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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-16-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00245

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00245


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THEkings bay, georgia NSB, school ocials work on partnership Relationships built during PEP meet and greet at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer and Community Relations Manager held a Personal Excellence Part nership Meet and Greet at the Clubs of Kings Bay Jan. 30. Nearly 50 service members and representatives from Cam den County School District at tended the event. We wanted to get everyone together so they can renew and discuss their partnerships, said Clainetta Jeerson, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer. is event is also a great opportunity to col laborate and plan future events. Community Relations Manager, Kelly Wirfel opened the event talking about the Navy Commu nity Service Program and how the PEP works in that program. e purpose of the PEP pro gram is to assist youth, from pre-school through high school, to become better educated, healthier and more responsible citizens, Wirfel said. e pro gram involves Navy people, in cluding military, civilians and family members, volunteering their time to tutor, encourage and mentor young people. Following Wirfels presenta tion, Jeerson discussed ways that both the commands and schools can improve their part nerships. She described three keys to making the program a success communication between the adopted school and command, documentation of participation in the events and followup reec tion on events. Following the presentations, base coordinators and school representatives talked about upcoming events and activities that they plan on participating in for the remainder of the school year and also the upcoming year. During the 2011 scal year, Kings Bay volunteers contributed 5,550 volunteer service hours to Camden County schools through the PEP program. Retired Activities Oce keeps retirees updated CFC exceeds targetKings Bay raises $248,000; $20,000 more than last year Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has exceeded its 2011 Combined Federal Cam paign goal by 7 percent. e campaign ended Jan. 30. Active duty service mem bers, civil service employees, contractors and retir ees throughout the base contributed $248,003 to the CFC campaign, which result ed in a $20,000 increase over the bases 2010 contributions. Kelly Wirfel, deputy public af fairs of ficer and Com bined Federal Campaign loaned ex ecutive, attributed the bases success in donating to the CFC campaign to the hard work and giving nature of individuals here at Kings Bay. Our employees, whether service members or civilians, truly want to make a dier ence, Wirfel said. ey are thankful for what they have, and not only want to make their countries better, but also want to make the communi ties better as well. e CFC is an annual fundraising drive conducted by NAS Jax site serves Kings Bay area e Retired Activities Oce mission according to IAW Sec Nav Directive 5420.1 and OP NAVInst 1720.3E, is to provide assistance and informational services to all military retirees, their family members, dependents and survivors, and active military contemplating retirement. e Naval Air Station Jack sonville RAO is in the Fleet and Family Support Center on the corner of Enterprise Avenue and Child Street across from the Post Oce and Navy Exchange. It serves all North Florida area and part of Southeast Georgia military retirees and their families. RAO provides direct assis tance and counseling on cur rent retiree related information matters. In some cases, RAO will direct a client to the appropriate agency or other resource to re solve a retirees issue. RAO works in cooperation with all on station service pro viders, as well as those at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, USO and city of Jacksonville Veterans Services. Services available at RAO include: Reporting the death of a ser vice member or spouse Survivor Benefit Plan claim forms filing and support Retired Pay issues Claims for unpaid compen sation Burial Benefits Social Security benefits Veterans benefits Survivors base benefits and privileges Civil Service/OPM benefits Combat Related Special Compensation Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay e oce is open with vol unteer representatives from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. during the week and 1 to 4 p.m. on Wednesdays. Appoint ments are not required, but can be made by call ing (904) 5425790. Walk-ins are welcomed. Sailors, civilians recognized for job accomplishments Trident Ret Facility recog nized its People of the Year for 2011 in an awards ceremony Jan. 31. Among the notable uni formed selections were TRI REFFAC Sailor of the Year Machinists Mate 1st Class Shane R. Whitford, a repair ship supervisor, plus Machin ists Mate 2nd Class Edward E. Martin, a Defensive Ordnance Support Facility weapons han dler who was recognized as Junior Sailor of the Year, and Navy Diver 3rd Class James W. Lidgard, a TRIREFFAC second class diver who was recognized as the Bluejacket of the Year. Additionally, TRIREFFAC recognized its top civil service employees at the ceremony. Capt. Richard Verbeke, TRIREFFAC commanding ocer, said each one of the personnel recognized displayed the commitment and eort that helped the command meet its mission and that their selec tions epitomized the successes that TRIREFFAC organization had last year. People are and have always been our key to success, Ver becke said. It is ex tremely gratify ing to be able to recognize the best of the best during our Civilians and Sailors of the Year Ceremony. ese individuals have consis tently gone above and beyond and have truly earned the recognition bestowed upon them. As ship superintendent for USS Georgia (SSGN 729), Whit ford provid ed out standing man age ment and leader ship for more than 500 military and civilian personnel, encompassing more than 2,000 maintenance actions, 250,000 man-hours and an emergent repair to the ships reduction gears. Being selected as the 2011 TRF Sailor of the year is an incredible honor, Whitford said. is award validates my pas sion for being a submariner and that I am on a course for success. Martin revamped his divisions training program as the training petty ocer by im proving the system, operation al and in-rate knowledge of all personnel. He also accelerated quali cations and certications to support critical watch bill ex ibility during an arduous han dling period. Honestly, I was surprised, he saidl ere was good com petition. Its a great honor be ing able to represent Trident Ret Facility as the Junior Sail or of the Year. Lidgard tallied more than 55 hours of accident-free ships husbandry repairs during his Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Trident Ret honors People of Year Up Periscope Inspirational figures in Black History Page 9 First & ten Four-on-Four Football, Greybeard hoops tip off Page 9 Black History NSB Kings Bay Chapel hosts celebration Page 4

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Scholarship offered to wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wound ed veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Opera tion Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must ap ply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minium 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more informa tion, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 18St. Marys Mardi Gras All at Jazz -themed Festival and Ball will be Feb. 18. Celebrity match makers from the OWN Networks LovetownUSA series will serve as grand marshals of the parade that begins at 10 a.m. in downtown St. Marys. Af ter the parade, attendees can browse more than 100 arts, crafts and food vendors; partake in the Chili Cook-o, Pet Parade and Most Romantic Dessert Contest, and enjoy two stages of enter tainment throughout the afternoon. Festivities continue at the annual Mardi Gras Ball to be held at Southern Junction. e St. Marys War of 1812 commemoration will begin at the festival with costumed re-enactors marching in the parade and events enacted at Orange Hall. To sign up for the Most Romantic Dessert contest e-mail romanticdesserts@gmail.com. Desserts should be brought to the designated area at the Gilman Waterfront Park between noon and 1 p.m., Feb. 18. Mardi Gras Ball tickets can be purchased for $35 at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center in Downtown St. Marys.Civil War battle to be re-enactede 36th Annual Re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee will be Feb. 17 to 19 at Olustee Battleeld Historic State Park, 5890 Battleeld Trail Road, Olustee, Fla., 50 miles west of Jacksonville o In terstate 10. More than 2,000 demonstrators will present impressions of military and civilian life at the time of Floridas largest Civil War battle. e weekend features a Civil War-era battle reenactment on Saturday at 3:30 p.m., as well as the re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee on Sun day at 1:30 p.m. Period music concerts, lectures, battleeld surgical practices and the lives of both white and black civilians will be portrayed. Mili tary camps and drills by infantry and artillery are scheduled throughout the weekend. e fee for Friday is $2 per person. Admission on Saturday and Sunday is $7 for adults and $3 for children, pre-school age children are free. Food conces sions will be available. Pets are not allowed. For more information, visit www.oridastateparks. org/olustee or http://battleofolustee.org.Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League will have a wie ball tour nament and golf cart rae to raise funds for Jus tins Miracle Field in Kingsland. e 1st Annual Wie Ball Tournament begins at 10 a.m., Satur day, March 3. Teams registered by Feb. 17 will re ceive an event T-shirt. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.Now hear this!Youve done it before and you can do it now. See the positive possibilities. Redirect the substantial energy of your frustration and turn it into positive, effective, unstoppable determination. Ralph Marston Recently, a friend of mine who is going through a dicult time in her life told me that she has made the decision to take the negative energy and turn it into positive momentum. Although she is having to deal with a stressful and emotional situation, she is reclaiming her power and shifting her focus to something positive, which in this case is running. Negative energy can assuredly lead to destructive behavior, but if you recognize that you have some pent up frustration, anger, hostility, or if you just feel over stressed, you can choose to release that negative energy with physical activity. When we are burdened with unpleasant circumstances, exercise can serve as a eective distraction and a way for us to create positive expression in our lives. For ex ample, running a race can be one of the most fun and exhilarating experiences you ever have, and you dont have to win to understand the sweet success that comes from completing a race. Whether it is a 5k or a mara thon, crossing that nish line and knowing you have just achieved something that you set out to do elicits feelings of empower ment and a sense of accomplishment that goes unmatched. A time in my life when I felt very on edge and a little out of control was during my husbands deployment to Afghanistan. With emotions running high and feeling preoccupied by constant worrying, I knew that I needed to do something that would help me clear my mind and relax. I started taking yoga classes and quickly realized that the mindbody connection that the practice of yoga is centered around was the perfect remedy for overcoming my anxiety. My yoga studio became my sanctuary, the place where I knew I could check my emotions at the door and grant myself pure serenity for the next hour. Not only did my yoga classes provide me with a designated time each week to escape and unwind, but many of the practices learned in yoga, such as deep breathing and meditation, became incredibly useful in my everyday life. I believe focusing on the negative can be extremely draining, yet negativity is at times unavoidable, so we can choose to let a negative situation drag us down or we can seek out positive avenues for expressing our emotions. Exercising is an opportunity for you to channel your energy into something that can produce favor able results. Whether it is a dance class with strong rhythms and beats that leaves you feeling uplifted and energized, a yoga class that soothes and calms you, a trainer who motivates and encourages you or a competitive event that challenges you and makes you feel like a champion, I encourage you to take any negative energy that might be present in your own life and use it to your fullest advantage by adopt ing an exercise program that, plain and simple, makes you feel good. Negative energy, positive momentum Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Have you ever heard of Response to Intervention? If not, you are not alone. Response to Intervention or RTI is a lengthy process designed to iden tify students who are struggling to learn and determine which inter ventions will help them achieve to the best their ability. Without understanding RTI and how it works, many caring but frus trated parents cry, I think my child needs to be in special education, but the school wont even test him or I told the teacher months ago that my child needed help, but she has not done anything about it. What many parents may not know is that classroom teachers and administrators are required to follow a specic set of guidelines in deter mining exactly what services a child may or may not need to receive. No two students are the same, not even in the same family. RTI assess es a childs learning needs, identies appropriate interventions, monitors progress over time and determines the eectiveness of those interven tions. RTI is not a spe cial education program, rather it is a general educa tion process which can be applied to any student who is not meeting or having diculty meeting expected academic goals. To help parents understand how this process works in the classroom, Supporting and Training Exception al Parents for Success of Kings Bay is hosting a free parent workshop Un derstanding Response to Interven tion from 6 to 8 p.m., ursday, Feb. 23. A team of professionals from the Camden County School System will oer detailed information about the 4-Tiered process and what it may mean for students struggling to learn. is workshop will be at the Kings Bay Youth Center, inside the Jack son Gate just past Crooked River El ementary School on Charlie Smith Highway/ Georgia Spur 40. No base identication is required to access this facility. Sim ply turn right into the Jackson Gate and make a right onto USS Wahoo Avenue. e building is at the end of the street. All parents interested in learning more about this process are encour aged to attend. Every student learns dierently and so the process will be dierent for each child. If you have a child who is strug gling to learn, is frustrated with school or may need some additional educational supports, you do not want to miss this workshop. Mark your calendar and plan to join other concerned and caring parents as they learn more about RTI. For more information, call (912) 573-8986 or e-mail Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson at clainetta.jeerson@navy.mil. Workshop focus on kids with needs As they relocate from duty station to duty station, military families face the challenge of nding and secur ing quality child care. While Navys Child and Youth Pro grams oer the Child Development Centers on most military installations to address this family need, the Kings Bay CYP is looking to broaden the availability of quality child care to military families. In particular, the CYP is in look ing for caring individuals to serve as on or o-base Child Development Home providers. e CDH profes sion oers caregivers the opportunity to work in their own home and watch their own children grow and develop while, at the same time, caring for the children of military families and earning an additional income. CDH assist military parents by providing child care services to support operational readiness and retention. ese homes and their providers serve as an alternative to center-based care and are often preferred by families for their small group size, neighborhood locations, home-like atmosphere and exible hours of operation. Anyone who lives in military housing and wishes to provide child care on a regular basis for more than 10 hours a week must be certied by the Navy as a CDH provider. Any one living o base must be state licensed, but can provide Navy child are by becoming Navy certied. Why become a CDH provider? Education and Training CPR/ First Aid training, Early Childhood Education provided, receive college credit for Navy training, Flexibility Set your own hours and select the age group of children that best suits your family, Independent Work Environment You work for yourself, in your own home, Income Being a CDH provider is a great source of income while saving the expense of child care, Benefits Toys and equip ment lending library available, free monthly training, on-site assistance and advice, low cost liability insur ance and direct subsidies at some locations, and Transferable Certification in transferable, whether you live in base housing or off-base Command certication is required to become a CDH provider. e cer tication is processed through the CYP CDH oce and includes, but is not limited to, health screenings, training CPR/ First Aid, nutrition, activity planning, business prac tices, parent/customer relations , home inspections and background checks. If you are committed to becoming a child development home provider, you must complete a free, 20-hour training program that focuses on de velopmentally appropriate childcare Child & Youth Programs Home child care providers needed

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40-plus dives last year. His technical expertise was crucial during acoustic device installations and towed array inspection and removals on Los An geles-class submarines. I am proud to be rec ognized as the TRF BJOY, Lidgard said. I am lucky to be doing a job that I honestly enjoy, and when you enjoy what you do and who you work with, you want to excel and do that little bit extra. David F. Platt, Shop 38A marine machinery mechanic supervisor was rec ognized as the Production Supervisor of the Year. He successfully supervised the main reduction gear repair on USS Georgia (SSGN 729). rough his dedicated eorts, the ship received this multi-million dollar repair and was fully op erational in a record 90 days. Additionally, his ex ceptional supervision was critical to the completion of the largest Major Main tenance Period mechanical work package ever performed on USS Florida (SSGN 728). Tammy Joy, repair de partment support services supervisor, was recognized as the Administrative Supervisor of the Year. She consistently provided superior administrative support for the Repair departments 738 civilian and 189 military positions. Her technical expertise was vital in the development of eleven job analyses for various machinist, marine machinery mechanic, electrician, pipetter, shiptter and welder positions. John B. Vasile, Code 510 control division of cer, was recognized for Production Support Supervisor of the Year. He displayed exceptional logistics expertise and technical competence, providing extraordinary leadership in the success ful implementation of Navy Enterprise Resource Planning. He ensured the com mands successful transi tion to Navy ERP ahead of schedule and was vital in attaining 500 million dollars worth of project ed inventory eciencies throughout the entire Navy logistics enterprise. Robert E. Nevers, Shop 57B lead mechanic, was recognized as the Produc tion Employee of the Year. His unmatched knowl edge, innovative problem solving and superb work ethic made him the go to guy for all matters related to non-metallic repairs or fabrication. He utilized his vast ex pertise and mentoring skills to train future shop leaders and assigned fellow mechanics according to their capabilities. In addition, as the En capsulation room Coor dinator, he awlessly inventoried and maintained equipment and numerous hazardous materials nec essary for manufacturing, repairing and testing over 100 vital shipboard cables in accordance with strin gent NAVSEA standards. Jimmy T. Risher, Code 740 IT specialist, was rec ognized as the Production Support Employee of the Year. His eorts were in strumental in the highly successful completion of numerous emergent Towed Array System re pairs both locally and at Port Canaveral, Fla. His technical skill and level of knowledge in all facets of Towed Array Systems enabled him to expertly coordinate the completion of short notice repair evolutions that enabled the unit to resume all scheduled operational commitments. Jerey Johnston, Shop 51C electronics mechanic, was recognized as the Craftsman of the Year. His unmatched technical abilities were crucial in the troubleshooting and repair of the Vibration Re ducer Eectiveness Moni toring System on the USS Florida (SSGN 728). He studied the circuitry and troubleshot down to the component level, where he was able to iso late and repair numerous problems in the Control Unit. In addition, his tech nical prociency and indepth knowledge of submarine electronics repair was vital of an AN/WIC2B Power Supply and the Central Atmosphere Mon itoring System on board USS Maryland (SSBN 738). Laura L. Perrine, wa terfront support depart ment administrative as sistant, was recognized as the Administrative Employee of the Year. Her management experience and proven ability to excel were key elements in her selection for the 2011 Ci vilian Leadership Devel opment program. She voluntarily as sumed the collateral du ties as departmental Key Custodian, Computer Ac cess Security Ocer and Combined Federal Cam paign Coordinator. Additionally, she vol unteered her assistance in developing the graphi cal presentation for the commands submission of the Secretary of Defense Maintenance award nom ination package. Jessica L. Braddock, Shop 57B apprentice, was recognized as the Appren tice of the Year. She quali ed as a digital engraver, cable encapsulation operator and conducted a 5S lean audit on the shops encapsulation room, logically segregating and or ganizing materials, tools and documentation that improved the eciency of cable production, repairs and testing. Additionally, she reduced production inter ruptions by researching material availability and compatibility for future assignments. TRIREFFAC provides quality industrial-level and logistics support for the incremental overhaul, modernization, and repair of Trident submarines. It also furnishes global submarine supplies and spare parts support. In addition, TRIREFFAC provides maintenance and support services to other submarines, regional maintenance customers, and other activities as requested. federal employees in their workplace each year. e mission is to promote and support giving through an employee-focused program that provides federal employees the opportunity to improve the quality of life for all. e CFC gives federal employees the opportunity to contribute to more than 4,000 pre-screened charities. President John F. Kennedy initiated the formal national giving program for federal workers in 1961. Since then, the CFC has evolved into the nations leading workplace giving program. is year was the 50th anniversary of the CFC, which has raised more than $6.7 billion since 1961. is campaign would not have been nearly as successful without the hard work and dedication of the key workers and support from leadership, Wirfel said. Enthusiastic key workers and command support are vital in the suc cess of the campaign.TRFCFC practices, child abuse, CPR training, discipline techniques and small business course work. e training also pro vides an excellent oppor tunity for the providers to share information and es tablish a support network. To view an online support network, go to the Nation al Network for Child Care Web Site. Interested? If you are looking for a way to sup port military families and earn additional income at the same time, contact CYP Director Candace Dugan or the operations clerk at (912) 573-9918. Training, the supplies, toys, activities and paper work are provided. You provide the love, patience and caring. Call today to nd out how you can become a Kings Bay CDH provider.CDH THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 BM2 Stephan Marriott and Freeman present colors. BM3 Robert Freeman displays the Navy flag during the parade of colors. Ray Fulton of the Ray Fulton and Community Praisers group performs a praise dance. Dr. Yvonne Johnson serves as the Mistress of Ceremonies. Madison Blyden, center, and Jasmine Mewborn, left, perform a praise dance. Veronica Oglesby sings America the Beautiful in the musical tribute. Clainetta Jefferson speaks about the origin of Black History Month.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 5 Students from Maime Lou Gross Elementary School join in the singing of the Negro National Anthem. Civil War re-enactors, Dr. Jacqueline Pierce, Liz Kennabrew and Dr. Clifford Pierce watch as the children recite poems. Dr. Clifford Pierce talks about the trials and tribulations of black soldiers during the Civil War. Dr. Jacqueline Pierce discusses the clothing and customs of women during the Civil War era. Students from Maime Lou Gross Elementary School recite the poem Bridge Builder.

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Marine Corps pilot shot down racial stereotypes Some military aviators spend their careers breaking speed records and achieving unprec edented combat victories. However, for one Marine Corps pilot, overcoming the barriers of segregation and rac ism was his most awe-inspiring victory. e rst African-American aviator in Marine Corps history, retired Lt. Gen. Frank E. Peter son, was born Mar. 2, 1932, in Topeka, Kan., of immigrant par ents native to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. His father was an intelligent man who spoke six languages and worked various jobs with the railroad and later as a televi sion and electronics repairman. His mother was a graduate of the University of Kansas, a feat virtually unheard of for an African-American woman in early twentieth century America. She counseled her children of the importance of education and encouraged them to read books. Coming of age as a youth in the 1940s, Peterson witnessed social exceptionism in the South and became disenchanted with quasi-integration in Topeka, Kan. where racial segregation was a highlighted if not largely celebrated form of liv ing and wanted to leave and see what else the world had to oer. His fathers work often took him to the Topeka Military Aireld and the early exposure to B-17, B-24 and B-29 bombers ying in and out of Topeka, Kan. Peterson got into building model airplanes, and dreamed of ying and going to outer space. He became fascinated by electronics like his father. Peterson also found heroes outside his family and signs of hope, looking up to Jackie Rob inson in 1947 after his accep tance into baseball. Blacks, he reasoned, could indeed take advan tage of changing, albeit slowly, social times. Adventurous and eager to see the world, Peterson wanted to enlist in the Navy at 17, but his parents were less than support ive as they hammered home to him the importance of going to college. Without their consent, he enrolled in Washburn University, but later after two se mesters and turning 18 years old in 1950 he went down to see the recruiter. Peterson found the entrance exam to be easy and sailed through with a high score. e recruiting oce called him back in, but requested that he take the test again. It seemed his abil ity to score high, for an AfricanAmerican, was in doubt. He took the test a second time and scored the highest score ever of anyone of any race for the recruiting oce. Later in June 1950, he enlisted with a guaranteed contract for electronics training at El Toro, Calif., upon completion of boot camp. While at El Toro for training as an electronics technician in December 1950, Peterson heard about Navy Ensign Jesse L. Brown, the rst AfricanAmerican to earn the Navy Wings of Gold, who was shot down over Korea. Browns ex ample of heroism motivated Peterson who applied for Naval Aviation Cadet Training the next day. Peterson was accepted and made his way to the Naval Air Station Basic Training Com mand at Pensacola, Fla., where only three African-Americans had trained before him, one of whom was Brown. Weeks of training went by and Peterson had not seen another black man, until he met another cadet named Dave Campbell, who heard about Peterson and looked him up. e two became friends. Campbell told Peterson that there had never been a black Marine Corps pilot. It was a bar rier and a goal the two shared until Campbell failed his nal carrier landing during advanced training in Texas, according to Peterson in his autobiography Into the Tigers Jaw. While ying the Navys SNJ trainer aircraft, Peterson dis covered that he was acrophobic yet he continued to y and over come his fears. On May 13, 1952, he landed on a carrier for the rst time and later completed advanced ight training to be come eligible for a commission. On Oct. 22, 1952, he accept ed his commission as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps and was designated a Marine aviator, fullling his dream. Peterson joined an elite group of African-American military 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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men. In his autobiogra phy, he said he was proud but contemplated the ob stacles ahead. At a time before the civil rights movement and with segregation permeating many southern states, Peterson then received orders to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in North Carolina, but he requested to not be stationed in the south. Soon after, he received orders to El Toro to train as a combat replacement pilot for the war in Korea. He continued to en counter racism even as the sentry at El Toro did not render Peterson a proper salute as he arrived on base for the rst time. Peterson recalled being disrespected at the sta tion ocers club and harassed at the hands of base military police, according to his autobiography. While at El Toro ying F4U Corsairs, Peterson was with Marine Fighter Training Squadron 10 and at last encountered fellow ocers who didnt play the race card and ac cepted him as one of their own. I learned in short order how and what it meant to be a Marine, and was damn proud to be one, remembered Peterson. Petersons rst com bat assignment was with the Devil Cats of Marine Fighter Squadron 212 during the Korea War, when numbers of AfricanAmericans in the Marine Corps increased from two percent in June 1950 to six percent by 1953. Flying 64 combat missions, he left Korea with six Air Medals and a Distinguished Fly ing Cross. In 1964 he received or ders to Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va. He went on to earn his bachelors de gree from George Wash ington University in 1967 and served in his second combat tour, this time in Vietnam. In 1968 he became the rst African-American to command a tactical air squadron, ying F-4 Phantoms with the Black Knights of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 314, and would earn 17 Air Medals as well as a Purple Heart. Peterson loved the big Phantom, especially for its large cockpit that could hold Petersons six-foot-one frame easily. Under his leadership, the Marines of his squadron would go on to earn the Robert M. Hanson Award for the most outstanding ghter squadron. But as Peterson and his squadron were ght ing hard in the skies over Vietnam, war protests and Americas civil rights movement were forcing many Americans to ques tion the status quo. Pe terson, who admired Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., said he was confused by Kings anti-war position at a time when more and more blacks were joining the military whether for opportunity or patriotism. His singular accomplishments continued when Peterson, then a 46-year-old colonel in command of the 9th Ma rine Amphibuous Brigade on Okinawa, Japan, became the rst AfricanAmerican selected for brigadier general in the Marine Corps. Rising to yet more ac complishments, he was later promoted to major general in May 1983 and lieutenant general in June 1986 as he took on com mand of Marine Corps Combat Development Command at Quantico. ere is no way to judge the impact that (he) had on youngsters in America, said retired Maj. Gen. Jerome G. Cooper who became the rst Af rican-American ambassador to Jamaica. It wasnt widespread, but to those of us who were Marines it was almost unbelievable. After delivering a commencement address speech lled with state ments of hope to young minorities, Peterson received an honorary Doc torate of Law from Virginia Union University in 1987. As a Marine pilot and a special breed of cat, Peterson retired from the Corps as a lieutenant gen eral in July 1988, fullling a line of honorable mili tary service started by his great-grandfather, Archie McKinney, with the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War. Peter son remains to this day an example of how much one can achieve by overcoming the many challenges faced by minorities, even in Americas land of opportunity. We were pushers, al ways seeking challenges and competition, said Peterson about what it meant to be a Marine aviator. Running through all of it was something we usually didnt even talk about because it just was, thats all that wild kind of spirit that goes with our particular kind of living. Peterson THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 7

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Question: Name a figure and why or how they influ enced you. Ill say Buck ONeil, a baseball player who lived from 1911 to 2006. Maybe you saw him on the Ken Burns PBS series Baseball. Joe Posnanskis The Soul of Baseball A Road Trip Through Buck ONeils America details his philosophy and life story. Its more about changing times in our country than baseball. ONeil was an eternal optimist who could see the good in just about anyone or anything. I strive to be more like him.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.ITCS Tony Avery NSB Kings Bay Chicago Malcom X. He was mis guided in the beginning but later realized America was a melting pot and it was not an us-againstthem mentality. Lynn Roberts NSB Kings Bay Saginaw, Mich. Coretta Scott King, because shes the image of what a strong, support ive woman should be, being the wife of Dr. King and his vision. Madison Blyden Family member Fernandina, Fla. Madam C.J. Walker, the entrepreneur part of her and how she laid out a lot of lines for women to start and own their own businesses. MA1 Melodie Kosiba NSB Kings Bay Security Roland, Okla. Dr. Martin Luther King. He pointed the way to equality as we know it today. RP3 Dustin Myers NSB Kings Bay Chapel Monroe, La. Molly Williams. She was the first African American woman firefighter in 1818, so she bridged the gap between segregation and being a fire fighter. Monique Gregory NSB Kings Bay Valdosta, Ga. Carter G. Woodson, because he is the father of Black History Month and took the time and effort to research and make it possible. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho As if playing dodgeball, kickball, indoor soccer, volleyball and basketball leagues were not enough to do around Kings Bay, KB Sports recently launched a Greybeard 30 & Over Basketball League. Anyone who stops by the tness center around lunchtime knows they can always nd a pickup bas ketball game going on, so it only made sense to try and launch the rst greybeard league at Kings Bay. Six teams signed up and started playing Feb. 7. With team names such as Young at Heart, e Wise Men, and e Young Old Timers, the guys are clear ly enjoying themselves. Games are played on the side courts as four-onfour. Even though the Super Bowl may have signaled the end of football season, KB Sports players didnt have it in them to pack away the footballs and ags. So began a Four-onFour Flag Football League. Games began Feb. 13 with 15 teams. e action is fast paced and touchdowns come quicker than you can say KB Sports. De fending 4v4 champs TRF returns, but a host of new teams are looking to knock them from their perch. TTF, Port Ops, USS Wyo ming, EOD, SWFLANT, Public Works and a host of MCSFB teams are pumped up and ready to go. Games are Monday through ursday on the softball eld. Interested in signing up a team or as an individual in any of the leagues? Its never too late. Register at www.kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com or contact the sports oce at (912) 573-8908.Hoops, football open play THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 Valentines Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowling and shoes, personal one-topping pizza, chips and unlimited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for rst, sec ond and third place. Also draw ings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. February Tournaments at the Big EZ Billiard Zone 7 p.m., Tues., Feb. 21 8-Ball. Must sign up and be present 15 min utes before the tournaments. Prizes for first place is a $50 giftcard and second place a $25 giftcard. For more information, call the Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Teen Maskquerade Party Its 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Center for ages 13 to 18 but still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more information, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 gift card from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay but ton and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their fam ily members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting parties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be sched uled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transporta tion, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Reg istration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Children must have turned 3 before Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Baseball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soccer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, re servists, military retirees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active military only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registration fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is avail able. ere will be a man datory skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice begin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more information, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information.Spring sports opens Just for kids Valentine bowling Saturday Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deploy ment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of oper ational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21, 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or con tribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Sup port Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Second Career will be pre sented by e Military O cers Association of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Trident Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy direc tor of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplat ing retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted mem ber has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, em ployer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, network ing, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotia tion, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, contact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513.

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Navy College Pirates Cove menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 11



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THEkings bay, georgia NSB, school ocials work on partnership Relationships built during PEP meet and greet at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer and Community Relations Manager held a Personal Excellence Part nership Meet and Greet at the Clubs of Kings Bay Jan. 30. Nearly 50 service members and representatives from Cam den County School District at tended the event. We wanted to get everyone together so they can renew and discuss their partnerships, said Clainetta Jeerson, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer. is event is also a great opportunity to col laborate and plan future events. Community Relations Manager, Kelly Wirfel opened the event talking about the Navy Commu nity Service Program and how the PEP works in that program. e purpose of the PEP pro gram is to assist youth, from pre-school through high school, to become better educated, healthier and more responsible citizens, Wirfel said. e pro gram involves Navy people, in cluding military, civilians and family members, volunteering their time to tutor, encourage and mentor young people. Following Wirfels presenta tion, Jeerson discussed ways that both the commands and schools can improve their part nerships. She described three keys to making the program a success communication between the adopted school and command, documentation of participation in the events and followup reec tion on events. Following the presentations, base coordinators and school representatives talked about upcoming events and activities that they plan on participating in for the remainder of the school year and also the upcoming year. During the 2011 scal year, Kings Bay volunteers contributed 5,550 volunteer service hours to Camden County schools through the PEP program. Retired Activities Oce keeps retirees updated CFC exceeds targetKings Bay raises $248,000; $20,000 more than last year Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has exceeded its 2011 Combined Federal Cam paign goal by 7 percent. e campaign ended Jan. 30. Active duty service mem bers, civil service employees, contractors and retir ees throughout the base contributed $248,003 to the CFC campaign, which result ed in a $20,000 increase over the bases 2010 contributions. Kelly Wirfel, deputy public af fairs of ficer and Com bined Federal Campaign loaned ex ecutive, attributed the bases success in donating to the CFC campaign to the hard work and giving nature of individuals here at Kings Bay. Our employees, whether service members or civilians, truly want to make a dier ence, Wirfel said. ey are thankful for what they have, and not only want to make their countries better, but also want to make the communi ties better as well. e CFC is an annual fundraising drive conducted by NAS Jax site serves Kings Bay area e Retired Activities Oce mission according to IAW SecNav Directive 5420.1 and OPNAVInst 1720.3E, is to provide assistance and informational services to all military retirees, their family members, dependents and survivors, and active military contemplating retirement. e Naval Air Station Jacksonville RAO is in the Fleet and Family Support Center on the corner of Enterprise Avenue and Child Street across from the Post Oce and Navy Exchange. It serves all North Florida area and part of Southeast Georgia military retirees and their families. RAO provides direct assistance and counseling on current retiree related information matters. In some cases, RAO will direct a client to the appropriate agency or other resource to resolve a retirees issue. RAO works in cooperation with all on station service providers, as well as those at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Naval Station Mayport, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society, USO and city of Jacksonville Veterans Services. Services available at RAO include: Reporting the death of a service member or spouse Survivor Benefit Plan claim forms filing and support Retired Pay issues Claims for unpaid compensation Burial Benefits Social Security benefits Veterans benefits Survivors base benefits and privileges Civil Service/OPM benefits Combat Related Special Compensation Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay e oce is open with volunteer representatives from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. during the week and 1 to 4 p.m. on Wednesdays. Appoint ments are not required, but can be made by call ing (904) 5425790. Walk-ins are welcomed. Sailors, civilians recognized for job accomplishments Trident Ret Facility recognized its People of the Year for 2011 in an awards ceremony Jan. 31. Among the notable uniformed selections were TRIREFFAC Sailor of the Year Machinists Mate 1st Class Shane R. Whitford, a repair ship supervisor, plus Machinists Mate 2nd Class Edward E. Martin, a Defensive Ordnance Support Facility weapons handler who was recognized as Junior Sailor of the Year, and Navy Diver 3rd Class James W. Lidgard, a TRIREFFAC second class diver who was recognized as the Bluejacket of the Year. Additionally, TRIREFFAC recognized its top civil service employees at the ceremony. Capt. Richard Verbeke, TRIREFFAC commanding ocer, said each one of the personnel recognized displayed the commitment and eort that helped the command meet its mission and that their selections epitomized the successes that TRIREFFAC organization had last year. People are and have always been our key to success, Ver becke said. It is extremely gratify ing to be able to recognize the best of the best during our Civilians and Sailors of the Year Ceremony. ese individuals have consistently gone above and beyond and have truly earned the recognition bestowed upon them. As ship superintendent for USS Georgia (SSGN 729), Whit ford provid ed outstanding man age ment and leader ship for more than 500 military and civilian personnel, encompassing more than 2,000 maintenance actions, 250,000 man-hours and an emergent repair to the ships reduction gears. Being selected as the 2011 TRF Sailor of the year is an incredible honor, Whitford said. is award validates my passion for being a submariner and that I am on a course for success. Martin revamped his divisions training program as the training petty ocer by improving the system, operational and in-rate knowledge of all personnel. He also accelerated qualications and certications to support critical watch bill exibility during an arduous handling period. Honestly, I was surprised, he saidl ere was good competition. Its a great honor being able to represent Trident Ret Facility as the Junior Sailor of the Year. Lidgard tallied more than 55 hours of accident-free ships husbandry repairs during his Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Trident Ret honors People of Year Up Periscope Inspirational figures in Black History Page 9 First & ten Four-on-Four Football, Greybeard hoops tip off Page 9 Black History NSB Kings Bay Chapel hosts celebration Page 4

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Scholarship offered to wounded vetse Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy is oering a Centennial Scholarship to honor Navy and Marine Corps Combat Wounded veterans who served during Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom. e program is administered by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief society and is in the form of a grant of $3,000 per academic year. Assistance must be available for a maximum two academic years of study. e recipient must apply each year. Applicants must: Be enrolled or accepted as a full-time student at an accredited U.S. Department of Education school Purse a teacher license Maintain a minium 2.5 GPA Be a combat wounded veteran of OND, OEF or OIF Visit the NMCRS Web site at www.nmcrs.org/ education for applications. For more information, contact the education program manager at (702) 696-4960 or education@nmcrs.org.St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 18St. Marys Mardi Gras All at Jazz -themed Festival and Ball will be Feb. 18. Celebrity matchmakers from the OWN Networks LovetownUSA series will serve as grand marshals of the parade that begins at 10 a.m. in downtown St. Marys. After the parade, attendees can browse more than 100 arts, crafts and food vendors; partake in the Chili Cook-o, Pet Parade and Most Romantic Dessert Contest, and enjoy two stages of entertainment throughout the afternoon. Festivities continue at the annual Mardi Gras Ball to be held at Southern Junction. e St. Marys War of 1812 commemoration will begin at the festival with costumed re-enactors marching in the parade and events enacted at Orange Hall. To sign up for the Most Romantic Dessert contest e-mail romanticdesserts@gmail.com. Desserts should be brought to the designated area at the Gilman Waterfront Park between noon and 1 p.m., Feb. 18. Mardi Gras Ball tickets can be purchased for $35 at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center in Downtown St. Marys.Civil War battle to be re-enactede 36th Annual Re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee will be Feb. 17 to 19 at Olustee Battleeld Historic State Park, 5890 Battleeld Trail Road, Olustee, Fla., 50 miles west of Jacksonville o Interstate 10. More than 2,000 demonstrators will present impressions of military and civilian life at the time of Floridas largest Civil War battle. e weekend features a Civil War-era battle reenactment on Saturday at 3:30 p.m., as well as the re-enactment of the Battle of Olustee on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Period music concerts, lectures, battleeld surgical practices and the lives of both white and black civilians will be portrayed. Military camps and drills by infantry and artillery are scheduled throughout the weekend. e fee for Friday is $2 per person. Admission on Saturday and Sunday is $7 for adults and $3 for children, pre-school age children are free. Food concessions will be available. Pets are not allowed. For more information, visit www.oridastateparks. org/olustee or http://battleofolustee.org.Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.Miracle League sets fund-raiserse Miracle League will have a wie ball tour nament and golf cart rae to raise funds for Jus tins Miracle Field in Kingsland. e 1st Annual Wie Ball Tournament begins at 10 a.m., Satur day, March 3. Teams registered by Feb. 17 will re ceive an event T-shirt. For more information, see www.camdenmiracleleague.com or call Je at (912) 322-1970.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.Now hear this!Youve done it before and you can do it now. See the positive possibilities. Redirect the substantial energy of your frustration and turn it into positive, effective, unstoppable determination. Ralph Marston Recently, a friend of mine who is going through a dicult time in her life told me that she has made the decision to take the negative energy and turn it into positive momentum. Although she is having to deal with a stressful and emotional situation, she is reclaiming her power and shifting her focus to something positive, which in this case is running. Negative energy can assuredly lead to destructive behavior, but if you recognize that you have some pent up frustration, anger, hostility, or if you just feel over stressed, you can choose to release that negative energy with physical activity. When we are burdened with unpleasant circumstances, exercise can serve as a eective distraction and a way for us to create positive expression in our lives. For example, running a race can be one of the most fun and exhilarating experiences you ever have, and you dont have to win to understand the sweet success that comes from completing a race. Whether it is a 5k or a mara thon, crossing that nish line and knowing you have just achieved something that you set out to do elicits feelings of empowerment and a sense of accomplishment that goes unmatched. A time in my life when I felt very on edge and a little out of control was during my husbands deployment to Afghanistan. With emotions running high and feeling preoccupied by constant worrying, I knew that I needed to do something that would help me clear my mind and relax. I started taking yoga classes and quickly realized that the mindbody connection that the practice of yoga is centered around was the perfect remedy for overcoming my anxiety. My yoga studio became my sanctuary, the place where I knew I could check my emotions at the door and grant myself pure serenity for the next hour. Not only did my yoga classes provide me with a designated time each week to escape and unwind, but many of the practices learned in yoga, such as deep breathing and meditation, became incredibly useful in my everyday life. I believe focusing on the negative can be extremely draining, yet negativity is at times unavoidable, so we can choose to let a negative situation drag us down or we can seek out positive avenues for expressing our emotions. Exercising is an opportunity for you to channel your energy into something that can produce favorable results. Whether it is a dance class with strong rhythms and beats that leaves you feeling uplifted and energized, a yoga class that soothes and calms you, a trainer who motivates and encourages you or a competitive event that challenges you and makes you feel like a champion, I encourage you to take any negative energy that might be present in your own life and use it to your fullest advantage by adopting an exercise program that, plain and simple, makes you feel good. Negative energy, positive momentum Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Local news and views Have you ever heard of Response to Intervention? If not, you are not alone. Response to Intervention or RTI is a lengthy process designed to identify students who are struggling to learn and determine which interventions will help them achieve to the best their ability. Without understanding RTI and how it works, many caring but frustrated parents cry, I think my child needs to be in special education, but the school wont even test him or I told the teacher months ago that my child needed help, but she has not done anything about it. What many parents may not know is that classroom teachers and administrators are required to follow a specic set of guidelines in determining exactly what services a child may or may not need to receive. No two students are the same, not even in the same family. RTI assesses a childs learning needs, identies appropriate interventions, monitors progress over time and determines the eectiveness of those interventions. RTI is not a spe cial education program, rather it is a general education process which can be applied to any student who is not meeting or having diculty meeting expected academic goals. To help parents understand how this process works in the classroom, Supporting and Training Exceptional Parents for Success of Kings Bay is hosting a free parent workshop Un derstanding Response to Intervention from 6 to 8 p.m., ursday, Feb. 23. A team of professionals from the Camden County School System will oer detailed information about the 4-Tiered process and what it may mean for students struggling to learn. is workshop will be at the Kings Bay Youth Center, inside the Jackson Gate just past Crooked River Elementary School on Charlie Smith Highway/ Georgia Spur 40. No base identication is required to access this facility. Simply turn right into the Jackson Gate and make a right onto USS Wahoo Avenue. e building is at the end of the street. All parents interested in learning more about this process are encouraged to attend. Every student learns dierently and so the process will be dierent for each child. If you have a child who is struggling to learn, is frustrated with school or may need some additional educational supports, you do not want to miss this workshop. Mark your calendar and plan to join other concerned and caring parents as they learn more about RTI. For more information, call (912) 573-8986 or e-mail Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson at clainetta.jeerson@navy.mil. Workshop focus on kids with needs As they relocate from duty station to duty station, military families face the challenge of nding and securing quality child care. While Navys Child and Youth Programs oer the Child Development Centers on most military installations to address this family need, the Kings Bay CYP is looking to broaden the availability of quality child care to military families. In particular, the CYP is in looking for caring individuals to serve as on or o-base Child Development Home providers. e CDH profession oers caregivers the opportunity to work in their own home and watch their own children grow and develop while, at the same time, caring for the children of military families and earning an additional income. CDH assist military parents by providing child care services to support operational readiness and retention. ese homes and their providers serve as an alternative to center-based care and are often preferred by families for their small group size, neighborhood locations, home-like atmosphere and exible hours of operation. Anyone who lives in military housing and wishes to provide child care on a regular basis for more than 10 hours a week must be certied by the Navy as a CDH provider. Anyone living o base must be state licensed, but can provide Navy child are by becoming Navy certied. Why become a CDH provider? Education and Training CPR/ First Aid training, Early Childhood Education provided, receive college credit for Navy training, Flexibility Set your own hours and select the age group of children that best suits your family, Independent Work Environment You work for yourself, in your own home, Income Being a CDH provider is a great source of income while saving the expense of child care, Benefits Toys and equip ment lending library available, free monthly training, on-site assistance and advice, low cost liability insurance and direct subsidies at some locations, and Transferable Certification in transferable, whether you live in base housing or off-base Command certication is required to become a CDH provider. e certication is processed through the CYP CDH oce and includes, but is not limited to, health screenings, training CPR/ First Aid, nutrition, activity planning, business practices, parent/customer relations , home inspections and background checks. If you are committed to becoming a child development home provider, you must complete a free, 20-hour training program that focuses on de velopmentally appropriate childcare Child & Youth Programs Home child care providers needed

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40-plus dives last year. His technical expertise was crucial during acoustic device installations and towed array inspection and removals on Los Angeles-class submarines. I am proud to be recognized as the TRF BJOY, Lidgard said. I am lucky to be doing a job that I honestly enjoy, and when you enjoy what you do and who you work with, you want to excel and do that little bit extra. David F. Platt, Shop 38A marine machinery mechanic supervisor was recognized as the Production Supervisor of the Year. He successfully supervised the main reduction gear repair on USS Georgia (SSGN 729). rough his dedicated eorts, the ship received this multi-million dollar repair and was fully operational in a record 90 days. Additionally, his exceptional supervision was critical to the completion of the largest Major Maintenance Period mechanical work package ever performed on USS Florida (SSGN 728). Tammy Joy, repair department support services supervisor, was recognized as the Administrative Supervisor of the Year. She consistently provided superior administrative support for the Repair departments 738 civilian and 189 military positions. Her technical expertise was vital in the development of eleven job analyses for various machinist, marine machinery mechanic, electrician, pipetter, shiptter and welder positions. John B. Vasile, Code 510 control division ofcer, was recognized for Production Support Supervisor of the Year. He displayed exceptional logistics expertise and technical competence, providing extraordinary leadership in the successful implementation of Navy Enterprise Resource Planning. He ensured the commands successful transition to Navy ERP ahead of schedule and was vital in attaining 500 million dollars worth of projected inventory eciencies throughout the entire Navy logistics enterprise. Robert E. Nevers, Shop 57B lead mechanic, was recognized as the Production Employee of the Year. His unmatched knowledge, innovative problem solving and superb work ethic made him the go to guy for all matters related to non-metallic repairs or fabrication. He utilized his vast expertise and mentoring skills to train future shop leaders and assigned fellow mechanics according to their capabilities. In addition, as the Encapsulation room Coordinator, he awlessly inventoried and maintained equipment and numerous hazardous materials necessary for manufacturing, repairing and testing over 100 vital shipboard cables in accordance with stringent NAVSEA standards. Jimmy T. Risher, Code 740 IT specialist, was recognized as the Production Support Employee of the Year. His eorts were instrumental in the highly successful completion of numerous emergent Towed Array System repairs both locally and at Port Canaveral, Fla. His technical skill and level of knowledge in all facets of Towed Array Systems enabled him to expertly coordinate the completion of short notice repair evolutions that enabled the unit to resume all scheduled operational commitments. Jerey Johnston, Shop 51C electronics mechanic, was recognized as the Craftsman of the Year. His unmatched technical abilities were crucial in the troubleshooting and repair of the Vibration Reducer Eectiveness Monitoring System on the USS Florida (SSGN 728). He studied the circuitry and troubleshot down to the component level, where he was able to isolate and repair numerous problems in the Control Unit. In addition, his technical prociency and indepth knowledge of submarine electronics repair was vital of an AN/WIC2B Power Supply and the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System on board USS Maryland (SSBN 738). Laura L. Perrine, waterfront support department administrative assistant, was recognized as the Administrative Employee of the Year. Her management experience and proven ability to excel were key elements in her selection for the 2011 Civilian Leadership Development program. She voluntarily assumed the collateral duties as departmental Key Custodian, Computer Access Security Ocer and Combined Federal Campaign Coordinator. Additionally, she volunteered her assistance in developing the graphical presentation for the commands submission of the Secretary of Defense Maintenance award nomination package. Jessica L. Braddock, Shop 57B apprentice, was recognized as the Apprentice of the Year. She qualied as a digital engraver, cable encapsulation operator and conducted a 5S lean audit on the shops encapsulation room, logically segregating and organizing materials, tools and documentation that improved the eciency of cable production, repairs and testing. Additionally, she reduced production interruptions by researching material availability and compatibility for future assignments. TRIREFFAC provides quality industrial-level and logistics support for the incremental overhaul, modernization, and repair of Trident submarines. It also furnishes global submarine supplies and spare parts support. In addition, TRIREFFAC provides maintenance and support services to other submarines, regional maintenance customers, and other activities as requested. federal employees in their workplace each year. e mission is to promote and support giving through an employee-focused program that provides federal employees the opportunity to improve the quality of life for all. e CFC gives federal employees the opportunity to contribute to more than 4,000 pre-screened charities. President John F. Kennedy initiated the formal national giving program for federal workers in 1961. Since then, the CFC has evolved into the nations leading workplace giving program. is year was the 50th anniversary of the CFC, which has raised more than $6.7 billion since 1961. is campaign would not have been nearly as successful without the hard work and dedication of the key workers and support from leadership, Wirfel said. Enthusiastic key workers and command support are vital in the suc cess of the campaign.TRFCFC practices, child abuse, CPR training, discipline techniques and small business course work. e training also provides an excellent opportunity for the providers to share information and establish a support network. To view an online support network, go to the National Network for Child Care Web Site. Interested? If you are looking for a way to support military families and earn additional income at the same time, contact CYP Director Candace Dugan or the operations clerk at (912) 573-9918. Training, the supplies, toys, activities and paperwork are provided. You provide the love, patience and caring. Call today to nd out how you can become a Kings Bay CDH provider.CDH THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 BM2 Stephan Marriott and Freeman present colors. BM3 Robert Freeman displays the Navy flag during the parade of colors. Ray Fulton of the Ray Fulton and Community Praisers group performs a praise dance. Dr. Yvonne Johnson serves as the Mistress of Ceremonies. Madison Blyden, center, and Jasmine Mewborn, left, perform a praise dance. Veronica Oglesby sings America the Beautiful in the musical tribute. Clainetta Jefferson speaks about the origin of Black History Month.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 5 Students from Maime Lou Gross Elementary School join in the singing of the Negro National Anthem. Civil War re-enactors, Dr. Jacqueline Pierce, Liz Kennabrew and Dr. Clifford Pierce watch as the children recite poems. Dr. Clifford Pierce talks about the trials and tribulations of black soldiers during the Civil War. Dr. Jacqueline Pierce discusses the clothing and customs of women during the Civil War era. Students from Maime Lou Gross Elementary School recite the poem Bridge Builder.

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Marine Corps pilot shot down racial stereotypes Some military aviators spend their careers breaking speed records and achieving unprecedented combat victories. However, for one Marine Corps pilot, overcoming the barriers of segregation and racism was his most awe-inspiring victory. e rst African-American aviator in Marine Corps history, retired Lt. Gen. Frank E. Peterson, was born Mar. 2, 1932, in Topeka, Kan., of immigrant parents native to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. His father was an intelligent man who spoke six languages and worked various jobs with the railroad and later as a television and electronics repairman. His mother was a graduate of the University of Kansas, a feat virtually unheard of for an African-American woman in early twentieth century America. She counseled her children of the importance of education and encouraged them to read books. Coming of age as a youth in the 1940s, Peterson witnessed social exceptionism in the South and became disenchanted with quasi-integration in Topeka, Kan. where racial segregation was a highlighted if not largely celebrated form of living and wanted to leave and see what else the world had to oer. His fathers work often took him to the Topeka Military Aireld and the early exposure to B-17, B-24 and B-29 bombers ying in and out of Topeka, Kan. Peterson got into building model airplanes, and dreamed of ying and going to outer space. He became fascinated by electronics like his father. Peterson also found heroes outside his family and signs of hope, looking up to Jackie Robinson in 1947 after his acceptance into baseball. Blacks, he reasoned, could indeed take advan tage of changing, albeit slowly, social times. Adventurous and eager to see the world, Peterson wanted to enlist in the Navy at 17, but his parents were less than supportive as they hammered home to him the importance of going to college. Without their consent, he enrolled in Washburn University, but later after two semesters and turning 18 years old in 1950 he went down to see the recruiter. Peterson found the entrance exam to be easy and sailed through with a high score. e recruiting oce called him back in, but requested that he take the test again. It seemed his ability to score high, for an AfricanAmerican, was in doubt. He took the test a second time and scored the highest score ever of anyone of any race for the recruiting oce. Later in June 1950, he enlisted with a guaranteed contract for electronics training at El Toro, Calif., upon completion of boot camp. While at El Toro for training as an electronics technician in December 1950, Peterson heard about Navy Ensign Jesse L. Brown, the rst AfricanAmerican to earn the Navy Wings of Gold, who was shot down over Korea. Browns example of heroism motivated Peterson who applied for Naval Aviation Cadet Training the next day. Peterson was accepted and made his way to the Naval Air Station Basic Training Command at Pensacola, Fla., where only three African-Americans had trained before him, one of whom was Brown. Weeks of training went by and Peterson had not seen another black man, until he met another cadet named Dave Campbell, who heard about Peterson and looked him up. e two became friends. Campbell told Peterson that there had never been a black Marine Corps pilot. It was a barrier and a goal the two shared until Campbell failed his nal carrier landing during advanced training in Texas, according to Peterson in his autobiography Into the Tigers Jaw. While ying the Navys SNJ trainer aircraft, Peterson discovered that he was acrophobic yet he continued to y and overcome his fears. On May 13, 1952, he landed on a carrier for the rst time and later completed advanced ight training to become eligible for a commission. On Oct. 22, 1952, he accepted his commission as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps and was designated a Marine aviator, fullling his dream. Peterson joined an elite group of African-American military 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012

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men. In his autobiography, he said he was proud but contemplated the obstacles ahead. At a time before the civil rights movement and with segregation permeating many southern states, Peterson then received orders to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point in North Carolina, but he requested to not be stationed in the south. Soon after, he received orders to El Toro to train as a combat replacement pilot for the war in Korea. He continued to encounter racism even as the sentry at El Toro did not render Peterson a proper salute as he arrived on base for the rst time. Peterson recalled being disrespected at the station ocers club and harassed at the hands of base military police, according to his autobiography. While at El Toro ying F4U Corsairs, Peterson was with Marine Fighter Training Squadron 10 and at last encountered fellow ocers who didnt play the race card and accepted him as one of their own. I learned in short order how and what it meant to be a Marine, and was damn proud to be one, remembered Peterson. Petersons rst combat assignment was with the Devil Cats of Marine Fighter Squadron 212 during the Korea War, when numbers of AfricanAmericans in the Marine Corps increased from two percent in June 1950 to six percent by 1953. Flying 64 combat missions, he left Korea with six Air Medals and a Distinguished Flying Cross. In 1964 he received orders to Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va. He went on to earn his bachelors degree from George Washington University in 1967 and served in his second combat tour, this time in Vietnam. In 1968 he became the rst African-American to command a tactical air squadron, ying F-4 Phantoms with the Black Knights of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 314, and would earn 17 Air Medals as well as a Purple Heart. Peterson loved the big Phantom, especially for its large cockpit that could hold Petersons six-foot-one frame easily. Under his leadership, the Marines of his squadron would go on to earn the Robert M. Hanson Award for the most outstanding ghter squadron. But as Peterson and his squadron were ghting hard in the skies over Vietnam, war protests and Americas civil rights movement were forcing many Americans to question the status quo. Peterson, who admired Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., said he was confused by Kings anti-war position at a time when more and more blacks were joining the military whether for opportunity or patriotism. His singular accomplishments continued when Peterson, then a 46-year-old colonel in command of the 9th Marine Amphibuous Brigade on Okinawa, Japan, became the rst AfricanAmerican selected for brigadier general in the Marine Corps. Rising to yet more accomplishments, he was later promoted to major general in May 1983 and lieutenant general in June 1986 as he took on command of Marine Corps Combat Development Command at Quantico. ere is no way to judge the impact that (he) had on youngsters in America, said retired Maj. Gen. Jerome G. Cooper who became the rst African-American ambassador to Jamaica. It wasnt widespread, but to those of us who were Marines it was almost unbelievable. After delivering a commencement address speech lled with statements of hope to young minorities, Peterson received an honorary Doctorate of Law from Virginia Union University in 1987. As a Marine pilot and a special breed of cat, Peterson retired from the Corps as a lieutenant general in July 1988, fullling a line of honorable military service started by his great-grandfather, Archie McKinney, with the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War. Peterson remains to this day an example of how much one can achieve by overcoming the many challenges faced by minorities, even in Americas land of opportunity. We were pushers, always seeking challenges and competition, said Peterson about what it meant to be a Marine aviator. Running through all of it was something we usually didnt even talk about because it just was, thats all that wild kind of spirit that goes with our particular kind of living. Peterson THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 7

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Question: Name a figure and why or how they influ enced you. Ill say Buck ONeil, a baseball player who lived from 1911 to 2006. Maybe you saw him on the Ken Burns PBS series Baseball. Joe Posnanskis The Soul of Baseball A Road Trip Through Buck ONeils America details his philosophy and life story. Its more about changing times in our country than baseball. ONeil was an eternal optimist who could see the good in just about anyone or anything. I strive to be more like him.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.ITCS Tony Avery NSB Kings Bay Chicago Malcom X. He was misguided in the beginning but later realized America was a melting pot and it was not an us-againstthem mentality. Lynn Roberts NSB Kings Bay Saginaw, Mich. Coretta Scott King, because shes the image of what a strong, supportive woman should be, being the wife of Dr. King and his vision. Madison Blyden Family member Fernandina, Fla. Madam C.J. Walker, the entrepreneur part of her and how she laid out a lot of lines for women to start and own their own businesses. MA1 Melodie Kosiba NSB Kings Bay Security Roland, Okla. Dr. Martin Luther King. He pointed the way to equality as we know it today. RP3 Dustin Myers NSB Kings Bay Chapel Monroe, La. Molly Williams. She was the first African American woman firefighter in 1818, so she bridged the gap between segregation and being a fire fighter. Monique Gregory NSB Kings Bay Valdosta, Ga. Carter G. Woodson, because he is the father of Black History Month and took the time and effort to research and make it possible. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho As if playing dodgeball, kickball, indoor soccer, volleyball and basketball leagues were not enough to do around Kings Bay, KB Sports recently launched a Greybeard 30 & Over Basketball League. Anyone who stops by the tness center around lunchtime knows they can always nd a pickup basketball game going on, so it only made sense to try and launch the rst greybeard league at Kings Bay. Six teams signed up and started playing Feb. 7. With team names such as Young at Heart, e Wise Men, and e Young Old Timers, the guys are clearly enjoying themselves. Games are played on the side courts as four-onfour. Even though the Super Bowl may have signaled the end of football season, KB Sports players didnt have it in them to pack away the footballs and ags. So began a Four-onFour Flag Football League. Games began Feb. 13 with 15 teams. e action is fast paced and touchdowns come quicker than you can say KB Sports. Defending 4v4 champs TRF returns, but a host of new teams are looking to knock them from their perch. TTF, Port Ops, USS Wyoming, EOD, SWFLANT, Public Works and a host of MCSFB teams are pumped up and ready to go. Games are Monday through ursday on the softball eld. Interested in signing up a team or as an individual in any of the leagues? Its never too late. Register at www.kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com or contact the sports oce at (912) 573-8908.Hoops, football open play THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 Valentines Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowling and shoes, personal one-topping pizza, chips and unlimited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for rst, second and third place. Also drawings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. February Tournaments at the Big EZ Billiard Zone 7 p.m., Tues., Feb. 21 8-Ball. Must sign up and be present 15 minutes before the tournaments. Prizes for first place is a $50 giftcard and second place a $25 giftcard. For more information, call the Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Teen Maskquerade Party Its 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Center for ages 13 to 18 but still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more information, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 giftcard from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay button and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their family members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting parties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transportation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Registration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Children must have turned 3 before Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Baseball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soccer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, reservists, military retirees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active military only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registration fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is available. ere will be a mandatory skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice begin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more information, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for pre-teens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information.Spring sports opens Just for kids Valentine bowling Saturday Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe par ents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deployment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of operational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21, 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, educa tion, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or con tribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Second Career will be presented by e Military Ocers Association of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Trident Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted mem ber has reached the point of being in their own transi tion, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, contact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513.

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Navy College Pirates Cove menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 16, 2012 11