, there was increased interest in coordinat ing activities to raise awareness of violence against women. As a result, time was set aside during October to raise awareness of violence against women issues. October became the princi ple focus of domestic violence awareness activities. Sexual as sault advocates looked THEkings bay, georgia Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Up Periscope Quick now! Give me 5 personal preferences Page 9 Sea Cadets Sailors of tomorrow do tour at Kings Bay Page 4 Pet moves Kings Bays vet clinic offers traveling tips Page 2 Bike safety emphasized Walk, Roll & Stroll From my perspective, safety is a mindset ... Rear Adm. Brian Prindle Naval Safety Center Sexual Assault Awareness Month observed at NSB Panetta blasts CongressSequestration could cost DoD $500 billion in spending cutsDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta blasted Congress March 30 for threatening the Defense Department with sequestration he said would be devastating to the force. Congress did a stupid thing, he told crewmembers of USS Peleliu during a shipboard vis it o the Southern California coast. What they essentially did was to put a gun to their heads and to the head of the country and basically say that if they did not come up with a plan to reduce the def icit, that this so-called sequester process would go into eect. at process, the secretary ex plained, would cut $1.2 trillion in federal spending across the board almost $500 billion to come from the defense budget. e cuts would be imple mented across the board, he said, guaranteeing that the force would be hollowed out in the e Veterans Aairs Depart ment is making progress on its pledge to end homelessness among veterans, with a focus on getting all homeless veterans o the streets by 2015, VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki told American Forces Press Service. Shinseki joined President Barack Obama in announcing the plan in November 2009, pro claiming that no veteran should ever have to be living on the streets. VA is working toward that goal, Shinseki told Congress last month, reporting that the num ber of homeless veterans on a given night dropped from 76,300 in 2010 to about 67,500 in 2011. e next goal, he said, is to drive those numbers down to 35,000 by the end of scal 2013, and ul timately, to zero. As Shinseki set out to trans form VA after arriving in 2009, he made the homeless issue a top priority in getting to the bottom of what he viewed as an institu tional problem. Homeless ness among veterans was a demonstration to me that we didnt have all our pro grams knitted together, he said. As good as we thought we were doing in health care and other benets, we had people who were slip ping through the gaps in our programs most visibly, the homeless. To support this eort, VAs budget request for scal 2013 includes nearly $1.4 billion for programs designed to prevent or end homelessness among veter ans. is represents a 33 percent increase, or $333 million, over the 2012 funding level. e additional funding will provide grants and technical as sistance to community nonprot organizations to maintain veter ans and their families in current housing or get them quickly into new housing.VAs help for homeless vets on target

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A Navy message recently released reminds Sailors of requirements as sociated with receiving involuntary separation pay. According to NAVADMIN 093/12, all Sailors involuntarily released from active duty, to include Sailors aected by the Enlisted Retention Board, may be eligible for ISP. Command leadership, career counselors and aected Sailors must review the message to ensure timely actions are met to receive payment. ISP has Navy Reserve require ments and obligations. Career counselors and command leadership can assist Sailors with applying for aliation in conjunc tion with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their initial military service obligation. e Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve. e SELRES consists of drilling re servists and units. SELRES typically fulll the traditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. e IRR oers Reserve aliation benets without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sail ors in the IRR have to maintain mobilization readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or conditions that may af fect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to aord every Sailor an opportunity to tran sition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily sep arated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Performto-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can contact the Career Transition Oce to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to aliate with the IRR. A Sailor who aliates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their supporting personnel of ce. is must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benet, according to the mes sage. If a signed Reserve aliation contract is not completed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Re cords to receive ISP. Under current legislation, Sailors who collect ISP and later collect a military retirement must repay their ISP upon retirement. Under current legislation, ISP must also be repaid upon receipt of Department of Veterans Aairs dis ability compensation. e Defense Finance and Ac counting Service will reduce retirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid. Read the message for more infor mation or call the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at (866) 827-5672 or e-mail cscmailbox@navy.mil. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! e higher your energy level, the more ecient your body. e more ecient your body, the better you feel and the more you will use your talent to produce outstanding results. Anthony RobbinsLast week I talked about the arrival of spring and the opportunity to revive our new years goals. As the weather con tinues to get warmer, and we start thinking about cookouts, the beach and summer vacations, we are reminded that if we want to look and feel our best this summer, we had better get to work. Whether your goal is to t into your favorite summer dress, be comfortable wearing that strappy bikini, have more energy to play with the kids at the beach or just show o some tight abs, now is the time to start working on shedding that unwanted winter weight! I think it is important to feel comfortable in your own skin yearround. In the summer months we tend to show a little more of it, and people seem to be extra motivated to get in shape. I once had a client who said she wanted to lose weight and get in shape so that dur ing her familys yearly beach vaca tion she would be comfortable enough to take a walk down the beach without feeling the need to wear her cover-up. is specic goal, along with her deep desire to make a change in her life, allowed her to lose 85 pounds and condently strut down the beach. is time of year promotes being active. Going on a walk or jog in the cool of the early morning leaves you feeling energized and ready to tackle the day. Hitting the gym in the evening is a positive way to wrap up your day and will leave you with a great sense of accomplishment. Regardless of when you choose to exercise, I encourage you to nd a workout you enjoy and look forward to doing. It is much more challenging to get motivated to do something you dread than something you take pleasure in. In an eort to help you get in shape for summer, the Kings Bay Fitness Complex is launching a Shape Up For Summer Fitness Challenge. is is an eight-week program that begins with weigh-ins on April 5 and 6. e program starts on April 9. e challenge is to workout at least twice a week at the Fitness Complex. It can be during Group Fitness classes, Command PT or individual workouts. Each participant will have a workout tracking card. Points will be earned for each workout completed. Workouts must be at least 30 minutes in length. ere will be opportunities to earn bonus points. Prizes will be awarded to the person with the greatest percentage of body weight lost, as well as to the person with the most points earned. Leave the excuses behind and come take our challenge to shape up for summer For more information, call me at 573-8972.Its time to Shape Up For Summer Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Volunteer income tax help offeredNavy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax provides a self-help oce including software and computers to aid service members, retir ees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, near the Per sonnel Support Detachment and open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers assist with ling if needed. Appointments are not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be avail able for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Rodeo April 13, 14 in Kingslande rst annual Equine Rescue Rodeo of South Georgia will be at 7:30 p.m., April 13 and 14 on Georgia 40 in Kingsland, across from K_ Mart-Publix shopping center. Admission is $15 for adults, $7 children 5 to 12 and free under 5. Military riders can compete for free with a military ID. All proceeds benet Equine Rescue of South Georgia. Call (912) 285-0133 for more information.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. Involuntary Separation Staying abreast of ISP requirements ere are many regulations about ying with and transporting our pets. Knowing and abiding by these rules is the pet owners responsibil ity, with veterinary personnel guid ing you through the process. A licensed veterinarian must is sue a health certicate to all ani mals traveling by air within 10 days of transport. Health certicates can be obtained by appointment at U.S. Army Veterinary Treatment Facili ties worldwide. is Web site includes links to all VTFs: vetcom.amedd.army.mil/ map.html. If youre going to Japan, Hawaii or Guam, these locations require long quarantine periods before your ani mal will be admitted beyond the ar rival point. e process to qualify for shorter quarantine periods requires multiple visits with your pet to your local VTF. Failure to follow the proper timeline can result in extended quaran tine times for your pets and large out of pocket expenses upon arrival. Additionally, many countries re quire health certicates and rabies certicates from civilian veterinar ians to have original signatures and to be countersigned or stamped by a U.S.D.A. veterinarian. In most countries, but not all, orig inal signatures by Army Veterinary Corps Ocers are exempt from this requirement, so it may be advanta geous to complete all of the steps in the process through the base VTF. Regulations also prevent pets from riding in temperatures under 45 degrees or more than 85 degrees for more than 45 minutes. is can be a major concern depending on what cities your ight goes through during your travels. It may be neces sary to ship your pet before or after the PCS in order to safely transport. For other foreign countries, see the listed Web sites and contact your local VTF. Questions about sedatives, food and water the day of travel, and traveling with very old, young or de bilitated animals are best addressed with a veterinarian before the date for the nal health certicate exam. Appointments at the VTFs ll up fast, so plan to call to schedule at least two to three weeks before the travel date. Heres a useful Web sites for Transport Security Administration traveling with pets: www.tsa.gov/ travelers/airtravel/assistant/edito rial_1036.shtm. Heres one with international requirements listed by destination: vetcom.amedd.army.mil/vetops/ international.html. Here are some tips from success ful travelers: Plan months in advance Stay flexible Contact the commercial airline months before you PCS Fly to any major hub Stay overnight if necessary Rent a car and drive to your des tination Take leave to avoid being rushed Send your pets with your family either before or after the weather embargo starts If your pet is traveling in a car rier you can ll the water container half way with water and freeze the night before, so that small amounts of water will be available without spilling NSB Veterinarian Clinic Traveling, PCSing with your pets 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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e Navy Personnel Command Web site, hosted at www.npc.navy.mil contains links to guidance and pol icy, programs, pay and benets, Navy messages, stories and much more, ocials reminded Sailors March 28. Our objective is to provide Sailors and their fami lies with a one-stop shop for all Navy-related informa tion and to get answers to their questions in a central ized location, said Lt. Jon Williams, functional Web site manager, NPC communications. e NPC Web site provides information and guidance vital to Sailors from boot camp to retirement and beyond. According to Williams, the NPC Web site is the second most visited Navy Web site and more than 85 percent of the Navys Web content can only be found here. e Web site contains more than 2,500 pages, 15,000 documents and registers nearly one million visits per month. e Reference Library section, which contains U.S. Navy forms and instructions and DoD directives and publications, receives the most active visits every month. In February, the NAVADMIN 2012 page was the most popular page accessed on the Web site and received more than 100,000 views. e Knowledge Base is another valuable feature on the NPC Web site and was created to supplement the NPC Customer Service Center. A Sailor can always call or e-mail the CSC for information, but also has the abil ity to go to www.npc.navy.mil to research and answer his or her own questions online 24/7. e Knowledge Base can be accessed from anywhere in the world. Sailors, retirees and their families can ask any question they want to about the Navy. e system uses keywords to generate a solution to their question. Sailors can access the Knowledge Base by visiting the NPC Web site and clicking on the Ask NPC a Question icon in the upper right corner of the page. e Naval Safety Center oers tips for Sailors in advance of spring vaca tions. e biggest stereotypes about spring break revolve around alcohol abuse. While movies and television may glamorize binge drinking, the Centers for Disease Control report that this behavior can be deadly. e center denes binge drinking as a male consuming ve or more alcoholic beverages or a woman consuming four or more alcoholic beverages within a two-hour period. ey report ndings that have alarming implications for Sailors: The prevalence of drinking among men is higher than the prev alence among women. About 90 percent of the alcohol consumed by those under the age of 21 is in the form of binge drinks. Binge drinkers are 14 times more likely to report alcohol-impaired driving than non-binge drinkers. Given that there are a large num ber of males and younger adults in the Navy, these statistics show there is reason for concern. Nonetheless, Sailors have plenty of smart options, according to Dan Dray, a trac and recreation safety specialist at NAVSAFECEN. We know that the young Sailors and Marines are going to go out and have fun, but the biggest asset they have in terms of safety is their peers, Dray said. Everyone carries a cell phone these days, so if youve had too much to drink, call a friend to come pick you up or take advantage of the safe ride programs that many ships oer. Training and awareness appear to be paying o. e Naval Safety Center tracks whether alcohol was a fac tor in fatal mishaps. e recently completed winter safety campaign ran from Dec. 1, 2011, through Feb. 29. is season there were two fatalities where alco hol was a contributing factor. Both were motor vehicle mishaps. While those are two too many, when compared to winter 20102011 when there were six alcoholrelated fatalities and winter 20092010 when there were nine, its an obvious improvement and a trend consistently moving in the right di rection. While impaired driving is an ob vious danger associated with overconsumption of alcohol, there are other problems as well. Aside from health risks such as high blood pressure, stroke, neuro logical damage and liver disease, the CDC reports that alcohol abuse is a major factor in sexual assaults. Eliminating this criminal behav ior is a major goal in the Navy and Marine Corps according to a recent blog post detailing Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. e safety portion of this initiative states in part that the naval services will aggressively prevent sexual as saults from occurring, support sexu al assault victims, and hold oend ers accountable. Using alcohol responsibly and maintaining situational awareness are important steps toward achiev ing this goal, Dray said. Naval Safety Center Keep safety guard up in springtime e USS Tennessee family is saddened by the tragic loss of our shipmate, brother and friend, So nar Technician Submarine 3rd Class Joseph Cas son. Everyones deepest condolences and prayers go out to his family. Petty Ocer Casson was a great American and an exceptional Sailor, who left an indelible mark on all. Tennessee was better for having him, and our nation has lost a tremendous young man. ere will be a memorial service at the Kings Bay Chapel at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 6. Uniform for military personnel is service dress blue; civilians should wear appropriate civilian attire.Memorial service set for STS3 Joseph Casson Contact a pet broker to ship your pets in case you cannot take them with you Allow sucient time between connecting ights in case there are delays or your pets can not y due to weather restrictions Have a list of hotels that accept pets in the cit ies you are stopping Do time consuming tasks weeks before you PCS Make an appoint ment with the Veterinary Treatment Facility for a health certicate within 10 days of your departure If you have further ques tions, need to schedule an appointment to obtain a health certicate or want to pick up copies of your pets medical records for travel, call the Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment Facility at (912) 573-0755. Happy and safe traveling.Pets Navy Personnel has new Web site THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Sea Cadets Sea Cadet PO3 Riley Regul, maneuvers a 64-foot small boat in the Saint Marys River. Sea Cadet SA Joshua Warren gets his sea legs. League Cadet Chandler Leonard gets a laugh out of BM3 Jennifer Grossman while underway. Coast Guardsmen and Naval Sea Cadets ride the waves off Fort Clinch, Fla. Clockwise from above left, Sea Cadets work together to solve a problem, Regul plots boat postions and Leonard maneuvers a compass. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 5 Preventing child abuse An active duty course manager and lead instruc tor at the Center for Infor mation Dominance Unit Corry Station, Fla., re cently obtained two certications through the Navy Credentialing Opportunities On-Line program. Cryptologic Technician Networking 1st Class Jes sica Gaukel manages and teaches the Joint Cyber Analysis Course course at CID and continues to take advantage of the Navy COOL program which has provided opportunities for Sailors who want to achieve excellence since 2006. Gaukel has recently ob tained two certications Comp TIA NetworkPlus and Security-Plus through the Navy COOL program. Gaukel said she also is studying to obtain her CISCO Computer Net work Administration cer tication. Navy COOL is a centralized, Web-based hub that consolidates information from numerous sources at the federal, state and local levels on certications, licenses, apprenticeships and growth opportunities that correspond with each Navy rating, job and occu pation. Armed with that in formation, Navy COOL has provided funding for Navy enlisted personnel to obtain civilian licenses and certications that are closely aligned with a Sailors job or rating. By holding a certi cation, youre meeting an industry-recognized standard of competency so that said, youre able to show your current or ganization whether it be military or any company that youve met an indus try-wide standard, but youre also able to show your peers that youve met that, Navy COOL Program Manager Keith Boring said. If a certication is not required for your rat ing, its still highly recom mended if you want to stay current in your eld. Gaukel said the certi cations she has obtained verify that she is capable of both operating and secur ing computer networks at the same level as her civilian counterparts. She stressed that ob taining the civilian certi cations are an important step not only for her per sonal development as a Sailor, but for any Sailor who wants to excel in the Navy. For active duty Sail ors, obtaining a certication can be their next step, something that will help them get promoted, Gaukel said. A certi cation is something the board can see that will set that Sailor from their peers. Chief Cryptologic Technician Networking Tammy Sternberg JCAC senior en listed leader said Gaukel has a reputation as being an outstanding techni cian, thanks in part to her pursuit of certications through Navy COOL. Petty Ocer Gaukel is our JCAC lead instruc tor and course manager, a position normally held by a chief petty ocer, Sternberg said. Her tech nical skills and knowledge have been enhanced by her pursuit of Navy COOL certications. To date, Navy COOL has processed nearly 66,000 credentials for Sailors and received more than 118 million hits to the Navy COOL Web site at www. cool.navy.mil. Navy COOL Program Supervisor Sam Kelley said his team cross-linked every Navy specialty or rating with Department of Labor equivalent and en sured the Navy oered at least one civilian certica tion to each job within the Navy. Boring said the thor oughness of the Navys training is showing up in the high rate being achieved by Sailors in successfully passing the certication and licensing examinations. On average, Sailors are passing at a rate of 96 per cent to 98 percent for vol untary licenses and certications, compared to the national average pass rate of 75 percent to 80 per cent. Gaukel explained that Navy COOL is, for many new Sailors, their rst op portunity to take advan tage of advanced training because new ascensions, dont qualify for tuition as sistance to attend college until theyve completed one year of active service. What I try to tell all of our students, is that after they complete A school, they should go through Navy COOL, obtain a voucher to take these certications, Gaukel said. ey should take a couple of days for review, but they should be able to pass their exams, and the best thing is that Navy COOL pays for all of it. e end result of the pursuit of a civilian certi cation is that the Sailors individual professional knowledge and skill-set usually increases due to the extra preparation time required for certication examinations and ongoing maintenance of that certication. By using these certi cations, and learning and reviewing the new est books that come out, were staying current, Gaukel said. So theyre continually feeding themselves to become a better operator, a better analyst, and a better Sailor. CID is the Navys Learn ing Center that leads, manages and delivers Navy and joint force train ing in information opera tions, information technology, cryptology and intelligence. With a sta of nearly 1,300 military, civilian and contracted sta members, CID oversees the development and administration of more than 168 courses at four commands, two detachments and 14 learning sites throughout the United States and in Japan. CID provides training for approximately 24,000 members of the U.S. Armed Services and allied forces each year. Navy COOL is one of many opportunities for personal and professional growth available to Sailors to earn certicates, licens es and degrees making them invaluable assets to the Navy. ose programs are important parts of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consoli dates a set of objectives and policies, new and ex isting, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most com bat-eective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. Sailors earn credentials e Chief of Naval Operations released NAVADMIN 083/10 March 12 out lining the realignment of his sta at the Pentagon to enhance the Navys ability to navigate scal challenges and deliver eet and platform readiness. Vice Adm. Bill Burke will assumed the new position of Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Sys tems (N9) March 12. He is responsible for the integra tion of manpower, training, sustainment, modernization, and procurement of the Navys warfare systems currently resourced by the directors of Expeditionary Warfare (N95), Surface Warfare (N96), Undersea Warfare (N97), and Air Warfare (N98). e realignment combines resources, and re sponsibilities necessary for procurement, manpower, training and readi ness under the resource sponsors for information dominance, surface war fare, undersea warfare, air warfare, and expeditionary warfare Burke. ese changes are intended to improve decision making processes associated with planning, programming, budgeting, and execution, and enhance our focus on warghting capability and total ownership cost. With this realignment, N8 will be responsible for integration of capabilities and resources and will be comprised of the directors for Programming (N80), Assessments (N81), Fiscal Management (N82), Na vy-Joint Capabilities and Integration (N83), Innova tion, Test and Evaluation, and Technology Requirements (N84), and Special Programs (N89). e director of test and evaluation and technology requirements (currently N091) will realign to N8 (N84) to improve under standing of future systems science and technology needs and eectiveness of our science and technology investment. e Naval Warfare Inte gration Group (N00X) will also be realigned to N81 to better integrate the OP NAV assessment process. CNO realigns OPNAV sta

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U.S. suspends MIA search in North Korea e United States has suspended eorts to nd remains of U.S. service members lost during the Korean War due to North Korean threats to launch a ballistic missile, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said in Washington D.C., March 21. Recovering remains of those lost and unac counted for is a priority to the Defense Department, and U.S. experts were due to enter North Korea this month. We have suspended that eort because we be lieve that North Korea has not acted appropriately in recent days and weeks and that its important for them to return to the stan dards of behavior that the international community has called for, Little said at a Pentagon news con ference. We do hope at some point to be able to re-engage the eort. e United States sees the recovery of remains as a humanitarian mission and does not link those operations with other policy issues, Tara Rigler, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said in a statement. However, she added, the North Koreans politicized these humanitarian op erations by linking them to long-standing annual military exercises which are defensive in nature and are designed to increase the interoperability between the United States and [South Korea]. Rigler said these actions and other developments call into question the credibility of all of North Koreas commitments, including the remains re covery operations. As a result, she added, we are suspending the current arrangement to resume remains recovery operations with [North Korea] until their actions indicate a willingness to move forward in good faith on its commitments. North Korea cited the exercises in refusing to honor procedures agreed to in October. Since then, Little said, indications have emerged that North Korea might launch ballis tic missiles. at would be in con travention of U.N. Security Council resolutions, he added, and that is unac ceptable behavior. e United States hopes to engage in the future with North Korea on ef forts to recover remains, Little said. But when there are suggestions that they might launch ballistic missiles, when they make bellicose statements about South Korea and engage in ac tions that could be con strued as provocative, we think that its not the right time to undertake this ef fort, he told reporters. Were hopeful that we will get past this period and that we can continue the remains recovery eort. e Defense Depart ment remains committed to the fullest possible ac counting of the more than 7,950 U.S. service members missing from the Korean War, ocials said. An esti mated 5,300 are missing in what is now North Korea. In many cases, the Unit ed States knows exactly where the service mem bers were buried, as U.S. forces attacked up into North Korea in late 1950. e Chinese army entered the fray and pushed U.S. and other United Nations forces out of the north. U.S. ocials say they know where those burials are, but have not been able to get to them. Other areas are more of a problem, ocials said, especially graves associated with prisoner of war camps. e North Koreans and Chinese tortured, beat and starved POWs, and many hundreds died from the abuse, ocials said. for a separate time to fo cus attention on sexual as sault issues. In the late 1980s, the National Coalition Against Sexual Assault informally polled state sexual assault coalitions to determine when to have a national Sexual Assault Awareness Week. A week in April was se lected. Some advocates began focusing attention on sexual violence throughout the month of April. In the late 1990s, many advocates began coordinating activities throughout the month of April on a regular basis, promot ing an idea for a nation ally recognized month for sexual violence awareness activities. From 2000-2001, the Resource Sharing Project and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center polled state, territory and tribal coalitions and found that the color teal was the preferred color for sexual assault awareness and prevention, and that April was the preferred month to coordinate national sexual assault awareness activities. As a result, Sexual As sault Awareness Month was rst observed nationally in April 2001. Additionally, the NSVRC has taken an active role in making sexual violence awareness and prevention resources available to the U.S. territories and the healthcare community. Over the last few years, the NSVRC has placed increasing emphasis on the prevention of sexual violence. As a result, the SAAM campaigns have included a greater focus on prevention. For more information on Sexual Assault or Sexual Assault Awareness month activities, contact the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Fam ily Support Center at (912) 573-2383 or Sexual As sault Response Coordina tor Betsey Larcom at (912) 573-2383.FFSC In this new plan, man power and readiness resources for the Information Dominance Corps will be consolidated under the DCNO for Information Dominance (N2/N6) to enable informed program wholeness and warghting capability trades for infor mation, cyber, and elec tronic warfare systems. Also, personnel, train ing and readiness person nel from N1 and N4 will be transferred to N2/N6 to enable more informed system centric trades and warghting integration. N2/N6 will be responsible for Integration and Interoperability assess ments for all warfare sys tems. N4 will transfer aoat readiness resources to N2/N6 and N9, but will maintain resource sponsorship for Logistics Pro grams, Energy & Environ mental Readiness, Ashore Readiness and the Combat Logistics Force. N4 will also retain responsibility for Fleet readiness report ing and assessment. While N1 will transfer manpower and training resources associated with Information Dominance, Fleet Readiness/ Logis tics and Warfare Systems to N2/N6, N4 and N9, re spectively, the N1 organization will retain resource sponsorship of all acces sions and advanced edu cation, exercise adminis trative control over Navy manpower policy, maintain responsibility for manpower assessment. e realignment begins this month and is expected to be completed by August. ere will be no personnel or billet reductions with this realignment, but there may be a small growth to allow the sta to conduct the missions, functions and tasks required. OPNAV Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Rutgers University President Richard L. McCormick participated in a signing ceremony March 21 to formalize an agreement to bring the Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps program to Rut gers for the rst time. e new agreement between the U.S. Navy and Rutgers University provides an opportunity for Rutgers students to earn a commission in the United States Navy or Marine Corps through the NROTC program, and marks the rst time since 1972 that the NROTC program is available to college students in the state of New Jersey. I am pleased we are bringing profession al military education and training to diverse, world-class educational environments like Rut gers, said Secretary Mabus. While this is a great opportunity for the Navy, Rutgers faculty, students and surrounding com munities will benet from the unique oppor tunity to know rsthand the pride, professionalism, and versatility of our Sailors and Marines. NROTC unit sta will begin to arrive at Rut gers in the spring of 2012, and the rst Naval Science classes will be taught in the fall semes ter of 2012. Rutgerss diverse stu dent population and stellar international rep utation in engineering and the sciences makes the university a good t for the Navy and Marine Corps as it seeks to meet global challenges dur ing a time of increasing technological demands. Rutgers is delighted to start the Naval Sci ence program on the New Brunswick Campus and honored to oer a Naval ROTC experience to New Jersey students, Rutgers University Presi dent Richard L. McCor mick said. e program will provide outstanding scholarship and career opportunities for those who enroll. Establishing Naval ROTC at Rutgers enrich es and strengthens the military and educational experience of Rutgers students, and also adds to the quality, eectiveness and diversity of our Navy and Marine Corps ocer ranks, Mabus said.ROTC anchors at Rutgers 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Navy College educational information process. It would guarantee that every area would be cut, Panetta said. It would guarantee that it would weaken our defense sys tem for the future. Panetta expressed dis appointment that a spe cially appointed congres sional decit-reduction committee hasnt been able to come up with solu tions that will prevent se questration from trigger ing in January 2013. Im doing everything possible to tell Congress that it would be irresponsible to let that happen, he told the crew. But my big gest concern is that Con gress has got to nd the strength, the courage and the will to get this done. Panetta said hes pointed to the example of the U.S. military to encourage Con gress to do the right thing. I told the members of Congress, Look, Ive got men and women that put their heads, their lives on the line every day to pro tect this country. Im just asking you to assume just a little bit of risk here to do whats right for this country and to solve the problems that we face, he told the group. If my men in women can do this, then you can do it as well, Panetta said he told Congress. So Im hoping that ultimately theyll do whats right and that [sequestration] wont happen.Panetta U.S. Forces Afghanistan formally preferred crimi nal charges under the Uniform Code of Military Justice today against Army Sta Sgt. Robert Bales. e charges, described in a statement from the commands headquar ters in the Afghan capital of Kabul, allege that on March 11 Bales acted with premeditation to murder 17 Afghan civilians and as saulted and tried to mur der six other civilians near Belambey in the Panjwai district of Afghanistans Kandahar province. Its the rst step in this process, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. John Kirby told reporters this morning. Bales, who is in pretrial connement at the Mid west Joint Regional Cor rectional Facility in Fort Leavenworth, Kan., is assigned to the 2nd Bat talion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash. e infantryman, who Army ocials say com pleted sniper training and held three good conduct medals, was own from Afghanistan on March 14 to a military detention facility in Kuwait. From there, he was transferred to Kansas. e next step in the military justice process is for the special court-mar tial convening authority at Joint Base Lewis-Mc Chord to decide whether to direct an investigation of the charges under the UCMJs Article 32. An Article 32 hearing is similar to a preliminary hearing in civilian law. No case can proceed to a gen eral court-martial unless a command rst conducts an Article 32 investigation. e investigating ocer submits to the com mand a written report with nonbinding recom mendations about the suf ciency of the charges and evidence. e report helps the command determine an appropriate disposition of the charges. Under the UCMJ, the maximum possible pun ishment for a premeditated murder conviction is a dishonorable discharge from the armed forces, re duction to the lowest en listed grade, forfeiture of pay and allowances, and death. e minimum sentence is life imprisonment with eligibility for parole. No disposition decision has been made yet about the preferred charges. Preferral of charges rep resents an accusation of criminal misconduct only. As in U.S. civilian law, a military member accused of criminal misconduct is presumed innocent until proven guilty at a trial by court-martial. e investigation is on going, Kirby said, and it is possible that more charg es could come until the in vestigation is closed. WASHINGTON, March 26, 2012 Criminal and administrative investigations continue following charges announced March 23 against Army Sta Sgt. Robert Bales, the NATO International Secu rity Assistance Force commander said March 26 in Washington, D.C. Bales, who is being held at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., is charged with killing 17 Afghan civilians and trying to kill six others March 11. U.S. ocials have paid compensation to the vic tims families, Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen conrmed to reporters during a Pentagon news conference, noting that such payments are ac cording to Afghan cultural norms. I extend once again my sincere condolences to the loved ones, family members and friends of those who were killed and injured in that sense less act of violence, Allen said. I also extend my deepest sympathies to the Bales family, who are going through a great deal right now. ey, too, deserve our support as they come to grips with the inevitable and drastic changes in their lives. Allen said because investigations continue and jurisdiction rests with ocials at Joint Base Lew is-McChord, Wash., he could not to go into more detail about the case. He added that investigators have and will retain my full support to let the facts take them where they may. Investigative and judicial processes will pro ceed according to military regulations, Allen said. Speculation in the media and through anony mous commentary serves no ones purpose in our interest and in our earnest desire to see justice done here, he added.Marine general says speculation uselessBales faces murder charges Marines get new helmets e U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Army have au thorized an initial produc tion run of up to 8,600 En hanced Combat Helmets. Ceradyne, Inc., the California-based manufacturer of the ECH, will soon begin production of the rst phase of the order: 4,000 helmets to be divided equally between the Ma rine Corps and the Army. Depending on when the Full Rate Production/Fielding decision is made, con tinual phase orders will be submitted until the quan tity of 8,600 helmets is met. ese helmets will not be elded until after the FRP/ Fielding decision is made. e ECH is a protective helmet consisting of a bal listic protective shell, pad suspension system and four-point chinstrap/nape strap retention system. e helmet fully exploits the latest lightweight material technology, Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene materials, to provide increased small arms protection above what is currently provided by the Marine Corps Lightweight Helmet and the Army Advanced Combat Helmet. is material provides a higher degree of ballistic protection than Kevlar and Twaron, bers used in both the LWH and ACH. It also provides enhanced protec tion against fragments. Beginning production of the ECH in March will allow the manufacturer to ramp up to full-rate pro duction capability by May, which is tentatively when the FRP/elding decision will be made. Once the FRP decision is made, this helmet will be elded to Marines in Afghanistan and Iraq. In addition, this helmet will be elded to those Soldiers deployed and those units in the ready phase on orders to deploy. e U.S. Navy is expect ed to eld helmets in sup port of Navy expedition ary requirements in the Central Command area of operations. Over the life of the pres ent contract, the Marines are expected to receive 38,500 helmets, while the Army will buy a total of 200,000 helmets. e Navy is expected to procure 6,700 helmets as well. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 7

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Heres a little quick quiz. I give you five choices, you tell me which you prefer. There are no right or wrong answers. Just your choice. Im asking which you prefer: 1) hot weather or cold weather? 2) home cooking or eating out? 3) dressing up or dressing down? 4) shower or bath? and 5) night owl or early bird? Personally, I cant stand cold weather anymore, I like home cooking (if its not my own), Ive never liked wearing a tie, taking a bath takes too long, and Ive always been an early bird. Deana Decker Retired Navy Groton, Conn. Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower, night owl. Cpl. Ronald Dunn Security Force Battalion Calhoun, Ga. Hot weather, eating out, dress down, shower, night owl. CECN Candon Norman CBMU 202 Greenbelt, Md. Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower, night owl. MM1 Chad Russell Trident Refit Facility Miami Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower early bird. Tina Elmer Family member Beloit, Wisc. Cold weather, home cooking, dress up, bath, night owl. EM1 Dan Darby NSB Kings Bay Warren, Mich. Hot weather, home cooking dress down, shower, night owl.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho This week has been a busy one here at Kings Bay Intramural Sports. Our Spring Softball season kicked o on Monday, and we had a full schedule of 24 games throughout the week. At the moment, we have 14 Mens and seven Co-Ed teams registered for the program. I am thrilled with this high level of participation, and I anticipate that we will have some more teams register once their boats return from duty. e softball complex was full of participants and spectators throughout the week. It was great to see everyone come out and enjoy some healthy competition on the diamond. We had some close games and some last-inning heroics that made for some great entertainment. e season continues rolling this week, so I am looking forward to seeing how the games play out. I encourage everyone to come out and show your support for your command as they battle it out on the elds. Games are held Monday through ursday at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. on elds 2 and 3. I look forward to seeing you all at the elds. Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports CoordinatorSoball gets underway Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and his wife Darleen attended the Navy-Marine Corps Ball March 24 to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, a nonprot organization. Darleen and I were hon ored to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Ball this eve ning, Greenert said. Its a terric event to benet an organization that has timeand-again helped our Sailors and Marines in need. Greenert said throughout the NMCRSs existence, countless Sailors, Marines and NavyMarine Corps fami lies have been helped by the organiza tion. For over a hundred years this organization has been taking care of our Sailors and Marines, Greenert said. Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Michael Barrett also attended the event, emphasizing the importance of the charity from the top down. Greenert and Amos spoke together at the event and praised NMCRS for the full range of support they pro vide to service members and dependents. Greenert said last year alone, about 4,000 NMCRS volunteers took care of more than 96,000 Sailors, Marines and their families with more than $50 million of donations used to help provide nan cial assistance and care for those service members and dependents in times when they needed it the most. In his closing remarks, Greenert thanked the au dience of caring leaders, program supporters and a CNO thanks NMCRS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 9

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e 2012 Annual Easter Egg Hunts will be at the Youth Center ball diamonds at 7 p.m., Friday, April 6 for children in kindergar ten through 12 years old. Bring a ashlight and a basket to hold your goodies. An egg hunt also is at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 7, for walking toddlers through pre-kin dergarten. Dont forget your bas kets. Parents are not allowed on the eld. ere will be prizes for children in each age group who nd the Special Eggs. For more information call (912) 573-2380. New lap swim hours at the Kings Bay Pool Lap swim hours are being re-adjusted to better serve active duty mem bers. The new hours started April 2. Morning lap swim is 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Active duty has pri ority. Lunch lap swim is 11 a.m. to noon for active duty only. 1200 to 1300 Open lap swim is noon to 1 p.m. For more infor mation call (912) 573-3990. The Shape Up for Summer Fitness Challenge At the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, an eight-week challenge with ben efits starts Monday, April 9, and continues through Sunday, June 3. Weigh-ins are on April 5 and 6. Weigh-outs are June 4 and 5. When you register, you will receive a workout tracking card. You must workout two days per week. Get your workouts initialed by the MWR Fitness Complex staff to earn your way to great prizes. For more infor mation call (912) 573-3990. Continental Championship Wrestling This event is at 6 p.m., Saturday, April 7, at the Fitness Complex basketball courts. Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $1 and available at Information, Travel and Tickets or at the door. Hot dogs, chips and drinks will be available for pur chase. In the main event is cham pion Rock-n-Roll Chris Turner vs. Big Rob Justice. For more infor mation. call (912) 573-4564. Kidsfest 2012 April is the month of the Military Child so celebrate at free Kidsfest, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at Under The Pines Park and the Tennis Court area. Food will be available for purchase. Free cot ton candy, Mobil Gaming System, Laser Tag, Fun Zone and Sports Zone. Also, face-painting, balloon artist and wax hands.Demonstrations by Lisa Allen, Tai Kwon Do and the Mad Scientist. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4564. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1!. Rack-N-Roll Lanes April Specials Holy Hop-pity $1 days from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 6, and Monday, April 9. All games and shoes are $1. April 9 to 13 is Super Saver Week with 10 percent o in-stock and ordered items at the Rack-NRoll Lanes Pro Shop. For more information call (912)573-9492. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e Early Bird Gets the Deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Information, Tickets and Travel in a new location Look for ITT at the Outdoor Adventure Center when the two share a building in April. ITT has information, travel destina tions and tickets for most area attractions plus more. Check us out for holiday destinations and vouchers for hotels in Orlando and other areas of the U.S. For more info call (912) 573-2289. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Un der the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great mov ie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompa nied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 6 Rio; April 7 and 8 Hop April 9 Tangled, April 14 and 15 Gnomeo & Juliet, April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids Easter Eggs hunts April 6, 7 Liberty call Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. April 19. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 9, 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention April 16safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A train ing lasting about three hours, safeTALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connect ed to helpers who are prepared to provide first aid interven tions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, April 16. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Job fair preparation covers key questionsThe job fair is next week What do I bring? How do I know who to talk to? What should I wear? What time should I arrive. What should my portfolio contain. Who should I speak to first? These and other questions will be discussed along with a brief question-and-answer period for those who are still unsure on how to shop a job fair. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1:30 to 3 p.m. April 9. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 9 to 12. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn. Information is provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 12.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 17Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. April 19. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops You d ont ha ve t o be an NFL star like Reg gi e Bush t o be a playe r! Just Get up and play an hour a day! Its a great w ay t o be healt hy ha ve fun, and av oid a lazy penalt y. Being healt h y and staying active is imp ortant. Vi sit smallstep. gov t o learn about fun w ays t o get an hour of exercise a day! T: 7.625 inT: 5.25 in 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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special group of combat casualty assistance nurses who provide in-home care and encouragement for wounded warriors as well as support for their family members. Today theres 100 ships deployed, 145 underway, 50,000 of our Sailors are out deployed and prob ably over 100,000 are un derway with hundreds of thousands of family members supporting them, worrying about them and taking care of them, as have so many of you out there tonight-thank you for taking care of those family members and those kids, Greenert said.ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chow der Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 10, 17 and 24. This workshop is an opportu nity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spend ing plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 12. Call 5734513 for more information.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separat ing, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interview ing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values, as well as simple, effective and easy-to-use resume formats that get job interviews will be explored. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., April 10. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Car-buying strategies examined April 16This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiat ing, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783. FFSCNMCRS Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 11

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 13 e men and women of the Oce of Naval In telligence celebrated the 130th anniversary of the establishment of the com mand in a ceremony today at ONIs headquarters in Suitland, Md. Leaders and members of the command joined dis tinguished guests from the Navy and national Intelli gence Community to mark the achievements of Amer icas longest-serving intelligence agency and honoring some of ONIs most accomplished military and civilian professionals. Lt. eodorus B.M. Mason planted the seed of this organization with three assisting ocers in 1882, said Capt. Robert Rupp, ONI commander. Lt. Masons vision be came Americas premier naval and maritime intel ligence agency, playing decisive roles in every major conict our coun try has been involved in, and providing the knowl edge that has secured our homeland, ensured victories overseas, saved countless lives, and enabled our Navy to main tain a technological and strategic advantage over our adversaries. ONI provides collec tions and analysis on for eign naval forces, capabili ties, systems and tactics, as well as the civil maritime environment to ensure the U.S. Navy maintains the technological and op erational advantage over potential adversaries on, above and below the sea and on land. ONI supports the design and development of the future eet through intelligence support to acquisition. Critical communications and information as surance support to the eet and shore-based commands are key com ponents of ONIs broad mission set, as is deploy ing technicians and intelligence personnel forward to directly support war ghters worldwide. ONI was established March 23, 1882 by Navy General Order Number 292 as the U.S. Navy began mod ernizing to compete with established European and rising Asian naval powers. ONI focused on advanced foreign technology and the evolving art of naval warfare just as the Navy was transforming from wooden hull sailing ships to steel and steam. Just as the U.S. Navy was evolving, ONI created the blueprint for intelligence tradecraft. Today ONI is an integral element of the Navys Information Dominance Corps. ONI professionals work closely with Information Warfare, Oceanography/ Meteorology, Information Professional and Space Cadre partners to achieve battlespace awareness and enable decision su periority for Navy commanders. As our Armed Forces transition from ghting prolonged land campaigns in the Middle East and our strategic priori ties are rebalanced toward the Asia Pacic region, the maritime domain be comes increasingly important, placing greater demands on the U.S. Navy and Naval Intelligence in the future, said retired Vice Adm. Lowell E. Ja coby, former director of Naval Intelligence and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Intel celebrates birthday At a moment of nation al transition, the United States is reshaping defense priorities and its military force to sustain U.S. global leadership and respond to changing security and scal needs, President Barack Obama said last month at the Pentagon. Obama, the rst presi dent to address reporters in the Pentagon brieng room, joined Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, to introduce a new military strategy that sets priorities for a 21st-century defense. e United States of America is the greatest force for freedom and se curity that the world has ever known, Obama said. In no small measure, thats because weve built the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped military in history and as commander in chief, Im going to keep it that way. Looking beyond the wars in Iraq and Afghani stan and long-term na tion-building with large military footprints, Obama said, the United States will be able to ensure its secu rity with smaller conven tional ground forces and by investing in capabilities that include intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and the ability to operate in environ ments where adversaries try to deny access. Panetta said the depart ment would need to make a strategic shift regardless of the nations scal situation. We are at that point in history, the secretary added. ats the reality of the world we live in. But he stressed that the U.S. military will remain capable across the spec trum. We will continue to conduct a complex set of missions ranging from counterterrorism, ranging from countering weapons of mass destruction to maintaining a safe, secure and eective nuclear de terrent, Panetta said. e Defense Strategic Guidance document says the future force will be led by the worlds nest, best cared for and battle-tested all-volunteer military one that will be smaller, but that also will be ex ible, agile and ready. e force will be leaner, further reducing the cost of doing business and nding eciencies in overhead, business practices and other support activities, according to the guidance. It also will be technologi cally superior, the docu ment adds, and networked across the ser vices as well as with diplo matic, devel opment and intelli gence agencies, allies and partners. As a global force, our military will never be do ing only one thing, Panetta said. It will be responsible for a range of missions and activities across the globe With the end of U.S. mil itary commitments in Iraq and the drawdown under way in Afghanistan, the secretary said, the Army and Marine Corps will no longer need to be sized to support the kind of largescale, long-term stability operations that have dominated military priorities and force generation over the past decade. Continuing investments in special operations forces, in new technolo gies such as ISR and unmanned systems and in space and especially cy berspace capabilities will help the force retain and continue to rene and in stitutionalize the expertise and capabilities that have been gained at such great cost over the last decade, Panetta said. Most importantly, the secretary added, we will structure and pace re ductions in the nations ground forces in such a way that they can surge, regenerate and mobilize capabilities needed for any contingency. Building in reversibility and the ability to quickly mobilize will be critical, he said. at means re-exam ining the mix of elements in the active and reserve components, Panetta said. It means maintaining a strong National Guard and Reserve. It means retaining a healthy cadre of experi enced [noncommissioned ocers] and midgrade of cers, and preserving the health and viability of the nations defense industrial base. e strategy, Dempsey said, is sound. It ensures we remain the pre-eminent military in the world, the chair man told reporters, it preserves the talent of the all-volunteer force, it takes into account the lessons of the last 10 years of war, [and] it acknowledges the imperative of a global, networked and full-spec trum joint force. e strategy calls for innovation new ways of operating and partner ing, Dempsey said, adding that it rebalances the defense focus by region and mission and makes important investments in emerging and proven capabilities such as cyber and special operations. Fundamentally, the chairman said, our strat egy has always been about our ability to respond to global contingencies wherever and whenever they happen. is does not change. We will always provide a range of options for our nation. We can and will always be able to do more than one thing at a time. More importantly, wherever we are confronted and in whatever sequence, we will win.Leaders looking ahead



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Rear Adm. Prindle spreads message at NSB Kings Bay Rear Adm. Brian Prindle, commander, Naval Safety Center, met with service members and civilian motorcyclists, command Motorcycle Safety Representatives and safety professionals Oct. 19 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e purpose of his visit was to discuss the variety of motorcycle safety issues that service members continuously face, both on and o duty. Representatives and guests from each command at Kings Bay were able to participate in the meeting. ey provided input, suggestions and asked Prindle questions about motorcycle safety. The prima ry discus sion points focused on risk man age ment and training for motorcycle riders. From my perspective, safety is a mindset, you must understand the risks, Prindle said. Our ultimate goal is zero preventable mishaps. A preventable mishap is one that you should have seen coming. rough effective risk management, you safely manage your way through the task, or you decide that its too risky to safely execute. When you truly under stand your environment, you should be able to attain zero preventable mishaps. e Naval Safety Center reported that 16 Sailors died in oduty motorcycle crashes in scal year 2011, slightly more than the previous year. Nine of those riders had taken the required basic motorcycle safety course, but only three had taken the followup sport bike training course, which is also mandatory. Safety center experts say the tragic total might have been lowered had those service members taken the additional training. Our main focus this year is to close the training gap, Prindle said. We want to provide good professional training, so you can all be good, professional riders. e bottom line is, training saves lives. Fleet & Family active combating violence Womens organized protests against violence began in the late 1970s in England with Take Back the Night marches. ese women-only protests emerged in direct response to the violence that women encountered as they walked the streets at night. Activities became more coordinated and soon developed into a movement that extended to the United States. In 1978, the rst Take Back the Night events in the America were held in San Francisco and New York City. Over time, sexual assault awareness activities expanded to include the issue of sexual violence against men and mens participation in ending sexual violence. By the early 1980s, there was increased interest in coordinating activities to raise awareness of violence against women. As a result, time was set aside during October to raise awareness of violence against women issues. October became the principle focus of domestic violence awareness activities. Sexual assault advocates looked THEkings bay, georgia Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Up Periscope Quick now! Give me 5 personal preferences Page 9 Sea Cadets Sailors of tomorrow do tour at Kings Bay Page 4 Pet moves Kings Bays vet clinic offers traveling tips Page 2 Bike safety emphasized Walk, Roll & Stroll From my perspective, safety is a mindset ... Rear Adm. Brian Prindle Naval Safety Center Sexual Assault Awareness Month observed at NSB Panetta blasts CongressSequestration could cost DoD $500 billion in spending cutsDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta blasted Congress March 30 for threatening the Defense Department with sequestration he said would be devastating to the force. Congress did a stupid thing, he told crewmembers of USS Peleliu during a shipboard visit o the Southern California coast. What they essentially did was to put a gun to their heads and to the head of the country and basically say that if they did not come up with a plan to reduce the deficit, that this so-called sequester process would go into eect. at process, the secretary explained, would cut $1.2 trillion in federal spending across the board almost $500 billion to come from the defense budget. e cuts would be implemented across the board, he said, guaranteeing that the force would be hollowed out in the e Veterans Aairs Department is making progress on its pledge to end homelessness among veterans, with a focus on getting all homeless veterans o the streets by 2015, VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki told American Forces Press Service. Shinseki joined President Barack Obama in announcing the plan in November 2009, proclaiming that no veteran should ever have to be living on the streets. VA is working toward that goal, Shinseki told Congress last month, reporting that the number of homeless veterans on a given night dropped from 76,300 in 2010 to about 67,500 in 2011. e next goal, he said, is to drive those numbers down to 35,000 by the end of scal 2013, and ultimately, to zero. As Shinseki set out to transform VA after arriving in 2009, he made the homeless issue a top priority in getting to the bottom of what he viewed as an institutional problem. Homeless ness among veterans was a demonstration to me that we didnt have all our programs knitted together, he said. As good as we thought we were doing in health care and other benets, we had people who were slipping through the gaps in our programs most visibly, the homeless. To support this eort, VAs budget request for scal 2013 includes nearly $1.4 billion for programs designed to prevent or end homelessness among veterans. is represents a 33 percent increase, or $333 million, over the 2012 funding level. e additional funding will provide grants and technical assistance to community nonprot organizations to maintain veterans and their families in current housing or get them quickly into new housing.VAs help for homeless vets on target

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A Navy message recently released reminds Sailors of requirements associated with receiving involuntary separation pay. According to NAVADMIN 093/12, all Sailors involuntarily released from active duty, to include Sailors aected by the Enlisted Retention Board, may be eligible for ISP. Command leadership, career counselors and aected Sailors must review the message to ensure timely actions are met to receive payment. ISP has Navy Reserve requirements and obligations. Career counselors and command leadership can assist Sailors with applying for aliation in conjunction with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their initial military service obligation. e Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve. e SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. SELRES typically fulll the traditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. e IRR oers Reserve aliation benets without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobilization readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or conditions that may affect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to aord every Sailor an opportunity to transition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily separated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Performto-Serve/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can contact the Career Transition Oce to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to aliate with the IRR. A Sailor who aliates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their supporting personnel ofce. is must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benet, according to the message. If a signed Reserve aliation contract is not completed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Under current legislation, Sailors who collect ISP and later collect a military retirement must repay their ISP upon retirement. Under current legislation, ISP must also be repaid upon receipt of Department of Veterans Aairs disability compensation. e Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid. Read the message for more information or call the Navy Personnel Command Customer Service Center at (866) 827-5672 or e-mail cscmailbox@navy.mil. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Now hear this! e higher your energy level, the more ecient your body. e more ecient your body, the better you feel and the more you will use your talent to produce outstanding results. Anthony RobbinsLast week I talked about the arrival of spring and the opportunity to revive our new years goals. As the weather continues to get warmer, and we start thinking about cookouts, the beach and summer vacations, we are reminded that if we want to look and feel our best this summer, we had better get to work. Whether your goal is to t into your favorite summer dress, be comfortable wearing that strappy bikini, have more energy to play with the kids at the beach or just show o some tight abs, now is the time to start working on shedding that unwanted winter weight! I think it is important to feel comfortable in your own skin yearround. In the summer months we tend to show a little more of it, and people seem to be extra motivated to get in shape. I once had a client who said she wanted to lose weight and get in shape so that during her familys yearly beach vaca tion she would be comfortable enough to take a walk down the beach without feeling the need to wear her cover-up. is specic goal, along with her deep desire to make a change in her life, allowed her to lose 85 pounds and condently strut down the beach. is time of year promotes being active. Going on a walk or jog in the cool of the early morning leaves you feeling energized and ready to tackle the day. Hitting the gym in the evening is a positive way to wrap up your day and will leave you with a great sense of accomplishment. Regardless of when you choose to exercise, I encourage you to nd a workout you enjoy and look forward to doing. It is much more challenging to get motivated to do something you dread than something you take pleasure in. In an eort to help you get in shape for summer, the Kings Bay Fitness Complex is launching a Shape Up For Summer Fitness Challenge. is is an eight-week program that begins with weigh-ins on April 5 and 6. e program starts on April 9. e challenge is to workout at least twice a week at the Fitness Complex. It can be during Group Fitness classes, Command PT or individual workouts. Each participant will have a workout tracking card. Points will be earned for each workout completed. Workouts must be at least 30 minutes in length. ere will be opportunities to earn bonus points. Prizes will be awarded to the person with the greatest percentage of body weight lost, as well as to the person with the most points earned. Leave the excuses behind and come take our challenge to shape up for summer For more information, call me at 573-8972.Its time to Shape Up For Summer Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Volunteer income tax help offeredNavy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax provides a self-help oce including software and computers to aid service members, retirees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, near the Personnel Support Detachment and open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers assist with ling if needed. Appointments are not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.Rodeo April 13, 14 in Kingslande rst annual Equine Rescue Rodeo of South Georgia will be at 7:30 p.m., April 13 and 14 on Georgia 40 in Kingsland, across from K_ Mart-Publix shopping center. Admission is $15 for adults, $7 children 5 to 12 and free under 5. Military riders can compete for free with a military ID. All proceeds benet Equine Rescue of South Georgia. Call (912) 285-0133 for more information.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League has a golf cart rae and will have a community yard sale, at 7 p.m., April 21. e league is seeking donated yard sale items. Call (912) 322-1970 to arrange for pickup or drop o. Both events fund Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Community market on SaturdaysVisit the St. Marys community market at the waterfront pavilion in downtown St. Marys From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. Stop by and see the vendors for all their specials. Involuntary Separation Staying abreast of ISP requirements ere are many regulations about ying with and transporting our pets. Knowing and abiding by these rules is the pet owners responsibility, with veterinary personnel guiding you through the process. A licensed veterinarian must issue a health certicate to all animals traveling by air within 10 days of transport. Health certicates can be obtained by appointment at U.S. Army Veterinary Treatment Facilities worldwide. is Web site includes links to all VTFs: vetcom.amedd.army.mil/ map.html. If youre going to Japan, Hawaii or Guam, these locations require long quarantine periods before your animal will be admitted beyond the arrival point. e process to qualify for shorter quarantine periods requires multiple visits with your pet to your local VTF. Failure to follow the proper timeline can result in extended quarantine times for your pets and large out of pocket expenses upon arrival. Additionally, many countries require health certicates and rabies certicates from civilian veterinarians to have original signatures and to be countersigned or stamped by a U.S.D.A. veterinarian. In most countries, but not all, original signatures by Army Veterinary Corps Ocers are exempt from this requirement, so it may be advantageous to complete all of the steps in the process through the base VTF. Regulations also prevent pets from riding in temperatures under 45 degrees or more than 85 degrees for more than 45 minutes. is can be a major concern depending on what cities your ight goes through during your travels. It may be necessary to ship your pet before or after the PCS in order to safely transport. For other foreign countries, see the listed Web sites and contact your local VTF. Questions about sedatives, food and water the day of travel, and traveling with very old, young or debilitated animals are best addressed with a veterinarian before the date for the nal health certicate exam. Appointments at the VTFs ll up fast, so plan to call to schedule at least two to three weeks before the travel date. Heres a useful Web sites for Transport Security Administration traveling with pets: www.tsa.gov/ travelers/airtravel/assistant/edito rial_1036.shtm. Heres one with international requirements listed by destination: vetcom.amedd.army.mil/vetops/ international.html. Here are some tips from successful travelers: Plan months in advance Stay flexible Contact the commercial airline months before you PCS Fly to any major hub Stay overnight if necessary Rent a car and drive to your destination Take leave to avoid being rushed Send your pets with your family either before or after the weather embargo starts If your pet is traveling in a carrier you can ll the water container half way with water and freeze the night before, so that small amounts of water will be available without spilling NSB Veterinarian Clinic Traveling, PCSing with your pets 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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e Navy Personnel Command Web site, hosted at www.npc.navy.mil contains links to guidance and policy, programs, pay and benets, Navy messages, stories and much more, ocials reminded Sailors March 28. Our objective is to provide Sailors and their families with a one-stop shop for all Navy-related information and to get answers to their questions in a centralized location, said Lt. Jon Williams, functional Web site manager, NPC communications. e NPC Web site provides information and guidance vital to Sailors from boot camp to retirement and beyond. According to Williams, the NPC Web site is the second most visited Navy Web site and more than 85 percent of the Navys Web content can only be found here. e Web site contains more than 2,500 pages, 15,000 documents and registers nearly one million visits per month. e Reference Library section, which contains U.S. Navy forms and instructions and DoD directives and publications, receives the most active visits every month. In February, the NAVADMIN 2012 page was the most popular page accessed on the Web site and received more than 100,000 views. e Knowledge Base is another valuable feature on the NPC Web site and was created to supplement the NPC Customer Service Center. A Sailor can always call or e-mail the CSC for information, but also has the ability to go to www.npc.navy.mil to research and answer his or her own questions online 24/7. e Knowledge Base can be accessed from anywhere in the world. Sailors, retirees and their families can ask any question they want to about the Navy. e system uses keywords to generate a solution to their question. Sailors can access the Knowledge Base by visiting the NPC Web site and clicking on the Ask NPC a Question icon in the upper right corner of the page. e Naval Safety Center oers tips for Sailors in advance of spring vacations. e biggest stereotypes about spring break revolve around alcohol abuse. While movies and television may glamorize binge drinking, the Centers for Disease Control report that this behavior can be deadly. e center denes binge drinking as a male consuming ve or more alcoholic beverages or a woman consuming four or more alcoholic beverages within a two-hour period. ey report ndings that have alarming implications for Sailors: The prevalence of drinking among men is higher than the prevalence among women. About 90 percent of the alcohol consumed by those under the age of 21 is in the form of binge drinks. Binge drinkers are 14 times more likely to report alcohol-impaired driving than non-binge drinkers. Given that there are a large number of males and younger adults in the Navy, these statistics show there is reason for concern. Nonetheless, Sailors have plenty of smart options, according to Dan Dray, a trac and recreation safety specialist at NAVSAFECEN. We know that the young Sailors and Marines are going to go out and have fun, but the biggest asset they have in terms of safety is their peers, Dray said. Everyone carries a cell phone these days, so if youve had too much to drink, call a friend to come pick you up or take advantage of the safe ride programs that many ships oer. Training and awareness appear to be paying o. e Naval Safety Center tracks whether alcohol was a factor in fatal mishaps. e recently completed winter safety campaign ran from Dec. 1, 2011, through Feb. 29. is season there were two fatalities where alcohol was a contributing factor. Both were motor vehicle mishaps. While those are two too many, when compared to winter 20102011 when there were six alcoholrelated fatalities and winter 20092010 when there were nine, its an obvious improvement and a trend consistently moving in the right direction. While impaired driving is an obvious danger associated with overconsumption of alcohol, there are other problems as well. Aside from health risks such as high blood pressure, stroke, neurological damage and liver disease, the CDC reports that alcohol abuse is a major factor in sexual assaults. Eliminating this criminal behavior is a major goal in the Navy and Marine Corps according to a recent blog post detailing Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. e safety portion of this initiative states in part that the naval services will aggressively prevent sexual assaults from occurring, support sexual assault victims, and hold oenders accountable. Using alcohol responsibly and maintaining situational awareness are important steps toward achieving this goal, Dray said. Naval Safety Center Keep safety guard up in springtime e USS Tennessee family is saddened by the tragic loss of our shipmate, brother and friend, Sonar Technician Submarine 3rd Class Joseph Casson. Everyones deepest condolences and prayers go out to his family. Petty Ocer Casson was a great American and an exceptional Sailor, who left an indelible mark on all. Tennessee was better for having him, and our nation has lost a tremendous young man. ere will be a memorial service at the Kings Bay Chapel at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 6. Uniform for military personnel is service dress blue; civilians should wear appropriate civilian attire.Memorial service set for STS3 Joseph Casson Contact a pet broker to ship your pets in case you cannot take them with you Allow sucient time between connecting ights in case there are delays or your pets cannot y due to weather restrictions Have a list of hotels that accept pets in the cities you are stopping Do time consuming tasks weeks before you PCS Make an appointment with the Veterinary Treatment Facility for a health certicate within 10 days of your departure If you have further questions, need to schedule an appointment to obtain a health certicate or want to pick up copies of your pets medical records for travel, call the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment Facility at (912) 573-0755. Happy and safe traveling.Pets Navy Personnel has new Web site THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Sea Cadets Sea Cadet PO3 Riley Regul, maneuvers a 64-foot small boat in the Saint Marys River. Sea Cadet SA Joshua Warren gets his sea legs. League Cadet Chandler Leonard gets a laugh out of BM3 Jennifer Grossman while underway. Coast Guardsmen and Naval Sea Cadets ride the waves off Fort Clinch, Fla. Clockwise from above left, Sea Cadets work together to solve a problem, Regul plots boat postions and Leonard maneuvers a compass. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 5 Preventing child abuse An active duty course manager and lead instructor at the Center for Information Dominance Unit Corry Station, Fla., recently obtained two certications through the Navy Credentialing Opportunities On-Line program. Cryptologic Technician Networking 1st Class Jessica Gaukel manages and teaches the Joint Cyber Analysis Course course at CID and continues to take advantage of the Navy COOL program which has provided opportunities for Sailors who want to achieve excellence since 2006. Gaukel has recently obtained two certications Comp TIA NetworkPlus and Security-Plus through the Navy COOL program. Gaukel said she also is studying to obtain her CISCO Computer Network Administration certication. Navy COOL is a centralized, Web-based hub that consolidates information from numerous sources at the federal, state and local levels on certications, licenses, apprenticeships and growth opportunities that correspond with each Navy rating, job and occupation. Armed with that information, Navy COOL has provided funding for Navy enlisted personnel to obtain civilian licenses and certications that are closely aligned with a Sailors job or rating. By holding a certication, youre meeting an industry-recognized standard of competency so that said, youre able to show your current organization whether it be military or any company that youve met an industry-wide standard, but youre also able to show your peers that youve met that, Navy COOL Program Manager Keith Boring said. If a certication is not required for your rating, its still highly recommended if you want to stay current in your eld. Gaukel said the certications she has obtained verify that she is capable of both operating and securing computer networks at the same level as her civilian counterparts. She stressed that obtaining the civilian certications are an important step not only for her personal development as a Sailor, but for any Sailor who wants to excel in the Navy. For active duty Sailors, obtaining a certication can be their next step, something that will help them get promoted, Gaukel said. A certication is something the board can see that will set that Sailor from their peers. Chief Cryptologic Technician Networking Tammy Sternberg JCAC senior enlisted leader said Gaukel has a reputation as being an outstanding technician, thanks in part to her pursuit of certications through Navy COOL. Petty Ocer Gaukel is our JCAC lead instructor and course manager, a position normally held by a chief petty ocer, Sternberg said. Her technical skills and knowledge have been enhanced by her pursuit of Navy COOL certications. To date, Navy COOL has processed nearly 66,000 credentials for Sailors and received more than 118 million hits to the Navy COOL Web site at www. cool.navy.mil. Navy COOL Program Supervisor Sam Kelley said his team cross-linked every Navy specialty or rating with Department of Labor equivalent and ensured the Navy oered at least one civilian certication to each job within the Navy. Boring said the thoroughness of the Navys training is showing up in the high rate being achieved by Sailors in successfully passing the certication and licensing examinations. On average, Sailors are passing at a rate of 96 percent to 98 percent for voluntary licenses and certications, compared to the national average pass rate of 75 percent to 80 percent. Gaukel explained that Navy COOL is, for many new Sailors, their rst opportunity to take advantage of advanced training because new ascensions, dont qualify for tuition assistance to attend college until theyve completed one year of active service. What I try to tell all of our students, is that after they complete A school, they should go through Navy COOL, obtain a voucher to take these certications, Gaukel said. ey should take a couple of days for review, but they should be able to pass their exams, and the best thing is that Navy COOL pays for all of it. e end result of the pursuit of a civilian certication is that the Sailors individual professional knowledge and skill-set usually increases due to the extra preparation time required for certication examinations and ongoing maintenance of that certication. By using these certications, and learning and reviewing the newest books that come out, were staying current, Gaukel said. So theyre continually feeding themselves to become a better operator, a better analyst, and a better Sailor. CID is the Navys Learning Center that leads, manages and delivers Navy and joint force training in information operations, information technology, cryptology and intelligence. With a sta of nearly 1,300 military, civilian and contracted sta members, CID oversees the development and administration of more than 168 courses at four commands, two detachments and 14 learning sites throughout the United States and in Japan. CID provides training for approximately 24,000 members of the U.S. Armed Services and allied forces each year. Navy COOL is one of many opportunities for personal and professional growth available to Sailors to earn certicates, licenses and degrees making them invaluable assets to the Navy. ose programs are important parts of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-eective force in the history of the Department of the Navy. Sailors earn credentials e Chief of Naval Operations released NAVADMIN 083/10 March 12 outlining the realignment of his sta at the Pentagon to enhance the Navys ability to navigate scal challenges and deliver eet and platform readiness. Vice Adm. Bill Burke will assumed the new position of Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Sys tems (N9) March 12. He is responsible for the integra tion of manpower, training, sustainment, modernization, and procurement of the Navys warfare systems currently resourced by the directors of Expeditionary Warfare (N95), Surface Warfare (N96), Undersea Warfare (N97), and Air Warfare (N98). e realignment combines resources, and responsibilities necessary for procurement, manpower, training and readiness under the resource sponsors for information dominance, surface warfare, undersea warfare, air warfare, and expeditionary warfare Burke. ese changes are intended to improve decision making processes associated with planning, programming, budgeting, and execution, and enhance our focus on warghting capability and total ownership cost. With this realignment, N8 will be responsible for integration of capabilities and resources and will be comprised of the directors for Programming (N80), Assessments (N81), Fiscal Management (N82), Navy-Joint Capabilities and Integration (N83), Innovation, Test and Evaluation, and Technology Requirements (N84), and Special Programs (N89). e director of test and evaluation and technology requirements (currently N091) will realign to N8 (N84) to improve understanding of future systems science and technology needs and eectiveness of our science and technology investment. e Naval Warfare Integration Group (N00X) will also be realigned to N81 to better integrate the OPNAV assessment process. CNO realigns OPNAV sta

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U.S. suspends MIA search in North Korea e United States has suspended eorts to nd remains of U.S. service members lost during the Korean War due to North Korean threats to launch a ballistic missile, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said in Washington D.C., March 21. Recovering remains of those lost and unaccounted for is a priority to the Defense Department, and U.S. experts were due to enter North Korea this month. We have suspended that eort because we believe that North Korea has not acted appropriately in recent days and weeks and that its important for them to return to the standards of behavior that the international community has called for, Little said at a Pentagon news conference. We do hope at some point to be able to re-engage the eort. e United States sees the recovery of remains as a humanitarian mission and does not link those operations with other policy issues, Tara Rigler, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said in a statement. However, she added, the North Koreans politicized these humanitarian operations by linking them to long-standing annual military exercises which are defensive in nature and are designed to increase the interoperability between the United States and [South Korea]. Rigler said these actions and other developments call into question the credibility of all of North Koreas commitments, including the remains recovery operations. As a result, she added, we are suspending the current arrangement to resume remains recovery operations with [North Korea] until their actions indicate a willingness to move forward in good faith on its commitments. North Korea cited the exercises in refusing to honor procedures agreed to in October. Since then, Little said, indications have emerged that North Korea might launch ballistic missiles. at would be in contravention of U.N. Security Council resolutions, he added, and that is unacceptable behavior. e United States hopes to engage in the future with North Korea on efforts to recover remains, Little said. But when there are suggestions that they might launch ballistic missiles, when they make bellicose statements about South Korea and engage in ac tions that could be con strued as provocative, we think that its not the right time to undertake this ef fort, he told reporters. Were hopeful that we will get past this period and that we can continue the remains recovery eort. e Defense Depart ment remains committed to the fullest possible ac counting of the more than 7,950 U.S. service members missing from the Korean War, ocials said. An esti mated 5,300 are missing in what is now North Korea. In many cases, the United States knows exactly where the service members were buried, as U.S. forces attacked up into North Korea in late 1950. e Chinese army entered the fray and pushed U.S. and other United Nations forces out of the north. U.S. ocials say they know where those burials are, but have not been able to get to them. Other areas are more of a problem, ocials said, especially graves associated with prisoner of war camps. e North Koreans and Chinese tortured, beat and starved POWs, and many hundreds died from the abuse, ocials said. for a separate time to focus attention on sexual assault issues. In the late 1980s, the National Coalition Against Sexual Assault informally polled state sexual assault coalitions to determine when to have a national Sexual Assault Awareness Week. A week in April was selected. Some advocates began focusing attention on sexual violence throughout the month of April. In the late 1990s, many advocates began coordinating activities throughout the month of April on a regular basis, promoting an idea for a nationally recognized month for sexual violence awareness activities. From 2000-2001, the Resource Sharing Project and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center polled state, territory and tribal coalitions and found that the color teal was the preferred color for sexual assault awareness and prevention, and that April was the preferred month to coordinate national sexual assault awareness activities. As a result, Sexual Assault Awareness Month was rst observed nationally in April 2001. Additionally, the NSVRC has taken an active role in making sexual violence awareness and prevention resources available to the U.S. territories and the healthcare community. Over the last few years, the NSVRC has placed increasing emphasis on the prevention of sexual violence. As a result, the SAAM campaigns have included a greater focus on prevention. For more information on Sexual Assault or Sexual Assault Awareness month activities, contact the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-2383 or Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Betsey Larcom at (912) 573-2383.FFSC In this new plan, man power and readiness resources for the Information Dominance Corps will be consolidated under the DCNO for Information Dominance (N2/N6) to enable informed program wholeness and warghting capability trades for infor mation, cyber, and elec tronic warfare systems. Also, personnel, training and readiness personnel from N1 and N4 will be transferred to N2/N6 to enable more informed system centric trades and warghting integration. N2/N6 will be responsible for Integration and Interoperability assessments for all warfare systems. N4 will transfer aoat readiness resources to N2/N6 and N9, but will maintain resource sponsorship for Logistics Programs, Energy & Environmental Readiness, Ashore Readiness and the Combat Logistics Force. N4 will also retain responsibility for Fleet readiness reporting and assessment. While N1 will transfer manpower and training resources associated with Information Dominance, Fleet Readiness/ Logistics and Warfare Systems to N2/N6, N4 and N9, respectively, the N1 organization will retain resource sponsorship of all accessions and advanced education, exercise administrative control over Navy manpower policy, maintain responsibility for manpower assessment. e realignment begins this month and is expected to be completed by August. ere will be no personnel or billet reductions with this realignment, but there may be a small growth to allow the sta to conduct the missions, functions and tasks required. OPNAV Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Rutgers University President Richard L. McCormick participated in a signing ceremony March 21 to formalize an agreement to bring the Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps program to Rutgers for the rst time. e new agreement between the U.S. Navy and Rutgers University provides an opportunity for Rutgers students to earn a commission in the United States Navy or Marine Corps through the NROTC program, and marks the rst time since 1972 that the NROTC program is available to college students in the state of New Jersey. I am pleased we are bringing professional military education and training to diverse, world-class educational environments like Rut gers, said Secretary Mabus. While this is a great opportunity for the Navy, Rutgers faculty, students and surrounding com munities will benet from the unique oppor tunity to know rsthand the pride, professionalism, and versatility of our Sailors and Marines. NROTC unit sta will begin to arrive at Rutgers in the spring of 2012, and the rst Naval Science classes will be taught in the fall semester of 2012. Rutgerss diverse student population and stellar international reputation in engineering and the sciences makes the university a good t for the Navy and Marine Corps as it seeks to meet global challenges during a time of increasing technological demands. Rutgers is delighted to start the Naval Science program on the New Brunswick Campus and honored to oer a Naval ROTC experience to New Jersey students, Rutgers University President Richard L. McCormick said. e program will provide outstanding scholarship and career opportunities for those who enroll. Establishing Naval ROTC at Rutgers enriches and strengthens the military and educational experience of Rutgers students, and also adds to the quality, eectiveness and diversity of our Navy and Marine Corps ocer ranks, Mabus said.ROTC anchors at Rutgers 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Navy College educational information process. It would guarantee that every area would be cut, Panetta said. It would guarantee that it would weaken our defense system for the future. Panetta expressed disappointment that a specially appointed congressional decit-reduction committee hasnt been able to come up with solutions that will prevent sequestration from triggering in January 2013. Im doing everything possible to tell Congress that it would be irresponsible to let that happen, he told the crew. But my big gest concern is that Con gress has got to nd the strength, the courage and the will to get this done. Panetta said hes pointed to the example of the U.S. military to encourage Con gress to do the right thing. I told the members of Congress, Look, Ive got men and women that put their heads, their lives on the line every day to protect this country. Im just asking you to assume just a little bit of risk here to do whats right for this country and to solve the problems that we face, he told the group. If my men in women can do this, then you can do it as well, Panetta said he told Congress. So Im hoping that ultimately theyll do whats right and that [sequestration] wont happen.Panetta U.S. Forces Afghanistan formally preferred criminal charges under the Uniform Code of Military Justice today against Army Sta Sgt. Robert Bales. e charges, described in a statement from the commands headquarters in the Afghan capital of Kabul, allege that on March 11 Bales acted with premeditation to murder 17 Afghan civilians and assaulted and tried to murder six other civilians near Belambey in the Panjwai district of Afghanistans Kandahar province. Its the rst step in this process, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. John Kirby told reporters this morning. Bales, who is in pretrial connement at the Midwest Joint Regional Correctional Facility in Fort Leavenworth, Kan., is assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash. e infantryman, who Army ocials say completed sniper training and held three good conduct medals, was own from Afghanistan on March 14 to a military detention facility in Kuwait. From there, he was transferred to Kansas. e next step in the military justice process is for the special court-martial convening authority at Joint Base Lewis-McChord to decide whether to direct an investigation of the charges under the UCMJs Article 32. An Article 32 hearing is similar to a preliminary hearing in civilian law. No case can proceed to a general court-martial unless a command rst conducts an Article 32 investigation. e investigating ocer submits to the command a written report with nonbinding recommendations about the sufciency of the charges and evidence. e report helps the command determine an appropriate disposition of the charges. Under the UCMJ, the maximum possible punishment for a premeditated murder conviction is a dishonorable discharge from the armed forces, reduction to the lowest enlisted grade, forfeiture of pay and allowances, and death. e minimum sentence is life imprisonment with eligibility for parole. No disposition decision has been made yet about the preferred charges. Preferral of charges represents an accusation of criminal misconduct only. As in U.S. civilian law, a military member accused of criminal misconduct is presumed innocent until proven guilty at a trial by court-martial. e investigation is ongoing, Kirby said, and it is possible that more charges could come until the investigation is closed. WASHINGTON, March 26, 2012 Criminal and administrative investigations continue following charges announced March 23 against Army Sta Sgt. Robert Bales, the NATO International Security Assistance Force commander said March 26 in Washington, D.C. Bales, who is being held at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., is charged with killing 17 Afghan civilians and trying to kill six others March 11. U.S. ocials have paid compensation to the victims families, Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen conrmed to reporters during a Pentagon news conference, noting that such payments are according to Afghan cultural norms. I extend once again my sincere condolences to the loved ones, family members and friends of those who were killed and injured in that senseless act of violence, Allen said. I also extend my deepest sympathies to the Bales family, who are going through a great deal right now. ey, too, deserve our support as they come to grips with the inevitable and drastic changes in their lives. Allen said because investigations continue and jurisdiction rests with ocials at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., he could not to go into more detail about the case. He added that investigators have and will retain my full support to let the facts take them where they may. Investigative and judicial processes will proceed according to military regulations, Allen said. Speculation in the media and through anonymous commentary serves no ones purpose in our interest and in our earnest desire to see justice done here, he added.Marine general says speculation uselessBales faces murder charges Marines get new helmets e U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Army have authorized an initial production run of up to 8,600 Enhanced Combat Helmets. Ceradyne, Inc., the California-based manufacturer of the ECH, will soon begin production of the rst phase of the order: 4,000 helmets to be divided equally between the Ma rine Corps and the Army. Depending on when the Full Rate Production/Fielding decision is made, con tinual phase orders will be submitted until the quan tity of 8,600 helmets is met. ese helmets will not be elded until after the FRP/ Fielding decision is made. e ECH is a protective helmet consisting of a ballistic protective shell, pad suspension system and four-point chinstrap/nape strap retention system. e helmet fully exploits the latest lightweight material technology, Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene materials, to provide increased small arms protection above what is currently provided by the Marine Corps Lightweight Helmet and the Army Advanced Combat Helmet. is material provides a higher degree of ballistic protection than Kevlar and Twaron, bers used in both the LWH and ACH. It also provides enhanced protec tion against fragments. Beginning production of the ECH in March will allow the manufacturer to ramp up to full-rate production capability by May, which is tentatively when the FRP/elding decision will be made. Once the FRP decision is made, this helmet will be elded to Marines in Afghanistan and Iraq. In addition, this helmet will be elded to those Soldiers deployed and those units in the ready phase on orders to deploy. e U.S. Navy is expected to eld helmets in support of Navy expeditionary requirements in the Central Command area of operations. Over the life of the present contract, the Marines are expected to receive 38,500 helmets, while the Army will buy a total of 200,000 helmets. e Navy is expected to procure 6,700 helmets as well. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 7

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Heres a little quick quiz. I give you five choices, you tell me which you prefer. There are no right or wrong answers. Just your choice. Im asking which you prefer: 1) hot weather or cold weather? 2) home cooking or eating out? 3) dressing up or dressing down? 4) shower or bath? and 5) night owl or early bird? Personally, I cant stand cold weather anymore, I like home cooking (if its not my own), Ive never liked wearing a tie, taking a bath takes too long, and Ive always been an early bird. Deana Decker Retired Navy Groton, Conn. Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower, night owl. Cpl. Ronald Dunn Security Force Battalion Calhoun, Ga. Hot weather, eating out, dress down, shower, night owl. CECN Candon Norman CBMU 202 Greenbelt, Md. Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower, night owl. MM1 Chad Russell Trident Refit Facility Miami Hot weather, home cooking, dress down, shower early bird. Tina Elmer Family member Beloit, Wisc. Cold weather, home cooking, dress up, bath, night owl. EM1 Dan Darby NSB Kings Bay Warren, Mich. Hot weather, home cooking dress down, shower, night owl.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho This week has been a busy one here at Kings Bay Intramural Sports. Our Spring Softball season kicked o on Monday, and we had a full schedule of 24 games throughout the week. At the moment, we have 14 Mens and seven Co-Ed teams registered for the program. I am thrilled with this high level of participation, and I anticipate that we will have some more teams register once their boats return from duty. e softball complex was full of participants and spectators throughout the week. It was great to see everyone come out and enjoy some healthy competition on the diamond. We had some close games and some last-inning heroics that made for some great entertainment. e season continues rolling this week, so I am looking forward to seeing how the games play out. I encourage everyone to come out and show your support for your command as they battle it out on the elds. Games are held Monday through ursday at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. on elds 2 and 3. I look forward to seeing you all at the elds. Intramural Sports With Jacob Miller Sports CoordinatorSoball gets underway Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and his wife Darleen attended the Navy-Marine Corps Ball March 24 to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, a nonprot organization. Darleen and I were honored to be part of the NavyMarine Corps Ball this evening, Greenert said. Its a terric event to benet an organization that has timeand-again helped our Sailors and Marines in need. Greenert said throughout the NMCRSs existence, countless Sailors, Marines and NavyMarine Corps fami lies have been helped by the organiza tion. For over a hundred years this organization has been taking care of our Sailors and Marines, Greenert said. Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Michael Barrett also attended the event, emphasizing the importance of the charity from the top down. Greenert and Amos spoke together at the event and praised NMCRS for the full range of support they provide to service members and dependents. Greenert said last year alone, about 4,000 NMCRS volunteers took care of more than 96,000 Sailors, Marines and their families with more than $50 million of donations used to help provide nancial assistance and care for those service members and dependents in times when they needed it the most. In his closing remarks, Greenert thanked the audience of caring leaders, program supporters and a CNO thanks NMCRS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 9

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e 2012 Annual Easter Egg Hunts will be at the Youth Center ball diamonds at 7 p.m., Friday, April 6 for children in kindergar ten through 12 years old. Bring a ashlight and a basket to hold your goodies. An egg hunt also is at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 7, for walking toddlers through pre-kin dergarten. Dont forget your bas kets. Parents are not allowed on the eld. ere will be prizes for children in each age group who nd the Special Eggs. For more information call (912) 573-2380. New lap swim hours at the Kings Bay Pool Lap swim hours are being re-adjusted to better serve active duty members. The new hours started April 2. Morning lap swim is 5:30 to 8:30 a.m. Active duty has priority. Lunch lap swim is 11 a.m. to noon for active duty only. 1200 to 1300 Open lap swim is noon to 1 p.m. For more information call (912) 573-3990. The Shape Up for Summer Fitness Challenge At the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, an eight-week challenge with benefits starts Monday, April 9, and continues through Sunday, June 3. Weigh-ins are on April 5 and 6. Weigh-outs are June 4 and 5. When you register, you will receive a workout tracking card. You must workout two days per week. Get your workouts initialed by the MWR Fitness Complex staff to earn your way to great prizes. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Continental Championship Wrestling This event is at 6 p.m., Saturday, April 7, at the Fitness Complex basketball courts. Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $1 and available at Information, Travel and Tickets or at the door. Hot dogs, chips and drinks will be available for pur chase. In the main event is cham pion Rock-n-Roll Chris Turner vs. Big Rob Justice. For more infor mation. call (912) 573-4564. Kidsfest 2012 April is the month of the Military Child so celebrate at free Kidsfest, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at Under The Pines Park and the Tennis Court area. Food will be available for purchase. Free cot ton candy, Mobil Gaming System, Laser Tag, Fun Zone and Sports Zone. Also, face-painting, balloon artist and wax hands.Demonstrations by Lisa Allen, Tai Kwon Do and the Mad Scientist. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4564. Fit Moms Stroller Class Here is a great cardio workout for you and your baby, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. Fitness class punch cards available for $20 and gives you 12 classes. Sign up at the front desk at the Fitness Complex. For more information, call 573-8972. KB Finnegans In April karaoke is back ursday, April 19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Prize Pong is every Wednesday night. Check out Fiesta Fridays and our $5 pitchers on Mon. and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Trivia returns on May 1!. Rack-N-Roll Lanes April Specials Holy Hop-pity $1 days from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 6, and Monday, April 9. All games and shoes are $1. April 9 to 13 is Super Saver Week with 10 percent o in-stock and ordered items at the Rack-NRoll Lanes Pro Shop. For more information call (912)573-9492. Free Bowling Wednesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e Early Bird Gets the Deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its$22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Information, Tickets and Travel in a new location Look for ITT at the Outdoor Adventure Center when the two share a building in April. ITT has information, travel destinations and tickets for most area attractions plus more. Check us out for holiday destinations and vouchers for hotels in Orlando and other areas of the U.S. For more info call (912) 573-2289. Legends Grill At Trident Lakes Golf Course, Legends has a new menu for all. Enjoy great appetizers, delicious lunch items and reasonable prices. e grill is open 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., seven days a week. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings At dusk about 7:45 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Movie Under the Stars presents Adventures of TinTin at the Youth Center Ballelds. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, family and settle in for a great movie at the outdoor theater. Snacks will be available for purchase. For more info call (912) 573-4564. Open Rec at the Teen Center Hours for are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movies for the kids Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompa nied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. April 6 Rio; April 7 and 8 Hop April 9 Tangled, April 14 and 15 Gnomeo & Juliet, April 21 and 22 How to Train Your Dragon April 28 and 29 Shrek If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call 912-573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202.TinTin airs April 21 Just for kids Easter Eggs hunts April 6, 7 Liberty call Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. April 19. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 9, 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention April 16safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. A training lasting about three hours, safeTALK is for everyone in the community and is designed to ensure that persons with thoughts of suicide are connected to helpers who are prepared to provide first aid interven tions. This class is offered 8 a.m. to noon, April 16. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Job fair preparation covers key questionsThe job fair is next week What do I bring? How do I know who to talk to? What should I wear? What time should I arrive. What should my portfolio contain. Who should I speak to first? These and other questions will be discussed along with a brief question-and-answer period for those who are still unsure on how to shop a job fair. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1:30 to 3 p.m. April 9. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 9 to 12. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn. Information is provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 12.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 17Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. For more information, call 573-4513. Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. April 19. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops You dont have to be an NFL star like Reg gi e Bush to be a playe r! Just Get up and play an hour a day! Its a great way to be healt hy have fun, and av oid a lazy penalt y. Being healt hy and staying active is important. Vi sit smallstep. gov to learn about fun ways to get an hour of exercise a day! T: 7.625 inT: 5.25 in 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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special group of combat casualty assistance nurses who provide in-home care and encouragement for wounded warriors as well as support for their family members. Today theres 100 ships deployed, 145 underway, 50,000 of our Sailors are out deployed and probably over 100,000 are underway with hundreds of thousands of family members supporting them, worrying about them and taking care of them, as have so many of you out there tonight-thank you for taking care of those family members and those kids, Greenert said.ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 10, 17 and 24. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 12. Call 5734513 for more information.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interview ing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 30 to May 3 for separation, plus 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 23 to 26 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values, as well as simple, effective and easy-to-use resume formats that get job interviews will be explored. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., April 10. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Car-buying strategies examined April 16This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783. FFSCNMCRS Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 5, 2012 13 e men and women of the Oce of Naval Intelligence celebrated the 130th anniversary of the establishment of the command in a ceremony today at ONIs headquarters in Suitland, Md. Leaders and members of the command joined dis tinguished guests from the Navy and national Intelli gence Community to mark the achievements of Amer icas longest-serving intelligence agency and honoring some of ONIs most accomplished military and civilian professionals. Lt. eodorus B.M. Mason planted the seed of this organization with three assisting ocers in 1882, said Capt. Robert Rupp, ONI commander. Lt. Masons vision became Americas premier naval and maritime intelligence agency, playing decisive roles in every major conict our country has been involved in, and providing the knowledge that has secured our homeland, ensured victories overseas, saved countless lives, and enabled our Navy to maintain a technological and strategic advantage over our adversaries. ONI provides collections and analysis on foreign naval forces, capabilities, systems and tactics, as well as the civil maritime environment to ensure the U.S. Navy maintains the technological and operational advantage over potential adversaries on, above and below the sea and on land. ONI supports the design and development of the future eet through intelligence support to acquisition. Critical communications and information assurance support to the eet and shore-based commands are key components of ONIs broad mission set, as is deploying technicians and intelligence personnel forward to directly support war ghters worldwide. ONI was established March 23, 1882 by Navy General Order Number 292 as the U.S. Navy began mod ernizing to compete with established European and rising Asian naval powers. ONI focused on advanced foreign technology and the evolving art of naval warfare just as the Navy was transforming from wooden hull sailing ships to steel and steam. Just as the U.S. Navy was evolving, ONI created the blueprint for intelligence tradecraft. Today ONI is an integral element of the Navys Information Dominance Corps. ONI professionals work closely with Information Warfare, Oceanography/ Meteorology, Information Professional and Space Cadre partners to achieve battlespace awareness and enable decision superiority for Navy commanders. As our Armed Forces transition from ghting prolonged land campaigns in the Middle East and our strategic priorities are rebalanced toward the Asia Pacic region, the maritime domain becomes increasingly important, placing greater demands on the U.S. Navy and Naval Intelligence in the future, said retired Vice Adm. Lowell E. Jacoby, former director of Naval Intelligence and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Intel celebrates birthday At a moment of nation al transition, the United States is reshaping defense priorities and its military force to sustain U.S. global leadership and respond to changing security and scal needs, President Barack Obama said last month at the Pentagon. Obama, the rst president to address reporters in the Pentagon brieng room, joined Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, to introduce a new military strategy that sets priorities for a 21st-century defense. e United States of America is the greatest force for freedom and security that the world has ever known, Obama said. In no small measure, thats because weve built the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped military in history and as commander in chief, Im going to keep it that way. Looking beyond the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and long-term nation-building with large military footprints, Obama said, the United States will be able to ensure its security with smaller conventional ground forces and by investing in capabilities that include intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and the ability to operate in environments where adversaries try to deny access. Panetta said the depart ment would need to make a strategic shift regardless of the nations scal situation. We are at that point in history, the secretary added. ats the reality of the world we live in. But he stressed that the U.S. military will remain capable across the spectrum. We will continue to conduct a complex set of missions ranging from counterterrorism, ranging from countering weapons of mass destruction to maintaining a safe, secure and eective nuclear deterrent, Panetta said. e Defense Strategic Guidance document says the future force will be led by the worlds nest, best cared for and battle-tested all-volunteer military one that will be smaller, but that also will be exible, agile and ready. e force will be leaner, further reducing the cost of doing business and nding eciencies in overhead, business practices and other support activities, according to the guidance. It also will be technologi cally superior, the docu ment adds, and networked across the ser vices as well as with diplo matic, devel opment and intelli gence agencies, allies and partners. As a global force, our military will never be doing only one thing, Panetta said. It will be responsible for a range of missions and activities across the globe With the end of U.S. military commitments in Iraq and the drawdown under way in Afghanistan, the secretary said, the Army and Marine Corps will no longer need to be sized to support the kind of largescale, long-term stability operations that have dominated military priorities and force generation over the past decade. Continuing investments in special operations forces, in new technologies such as ISR and unmanned systems and in space and especially cyberspace capabilities will help the force retain and continue to rene and institutionalize the expertise and capabilities that have been gained at such great cost over the last decade, Panetta said. Most importantly, the secretary added, we will structure and pace reductions in the nations ground forces in such a way that they can surge, regenerate and mobilize capabilities needed for any contingency. Building in reversibility and the ability to quickly mobilize will be critical, he said. at means re-exam ining the mix of elements in the active and reserve components, Panetta said. It means maintaining a strong National Guard and Reserve. It means retaining a healthy cadre of experi enced [noncommissioned ocers] and midgrade of cers, and preserving the health and viability of the nations defense industrial base. e strategy, Dempsey said, is sound. It ensures we remain the pre-eminent military in the world, the chairman told reporters, it preserves the talent of the all-volunteer force, it takes into account the lessons of the last 10 years of war, [and] it acknowledges the imperative of a global, networked and full-spectrum joint force. e strategy calls for innovation new ways of operating and partnering, Dempsey said, adding that it rebalances the defense focus by region and mission and makes important investments in emerging and proven capabilities such as cyber and special operations. Fundamentally, the chairman said, our strategy has always been about our ability to respond to global contingencies wherever and whenever they happen. is does not change. We will always provide a range of options for our nation. We can and will always be able to do more than one thing at a time. More importantly, wherever we are confronted and in whatever sequence, we will win.Leaders looking ahead