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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-23-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00246

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00246


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Job fair draws full houseKings Bays MWR earns high accreditation mark 4-Star award highest given out in rst year by Navy Installations Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and Rec reation Department held a cel ebration to ocially recognize the accomplishment of earning the 4-Star Accreditation by Com mander, Navy Installations Com mand, Wednesday, Feb. 15. e MWR program was rec ognized for outstanding perfor mance in nancial and personnel management, customer service and compliance of Department of Defense MWR physical tness center and liberty standards. is is a big day for us. We are here to celebrate something very special, said Bob Spinnenweber, MWR director. is award is all about the people in this room and the work you put in each and every day. I know you work hard every day, and I expect a lot from you, but in the end, we won the race. Last year was the inaugural year for the CNIC MWR Accreditation Program. Base size determines the criteria for required facilities, equipment and manning. After submitting the ac creditation package, a validation team makes a site visit where it thoroughly inspects every aspect of the program. Kings Bay is all about quality of life, and that is what each and every one of you focuses on ev ery single day for our Sailors and families, said Capt. John ONeill, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer. Congratu lations. I am very proud of you, and you all should be proud of yourselves. e accreditation is good for two years with a performance data call submitted each year to validate USS Rhode Island Sailors coach students in state contest If someone gave you a team of seven people, some plastic building blocks, a circuit board and two-decades worth of Navy electronics ex perience, what would you come up with? Two Sailors from USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (Gold) were given that recipe to help a local robotics team take a lunch box to the Geor gia state championship. Electronics Techni cian 1st Class George Martell and Electron ics Technician 1st Class Roberto J. Soto began mentoring the Myste rious Minds Lego Ro botics team three years ago. e team is made up of students from Mary Lee Clark Elementary and St. Marys Middle School, both near the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines homeport at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Working alongside the teams coaches, Mary Boily and Marcia Tra vis, the Navy ETs used their engineering back ground to advise the students on the produc tion and the programming of an autonomous robot as part of the First Lego League Challenge. FLL is an interna tional organization with a mission to inspire young people to be science and tech nol ogy lead ers, said Boily, the teams head coach and a teacher at Mary Lee Clark. Engaging them in exciting mentorbased programs that build science, engineering and technology skills inspires innova tion, and that fosters well-rounded life capabilities including selfcondence, communi cation, and leadership. Martells background in electronics and computers allows him to instruct the team in programming and electronic circuit work. rough his willingness to mentor, the team has gained a rudimentary understanding of elec tricity and developed advanced level pro gramming skills. Soto uses his engi neering background to instruct the team in ro botics. e team has gained valuable knowledge in the areas of engineer ing, analyzing robot tasking, complex prob lem-solving and team work from his leader ship. Each year, the FLL Challenge presents a social problem and allows the teams eight weeks to build and pro gram a robot, complete a research project and gain an understanding of the value of Gracious Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Mysterious Minds solve Lego robotics Up Periscope The good and bad of National Nutrition Month Page 9 My Valentine First father-daughter NSB dance a big hit Page 4 Coast Guards Papp to speakCamden Partnership hosts commandant at March 16 eventSecuring our borders, sav ing lives and property at sea, ensuring the safety of pro fessional mariners and rec reational and commercial vessels, responding to natu ral disasters, protecting our marine environment and de fending our nation. Theyre are all in a days work for the Unit ed States Coast Guard. The leader of Americas oldest continuous seagoing service, Adm. Robert J. Papp, will be honored by e Camden Partnership and the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the U. S. at the annual A Community at Cares luncheon. Excitement over his impending visit is high. What a thrill for us in Camden County to host the commandant of the Coast Guard, said Keith Post, re tired senior chief and Georgia president of the Navy League. Since landing the Maritime Safety and Security Team in FFSC-sponsored day draws engineering, technical recruitersMore than 200 veterans and military members planning for transition, as well as qualied military family members, at tended a Technical and Engi neering Field Job Fair sponsored by the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay Feb. 8. Twenty-eight companies sent representatives to meet po tential candidates, explain hir ing processes and administer screening exams. e Kings Bay Conference Center was crowded with recruit ers and hiring managers seek ing technicians, operators, me chanics, instruc tors, inspec tors, super visors and manag ers. Dave Sny der, Recruiter for Commissioning Agents, Inc., attended the event to speak with technicians and engineers about his companys opportuni ties across the country. I attend several job fairs a year, Navy and civilian, he said. e Kings Bay event did not have the most visitors, but it did have the largest number of good, inter viewable candi dates of any job fair I have ever been to. Im still fol lowing up with people. Synders sentiments were Best Mess Chefs take on the fleet in gourmet cooking Page 5

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 From education and employment to program cuts and reduc tions, President Barack Obamas s cal 2013 budget proposal has been dominating the headlines. According to an Oce of Man agement and Budget fact sheet, the budget request includes: $8.5 billion in Defense Department base funding to support military families, from child care and education for military chil dren to counseling and employment programs for the entire family. More than $1 billion through the Education Departments Impact Aid program to local school districts where a military base may increase the num ber of students and decrease the prop erty tax base. Districts educating more than 368,000 children from military families receive these funds. Funding for a 1.7 percent pay raise for service members, the full amount authorized by law, as well as a variety of special skill-based payments, enlistment and re-enlist ment bonuses, and other benets. About $2.4 billion for programs serving wounded, ill and injured service members, with $747 mil lion of that total to address traumat ic brain injury and psychological health needs. $465 million for medical research specically focused on psychologi cal health, TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder. $259 million for the Labor Departments Veterans Employment and Training Service, and $8 mil lion for the departments transition assistance program and grants for employment services to veterans. Continuing grants under the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program at a level of $38 million. Expanding entrepreneurship training for veterans and military families through the Small Business Administrations National Veterans Entrepreneurship Training, a new $7 million program that will train up to 260,000 veterans annually. $278 million for implementa tion of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act. Almost $1.4 billion for services through Veterans Aairs for homeless and at-risk veterans. e DOD budget request provides $1.3 billion in funding for child care space for more than 200,000 chil dren, as well as $1.4 billion for family support centers and Morale, Welfare And Recreation programs. It also commits $2.7 billion for the educa tion of more than 61,000 students at DOD Education Activity schools. e request includes more than $50 million to improve public school facilities on military installations. Military construction funding is set at $9.1 billion, and family hous ing at $1.7 billion. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Opera tion New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be avail able for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Ap plicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minium 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs. org/education for applications. For more in formation, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@ nmcrs.org.Wounded Warriors to tour Jaxe Wounded Warrior Project 2012 Soldier Ride comes to Jacksonville March 1 to 4. For more information, to volunteer or to donate to Soldier Ride, visit soldierride.org. For more about the Wounded Warrior Project, visit woundedwarriorproject.org.Runabout auto show March 17Kingslands 7th annual Runabout in the Royal District is Saturday, March 17, to benet Lighthorse Learning Center in St. Marys and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. e auto show features classic cars, stylish imports, muscle cars, antique tractors and more, with food, vendors and free entertainment. To enter your vehicle in the show, become vendor or a sponsor, visit www.KingslandDDA.com and click on the Events page. You also may contact Trish Jared at (912) 729-2848 or pjar ed@kingslandgeorgia.com.Volunteer income tax help offeredTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help oce and will include all the soft ware and computers to aid service members, retirees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Support Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walkin at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Appointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League will have a wie ball tournament and golf cart rae to raise funds for Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. e 1st An nual Wie Ball Tournament begins at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 3. Teams registered by Feb. 17 will receive an event T-shirt. For more informa tion, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970. Now hear this! There is no happiness except in the realization that we have accomplished something. Henry Ford Over the past few weeks, I have talked a lot about the importance of setting goals. Once those goals are set, it is equally as important to determine how you will measure your success. When it comes to making changes in your life to improve your health and tness, the scale is often the measurement tool of choice, and although weighing yourself can be an eective way to track your progress, you should not rely too heavily on reinforcement from the scale. When you adopt a healthy lifestyle, one that promotes choosing wholesome, healthy food and exer cising daily, you will quickly notice that the benets of this lifestyle go far beyond the scale. Living such a lifestyle will provide you with better health, more energy, stamina and endurance. Your clothes will t bet ter, your condence will soar, your will power will strengthen, and with each passing day, your determination to succeed will become unstoppable. e scale is just a machine that spits out a number. All these other results are your body, your mind and your heart letting you know that you are on the right track. If your goal is to lose weight, then yes, every pound lost is a step in the right direction. But it is not the only indicator of your success. I urge you to stop and take a moment to rec ognize the other victories you have won, such as saying no to a piece of cake when its right there in front of you or after years of not being able to wear them, nally tting back into those skinny jeans. When you start eating healthier, lose some weight and are able to get o a medication that truly is a victory. When you run a mile for the rst time or when you are able to play outside with your kids when you normally would sit it out, you have achieved something great. When someone asks you, Have you lost weight? or if you complete a tough workout, give yourself a pat on the back because you deserve it. If you concentrate solely on the scale to determine your level of success, you will undoubtedly miss the deep sense of achievement that comes in small ways every day. Choosing a fad diet, trying to nd a quick x or starting a program only to return to your old, bad habits as soon as it ends will never lead to long-term success. Adopt ing a way of life that makes health a priority and that helps you realize the power you already have within to achieve your goals, will allow you to appreciate the process and the endless rewards that come with liv ing a healthy and active lifestyle. Work hard every day, believe in yourself and your ability to do whatever it is you set your mind to, and you will, without a doubt, have many great successes. ink beyond a number on the scale Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. As they relocate from duty station to duty station, military families face the challenge of nding and secur ing quality child care. While Navys Child and Youth Programs oer the Child Development Centers on most military installations to address this family need, the Kings Bay CYP is looking to broaden the availability of quality child care to military families. In particular, the CYP is in look ing for caring individuals to serve as on or o-base Child Development Home providers. e CDH profes sion oers caregivers the opportunity to work in their own home and watch their own children grow and develop while, at the same time, caring for the children of military families and earning an additional income. CDH assist military parents by providing child care services to support operational readiness and retention. ese homes and their providers serve as an alternative to center-based care and are often preferred by families for their small group size, neighborhood locations, home-like atmosphere and exible hours of operation. Anyone who lives in military housing and wishes to provide child care on a regular basis for more than 10 hours a week must be certied by the Navy as a CDH provider. Any one living o base must be state li censed, but can provide Navy child are by becoming Navy certied. Why become a CDH provider? Education and Training CPR/ First Aid training, Early Childhood Education provided, receive college credit for Navy training, Flexibility Set your own hours and select the age group of children that best suits your family, Independent Work Environment You work for yourself, in your own home, Income Being a CDH provider is a great source of income while sav ing the expense of child care, Benets Toys and equip ment lending library available, free monthly training, on-site assistance and advice, low cost liability insur ance and direct subsidies at some locations, and Transferable Certification in transferable, whether you live in base housing or off-base Command certication is required to become a CDH provid er. e certication is processed through the CYP CDH oce and includes, but is not limited to, health screenings, training CPR/ First Aid, nutrition, activity planning, business practices, parent/customer relations , home inspections and background checks. If you are committed to becoming a child development home provider, you must complete a free, 20-hour training program that focuses on developmentally appropriate childcare practices, child abuse, CPR train ing, discipline techniques and small business course work. e training also provides an ex cellent opportunity for the providers to share information and establish a support network. To view an online support network, go to the National Network for Child Care Web Site. Interested? If you are looking for a way to support military families and earn additional income at the same time, contact CYP Director Candace Dugan or the operations clerk at (912) 573-9918. Training, the sup plies, toys, activities and paperwork are provided. You provide the love, patience and caring. Call today to nd out how you can become a Kings Bay CDH provider. Defense budget 2013 Home child care providers needed Budget proposal is family friendly

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Coast Guard men and women are taught early in their careers, to do the right thing when its the right thing to do, even when no one is looking. For Stewards Mate 3rd Class Warren T. Deyam pert doing the right thing was the obvious choice during the early morning hours of Feb. 3, 1943. Until now, Deyamperts story has gone untold. His life ended in tragic irony, but he remains a Coast Guard hero. ere are so many in dividuals in the history of the Coast Guard who have placed themselves in harms way so others might live, said Atlantic Area Histori an William H. Thie sen, PhD. These men and women deserve to be recognized and honored. Mr. Deyam pert is a perfect example and it is time his story is told. A Mobile, Ala., native, Deyampert was stationed aboard Coast Guard Cut ter Escanaba, homeported in Grand Haven, Mich., at the time, and was one of approximately 5,000 African Americans that served as Coast Guardsmen dur ing World War II. By June 1942 the Es canaba changed stations from the Great Lakes to Boston to serve as part of the Coast Guards Green land Patrol. e cutter was fully dedicated to the mis sion of protecting and preserving U.S. waters during World War II. On Feb. 3, 1943, Dey ampert, the Escanaba and crew were all part of an escort of three steamers, including the U.S. Army Transport Dorchester. e steamers were being escorted from Newfound land to Greenland. e Dorchester, car rying approximately 900 crew and passengers, was pierced by a torpedo at 1 a.m., creating a massive hole through the hull and causing the transport to sink in 20 minutes. e crew of the Es canaba quickly sprang into action. Deyampert was one of many who volunteered to go into the icy waters in an attempt to rescue any sur vivors from the Dorches ter. is was the rst time in the cutters history that crewmembers would uti lize the tethered rescue swimmer method to retrieve debilitated survi vors. is system, complete with rubber exposure suits, was developed for cutters by Lt. Robert H. Prause, executive ocer of the Escanaba. Despite the cold temperatures, frigid water and unforgiving seas, Dey ampert and fellow crew members were credited with saving 133 lives that morning. iesen said the rescue eort took a total of eight hours, and the rescuers, includ ing Dey am pert, lived, thanks to their train ing and skill set. Nearly one year later, the Escanaba and crew joined the crews of Coast Guard Cutters Storis and Raritan on a convoy escort from Greenland to New foundland. At approximately 5 a.m. June 13, 1943, an explosion rocked the Escanaba, causing the cutter to sink, taking 100 crewmembers with it. In an ironic twist of fate, Deyampert, who was re spon sible for sav ing so many lives in the February sink ing of the Dorchester, per ished as the Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba sank into its watery grave. When you look at Dey amperts case, you see a young man who had his whole life ahead of him, iesen said. He, like thousands of other young Americans serving in the military, gave his life so that our nation could live in peace and enjoy the freedoms that it does today. I hope readers will appreciate the sacrice made by Petty Ocer Deyampert, who fought to save the lives of others, but lost his own in the defense of our country. Deyampert was hon ored posthumously with the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for the bravery, determination and disregard for his own safety ... in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.Coast Guard hero gave life in World War II THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Photos courtesy of Morale, Welfare and RecreationThe first My Little Valentines Father and Daughter Dance was a sellout Feb. 11. The chocolate fountain was a big hit with everyone at the MWR-hosted event in the Conference Center. More than 150 event tickets were sold. Hey, youre awfully cute! Photos captured the joy. Come on, lets dance! Music by Daddy-O got dads, step dads, granddads, family friends and their dates out on the dance floor. Magical moments were many. The youngest girl was 19 months. The oldest, age 15.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5 Professionalism (team work) based on this social problem. is years title, Food Factor, focused on food safety. After preliminary test ing four styles of lunch boxes using thermometers, the team, with the help of the Sailors, devel oped a temperature mea suring system using ten thermistors in a parallel circuit that was wired to a multi-meter. is allowed measurement of multiple lunches to be taken over ve hours without open ing the lunchboxes. e research revealed that of the four lunchbox styles tested, none were able to maintain a temper ature less than 40-degrees for even three hours. At ve hours, temperatures ranged anywhere from 42 to 58-degrees. is was invaluable data because the Food and Drug Administration has established that food stored at 41 to 135-degrees is the temperature range in which food-borne bac teria can grow. e teams invention, the Munch Box, is able to maintain a safe tempera ture of 35-degress for at least ve hours. After eight hours, the lunch box was still an ac ceptable 38-degrees. e best part was that the food wasnt even sog gy, Boiley said. Last December, the team competed at Georgia Institute of Technology in Savan nah, Ga., and placed rst in robot performance. e team also took the cham pion award, which quali ed them to compete in the Super Regionals at Warner Robins Air Force Base. At Warner Robins, the team placed rst in research, rst in robot per formance and placed sixth overall, enough to qualify for the state competition at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Facing 48 of the best teams from around the state, the team placed 14th in robot performance January. Seven students, some plastic building blocks, a circuit board and twodecades worth of Navy electronics experience. Sounds like the beginning of a great idea. Robot Admiral Harvey visits Kings Bay the standards. Combined customers satisfaction scores, employee satisfaction, turnover numbers and nancial performance all determine an accreditation score. Installations are award ed three, four or ve stars. During this rst year, fourstar was the highest level achieved. Eleven bases worldwide were recog nized with 4-Star awards, ve of those being in the Southeast region. MWR Culinary Specialists as signed to Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic participated in a cu linary competition for Navy chefs, Feb. 10, at the Sheraton Hotel in Virginia Beach, Va. e 2nd Annual Best of the Mess competition, sponsored by the Chief Petty Ocer Scholarship Fund organization, pit ted teams from SUBLANT, USS eodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), Naval Sea Sys tems Norfolk and Carrier Strike Group 2, in a Top Chef style cook-o where each group prepared a three-course tasting menu featuring New Orleans style food for 300 guests. We wanted to do something dierent with our menu this year, said Cu linary Specialist 1st Class Jeerey Zimmerman, a chef with the SUBLANT Hot Runners. With the theme ingredients they gave us, it would be easy to do a gumbo, etouee or jambalaya or anything of that sort, but we tried to go out of the box. We didnt want to do anything other teams might be do ing. We were focusing on originality. SUBLANTs menu con sisted of a pecan crusted oyster Poboy bruschetta appetizer, SUBLANT Ca jun pork shoulder, and Creole okra fettuccine entrees and a bananas foster king cake for dessert. I love experimenting with food and trying new things, Zimmerman said. I love to bake and if I see a recipe that interests me, Ill try it! Team SUBLANT also participated in the inau gural BOM and used that experience to prepare for this years contest. We denitely learned from last years competition, said Chief Culinary Specialist Angel Lebron, leading chief petty ocer for the SUBLANT Flag Mess. We allowed our selves more prep time and implemented a few addi tional things to our setup. Lebron said his Sailors took the lead in preparing SUBLANT for the competition and that he was more of a team advisor. is competition is based on our junior Sailors skills. eyre at that level where theyre learning, but also teaching each other, Lebron said. is year, my role is to be the teams eyes and ears and their backup. Im also as sisting with the setup and decoration of our station, which last year we kind of fell short in. Youd be sur prised at what the Sailors can come up with using the ingredients list they are provided. ey have free will and knowledge to explore dierent recipes. And this contest allows us a chance to show the world that we are not just Sailors in the Navy, but also technicians in the art of cooking. e BOM competition is an annual event for the CPOSF organization, which raised $3,000 last year. Its a great opportunity for a fund-raiser for the scholarship fund, said Jesse Elliott, president of the Chief Petty Ocer Scholarship Fund Organization. Team SUBLANT n ished the evening as sec ond runner-up with lasts years champion Roos evelt taking second place and Carrier Strike Group 2 taking home this years top spot. SUBLANT second runnerup at Best of MessIts the best time of the year for any sports league playos! Dodgeballs single elim ination tournament is un derway, the regular season standings decided Feb. 15. Five of the 15 teams were still standing after the rst playo round last week. O the Wall, Team Bomb Squad, Go Deep of Tri dent Ret Facil ity and Face It and Team Go Big, both of the of Marine Corp Security Force Battalion are vying for the inaugural dodgeball title. Kickball has become the rage at Kings Bay and the remaining four playo teams, Security Ball Bust ers, USS Tennessees Tenacious Tenn, USS Wyoming and Les Boules of TRF, look to take home the inaugural kickball championship. Indoor Soccer playos start tonight. Teams have been battling it out all sea son, and nothing less is expected during the playos. SMB FC of USS Florida, USS Maryland Blue, Envoy of SUBASE, USS Rhode Is land, USS Wyoming un dershazbots, Free Agents and MSST Kings Bay are all looking to take home the title. And in other sports news, it was batters up for Major League Baseball spring training this week. KB Sports could not be more ex cited. ose of us in the oce are already discussing who has the best pitching (Miami Mar lins), hitting (Marlins) and elding (Marlins). Every one in the oce agrees. e Miami Marlins are the team to beat this season. Really. Ask anyone in the Intraumural Sports oce. In a totally unrelated note, the MWR Sports Coordi nator is a big Miami Mar lins fan. Expect a full recap of all the intramural playos, and less Marlin talk, in next weeks edition. Intramural Sports With Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Playos begin at Kings Bay

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or con tribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center takes most of its work shops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors can create a presen tation in response to a units special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoc trination of newly assigned per sonnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Sup port Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Second Career will be pre sented by e Military O cers Association of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Trident Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy direc tor of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplat ing retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, em ployer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, network ing, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotia tion, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, contact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513. 2003, the Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay in 2007, and the addition of the USCGC Sea Dragon, it is tting and very appropriate that Admiral Papp see rsthand how we feel about and take care of the men and women of our military who get to call Camden County home during their respective tours here. It is a big win for our area. Slated for Friday, March 16, the event will include a visit from Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr., Coast Guard commandant since May 25, 2010. Papp leads the largest component of the Depart ment of Homeland Security, which comprises 42,000 active duty, 8,200 Reserve, 8,000 civilian and 31,000 volunteer personnel. As you may remember, Camden County came very close to losing the Coast Guards Maritime Safety and Security Team based in St. Marys, said Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership. A Camden Partnership news release says it was through the advocacy and support of local residents that partnership members were able to educate legislators about the im portance of Coast Guard funding, and the teams presence was secured. is is what we do and this is what partnerships can accomplish, McNeill said. Approximately 85 mem bers of the MSST continue to call Camden home. Along with the Maritime Force Protection Unit at Kings Bay, they comprise the entire Coast Guard presence locally. Papp is a 1975 graduate of the Coast Guard acad emy. He holds a masters degree is National Security and Strategic Studies and a masters in management. He is the 13th Gold An cient Mariner, an honorary position held by an ocer with more than 10 years of cumulative sea duty who has held the qualication of cutterman longer than any other ocer. ose interested in participating in the Community at Cares event should call (912) 882-2636 or e-mail the camdent partnership@tds.net. Res ervations for the March 16 luncheon are $25. Sponsorship forms are available at www.the cam denpartnership.org.Papp echoed by many of the representatives in atten dance. e event was in no small part a success due to the professional servic es provided by the MWR Conference Center sta, by local Culinary Special ists Senior Chief Chandler and Petty Ocer Hammond, and the eorts of Navy Career Counselors and Deckplate Leaders in promoting the event and permitting attendance, said Beth Hubbart, the Family Employment Readiness Program Man ager for FFSC. e next planned event is the biannual Navy TriBase Job Fair April 18, at the Morocco Shrine Center in Jacksonville, Fla. Transitioning service members can receive as sistance from the FFSC Career Support and Re-Jobs 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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A Teen Maskquerade Party is 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Cen ter for ages 13 to 18 and still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more in formation, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 gift card from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay button and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employ ees and their family members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service mem bers that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an addi tional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting parties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be sched uled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Teen Centers hours for Open Recreation are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. ursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. is is free to all. For more infor mation, call the Youth Cen ter at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information on how to become a sports official.Open Rec hours set Just for kids Teen Maskquerade Friday Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. a CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw tention sta in many ways be yond hosting job fairs. Individual appointments to create job search tools such as resumes, cover letters and tai lored job search strategies are available. Several classes are oered each month, including Crack the Code: Creating a Private Sec tor Resume from Your Military Experience and 10 Steps to a Federal Job. e Career Support and Retention Oce lists job postings from local area and national employers, boasts a library of recently published titles on career topics and makes available computers, printers, scanners, and fax machines for your use. For more information or to register for classes, call the Ca reer Support and Retention Of ce at 573-4513.Jobs THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7

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This is National Nutrition Month. What do you think are the most-nutritious and least-nutritious things you eat? For me, my oatmeal breakfasts are probably the most nutritious, though my doctor says oatmeal isnt that great, only better than most other things ... like the wings and pizza Super Bowl leftovers Ive been eating lately for breakfast. The worst? Probably horseradish cheese. I eat a lot of it. This stuff is full of saturated fat. One ounce has 28 percent daily value. But its great and clears up my sinuses. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Bernel Moxey Retired Navy Gulfport, Miss. Spaghetti (pasta) is the most nutritional and (the least) fast food. Lance Cpl. Jonathan Bruen Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Iron Mountain, Mich. The least would prob ably be potato chips and the most would be lunch meat sandwiches. MASA Jesus Acosta Marine Corps Security Force Battalion San Angelo, Texas The least nutritional is fast food. The most nutritional is fruits and vegetables. Theyre one of the best things for you. MA2 Johnny Archer Kings Bay Security Sandersville, Ga. The least nutritional is probably bread. I love it, and eat a lot, but it puts on weight. The most nutritional is blueberries, avocado and boiled egg whites. Jackie Brady Family member Bath, Maine I drink a lot of water and milk, but no soda. The bad part is I eat too much of something. We call it bad portion control. AT1 William Roberts Kings Bay CPPD Jacksonville, Fla. The most nutritional is probably vegetables. The least would be Swiss Roll cakes. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho How we handle our nances and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nan cially secure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Sup port Center oers many nancial classes designed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. ink about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times ve days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eat ing out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of going to the bookstore, go to the li brary and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average elec trical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Sup port Center, in support of the Military Saves Cam paign, oers nancial classes for military members and their families. Here are just a few of the Small steps help save big money THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Navy College educational information nancial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This work shop prepares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehen sive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will under stand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the impor tant dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, dis counts, nancing, highpressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.Save 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chow der Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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Job fair draws full houseKings Bays MWR earns high accreditation mark 4-Star award highest given out in rst year by Navy Installations Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and Rec reation Department held a cel ebration to ocially recognize the accomplishment of earning the 4-Star Accreditation by Com mander, Navy Installations Com mand, Wednesday, Feb. 15. e MWR program was rec ognized for outstanding perfor mance in nancial and personnel management, customer service and compliance of Department of Defense MWR physical tness center and liberty standards. is is a big day for us. We are here to celebrate something very special, said Bob Spinnenweber, MWR director. is award is all about the people in this room and the work you put in each and every day. I know you work hard every day, and I expect a lot from you, but in the end, we won the race. Last year was the inaugural year for the CNIC MWR Accreditation Program. Base size determines the criteria for required facilities, equipment and manning. After submitting the ac creditation package, a validation team makes a site visit where it thoroughly inspects every aspect of the program. Kings Bay is all about quality of life, and that is what each and every one of you focuses on ev ery single day for our Sailors and families, said Capt. John ONeill, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer. Congratu lations. I am very proud of you, and you all should be proud of yourselves. e accreditation is good for two years with a performance data call submitted each year to validate USS Rhode Island Sailors coach students in state contest If someone gave you a team of seven people, some plastic building blocks, a circuit board and two-decades worth of Navy electronics experience, what would you come up with? Two Sailors from USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (Gold) were given that recipe to help a local robotics team take a lunch box to the Geor gia state championship. Electronics Technician 1st Class George Martell and Electronics Technician 1st Class Roberto J. Soto began mentoring the Mysterious Minds Lego Robotics team three years ago. e team is made up of students from Mary Lee Clark Elementary and St. Marys Middle School, both near the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines homeport at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Working alongside the teams coaches, Mary Boily and Marcia Travis, the Navy ETs used their engineering background to advise the students on the production and the programming of an autonomous robot as part of the First Lego League Challenge. FLL is an international organization with a mission to inspire young people to be science and tech nol ogy lead ers, said Boily, the teams head coach and a teacher at Mary Lee Clark. Engaging them in exciting mentorbased programs that build science, engineering and technology skills inspires innovation, and that fosters well-rounded life capabilities including selfcondence, communication, and leadership. Martells background in electronics and computers allows him to instruct the team in programming and electronic circuit work. rough his willingness to mentor, the team has gained a rudimentary understanding of electricity and developed advanced level programming skills. Soto uses his engineering background to instruct the team in robotics. e team has gained valuable knowledge in the areas of engineering, analyzing robot tasking, complex problem-solving and team work from his leadership. Each year, the FLL Challenge presents a social problem and allows the teams eight weeks to build and program a robot, complete a research project and gain an understanding of the value of Gracious Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Mysterious Minds solve Lego robotics Up Periscope The good and bad of National Nutrition Month Page 9 My Valentine First father-daughter NSB dance a big hit Page 4 Coast Guards Papp to speakCamden Partnership hosts commandant at March 16 eventSecuring our borders, saving lives and property at sea, ensuring the safety of professional mariners and recreational and commercial vessels, responding to natural disasters, protecting our marine environment and defending our nation. Theyre are all in a days work for the United States Coast Guard. The leader of Americas oldest continuous seagoing service, Adm. Robert J. Papp, will be honored by e Camden Partnership and the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the U. S. at the annual A Community at Cares luncheon. Excitement over his impending visit is high. What a thrill for us in Camden County to host the commandant of the Coast Guard, said Keith Post, retired senior chief and Georgia president of the Navy League. Since landing the Maritime Safety and Security Team in FFSC-sponsored day draws engineering, technical recruitersMore than 200 veterans and military members planning for transition, as well as qualied military family members, attended a Technical and Engineering Field Job Fair sponsored by the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay Feb. 8. Twenty-eight companies sent representatives to meet potential candidates, explain hiring processes and administer screening exams. e Kings Bay Conference Center was crowded with recruiters and hiring managers seeking technicians, operators, mechanics, instruc tors, inspec tors, super visors and manag ers. Dave Sny der, Recruiter for Commissioning Agents, Inc., attended the event to speak with technicians and engineers about his companys opportunities across the country. I attend several job fairs a year, Navy and civilian, he said. e Kings Bay event did not have the most visitors, but it did have the largest number of good, inter viewable candi dates of any job fair I have ever been to. Im still following up with people. Synders sentiments were Best Mess Chefs take on the fleet in gourmet cooking Page 5

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 From education and employment to program cuts and reductions, President Barack Obamas scal 2013 budget proposal has been dominating the headlines. According to an Oce of Management and Budget fact sheet, the budget request includes: $8.5 billion in Defense Department base funding to support military families, from child care and education for military children to counseling and employment programs for the entire family. More than $1 billion through the Education Departments Impact Aid program to local school districts where a military base may increase the num ber of students and decrease the prop erty tax base. Districts educating more than 368,000 children from military families receive these funds. Funding for a 1.7 percent pay raise for service members, the full amount authorized by law, as well as a variety of special skill-based payments, enlistment and re-enlistment bonuses, and other benets. About $2.4 billion for programs serving wounded, ill and injured service members, with $747 mil lion of that total to address traumatic brain injury and psychological health needs. $465 million for medical research specically focused on psychological health, TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder. $259 million for the Labor Departments Veterans Employment and Training Service, and $8 million for the departments transition assistance program and grants for employment services to veterans. Continuing grants under the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program at a level of $38 million. Expanding entrepreneurship training for veterans and military families through the Small Business Administrations National Veterans Entrepreneurship Training, a new $7 million program that will train up to 260,000 veterans annually. $278 million for implementa tion of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act. Almost $1.4 billion for services through Veterans Aairs for homeless and at-risk veterans. e DOD budget request provides $1.3 billion in funding for child care space for more than 200,000 children, as well as $1.4 billion for family support centers and Morale, Welfare And Recreation programs. It also commits $2.7 billion for the education of more than 61,000 students at DOD Education Activity schools. e request includes more than $50 million to improve public school facilities on military installations. Military construction funding is set at $9.1 billion, and family housing at $1.7 billion. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Scholarship is for wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minium 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs. org/education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@ nmcrs.org.Wounded Warriors to tour Jaxe Wounded Warrior Project 2012 Soldier Ride comes to Jacksonville March 1 to 4. For more information, to volunteer or to donate to Soldier Ride, visit soldierride.org. For more about the Wounded Warrior Project, visit woundedwarriorproject.org.Runabout auto show March 17Kingslands 7th annual Runabout in the Royal District is Saturday, March 17, to benet Lighthorse Learning Center in St. Marys and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. e auto show features classic cars, stylish imports, muscle cars, antique tractors and more, with food, vendors and free entertainment. To enter your vehicle in the show, become vendor or a sponsor, visit www.KingslandDDA.com and click on the Events page. You also may contact Trish Jared at (912) 729-2848 or pjared@kingslandgeorgia.com.Volunteer income tax help offeredTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help oce and will include all the software and computers to aid service members, retirees and dependents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Support Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walkin at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Appointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League will have a wie ball tournament and golf cart rae to raise funds for Justins Miracle Field in Kingsland. e 1st An nual Wie Ball Tournament begins at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 3. Teams registered by Feb. 17 will receive an event T-shirt. For more informa tion, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970. Now hear this! There is no happiness except in the realization that we have accomplished something. Henry Ford Over the past few weeks, I have talked a lot about the importance of setting goals. Once those goals are set, it is equally as important to determine how you will measure your success. When it comes to making changes in your life to improve your health and tness, the scale is often the measurement tool of choice, and although weighing yourself can be an eective way to track your progress, you should not rely too heavily on reinforcement from the scale. When you adopt a healthy lifestyle, one that promotes choosing wholesome, healthy food and exercising daily, you will quickly notice that the benets of this lifestyle go far beyond the scale. Living such a lifestyle will provide you with better health, more energy, stamina and endurance. Your clothes will t better, your condence will soar, your will power will strengthen, and with each passing day, your determination to succeed will become unstoppable. e scale is just a machine that spits out a number. All these other results are your body, your mind and your heart letting you know that you are on the right track. If your goal is to lose weight, then yes, every pound lost is a step in the right direction. But it is not the only indicator of your success. I urge you to stop and take a moment to recognize the other victories you have won, such as saying no to a piece of cake when its right there in front of you or after years of not being able to wear them, nally tting back into those skinny jeans. When you start eating healthier, lose some weight and are able to get o a medication that truly is a victory. When you run a mile for the rst time or when you are able to play outside with your kids when you normally would sit it out, you have achieved something great. When someone asks you, Have you lost weight? or if you complete a tough workout, give yourself a pat on the back because you deserve it. If you concentrate solely on the scale to determine your level of success, you will undoubtedly miss the deep sense of achievement that comes in small ways every day. Choosing a fad diet, trying to nd a quick x or starting a program only to return to your old, bad habits as soon as it ends will never lead to long-term success. Adopting a way of life that makes health a priority and that helps you realize the power you already have within to achieve your goals, will allow you to appreciate the process and the endless rewards that come with living a healthy and active lifestyle. Work hard every day, believe in yourself and your ability to do whatever it is you set your mind to, and you will, without a doubt, have many great successes. ink beyond a number on the scale Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. As they relocate from duty station to duty station, military families face the challenge of nding and securing quality child care. While Navys Child and Youth Programs oer the Child Development Centers on most military installations to address this family need, the Kings Bay CYP is looking to broaden the availability of quality child care to military families. In particular, the CYP is in look ing for caring individuals to serve as on or o-base Child Development Home providers. e CDH profes sion oers caregivers the opportunity to work in their own home and watch their own children grow and develop while, at the same time, caring for the children of military families and earning an additional income. CDH assist military parents by providing child care services to support operational readiness and retention. ese homes and their providers serve as an alternative to center-based care and are often preferred by families for their small group size, neighborhood locations, home-like atmosphere and exible hours of operation. Anyone who lives in military housing and wishes to provide child care on a regular basis for more than 10 hours a week must be certied by the Navy as a CDH provider. Anyone living o base must be state licensed, but can provide Navy child are by becoming Navy certied. Why become a CDH provider? Education and Training CPR/ First Aid training, Early Childhood Education provided, receive college credit for Navy training, Flexibility Set your own hours and select the age group of children that best suits your family, Independent Work Environment You work for yourself, in your own home, Income Being a CDH provider is a great source of income while saving the expense of child care, Benets Toys and equipment lending library available, free monthly training, on-site assistance and advice, low cost liability insurance and direct subsidies at some locations, and Transferable Certification in transferable, whether you live in base housing or off-base Command certication is required to become a CDH provider. e certication is processed through the CYP CDH oce and includes, but is not limited to, health screenings, training CPR/ First Aid, nutrition, activity planning, business practices, parent/customer relations , home inspections and background checks. If you are committed to becoming a child development home provider, you must complete a free, 20-hour training program that focuses on developmentally appropriate childcare practices, child abuse, CPR train ing, discipline techniques and small business course work. e training also provides an excellent opportunity for the providers to share information and establish a support network. To view an online support network, go to the National Network for Child Care Web Site. Interested? If you are looking for a way to support military families and earn additional income at the same time, contact CYP Director Candace Dugan or the operations clerk at (912) 573-9918. Training, the supplies, toys, activities and paperwork are provided. You provide the love, patience and caring. Call today to nd out how you can become a Kings Bay CDH provider. Defense budget 2013 Home child care providers needed Budget proposal is family friendly

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Coast Guard men and women are taught early in their careers, to do the right thing when its the right thing to do, even when no one is looking. For Stewards Mate 3rd Class Warren T. Deyampert doing the right thing was the obvious choice during the early morning hours of Feb. 3, 1943. Until now, Deyamperts story has gone untold. His life ended in tragic irony, but he remains a Coast Guard hero. ere are so many individuals in the history of the Coast Guard who have placed themselves in harms way so others might live, said Atlantic Area Historian William H. Thie sen, PhD. These men and women deserve to be recognized and honored. Mr. Deyampert is a perfect example and it is time his story is told. A Mobile, Ala., native, Deyampert was stationed aboard Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba, homeported in Grand Haven, Mich., at the time, and was one of approximately 5,000 African Americans that served as Coast Guardsmen during World War II. By June 1942 the Escanaba changed stations from the Great Lakes to Boston to serve as part of the Coast Guards Greenland Patrol. e cutter was fully dedicated to the mission of protecting and preserving U.S. waters during World War II. On Feb. 3, 1943, Deyampert, the Escanaba and crew were all part of an escort of three steamers, including the U.S. Army Transport Dorchester. e steamers were being escorted from Newfoundland to Greenland. e Dorchester, carrying approximately 900 crew and passengers, was pierced by a torpedo at 1 a.m., creating a massive hole through the hull and causing the transport to sink in 20 minutes. e crew of the Escanaba quickly sprang into action. Deyampert was one of many who volunteered to go into the icy waters in an attempt to rescue any survivors from the Dorchester. is was the rst time in the cutters history that crewmembers would utilize the tethered rescue swimmer method to retrieve debilitated survivors. is system, complete with rubber exposure suits, was developed for cutters by Lt. Robert H. Prause, executive ocer of the Escanaba. Despite the cold temperatures, frigid water and unforgiving seas, Deyampert and fellow crewmembers were credited with saving 133 lives that morning. iesen said the rescue eort took a total of eight hours, and the rescuers, includ ing Dey am pert, lived, thanks to their training and skill set. Nearly one year later, the Escanaba and crew joined the crews of Coast Guard Cutters Storis and Raritan on a convoy escort from Greenland to Newfoundland. At approximately 5 a.m. June 13, 1943, an explosion rocked the Escanaba, causing the cutter to sink, taking 100 crewmembers with it. In an ironic twist of fate, Deyampert, who was respon sible for sav ing so many lives in the February sinking of the Dorchester, perished as the Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba sank into its watery grave. When you look at Deyamperts case, you see a young man who had his whole life ahead of him, iesen said. He, like thousands of other young Americans serving in the military, gave his life so that our nation could live in peace and enjoy the freedoms that it does today. I hope readers will appreciate the sacrice made by Petty Ocer Deyampert, who fought to save the lives of others, but lost his own in the defense of our country. Deyampert was honored posthumously with the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for the bravery, determination and disregard for his own safety ... in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.Coast Guard hero gave life in World War II THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Photos courtesy of Morale, Welfare and RecreationThe first My Little Valentines Father and Daughter Dance was a sellout Feb. 11. The chocolate fountain was a big hit with everyone at the MWR-hosted event in the Conference Center. More than 150 event tickets were sold. Hey, youre awfully cute! Photos captured the joy. Come on, lets dance! Music by Daddy-O got dads, step dads, granddads, family friends and their dates out on the dance floor. Magical moments were many. The youngest girl was 19 months. The oldest, age 15.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 5 Professionalism (team work) based on this social problem. is years title, Food Factor, focused on food safety. After preliminary testing four styles of lunchboxes using thermometers, the team, with the help of the Sailors, developed a temperature measuring system using ten thermistors in a parallel circuit that was wired to a multi-meter. is allowed measurement of multiple lunches to be taken over ve hours without opening the lunchboxes. e research revealed that of the four lunchbox styles tested, none were able to maintain a temperature less than 40-degrees for even three hours. At ve hours, temperatures ranged anywhere from 42 to 58-degrees. is was invaluable data because the Food and Drug Administration has established that food stored at 41 to 135-degrees is the temperature range in which food-borne bacteria can grow. e teams invention, the Munch Box, is able to maintain a safe temperature of 35-degress for at least ve hours. After eight hours, the lunch box was still an acceptable 38-degrees. e best part was that the food wasnt even soggy, Boiley said. Last December, the team competed at Georgia Institute of Technology in Savan nah, Ga., and placed rst in robot performance. e team also took the cham pion award, which quali ed them to compete in the Super Regionals at Warner Robins Air Force Base. At Warner Robins, the team placed rst in research, rst in robot performance and placed sixth overall, enough to qualify for the state competition at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Facing 48 of the best teams from around the state, the team placed 14th in robot performance January. Seven students, some plastic building blocks, a circuit board and twodecades worth of Navy electronics experience. Sounds like the beginning of a great idea. Robot Admiral Harvey visits Kings Bay the standards. Combined customers satisfaction scores, employee satisfaction, turnover numbers and nancial performance all determine an accreditation score. Installations are award ed three, four or ve stars. During this rst year, fourstar was the highest level achieved. Eleven bases worldwide were recog nized with 4-Star awards, ve of those being in the Southeast region. MWR Culinary Specialists assigned to Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic participated in a culinary competition for Navy chefs, Feb. 10, at the Sheraton Hotel in Virginia Beach, Va. e 2nd Annual Best of the Mess competition, sponsored by the Chief Petty Ocer Scholarship Fund organization, pitted teams from SUBLANT, USS eodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), Naval Sea Systems Norfolk and Carrier Strike Group 2, in a Top Chef style cook-o where each group prepared a three-course tasting menu featuring New Orleans style food for 300 guests. We wanted to do something dierent with our menu this year, said Culinary Specialist 1st Class Jeerey Zimmerman, a chef with the SUBLANT Hot Runners. With the theme ingredients they gave us, it would be easy to do a gumbo, etouee or jambalaya or anything of that sort, but we tried to go out of the box. We didnt want to do anything other teams might be doing. We were focusing on originality. SUBLANTs menu consisted of a pecan crusted oyster Poboy bruschetta appetizer, SUBLANT Cajun pork shoulder, and Creole okra fettuccine entrees and a bananas foster king cake for dessert. I love experimenting with food and trying new things, Zimmerman said. I love to bake and if I see a recipe that interests me, Ill try it! Team SUBLANT also participated in the inaugural BOM and used that experience to prepare for this years contest. We denitely learned from last years competition, said Chief Culinary Specialist Angel Lebron, leading chief petty ocer for the SUBLANT Flag Mess. We allowed ourselves more prep time and implemented a few additional things to our setup. Lebron said his Sailors took the lead in preparing SUBLANT for the competition and that he was more of a team advisor. is competition is based on our junior Sailors skills. eyre at that level where theyre learning, but also teaching each other, Lebron said. is year, my role is to be the teams eyes and ears and their backup. Im also assisting with the setup and decoration of our station, which last year we kind of fell short in. Youd be surprised at what the Sailors can come up with using the ingredients list they are provided. ey have free will and knowledge to explore dierent recipes. And this contest allows us a chance to show the world that we are not just Sailors in the Navy, but also technicians in the art of cooking. e BOM competition is an annual event for the CPOSF organization, which raised $3,000 last year. Its a great opportunity for a fund-raiser for the scholarship fund, said Jesse Elliott, president of the Chief Petty Ocer Scholarship Fund Organization. Team SUBLANT nished the evening as second runner-up with lasts years champion Roosevelt taking second place and Carrier Strike Group 2 taking home this years top spot. SUBLANT second runnerup at Best of MessIts the best time of the year for any sports league playos! Dodgeballs single elimination tournament is underway, the regular season standings decided Feb. 15. Five of the 15 teams were still standing after the rst playo round last week. O the Wall, Team Bomb Squad, Go Deep of Trident Ret Facility and Face It and Team Go Big, both of the of Marine Corp Security Force Battalion are vying for the inaugural dodgeball title. Kickball has become the rage at Kings Bay and the remaining four playo teams, Security Ball Busters, USS Tennessees Tenacious Tenn, USS Wyoming and Les Boules of TRF, look to take home the inaugural kickball championship. Indoor Soccer playos start tonight. Teams have been battling it out all season, and nothing less is expected during the playos. SMB FC of USS Florida, USS Maryland Blue, Envoy of SUBASE, USS Rhode Island, USS Wyoming undershazbots, Free Agents and MSST Kings Bay are all looking to take home the title. And in other sports news, it was batters up for Major League Baseball spring training this week. KB Sports could not be more excited. ose of us in the oce are already discussing who has the best pitching (Miami Marlins), hitting (Marlins) and elding (Marlins). Everyone in the oce agrees. e Miami Marlins are the team to beat this season. Really. Ask anyone in the Intraumural Sports oce. In a totally unrelated note, the MWR Sports Coordinator is a big Miami Marlins fan. Expect a full recap of all the intramural playos, and less Marlin talk, in next weeks edition. Intramural Sports With Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Playos begin at Kings Bay

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or con tribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center takes most of its workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors can create a presentation in response to a units special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Second Career will be presented by e Military Ocers Association of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Trident Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, contact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513. 2003, the Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay in 2007, and the addition of the USCGC Sea Dragon, it is tting and very appropriate that Admiral Papp see rsthand how we feel about and take care of the men and women of our military who get to call Camden County home during their respective tours here. It is a big win for our area. Slated for Friday, March 16, the event will include a visit from Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr., Coast Guard commandant since May 25, 2010. Papp leads the largest component of the Depart ment of Homeland Security, which comprises 42,000 active duty, 8,200 Reserve, 8,000 civilian and 31,000 volunteer personnel. As you may remember, Camden County came very close to losing the Coast Guards Maritime Safety and Security Team based in St. Marys, said Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership. A Camden Partnership news release says it was through the advocacy and support of local residents that partnership members were able to educate legislators about the importance of Coast Guard funding, and the teams presence was secured. is is what we do and this is what partnerships can accomplish, McNeill said. Approximately 85 members of the MSST continue to call Camden home. Along with the Maritime Force Protection Unit at Kings Bay, they comprise the entire Coast Guard presence locally. Papp is a 1975 graduate of the Coast Guard acad emy. He holds a masters degree is National Security and Strategic Studies and a masters in management. He is the 13th Gold An cient Mariner, an honorary position held by an ocer with more than 10 years of cumulative sea duty who has held the qualication of cutterman longer than any other ocer. ose interested in participating in the Community at Cares event should call (912) 882-2636 or e-mail the camdentpartnership@tds.net. Reservations for the March 16 luncheon are $25. Sponsorship forms are available at www.the camdenpartnership.org.Papp echoed by many of the representatives in attendance. e event was in no small part a success due to the professional services provided by the MWR Conference Center sta, by local Culinary Specialists Senior Chief Chandler and Petty Ocer Hammond, and the eorts of Navy Career Counselors and Deckplate Leaders in promoting the event and permitting attendance, said Beth Hubbart, the Family Employment Readiness Program Manager for FFSC. e next planned event is the biannual Navy TriBase Job Fair April 18, at the Morocco Shrine Center in Jacksonville, Fla. Transitioning service members can receive assistance from the FFSC Career Support and Re-Jobs 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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A Teen Maskquerade Party is 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Center for ages 13 to 18 and still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more information, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 giftcard from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay button and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their family members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting parties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings e Teen Centers hours for Open Recreation are 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. ursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. is is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information on how to become a sports official.Open Rec hours set Just for kids Teen Maskquerade Friday Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. a CFC participantProvided as a public service healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw tention sta in many ways beyond hosting job fairs. Individual appointments to create job search tools such as resumes, cover letters and tailored job search strategies are available. Several classes are oered each month, including Crack the Code: Creating a Private Sector Resume from Your Military Experience and 10 Steps to a Federal Job. e Career Support and Retention Oce lists job postings from local area and national employers, boasts a library of recently published titles on career topics and makes available computers, printers, scanners, and fax machines for your use. For more information or to register for classes, call the Career Support and Retention Ofce at 573-4513.Jobs THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 7

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This is National Nutrition Month. What do you think are the most-nutritious and least-nutritious things you eat? For me, my oatmeal breakfasts are probably the most nutritious, though my doctor says oatmeal isnt that great, only better than most other things ... like the wings and pizza Super Bowl leftovers Ive been eating lately for breakfast. The worst? Probably horseradish cheese. I eat a lot of it. This stuff is full of saturated fat. One ounce has 28 percent daily value. But its great and clears up my sinuses. Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Bernel Moxey Retired Navy Gulfport, Miss. Spaghetti (pasta) is the most nutritional and (the least) fast food. Lance Cpl. Jonathan Bruen Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Iron Mountain, Mich. The least would probably be potato chips and the most would be lunch meat sandwiches. MASA Jesus Acosta Marine Corps Security Force Battalion San Angelo, Texas The least nutritional is fast food. The most nutritional is fruits and vegetables. Theyre one of the best things for you. MA2 Johnny Archer Kings Bay Security Sandersville, Ga. The least nutritional is probably bread. I love it, and eat a lot, but it puts on weight. The most nutritional is blueberries, avocado and boiled egg whites. Jackie Brady Family member Bath, Maine I drink a lot of water and milk, but no soda. The bad part is I eat too much of something. We call it bad portion control. AT1 William Roberts Kings Bay CPPD Jacksonville, Fla. The most nutritional is probably vegetables. The least would be Swiss Roll cakes. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho How we handle our nances and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nancially secure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Support Center oers many nancial classes designed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. ink about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times ve days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eating out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of going to the bookstore, go to the library and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average electrical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Support Center, in support of the Military Saves Campaign, oers nancial classes for military members and their families. Here are just a few of the Small steps help save big money THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 9

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Navy College educational information nancial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This work shop prepares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehen sive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will under stand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the important dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing, highpressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.Save 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Galley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 23, 2012