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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-09-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00244

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00244


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Ceremony Feb. 3 at Washington Navy Yard Vice Adm. William D. French relieved Vice Adm. Michael C. Vitale as Commander, Navy Installations Command during a Change of Command ceremony in CNIC Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, Feb. 3. Vitale has served as the chief ocer leading the Navys entire shore infrastructure for nearly three years and was the third commander in the history of CNIC. is infrastructure, also known as the CNIC Enterprise; includes 11 Navy Regions, 70 Installations and 127 Naval Op erations Support Centers, and is responsible for 31 business lines and 122 critical shore capabilities across three major catego ries operations, quality of life, and facilities management. roughout his tenure, Vitale lead eorts to standardize, align, synchronize and innovate new methods and processes that fur thered CNICs mission to deliver eective and ecient readiness from the shore that sustain the eet, enable the ghter, and support families. Vitale praised the numerous accomplishments of the per sonnel under his command and of the entire CNIC Enterprise; from molding the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System into the model Person nel Accountability System used across the services, to the devel opment of new shore integration methods and a Total Workforce, capable of continuously sup porting operations and services. e personnel here at the Headquarters, and throughout the entire Enterprise have faced growing numbers of issues and challenges, Vitale said. Ive had the pleasure of witnessing Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Home again Page 4 Volunteers Page 5USS Maryland returns to NSB Kings Bay Fighting Mary preps for ret aer 60th deployment cruisee Blue Crew of USS Maryland (SSBN 738) returned to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Jan. 21 following a two-month patrol. e patrol was the 60th such deployment by the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine since its commissioning in 1992. For Logistics Specialist Sea man Apprentice Kevin Edwards of San Francisco, the successful completion of 60 patrols previ ous to him helped put him at ease during his rst patrol. Everything went incredibly well, Edwards said. I learned a tremendous amount of infor mation about supply and submarines. e entire crew was of great help in training and men toring me during the underway qualication process. With his shipmates help, Ed wards qualied four watch sta tions including helms man and planes man. I have even complet ed more than 75-percent of my submarine qualication towards my Fish, Edwards said. Missile Technician 2nd Class Andrew Lopez of Belton, Texas didnt have the same apprehen sions as Lopez being a veteran of eight previous patrols. It was a fairly easy patrol, Lo pez said. Im now the qualica tion petty ocer for my division. Its great to get the opportunity to lead and mentor my peers and help them along the qualica tion path. e new qualication petty of cer took his job seriously dur ing the patrol and reported more than half of his division qualied to the next higher watch station. Maryland is currently per forming a ret period at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in preparation for its 61st patrol. French relieves Vitale at Installations Command Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Petty Officer Joshua Clabby, left, and MES 1st Class Jeffrey Fallon talk about their jobs and later offered a demonstration of their explosive-detection dog unit. By Kelly A. WirfelNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Deputy Public Affairs OfficerThe U. S. Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay (91108) hosted a ceremony to celebrate its adoption by the Camden-Kings Bay Navy League, Jan. 28. the ceremony by welcoming nearly 200 Navy League mem bers, Coast Guardians, and family members. Its awesome to have so many people here to support this event today, Baer said. The support we have received from this community is overwhelming. Hunt Thornhill, Camden-Kings Bay Navy League president, said the league is excited to formalize the relationship. We have had an outstanding relationship with the MSST for several years now, and it is great to formally recognize that, Thornhill said. What these men and women do each day is extremely important to our country and our community. Anything we can do to support them, we will do. Following the ceremony, the MSST hosted a barbecue, along with tours and demonstrations of equipment and capabilities. Navy League adopts Coast Guard unit Embassy pulls out of SyriaOcials evacuate sta in wake of utterly deplorable actions in countryArmed attacks by Syrian President Bashar al-Assads regime that have killed and wounded thousands of citi zens since last January are utterly deplorable, Penta gon Press Secretary George Little said in Washington D.C. Monday. On the same day the State Department suspended op eration of the U.S. Embassy in Damas cus and moved all American personnel, including Ambassa dor Robert Ford, out of the country, Little said the Defense Departments focus remains on applying intense diplomatic and eco nomic pressure on the Assad regime. We believe there is a strong chance that pressure can yield results on behalf of the Syrian people and those who are repressed in Syria, he added. President Barack Obama issued a strong statement Feb. 4 about the regimes ac tions. irty years after his fa ther massacred tens of thou sands of innocent Syrian men, women, and children in Hama, Bashar al-Assad has demonstrated a similar disdain for human life and dignity, the president said. On Feb. 3, the Syrian gov ernment murdered hun

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Black History Month feted Feb. 9e Black History Month Celebration will be at 10 a.m., ursday, Feb. 9 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays chapel. Pirates Cove Galley will have a $4.55 per-person Black History lunch following.Scorby guest speaker for MOAARear Admiral John C. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, will be guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Association of Americas monthly dinner Tuesday, Feb. 21 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner and a program. Cost for the meal is $35 per person or $65 per couple. RSVPs to Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912729) 2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net by Feb. 15. Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546. Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday-Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens W e are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit. Aristotle How many people can relate tostarting an exercise program or going on a diet only to quit after a few weeks andreturn to your old, unhealthy habits? As we enter February, those New Years resolutions made just a mere month ago might already be a thing of the past. is problem is not uncommon. Starting an exercise program or changing our eating habits is no easy feat. It takes sac rice, a high level of commitment and strong motivation to adopt a healthier way of life. A Gallup Poll in 2011 reported that only about half of Americans are exercising for at least 30 minutes three days per week and over half are not eating the recommended ve or more servings of fruit and vegetables each day. Despite the proven physical and mental health benets of exercising regularly and eating a healthy, balanced diet,the majority of ourpopulation isstill struggling to hop on the healthy lifestyle bandwagon, and stay on it. Truth be told, our society does not support a healthy way of life. Fast food res taurants, convenience stores with rows of candy and salty snacks, calorie-ridden beverages and sedentary lifestyles spent in front of the computer or television have contributed to our unhealthy, unt society. Unfortunately, this has led to a population plagued by prevent able chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, heart disease and cancer. is all sounds very bleak. But the good news is, we can do something about it. Exercising and eating healthy are two of the few things we have control over in this life, we just have to commit to making these habits a permanent part of our lifestyle. Daily physical activity has to become as ordinary as brushing your teeth. Choosing healthy, whole foods like fresh fruit and vegetables over unhealthy and often more convenient options must become a daily practice. Youll nd that as you start to adopt these healthy lifestyle habits and commit to them day-in, dayout, this new way of life will become more and more appealing as well as easier to sustain. Engaging in daily physical activity and making healthier food choices oers an array of benets, from losing weight and getting o medications to hav ing more energy and an improved mood. ere is no quick x, no magic pill that will aord you optimal health. You must put in the work to reap the rewards. As you set health-related goals for yourself, remember that consistency is key and repeated eort will lead to results. By setting realistic goals and making small changes over time that you are able to stick to, you can successfully change your habits and achieve a lifestyle that will provide you with overall better health and a higher quality of life. Achieve consistency in your routine Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator In this day of social media we have friends all across the coun try that we can communicate with at the stroke of a key. Whether it is texting or typing, we are con nected as never before. Can I ask you a question? Are you lonely? Sometimes the very technology that connects us can leave us lonely. When you need girl chat, or guy chat, do you reach for your iPhone to call or text? Do you meet for coee or sit at the screen typing? What is a friend? MerriamWebster denes a friend as, one attached to another by aection or esteem, a favored companion. Companion is dened as one that accompanies another, one that keeps company with another; one that is closely connected with something similar. We need friends. We are created to have that favored companion, to be closely connected, to be aec tionately attached to others. And this diers from the friends on Facebook and Twitter. How many people follow you on Twitter? How many friends on Face book? Of those, how many will be there to clean your house or sit with you when youve had a bad day? Did you know that friend or friendship is in the top 1 percent of terms looked up on MerriamWebsters site? I think maybe many of us are trying to gure out friendship in this new age of technology. Friendships, to be healthy and fullling, need to be give and take. To have that companion walk with you, you must be willing to be that companion to walk with another. is is true in marriage but also in friendship. I hear from many women ex pressing the challenges of friendship and loneliness. Relocation can leave us separated from strong, supportive relationships often when we need them most, like during deployment. I do not have ve easy steps to at tract friends. What I do have is ideas and tips to become a good friend. Deb is my persistent friend. She decided we were going to be friends, without my knowledge or consent. Deb demonstrated charac teristics of friendship that drew me into her loving circle of friends. Patience: Deb was willing to wait for me to respond to her over tures of friendship. She did not expect me to respond in a certain time frame. Good thing too. It took almost a year. Acceptance: Deb knows we all have warts. Deb chooses to over look warts to see the person behind the warts. I have always felt accept ed by Deb. She may not always agree with me but she always accepts me as a person. Consistent persistence: is is the attribute that bothered me most about Deb but also the one I most love and appreciate now. Deb reached out to me consistently with an e-mail and phone call once a week for nine months before I accepted an invitation to get together. Wow! Seless: Deb didnt want to be my friend to get something from me. She befriended me to give, to share. She looked for ways to be companions on the same journey. Forgiveness: Deb was quick to forgive me when I was stupid. She was equally quick to ask forgiveness when she wronged me. Building deep friendships takes time, but with these characteris tics we can build friends that will enhance our lives and we will add to theirs. As military spouses I have seen the road to friendship acceler ated by the very nature of our lifestyle. Dont be discouraged. Work on becoming that friend and watch what friends bloom in your life.Working at becoming good friends On the Home Front By Beth Wilson How we handle our nances and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nancially se cure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Support Center of fers many nancial classes designed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. Think about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times five days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eating out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of going to the bookstore, go to the library and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average electrical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incan descent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Support Cen ter, in support of the Military Saves Campaign, oers nancial classes for military members and their fam ilies. Here are just a few of the nan cial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This workshop pre pares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehensive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will understand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the important dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, dis counts, nancing, high-pressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.Small steps save money in long run Navy Personnel Command 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Doris Miller, known as Do rie to shipmates and friends, was born in Waco, Texas, Oct. 12, 1919, to Henrietta and Con ery Miller. He had three broth ers, one of which served in the Army during World War II. While attending Moore High School in Waco, he was a full back on the football team. He worked on his fathers farm be fore enlisting in the U.S Navy as Mess Attendant, ird Class, at Dallas, Texas, Sept. 16 1939, to travel, and earn money for his family. He later was commended by the Secretary of the Navy, was advanced to Mess Attendant, Second Class and First Class, and subsequently was promot ed to Cook, ird Class. Following training at the Naval Training Station, Norfolk, Vir ginia, Miller was assigned to the ammunition ship USS Pyro (AE1) where he served as a Mess Attendant, and on Jan. 2, 1940 was transferred to USS West Vir ginia (BB-48), where he became the ships heavyweight boxing champion. In July of that year he had temporary duty aboard USS Nevada (BB36) at Secondary Battery Gunnery School. He returned to West Virginia and was serving in that battle ship when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor Dec. 7 ,1941. Miller had arisen at 6 a.m., and was collecting laundry when the alarm for general quarters sounded. He headed for his bat tle station, the antiaircraft bat tery magazine amidship, only to discover that torpedo damage had wrecked it, so he went on deck. Because of his physical prow ess, he was assigned to carry wounded fellow Sailors to plac es of greater safety. en an ocer ordered him to the bridge to aid the mortally wounded captain of the ship. He subsequently manned a 50 caliber Browning anti-aircraft machine gun until he ran out of ammunition and was ordered to abandon ship. Miller described ring the machine gun during the battle, a weapon which he had not been trained to operate: It wasnt hard. I just pulled the trig ger and she worked ne. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I red her for about fteen minutes. I think I got one of those Jap planes. ey were diving pretty close to us. During the attack, Japanese aircraft dropped two armored piercing bombs through the deck of the battleship and launched ve 18inch air craft tor pedoes into her port side. Heavily damaged by the en suing explosions, and suer ing from severe ooding below decks, the crew abandoned ship while West Virginia slowly set tled to the harbor bottom. Of the 1,541 men on West Vir ginia during the attack, 130 were killed and 52 wounded. Subsequently reoated, repaired, and modernized, the battleship served in the Pacic theater through to the end of the war in August 1945. Miller was commended by the Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox April 1, 1942, and on May 27 he received the Navy Cross, which Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the Commander in Chief, Pacic Fleet, personally presented to Miller on board air craft carrier USS Enterprise (CV6) for his extraordinary courage in battle. Speaking of Miller, Nimitz remarked: is marks the rst time in this conict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacic Fleet to a member of his race and Im sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts. On Dec. 13, 1941, Miller re ported to USS Indianapolis (CA35), and subsequently returned to the west coast of the United States in November 1942. Assigned to the newly con structed USS Liscome Bay (CVE56) in the spring of 1943, Miller was on board that escort carrier during Operation Galvanic, the seizure of Makin and Tarawa Atolls in the Gilbert Islands. Lis come Bays aircraft supported operations ashore Nov. 20 to 23, 1943. At 5:10 a.m. Nov. 24, while cruising near Butaritari Island, a single torpedo from Japanese submarine I-175 struck the es cort carrier near the stern. e aircraft bomb magazine deto nated a few moments later, sink ing the warship within minutes. Listed as missing following the loss of that escort carrier, Miller was ocially presumed dead Nov. 25, 1944, a year and a day after the loss of Liscome Bay. Only 272 Sailors survived the sinking of Liscome Bay, while 646 died. In addition to the Navy Cross, Miller was entitled to the Pur ple Heart Medal; the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp; the Asiatic-Pacic Campaign Medal; and the World War II Victory Medal. Commissioned on June 30, 1973, USS Miller (FF-1091), a Knox-class frigate, was named in honor of Doris Miller. On Oct. 11, 1991, Alpha Kap pa Alpha Sorority dedicated a bronze commemorative plaque of Miller at the Miller Family Park located on the Naval Base Pearl Harbor. Dorrie Miller, American hero at Pearl Harbor a CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 Chief Information Technician Submarines Cody Caddell is hugged by wife, Erin. Machinists Mate 1st Class Freddie Sanchezmaiz greets his 12-year-old son, Gustavo, and his fouryear-old daughter, Annabella. Machinists Mate Fireman Apprentice Travis Hutchings and his family leave the homecoming, headed for home. Families met crew members in a homecoming reception at the Big EZ Sports Club at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after USS Maryland returned from three months at sea. Above, Chief Information Technician Submarines Cody Caddell and daughter, Stella. A girl plays with a balloon while waiting for her father at the USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (Blue) homecoming.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 5 The center conserves and sustains some of the earths rarest wild animals through innovative training, research, education, breeding and field pro grams that contribute to the survival of wildlife in nature. Volunteers from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay rake debris at the White Oak Conservation Center, Jan. 25. Machinery Repairman Fireman Samantha Lundy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay volunteers for Second Harvest of South Georgia at the Camden Community Recreation Center, Jan. 26. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Stephan Marriott packs grocery bags. The food was delivered to churches for distribution. Electronics Technician 1st Class Ryan Smith rakes at White Oak Conservation Center.

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 13 and 27. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deploy ment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of oper ational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Feb. 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 14, 21 and 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, edu cation, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or contribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop soonThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the informa tion and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 15. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Sup port Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Sec ond Career will be presented by e Military Ocers Asso ciation of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Tri dent Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be ed ucated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given an nually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer per ceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job mar ketvand other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior en listed, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, Marketing Your self for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, con tact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513. Observing Colors For more than 200 years, the day wide at 0800 and at When The National Anthem. and remain seated at attention 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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My Sweet Valentine Father & Daughter Dance will be 5 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Kings Bay Conference Cen ter. Enjoy an evening with your daughter, dining on a fabulous menu. Adult tickets are only $10 and for children 12 and under tickets are $6. Children 2 and under are free with a paying adult. Tickets will be available at the conference center, Child De velopment Center, Youth Center and Information, Tickets and Travel oce. ere will be mu sic, dancing, photos and a door prize drawing. Each daughter will receive a ower. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. February Tournaments at the Big EZ Billiard Zone 6 p.m., Tues., Feb. 14 Texas Holdem Poker and 7 p.m., Tues., Feb. 21 8-Ball. Must sign up and be present 15 minutes before the tournaments. Prizes for rst place is a $50 giftcard and second place a $25 giftcard. For more information, call the Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Chocolate and Chaturanga Its 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 13 at the Fitness Complex Spin Studio. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. A special 90-minute Hot Yoga class is set for Valentines Day. Join the instructors for a rejuvenating yoga session and some sweet treats. This class will be held in a heated room to allow for increased flexibility and deep relaxation. Spots are limited to the first 40 people. For more information, call (912) 573-8972. Note: The Zumba class on Monday, Feb. 13 will be cancelled due to this event. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Teen Maskquerade Party Its 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Center for ages 13 to 18 but still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more information, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 gift card from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. So Full, Soul Food Social It will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy a feast of southern fried chicken, baked barbecue chicken and smothered pork chops with more for $10. Enjoy music and some historical soul food dis plays. Tickets will be available at the Kings Bay Conference Center and Information, Ticekts and Travel office. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Valentiness Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowl ing and shoes, personal onetopping pizza, chips and unlim ited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for first, second and third place. Also drawings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay but ton and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their fam ily members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Registration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Children must have turned 3 before Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Base ball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soc cer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, reservists, military retir ees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active military only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registra tion fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is available. ere will be a mandatory skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice be gin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the lat est information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information.Spring sports opens Just for kids Sweet Valentine Dance Feb. 11 dreds of citizens, includ ing women and children, in Homs through shelling and other indiscriminate violence, Obama added, and Syrian forces con tinue to prevent hundreds of injured civilians from seeking medical help. e United States and our international partners support the Syrian people in achieving their aspira tions and will continue to assist the Syrian people toward that goal, the presi dent said. On Feb. 4, Russian and Chinese representatives on the U.N. Security Council vetoed a resolu tion that backed an Arab League plan to resolve the crisis in Syria. irteen of the councils 15 members voted in favor of a draft text submitted by Morocco. A veto by any one of the councils ve permanent members China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States means a resolution cant be ad opted. At the State Department today, spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in a statement that the recent surge in violence in Syria, including bombings in Damascus on Dec. 23 and Jan. 6, has raised serious concerns that our Embas sy is not suciently pro tected from armed attack. e U.S. embassy, along with several other dip lomatic missions, she added, conveyed our se curity concerns to the Syr ian government but the regime failed to respond adequately. e deteriorating secu rity situation that led to the suspension of diplo matic operations makes clear once more the dan gerous path Assad has chosen and the regimes inability to fully control Syria, Nuland said. In the meantime, ac cording to news reports, over the past weeks sev eral of the Assad regimes military leaders have publicly sided with those who are opposing the Syrian regime. It is noteworthy, Little said, that were seeing some high-level defec tions of senior Syrian mili tary ocials to the op position.Syria this Enterprise solve complex and dynamic problems, some self-imposed, some caused by outside forces, and forge a way ahead toward a model of shore integration that has forever changed how we do business and provide service the Fleet, Fighter and Family. Vitale thanked the many Navy communities throughout the world that support and allow the Navy to operate in close proxim ity to their homes and live lihoods, acknowledging the importance of main taining close ties from the smallest Installation to the headquarters level. Its the communi ties, both in the U.S. and abroad, that invite us to live and operate in their backyard, and its the communities, both within the Navy and outside, that are the anchor of our ability to maintain and operate the best Naval force in the world, and I want to thank each one for their support, patience, and welcoming spirit, Vitale said. French thanked Vitale for his wisdom and guidance and spoke briey about his optimism and vision for the future of CNIC. During the last six years I have been with the CNIC Enterprise I have learned that we have some of the best, brightest, and most talented professionals in the Navy, French said. Un der Vice Admiral Vitales leadership the CNIC team has set the example for how an Enterprise should func tion and have established immense credibility on how you are meeting cus tomer needs. Im honored to be taking command at this point in the history of the command. Vice Adm. French was promoted shortly before the event after having a successful tour at Navy Region Southwest in San Diego, Calif., where he ac complished major milestones towards energy and water conservation and numerous other green initiatives. French, the son of an Air Force ocer and native of San Antonio, is a graduate of Vanderbilt Univer sity where he received commission through the Naval Reserve Ocer Training Corps program in May, 1979. He earned a Master of Science degree from Naval Postgraduate School in 1985 and a Mas ter of Arts from the Naval War College in 1999. A career submarine ocer, French has served on a number of submarines and commanded USS Salt Lake City (SSN 716) and Submarine Squadron 3 in Pearl Harbor. His prior Flag Ocer commands in clude tours at Navy Region Northwest, Navy Region Marianas in Guam, and Navy Region Southwest. I am proud to be part of such a superb organi zation, and look I forward to working with you over the next few years, added French. CNIC oversees a $10 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities and 58,000 personnel, all managed from a single unied enterprise. French THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 7

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Spending priorities in the forthcoming scal 2013 defense budget request call for reductions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in special operations forces and maintaining the number of big-deck carriers, Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta said in Washington, D.C., Jan. 26. e Pentagons budget topline request is set at $525 billion for scal 2013 with an ad ditional $88.4 billion for overseas contin gency operations mostly in Afghanistan. is is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this scal year. Defense Department ocials used the new defense strategy guidance that Pres ident Barack Obama announced earlier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. e budget seeks to minimize the im pact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service members will receive their full pay raises in scal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises be ginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important ben et, and one that has far outpaced in ation. Changes to health care will not aect active duty personnel or their fami lies, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are rec ommending increases in health care fees, co-pays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increases, the cost borne by mili tary retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DOD on the path to save $259 billion over the next ve years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the budget a balanced, complete package that keeps the Ameri can military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced package, the secretary said, because while some programs are eliminated or delayed, others are in creased. e budget looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and ex ible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the number of special op erations forces is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their traditional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. e request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over ve years. Currently, the two services have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty members, re spectively. e secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. e budget treats the reserve compo nents very carefully, Panetta said. Af ter a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve components will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. e reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only marginal reduc tions in the Army Reserve and Army Na tional Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. e Air Force will make balanced reductions in the Air Guard that are con sistent with reductions in the active com ponent and Air Force Reserve. e request also calls for more base realignments and closures, and a BRAClike authority to recommend changes to military retirement. But the president and department have made clear that the retirement benets of those who current ly serve will be protected by grandfather ing their benets, Panetta said. e budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commitment to the Pacic Command area of operations. e request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 aircraft carriers and 10 carrier air wings, Panetta said. It will also main tain the current Marine and Army pos ture in the Asia-Pacic region, and will base littoral combat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. e budget will eliminate two forwardbased Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. e United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabilities such as the alliance ground surveillance program. e Navy will retire seven older cruis ers and two amphibious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. e budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an anti-access, aerial-denial scenario and will fund the next-generation bomber and moderniza tion of the submarine eet. e F-35 joint strike ghter is key to maintaining domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the program, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed procurement to com plete more testing and allow for develop mental changes before buying in signi cant quantities, he added. e budget will maintain all legs of the nuclear triad bombers, ICBMs and submarines and will invest in signicantly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strategy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also en sure a strong, agile military for the future. e budget must pass Congress, and the secretary said he hopes members of Congress understand the strategy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when members un derstand the sacrice involved in reduc ing the defense budget by half a trillion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid sequestration, a further round of cuts that would inict severe damage to our national defense for generations, Panet ta said. Panetta announces defense budget priorities President Barack Obama has nominated Marine Corps Lt. Gen. John F. Kelly to be the next commander of U.S. Southern Command, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Jan. 27. If conrmed by the Senate, Kelly would replace Air Force Gen. Douglas M. Fraser at the Miami-based com mand. Fraser, who took over command of Southcom in June 2009, has not announced his future plans, a Southcom spokesman said today. If promoted to the four-star posi tion, Kelly will be the third Marine Corps commander of Southcom, following Gen. Peter Pace, who held the command for 12 months ending in September 2001, and Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who com manded Southcom from 1997 to 2000. Kelly is the former commander of the 1st Marine Ex peditionary Force, based at Camp Pendleton, Calif. He commanded the 1st MEF through a year-long mission in Iraqs al Anbar and Ninewa provinces beginning in early 2008. He returned stateside to command Marine Forces Reserve and Marine Forces North from October 2009 to March 2011. Since then, he has served as the senior mili tary advisor to the secretary of defense. Southcom comprises a multinational sta of about 1,200 military members, civilians and contractors, in cluding representatives of more than a dozen federal agencies, with a primary mission of protecting southern approaches into the United States, a spokesman said. e command works with 31 countries and 15 territo ries on regional security challenges. President nominates Kelly to lead Southern Command 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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I met x1 in high school. The funny thing was, she went to a different junior high school than I did, and when I asked a football teammate who went to that school to introduce me to that (last name)-chick he introduced me to her cousin and not the girl I wanted to meet. When after 24 years of marriage we divorced, I wisely made a vow not to return to high school for my next spouse but instead to meet her in church. But there was x2, sitting on that bar stool ... You dont want to know the rest.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.HM2 Arlene Elliott NSB Naval Branch Health Clinic Jackson, N.J. I met my boy friend at Jackson Memorial High School. CS2 Jerrod Pearce NSB Barracks Eureka, Calif. I met my wife through a friend who was stationed on the USS Tennessee, who was born and raised in Fernandina and knew local girls. JoAnne Thomas Family member Lafayette, Ind. I met my husband on a blind date. I worked for someone and she connected me up with a friend of her husband. Freddie Esparagoza Retired Navy Manila, Philipines My wife was my next-door neighbor, and my best friend growing up was her brother. FTC Will Corey USS Alaska Gold Newport News, Va. I met my wife in high school, Denbigh High School in Newport News, Virginia. She was a friend of mine. Leading Hand Alan Waterson HMS Astute Dundee, Scotland Through friends, that was it, really. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Jaguars visit Enterprise Cheerleaders and football players from the NFLs Jacksonville Jaguars visited aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) while the ship was in port at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Jan. 31. e players and cheerleaders took photos with Sailors and Marines, signed autographs and toured the ight deck during their visit to the 50-year-old ship. is is something that a lot of us have never done before, so it was a great expe rience to get to tour the actual ship and see all the aircraft, said Chelsea Belloit, Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleader. We denitely had a great time and we hope to come back and tour again. e Sailors and Marines aboard Big E were pleased about the visit and enjoyed having the chance to have their photos taken with the special guests. We had the Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleaders and a couple of their play ers come on board and it was awesome, said Aviation Machinists Mate Airman Michael Foster. I just got my picture tak en with a couple of the cheerleaders and an autographed calendar. Im loving it. Not only did the ships crew appreci ate the opportunity to meet and greet the football players and cheerleaders, the athletes had a memorable experience as well. is is my rst time on an aircraft car rier and this thing is huge. Its amazing, said Samantha Snyder, a Jacksonville Jag uars cheerleader. Being here is a very unique opportunity. is is probably the best part of our job. is is my rst time aboard Enter prise, said Zach Miller, tight end for the Jacksonville Jaguars. Its eye-opening THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 9

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e state of military lo gistics is healthy and ser vice members are doing amazing things to sup ply operations around the world, but the system is strained as a result of 10 years of war, the Joint Stas director of logistics said Jan. 10 in Washington, D.C. Air Force Lt. Gen. Brooks L. Bash said mili tary logisticians are, in many respects, the unsung heroes of Americas 21st-century wars. In the past year alone, they or chestrated the withdrawal of tens of thousands of American service members and millions of piec es of equipment from Iraq. ey supplied forces ght ing in Afghanistan, even as political considerations closed a key route into the landlocked country. ey did all this while continuing their everyday missions handling permanent changes of station for tens of thou sands of service mem bers, ensuring training requirements are met and ensuring that forward-deployed personnel around the world have what they need to do their missions. ey also have supplied allies and other U.S. gov ernment agencies, and they have kicked into even higher gear to aid people around the world hit by natural disasters. No other country in the world can do what were doing, Bash said. Were ying and taking stu halfway around the world. e fact that Afghanistan is a landlocked country adds to the challenge. Si multaneously completing the Iraq drawdown and then, oh, by the way, doing Navy College educational information At a moment of national tran sition, the United States is re shaping defense priorities and its military force to sustain U.S. global leadership and respond to changing security and scal needs, President Barack Obama said Jan. 5 at the Pentagon. Obama, the rst president to address reporters in the Pentagon brieng room, joined Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, to introduce a new military strategy that sets priori ties for a 21st-century defense. e United States of America is the greatest force for freedom and security that the world has ever known, Obama said. In no small measure, thats because weve built the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped military in history and as commander in chief, Im going to keep it that way. Even as the tide of war recedes and U.S. forces prevail in todays missions, he added, we have the opportunity and the respon sibility to look ahead to the force we need for the future. Looking beyond the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and longterm nation-building with large military footprints, Obama said, the United States will be able to ensure its security with smaller conventional ground forces and by investing in capabilities that include intelligence, surveil lance and reconnaissance and the ability to operate in environments where adversaries try to deny access. Yes, our military will be lean er, he said, but the world must know the United States is going to maintain our military superiority with armed forces that are agile, exible and ready for the full range of contingencies and threats. Panetta said the department would need to make a strategic shift regardless of the nations scal situation. We are at that point in histo ry, the secretary added. ats the reality of the world we live in. But he stressed that the U.S. military will remain capable across the spectrum. We will continue to conduct a complex set of missions ranging from counterterrorism, ranging from countering weapons of mass destruction to maintain ing a safe, secure and eective nuclear deterrent, Panetta said, adding that the department will be fully prepared to protect our interests, defend our homeland and support civil authorities. e Defense Strategic Guid ance document released today says the future force will be led by the worlds nest, best cared for and battle-tested all-volun teer military one that will be smaller, but that also will be ex ible, agile and ready. e force will be leaner, fur ther reducing the cost of doing business and nding eciencies in overhead, business prac tices and other support activi ties, according to the guidance. It also will be technologically superior, the document adds, and networked across the ser vices as well as with diplomatic, development and intelligence agencies, allies and partners. e strategy also outlines a force that will be able to regen erate and mobilize for an unpredictable future, preserving the U.S. industrial base. Military faced with priority force reshaping Logistics remain healthy 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Recently a contingent of logistics ocers from Marine Forces Europe led a group of Army, Navy, Air Force and United States Embassy ocials traveled to Trondheim, Norway, for briefs and a site sur vey of the Marine Corps Pre-positioning ProgramNorway facility. e MFE logistics ocers teamed up with Nor wegian logisticians and US Embassy ocials to deliver briefs outlining the history of the program and unveil the Marine Corps intent for the future. Ambassador Barry B. White, United States Am bassador to Norway, was present for the briefs and accompanied the service members on a tour of the caves. e Marine Corps, with the help of our Norwegian partners, has worked hard to ensure that the equip ment stored in this facility is not a relic of the Cold War, but responds directly to todays security and cri sis response needs, said Ambassador White. In the late 1970s, the United States needed a place to stage vast amounts of equipment and Norway had a need for a security partnership due to Cold War tensions with Russia. is devel oped into a friendship and partnership between the Norwegian military and the United States Marine Corps. e result was the es tablishment of the Norway Air-Landed Marine Expeditionary Brigade which after extensive research was declared operational in 1990. For the next 15 years, NALMEB operated and supported the Marine Corps until the shift to the Marine Air Ground Task Force became the primary model for deployments and operations across the board. e sta took this shift in stride and NA LMEB morphed into what is now known as the Marine Corps Pre-Positioning ProgramNorway. e United States Marine Corps has maintained a strong relationship with the Norwegian military since the inception of the Norway Air-Landed MEB Program and its re-designation as MCPP-N in 2004 which signied its change in focus to a theater and global responsive capabil ity, said Lt. Col. Kenneth Oldham, a logistics ocer with MFE. e Norwegian military provides us access to modern climate controlled storage facilities and a highly skilled and motivated workforce. is, coupled with the sig nicant burden-sharing contribution provided by Norway, who pays for 50 percent of all operating costs, and access to mod ern multi-modal trans portation hubs for quick deployments, make this a cost-eective program for the Marine Corps, with proven operational value for our forward-deployed forces. e MCPP-N facility is comprised of seven loca tions totaling more than 900,000 square feet of storage. e actual caves make up 471,445 sq. ft. of climate controlled stor age, regulated to between 45 to 55 percent humidity and a regulated tempera ture of between 45 to 50 degrees. is precise regulation allows tents, vehicle tires and other climate sensitive equipment to be stored safely, and maintain a high level of readi ness to be readily deploy able for any contingency that may arise. ere are common items in our inventory that can and will continue to support any service, as well as other nations. Our program provides sustainment as well as unique Marine Corps equipment. Whether its sandbags, MREs, or ammunition, our total package concept has cross-service capabilities, said Neil Hagen, prepositioning analyst, Headquarters Marine Corps. But our primary goal continues to be supporting a Marine AirGround Task Force, One of the main goals of MCPP-N is the rapid de ployment and issuance of equipment in support of the Marine Corps, regard less of the contingency. e caves house vehicles, rations, ammunition and other assorted equipment, enough to support approximately 13,000 Marines for thirty days. With the sun setting on combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, MCPP-N is posturing to transform itself for the post Opera tion Enduring Freedom battleeld and continue to support emergency, disaster relief and annual exercises as needed by U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command, MARFOREUR and Marine Forces Africa. Recently, MARFOREUR was called upon to provide humanitarian assistance to the earthquake victims in Turkey. Together with their MCPP-N counter parts, Marines from Stutt gart, Germany, ew to Norway to withdraw more than 300 tents and space heaters to palletize and ship to Turkey. In the space of about 72 hours from notication to completion the Marines prepared more than 91,000 lbs. of equipment and shuttled it o to help in the relief eort. Because it works as it did in Turkey and elsewhere, and because it is a visible symbol of our mu tual security commitment, MCPP-N is enormously important for U.S.-Norway relations, said the ambas sador. Humanitarian relief isnt only one piece of the operational puzzle; there are a host of annual exer cises with partner nations who receive gear to sup port their training. Equipment is pulled from the caves every year to support ongoing operations and exercises, Old ham said. ere are more than 350 items standing ready for receipt by Ma rines of the Special Pur pose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Black Sea Ro tational Force. is equipment will be inspected and signed for next week by BSRF Ma rines, then transported to both Georgia and Ro mania to support their operations during their six-month deployment. Equipment will also be pulled in March to support Marines, participation in the upcoming Norwegian Exercise Cold Response 12 in as well as during the summer to support Ex ercises Sabre Strike and BALTOPS in the Baltics. As combat operations wind down this becomes a pivotal year for the MCPPN program as the Nor wegian and US military logistics, and plans communities put their heads together and attempt to forecast how MCPP-N fac tors into future operations. For the past 40 years this solid bond has weathered not only the icy chill of Norway, but the often short-fused and vital lo gistic support tempo that requires a high state of vigilance and a readiness to deploy equipment to not just Europe and Africa, but virtually anywhere in the world. e attendees from both the EUCOM and AFRICOM stas left with a much greater apprecia tion of what MCCP-N does and how it can enable operational capabilities for both theater security cooperation activities and crisis response throughout their areas of responsibility while also assuring our Northern European partners of our continued commitment to their na tional security, Oldham said.Corps gear kept in caves Home loans guaranteed by the Department of Vet erans Aairs continue to have the lowest serious delinquency and foreclo sure rates in the mortgage industry. Veterans have also taken advantage of their home loan benet in re cord numbers, as VA loan originations reached their highest total in eight years. e continued strong performance and high volume of VA loans are a testament to the impor tance of VAs home loan program and a tribute to the skilled VA professionals who help homeowners in nancial trouble keep their homes, said Secretary of Veterans Aairs, Eric K. Shinseki. Last year, VA helped 72,391 veterans and ser vicemembers who were in default on their mortgage loan retain their homes or avoid foreclosure, an increase from 66,030 from the prior year.At the same time, foreclosures on VA guaranteed loans dropped by 28 percent. According to the Mort gage Bankers Association National Delinquency Survey, VAs foreclosure rate for the last 14 quarters and serious delinquency rate for the last 11 quarters have been the lowest of all measured loan types, even prime loans. In scal year 2011, VA guaranteed 357,594 loans, an increase of nearly 14 percent over last year. ere are currently over 1.5 million active VA home loans.e program makes home ownership more af fordable for veterans, ac tive duty Servicemembers, and eligible surviving spouses by permitting nodownpayment loans and by protecting lenders from loss if the borrower fails to repay the loan. Much of the pro grams strength stems from the eorts of VA employees and loan servicers nationwide, whose mis sion is to ensure all veter ans receive every possible opportunity to remain in their homes, avoid fore closure, and protect their credit from the consequences of a foreclosure. We are committed to making even more Veter ans and Servicemembers aware of this important benet and delivering the assistance they deserve when nancial diculties arise, said VAs Under Secretary for Benets Alli son A. Hickey. For veterans and ser vicemembers who have trouble meeting their mortgage obligations or anticipate problems in the near future, VA rst recommends contacting their loan servicer. Depending on the situ ation, VAs loan specialists can intervene on a veter ans behalf to help pursue home-retention options such as repayment plans, forbearances, and loan modications. Veterans and service members can also call VA toll-free at (877) 827-3702 to speak with a VA specialist concerning foreclosure avoidance. Veterans may obtain a certicate of eligibilityand sign up for eB enets through the Web portal at www.ebenets. va.gov. e Department of De fense and VA jointly devel oped the eBenets portal as a single secure point of access for online ben et information and tools to perform multiple selfservice functions such as checking the status of their claim. Servicemembers may enroll in eBenets using their Common Access Card at any time during their military service, or before they leave during their Transition Assis tance Program briengs. Veterans may also enroll in eBenets and obtain a premium account by verifying their identity in-per son at the nearest regional oce or online depending on their status, or calling VAs toll free number at (800) 827-1000. Since 1944, when home loan guaranties were rst oered under the original GI Bill, VA has guaranteed more than 19.4 million home loans worth over $1.1 trillion. standing next to some of these ghter pilots and these jets. Its fun for me. Miller thanked the Sailors and Marines for their service on behalf of the Jaguars and expressed the team members appreciation for the sacrices ser vicemembers make for their country. During their time aboard Enterprise, the Jaguars representatives gave away more than 300 calendars and 1,000 personally auto graphed posters. Enterprise is underway participating in exercise Bold Alligator 2012. is exercise will take place Jan. 30 to Feb 12 aoat and ashore in and around Virginia and North Carolina.VA home loans do wellJaguars THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 11

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Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFriday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMonday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style Greens Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. As the U.S. Navy prepares to celebrate the bicentennial of the War of 1812, a book authored by U.S. Na val War College professor entitled, Utmost Gallantry: e U.S. and Royal Navies at Sea in the War of 1812 hit the bookstands in time for the holidays. After Prof. Kevin Mc Cranies book Admiral Lord Keith and the Naval War Against Napoleon was published ve years ago, he began to search for something new to write about. Despite a growing list of topics to consider, McCranie said the War of 1812 was not one of them. About four years ago, I thought the War of 1812 might be a good topic for a professional journal ar ticle, McCranie said. e more I researched, the more I discovered previ ous authors didnt deal with the important as pects of the naval war or simply espoused biased opinions or a nationalistic perspective. McCranies knowledge of British naval history and the Napoleonic wars led him to conclude much of the published material on the War of 1812 contained bias and served other purposes than providing a historic account. In writing Utmost Gallantry, McCranie said he wanted to make sure read ers werent misguided by incorrect information or interpretations. e War of 1812 is signicant because it paved the way for future development of the U.S. Navy, McCranie said. Challeng ing the most dominant naval power of the time, the less powerful U.S. Navy found ways to protract the war and incurred signicant costs for Great Brit ain. ats why the War of 1812 is important for na tional leaders to study. e publication of Mc Cranies book comes at a great time when people may have a renewed inter est in this period of American history. is book really started out as an article until I started to dig, McCranie said. As I began to write, it did occur to me the bi centennial of the war was approaching. I hope this book provides a fresh per spective at a time where people might be interest ed in learning more. Starting in April 2012 through 2014 the Unit ed States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard will celebrate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 with events around the country. Large Navy celebration events are being planned for Baltimore, New York, Norfolk, Cleveland, Chi cago, Boston and New Or leans. War of 1812 revisited in book Pirates Cove Galley menus 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Haiti, tsunami, and what ever else pops up, and also supporting the combat ant commanders in their regions with what theyre doing every day. And logisticians are sus taining the eort. Other countries can get troops to remote areas of the world, but they cannot sustain operations in those regions like the U.S. military can, the general said. Afghanistan is a case in point. It is one of the more remote areas on the planet. It is landlocked. Pakistan closed the border crossings from the port of Karachi to Afghanistan following an accident on the border that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. Even though those gates are closed, Bash noted, American, international and Afghan forces are still getting what they need. e American logistics ef fort supplies 91,000 U.S. personnel with the food, ammunition, fuel, spare parts, armored vehicles and whatever else they need. e rst thing we did was we planned for it, the general said. e Paki stanis had closed the gates to Afghanistan before, and logisticians planned for the possibility. Planners looked at al ternatives to the Pakistani gates. ey examined sup plying troops by air, Bash said, but that is expensive and can be limited. ey developed the Northern Distribution Network an eort that connects Baltic and Caspian Sea ports with Afghanistan through Russia and the countries of Central Asia and the Caucasus. We have shifted about 30 percent of what was coming in through Pakistan to the northern distribution, Bash said. It has more capability, and then we built up some of our stocks. Logisticians built up 60 days worth of stocks in Af ghanistan. But because of the northern distribution being open, it is having little to no operational impact, he said. is is more expensive, but it is eective, the gen eral said. About 85 percent of fuel, for example, comes through the Northern Dis tribution Network. Logis ticians also are using more airlift, and that causes problems on its own, the general said. Allies, likewise, built up stocks. We have acquisi tion cross-servicing agree ments with them so that, if they do come up short, then we can help them out through those sorts of agreements, Bash said. So while there are no shortages, the increased tempo imposes its own price on logisticians. ere are areas in lo gistics some of our spe cialty areas and our equipment and others that need to be recapitalized and reset, Bash said. Putting ight hours on airplanes and helicopters and put ting miles on mine-resis tant, ambush-protected vehicles, for example, takes a toll on the equip ment, he explained. And there is a cost to the people in the logistics enterprise as well, Bash said, but they continue to get the job done. I would say our logisti cians are the most experi enced in history, he said. Logistics personnel are the greatest combat multiplier in the logistics enter prise, he added. Educating and training those personnel is key to success in the future, the general said. We might decrease the number of our people, but the people we do have, we need to make sure theyre experienced and trained properly, he said. Force structure adjust ments will be necessary in the logistics eld, the gen eral said, and the Defense Department must be care ful to preserve what truly is necessary rst of all, the people needed for the eort regardless of the budget situation. Another necessity is access. e best ghting force in the world is no good if it cannot get to the scene of a ght and sus tain itself, Bash noted. A nal multiplier is operational contract support. From the time of spears and arrows to modern warfare today, as technol ogy has progressed so has the way we ght. Unmanned aerial vehicles give our troops an ex tra edge on the battleeld. Its important for the guys on the ground to be able to see over that wall that theyre about to go into and it keeps us from using manned vehicles and risking lives, said Sta Sgt. Chad Olsen, squadron weapons and tactical instructor, VMU-2. Its the eyes in the sky e Naval Air Systems Command demonstrated the next model UAV to be incorporated into the Ma rine Corps at the Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 3 aireld here Jan. 22. Ocials said they plan to have the RQ21A Small Tactical Unmanned Aerial System, better known as the Integrator, in produc tion for the Marine Corps by scal year 2013. It ew for the rst time in a tactical environment in front of VMU-2 and VMU-3, two of its future operators. e VMU-2 Marines, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Combat Center in support of Enhanced Mo jave Viper. ey got an unexpected treat when they found out the demon stration would take place on the same aireld they were operating on. We knew thered be an other UAV out here, but we didnt expect it to be the Integrator, said Olsen. Coincidentally, the AAI RQ-7 Shadow, one of the current UAVs in operation, was also scheduled to run exercises alongside the Integrator, highlighting the crafts dierences even more. Visually, the Integrator is sleeker and features a attened tail, versus the upward bent tail of the shadow. Its awesome, said Cpl. Juan Reyes, eld radio op erator, VMU-2, after see ing the Integrator for the rst time. Its smaller and more tactical. e Shadow also re quires a longer launching pad and creates a notice ably louder noise, while the Integrators launching pad is nearly half the size of the Shadows and the noise more mued. But what sets the Inte grator apart from most UAVs is not the launch, its the recovery. e biggest thing is were not tied to the run way like previous tactical unmanned aerial sys tems, said John F. Parks, deputy assistant program manager of logistics, PMA 263, NAVAIR. e Integrators retriev al system combines the use of global positioning systems with the high ten sion cables. e specially-made cable hangs from a 54-foottall receiver, attached at each end, with a dier ential GPS pad located directly below it. e UAV operator lines up Integrators GPS with the one on the ground. As the two sync, the wing hooks onto the rope and comes to a complete stop approxi mately 20 feet from the ground. e Integrators acceler ometer senses the loss of forward momentum and shuts of the engine. e aircraft is lowered down by on a pulley system and dis connected from the cable. Using the Integrator of landing will change the role of VMUs on naval ships. e Shadow cant be recovered on ships be cause it could not land on the moving vessel. e Integrator will make that ex tra mobility possible. Its going to be an amazing capability for us with its size and being able to be deployed with the MEUs and own o of ships, Olsen said. Its go ing to expand our abilities exponentially.Marines await Integrator Logistics THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 13



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Ceremony Feb. 3 at Washington Navy Yard Vice Adm. William D. French relieved Vice Adm. Michael C. Vitale as Commander, Navy Installations Command during a Change of Command ceremony in CNIC Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, Feb. 3. Vitale has served as the chief ocer leading the Navys entire shore infrastructure for nearly three years and was the third commander in the history of CNIC. is infrastructure, also known as the CNIC Enterprise; includes 11 Navy Regions, 70 Installations and 127 Naval Operations Support Centers, and is responsible for 31 business lines and 122 critical shore capabilities across three major categories operations, quality of life, and facilities management. roughout his tenure, Vitale lead eorts to standardize, align, synchronize and innovate new methods and processes that furthered CNICs mission to deliver eective and ecient readiness from the shore that sustain the eet, enable the ghter, and support families. Vitale praised the numerous accomplishments of the personnel under his command and of the entire CNIC Enterprise; from molding the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System into the model Personnel Accountability System used across the services, to the development of new shore integration methods and a Total Workforce, capable of continuously supporting operations and services. e personnel here at the Headquarters, and throughout the entire Enterprise have faced growing numbers of issues and challenges, Vitale said. Ive had the pleasure of witnessing Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Home again Page 4 Volunteers Page 5USS Maryland returns to NSB Kings Bay Fighting Mary preps for ret aer 60th deployment cruisee Blue Crew of USS Maryland (SSBN 738) returned to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Jan. 21 following a two-month patrol. e patrol was the 60th such deployment by the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine since its commissioning in 1992. For Logistics Specialist Sea man Apprentice Kevin Edwards of San Francisco, the successful completion of 60 patrols previ ous to him helped put him at ease during his rst patrol. Everything went incredibly well, Edwards said. I learned a tremendous amount of information about supply and submarines. e entire crew was of great help in training and mentoring me during the underway qualication process. With his shipmates help, Ed wards qualied four watch sta tions including helms man and planes man. I have even complet ed more than 75-percent of my submarine qualication towards my Fish, Edwards said. Missile Technician 2nd Class Andrew Lopez of Belton, Texas didnt have the same apprehen sions as Lopez being a veteran of eight previous patrols. It was a fairly easy patrol, Lo pez said. Im now the qualica tion petty ocer for my division. Its great to get the opportunity to lead and mentor my peers and help them along the qualica tion path. e new qualication petty of cer took his job seriously dur ing the patrol and reported more than half of his division qualied to the next higher watch station. Maryland is currently per forming a ret period at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in preparation for its 61st patrol. French relieves Vitale at Installations Command Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Petty Officer Joshua Clabby, left, and MES 1st Class Jeffrey Fallon talk about their jobs and later offered a demonstration of their explosive-detection dog unit. By Kelly A. WirfelNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Deputy Public Affairs OfficerThe U. S. Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay (91108) hosted a ceremony to celebrate its adoption by the Camden-Kings Bay Navy League, Jan. 28. the ceremony by welcoming nearly 200 Navy League members, Coast Guardians, and family members. Its awesome to have so many people here to support this event today, Baer said. The support we have received from this community is overwhelming. Hunt Thornhill, Camden-Kings Bay Navy League president, said the league is excited to formalize the relationship. We have had an outstanding relationship with the MSST for several years now, and it is great to formally recognize that, Thornhill said. What these men and women do each day is extremely important to our country and our community. Anything we can do to support them, we will do. Following the ceremony, the MSST hosted a barbecue, along with tours and demonstrations of equipment and capabilities. Navy League adopts Coast Guard unit Embassy pulls out of SyriaOcials evacuate sta in wake of utterly deplorable actions in countryArmed attacks by Syrian President Bashar al-Assads regime that have killed and wounded thousands of citizens since last January are utterly deplorable, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said in Washington D.C. Monday. On the same day the State Department suspended operation of the U.S. Embassy in Damascus and moved all American personnel, including Ambassa dor Robert Ford, out of the country, Little said the Defense Departments focus remains on applying intense diplomatic and economic pressure on the Assad regime. We believe there is a strong chance that pressure can yield results on behalf of the Syrian people and those who are repressed in Syria, he added. President Barack Obama issued a strong statement Feb. 4 about the regimes actions. irty years after his father massacred tens of thousands of innocent Syrian men, women, and children in Hama, Bashar al-Assad has demonstrated a similar disdain for human life and dignity, the president said. On Feb. 3, the Syrian government murdered hun

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Black History Month feted Feb. 9e Black History Month Celebration will be at 10 a.m., ursday, Feb. 9 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays chapel. Pirates Cove Galley will have a $4.55 per-person Black History lunch following.Scorby guest speaker for MOAARear Admiral John C. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, will be guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Association of Americas monthly dinner Tuesday, Feb. 21 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner and a program. Cost for the meal is $35 per person or $65 per couple. RSVPs to Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912729) 2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net by Feb. 15. Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546. Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday-Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens W e are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit. Aristotle How many people can relate tostarting an exercise program or going on a diet only to quit after a few weeks andreturn to your old, unhealthy habits? As we enter February, those New Years resolutions made just a mere month ago might already be a thing of the past. is problem is not uncommon. Starting an exercise program or changing our eating habits is no easy feat. It takes sacrice, a high level of commitment and strong motivation to adopt a healthier way of life. A Gallup Poll in 2011 reported that only about half of Americans are exercising for at least 30 minutes three days per week and over half are not eating the recommended ve or more servings of fruit and vegetables each day. Despite the proven physical and mental health benets of exercising regularly and eating a healthy, balanced diet,the majority of ourpopulation isstill struggling to hop on the healthy lifestyle bandwagon, and stay on it. Truth be told, our society does not support a healthy way of life. Fast food restaurants, convenience stores with rows of candy and salty snacks, calorie-ridden beverages and sedentary lifestyles spent in front of the computer or television have contributed to our unhealthy, unt society. Unfortunately, this has led to a population plagued by preventable chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, heart disease and cancer. is all sounds very bleak. But the good news is, we can do something about it. Exercising and eating healthy are two of the few things we have control over in this life, we just have to commit to making these habits a permanent part of our lifestyle. Daily physical activity has to become as ordinary as brushing your teeth. Choosing healthy, whole foods like fresh fruit and vegetables over unhealthy and often more convenient options must become a daily practice. Youll nd that as you start to adopt these healthy lifestyle habits and commit to them day-in, dayout, this new way of life will become more and more appealing as well as easier to sustain. Engaging in daily physical activity and making healthier food choices oers an array of benets, from losing weight and getting o medications to having more energy and an improved mood. ere is no quick x, no magic pill that will aord you optimal health. You must put in the work to reap the rewards. As you set health-related goals for yourself, remember that consistency is key and repeated eort will lead to results. By setting realistic goals and making small changes over time that you are able to stick to, you can successfully change your habits and achieve a lifestyle that will provide you with overall better health and a higher quality of life. Achieve consistency in your routine Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator In this day of social media we have friends all across the country that we can communicate with at the stroke of a key. Whether it is texting or typing, we are connected as never before. Can I ask you a question? Are you lonely? Sometimes the very technology that connects us can leave us lonely. When you need girl chat, or guy chat, do you reach for your iPhone to call or text? Do you meet for coee or sit at the screen typing? What is a friend? MerriamWebster denes a friend as, one attached to another by aection or esteem, a favored companion. Companion is dened as one that accompanies another, one that keeps company with another; one that is closely connected with something similar. We need friends. We are created to have that favored companion, to be closely connected, to be aectionately attached to others. And this diers from the friends on Facebook and Twitter. How many people follow you on Twitter? How many friends on Facebook? Of those, how many will be there to clean your house or sit with you when youve had a bad day? Did you know that friend or friendship is in the top 1 percent of terms looked up on MerriamWebsters site? I think maybe many of us are trying to gure out friendship in this new age of technology. Friendships, to be healthy and fullling, need to be give and take. To have that companion walk with you, you must be willing to be that companion to walk with another. is is true in marriage but also in friendship. I hear from many women expressing the challenges of friendship and loneliness. Relocation can leave us separated from strong, supportive relationships often when we need them most, like during deployment. I do not have ve easy steps to attract friends. What I do have is ideas and tips to become a good friend. Deb is my persistent friend. She decided we were going to be friends, without my knowledge or consent. Deb demonstrated characteristics of friendship that drew me into her loving circle of friends. Patience: Deb was willing to wait for me to respond to her overtures of friendship. She did not expect me to respond in a certain time frame. Good thing too. It took almost a year. Acceptance: Deb knows we all have warts. Deb chooses to overlook warts to see the person behind the warts. I have always felt accepted by Deb. She may not always agree with me but she always accepts me as a person. Consistent persistence: is is the attribute that bothered me most about Deb but also the one I most love and appreciate now. Deb reached out to me consistently with an e-mail and phone call once a week for nine months before I accepted an invitation to get together. Wow! Seless: Deb didnt want to be my friend to get something from me. She befriended me to give, to share. She looked for ways to be companions on the same journey. Forgiveness: Deb was quick to forgive me when I was stupid. She was equally quick to ask forgiveness when she wronged me. Building deep friendships takes time, but with these characteristics we can build friends that will enhance our lives and we will add to theirs. As military spouses I have seen the road to friendship accelerated by the very nature of our lifestyle. Dont be discouraged. Work on becoming that friend and watch what friends bloom in your life.Working at becoming good friends On the Home Front By Beth Wilson How we handle our nances and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nancially secure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Support Center of fers many nancial classes designed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. Think about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times five days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eating out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of going to the bookstore, go to the library and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average electrical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Support Center, in support of the Military Saves Campaign, oers nancial classes for military members and their families. Here are just a few of the nancial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This workshop pre pares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehensive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will understand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the important dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing, high-pressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more information, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.Small steps save money in long run Navy Personnel Command 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Doris Miller, known as Dorie to shipmates and friends, was born in Waco, Texas, Oct. 12, 1919, to Henrietta and Conery Miller. He had three brothers, one of which served in the Army during World War II. While attending Moore High School in Waco, he was a fullback on the football team. He worked on his fathers farm before enlisting in the U.S Navy as Mess Attendant, ird Class, at Dallas, Texas, Sept. 16 1939, to travel, and earn money for his family. He later was commended by the Secretary of the Navy, was advanced to Mess Attendant, Second Class and First Class, and subsequently was promoted to Cook, ird Class. Following training at the Naval Training Station, Norfolk, Virginia, Miller was assigned to the ammunition ship USS Pyro (AE1) where he served as a Mess Attendant, and on Jan. 2, 1940 was transferred to USS West Virginia (BB-48), where he became the ships heavyweight boxing champion. In July of that year he had temporary duty aboard USS Nevada (BB36) at Secondary Battery Gunnery School. He returned to West Virginia and was serving in that battleship when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor Dec. 7 ,1941. Miller had arisen at 6 a.m., and was collecting laundry when the alarm for general quarters sounded. He headed for his battle station, the antiaircraft battery magazine amidship, only to discover that torpedo damage had wrecked it, so he went on deck. Because of his physical prowess, he was assigned to carry wounded fellow Sailors to places of greater safety. en an ocer ordered him to the bridge to aid the mortally wounded captain of the ship. He subsequently manned a 50 caliber Browning anti-aircraft machine gun until he ran out of ammunition and was ordered to abandon ship. Miller described ring the machine gun during the battle, a weapon which he had not been trained to operate: It wasnt hard. I just pulled the trigger and she worked ne. I had watched the others with these guns. I guess I red her for about fteen minutes. I think I got one of those Jap planes. ey were diving pretty close to us. During the attack, Japanese aircraft dropped two armored piercing bombs through the deck of the battleship and launched ve 18inch aircraft torpedoes into her port side. Heavily damaged by the ensuing explosions, and suering from severe ooding below decks, the crew abandoned ship while West Virginia slowly settled to the harbor bottom. Of the 1,541 men on West Virginia during the attack, 130 were killed and 52 wounded. Subsequently reoated, repaired, and modernized, the battleship served in the Pacic theater through to the end of the war in August 1945. Miller was commended by the Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox April 1, 1942, and on May 27 he received the Navy Cross, which Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the Commander in Chief, Pacic Fleet, personally presented to Miller on board aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV6) for his extraordinary courage in battle. Speaking of Miller, Nimitz remarked: is marks the rst time in this conict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacic Fleet to a member of his race and Im sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts. On Dec. 13, 1941, Miller reported to USS Indianapolis (CA35), and subsequently returned to the west coast of the United States in November 1942. Assigned to the newly constructed USS Liscome Bay (CVE56) in the spring of 1943, Miller was on board that escort carrier during Operation Galvanic, the seizure of Makin and Tarawa Atolls in the Gilbert Islands. Liscome Bays aircraft supported operations ashore Nov. 20 to 23, 1943. At 5:10 a.m. Nov. 24, while cruising near Butaritari Island, a single torpedo from Japanese submarine I-175 struck the escort carrier near the stern. e aircraft bomb magazine detonated a few moments later, sinking the warship within minutes. Listed as missing following the loss of that escort carrier, Miller was ocially presumed dead Nov. 25, 1944, a year and a day after the loss of Liscome Bay. Only 272 Sailors survived the sinking of Liscome Bay, while 646 died. In addition to the Navy Cross, Miller was entitled to the Purple Heart Medal; the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp; the Asiatic-Pacic Campaign Medal; and the World War II Victory Medal. Commissioned on June 30, 1973, USS Miller (FF-1091), a Knox-class frigate, was named in honor of Doris Miller. On Oct. 11, 1991, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority dedicated a bronze commemorative plaque of Miller at the Miller Family Park located on the Naval Base Pearl Harbor. Dorrie Miller, American hero at Pearl Harbor a CFC participantProvided as a public service healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 Chief Information Technician Submarines Cody Caddell is hugged by wife, Erin. Machinists Mate 1st Class Freddie Sanchezmaiz greets his 12-year-old son, Gustavo, and his fouryear-old daughter, Annabella. Machinists Mate Fireman Apprentice Travis Hutchings and his family leave the homecoming, headed for home. Families met crew members in a homecoming reception at the Big EZ Sports Club at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after USS Maryland returned from three months at sea. Above, Chief Information Technician Submarines Cody Caddell and daughter, Stella. A girl plays with a balloon while waiting for her father at the USS Maryland (SSBN 738) (Blue) homecoming.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 5 The center conserves and sustains some of the earths rarest wild animals through innovative training, research, education, breeding and field pro grams that contribute to the survival of wildlife in nature. Volunteers from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay rake debris at the White Oak Conservation Center, Jan. 25. Machinery Repairman Fireman Samantha Lundy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay volunteers for Second Harvest of South Georgia at the Camden Community Recreation Center, Jan. 26. Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Stephan Marriott packs grocery bags. The food was delivered to churches for distribution. Electronics Technician 1st Class Ryan Smith rakes at White Oak Conservation Center.

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 13 and 27. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deployment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of operational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Feb. 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 14, 21 and 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regarding the military lifestyle, edu cation, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or contribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop soonThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the information and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 15. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Transition program Feb. 28 e Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year lecture regarding transition here at Kings Bay. Marketing Yourself for a Second Career will be presented by e Military Ocers Association of America 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 28, in the Trident Training Facility. Col. Dan Koslov, USAF (Ret.), now a deputy director of transition services on MOAAs national sta will present the program. is presentation is a great professional development opportunity. e lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare them for that role as well as many multi-day programs. e presentation, given annually at over 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as upto-date, hard-hitting, and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive information on the retirement decision itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job marketvand other relevant and important transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcomed. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an in-depth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information, contact FFSCs Paul Stewart at 573-4511 or 573-4513. Observing Colors For more than 200 years, the day wide at 0800 and at When The National Anthem. and remain seated at attention 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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My Sweet Valentine Father & Daughter Dance will be 5 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy an evening with your daughter, dining on a fabulous menu. Adult tickets are only $10 and for children 12 and under tickets are $6. Children 2 and under are free with a paying adult. Tickets will be available at the conference center, Child Development Center, Youth Center and Information, Tickets and Travel oce. ere will be music, dancing, photos and a door prize drawing. Each daughter will receive a ower. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. February Tournaments at the Big EZ Billiard Zone 6 p.m., Tues., Feb. 14 Texas Holdem Poker and 7 p.m., Tues., Feb. 21 8-Ball. Must sign up and be present 15 minutes before the tournaments. Prizes for rst place is a $50 giftcard and second place a $25 giftcard. For more information, call the Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Chocolate and Chaturanga Its 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 13 at the Fitness Complex Spin Studio. Cost is $2.50 or one punch. A special 90-minute Hot Yoga class is set for Valentines Day. Join the instructors for a rejuvenating yoga session and some sweet treats. This class will be held in a heated room to allow for increased flexibility and deep relaxation. Spots are limited to the first 40 people. For more information, call (912) 573-8972. Note: The Zumba class on Monday, Feb. 13 will be cancelled due to this event. Sham-Rock the House Its 4 to 7 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at K.B. Finnegans, with free entertainment, drink specials, heavy hors doeuvres, bar bingo, door prizes, trivia and T-shirt prizes, plus a grand prize for the best St. Pattys Day costume. Call (912) 573-9492 for more information. Teen Maskquerade Party Its 7 to 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, at the Kings Bay Youth Center for ages 13 to 18 but still in high school. Cost is $5 with a mask, $8 without a mask. Dress to impress for a DJ, snacks, fun, friends and prizes. For more information, call the Teen Center at (912) 573-2380. Resident Gaming at Oscars Its at 7 p.m., every Monday in February, with PS3 Challenge: Madden 2012. Sign up to play for the highest number of points in February and win a $25 giftcard from GameStop. For more information, call Oscars at (912) 573-8328. So Full, Soul Food Social It will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy a feast of southern fried chicken, baked barbecue chicken and smothered pork chops with more for $10. Enjoy music and some historical soul food displays. Tickets will be available at the Kings Bay Conference Center and Information, Ticekts and Travel office. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Valentiness Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowling and shoes, personal onetopping pizza, chips and unlimited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for first, second and third place. Also drawings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay button and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their family members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Registration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Children must have turned 3 before Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Baseball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soccer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, reservists, military retirees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active military only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registration fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is available. ere will be a mandatory skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice begin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more information, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for pre-teens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semes ter, for youths kindergar ten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more informa tion, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information.Spring sports opens Just for kids Sweet Valentine Dance Feb. 11 dreds of citizens, including women and children, in Homs through shelling and other indiscriminate violence, Obama added, and Syrian forces continue to prevent hundreds of injured civilians from seeking medical help. e United States and our international partners support the Syrian people in achieving their aspirations and will continue to assist the Syrian people toward that goal, the president said. On Feb. 4, Russian and Chinese representatives on the U.N. Security Council vetoed a resolution that backed an Arab League plan to resolve the crisis in Syria. irteen of the councils 15 members voted in favor of a draft text submitted by Morocco. A veto by any one of the councils ve permanent members China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States means a resolution cant be adopted. At the State Department today, spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in a statement that the recent surge in violence in Syria, including bombings in Damascus on Dec. 23 and Jan. 6, has raised serious concerns that our Embassy is not suciently protected from armed attack. e U.S. embassy, along with several other diplomatic missions, she added, conveyed our security concerns to the Syrian government but the regime failed to respond adequately. e deteriorating security situation that led to the suspension of diplomatic operations makes clear once more the dangerous path Assad has chosen and the regimes inability to fully control Syria, Nuland said. In the meantime, according to news reports, over the past weeks several of the Assad regimes military leaders have publicly sided with those who are opposing the Syrian regime. It is noteworthy, Little said, that were seeing some high-level defections of senior Syrian military ocials to the opposition.Syria this Enterprise solve complex and dynamic problems, some self-imposed, some caused by outside forces, and forge a way ahead toward a model of shore integration that has forever changed how we do business and provide service the Fleet, Fighter and Family. Vitale thanked the many Navy communities throughout the world that support and allow the Navy to operate in close proxim ity to their homes and live lihoods, acknowledging the importance of main taining close ties from the smallest Installation to the headquarters level. Its the communities, both in the U.S. and abroad, that invite us to live and operate in their backyard, and its the communities, both within the Navy and outside, that are the anchor of our ability to maintain and operate the best Naval force in the world, and I want to thank each one for their support, patience, and welcoming spirit, Vitale said. French thanked Vitale for his wisdom and guidance and spoke briey about his optimism and vision for the future of CNIC. During the last six years I have been with the CNIC Enterprise I have learned that we have some of the best, brightest, and most talented professionals in the Navy, French said. Un der Vice Admiral Vitales leadership the CNIC team has set the example for how an Enterprise should func tion and have established immense credibility on how you are meeting cus tomer needs. Im honored to be taking command at this point in the history of the command. Vice Adm. French was promoted shortly before the event after having a successful tour at Navy Region Southwest in San Diego, Calif., where he accomplished major milestones towards energy and water conservation and numerous other green initiatives. French, the son of an Air Force ocer and native of San Antonio, is a graduate of Vanderbilt University where he received commission through the Naval Reserve Ocer Training Corps program in May, 1979. He earned a Master of Science degree from Naval Postgraduate School in 1985 and a Master of Arts from the Naval War College in 1999. A career submarine ocer, French has served on a number of submarines and commanded USS Salt Lake City (SSN 716) and Submarine Squadron 3 in Pearl Harbor. His prior Flag Ocer commands include tours at Navy Region Northwest, Navy Region Marianas in Guam, and Navy Region Southwest. I am proud to be part of such a superb organization, and look I forward to working with you over the next few years, added French. CNIC oversees a $10 billion budget, more than 83,000 facilities and 58,000 personnel, all managed from a single unied enterprise. French THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 7

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Spending priorities in the forthcoming scal 2013 defense budget request call for reductions in the end strength of the Army and Marine Corps, an increase in special operations forces and maintaining the number of big-deck carriers, Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta said in Washington, D.C., Jan. 26. e Pentagons budget topline request is set at $525 billion for scal 2013 with an additional $88.4 billion for overseas contingency operations mostly in Afghanistan. is is down from $531 billion and $115 billion, respectively, in this scal year. Defense Department ocials used the new defense strategy guidance that President Barack Obama announced earlier this month to shape the budget request, the secretary said. e budget seeks to minimize the impact of cuts on personnel accounts. Service members will receive their full pay raises in scal 2013 and 2014, Panetta said. We will achieve some cost savings by providing more limited pay raises beginning in 2015, he added. Health care is another important benet, and one that has far outpaced ination. Changes to health care will not aect active duty personnel or their families, Panetta said. We decided that to help control growth of health care costs, we are recommending increases in health care fees, co-pays and deductibles for retirees, he said. But let me be clear that even after these increases, the cost borne by military retirees will remain below the levels in comparable private-sector plans. Overall, the request puts DOD on the path to save $259 billion over the next ve years and $487 billion over the next 10. Panetta called the budget a balanced, complete package that keeps the American military the pre-eminent force in the world. It is a balanced package, the secretary said, because while some programs are eliminated or delayed, others are increased. e budget looks to re-shape the military to be more agile, quick and exible that incorporates the lessons learned in 10 years of war, he added. Increasing the number of special operations forces is key to the plan, Panetta said, and special operators will begin to shift back to their traditional pre-9/11 mission of instructing local forces. e request puts the Army on a path to drop to 490,000 soldiers and the Marine Corps to 182,000 Marines over ve years. Currently, the two services have 562,000 and 202,000 active-duty members, re spectively. e secretary noted this is still higher than the numbers on 9/11. e budget treats the reserve components very carefully, Panetta said. After a decade of being an integral part of Americas wars, the reserve components will not go back to being a strategic Cold War-era reserve. e reserves will be the nations hedge against the unexpected, the secretary said. We are making only marginal reductions in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard, and no reductions in the Marine Corps Reserve, the secretary said. e Air Force will make balanced reductions in the Air Guard that are consistent with reductions in the active component and Air Force Reserve. e request also calls for more base realignments and closures, and a BRAClike authority to recommend changes to military retirement. But the president and department have made clear that the retirement benets of those who currently serve will be protected by grandfathering their benets, Panetta said. e budget maintains the current U.S. focus in the Central Command region and increases American commitment to the Pacic Command area of operations. e request looks to maintain the Navys current 11 aircraft carriers and 10 carrier air wings, Panetta said. It will also maintain the current Marine and Army posture in the Asia-Pacic region, and will base littoral combat ships in Singapore and Bahrain. e budget will eliminate two forwardbased Army heavy brigades in Europe. Instead, brigades will rotate in and out of the area. e United States and European allies also will look to share costs for new capabilities such as the alliance ground surveillance program. e Navy will retire seven older cruisers and two amphibious ships early, and the Air Force will eliminate six tactical air squadrons. e budget sinks more money into technologies to prevail in an anti-access, aerial-denial scenario and will fund the next-generation bomber and modernization of the submarine eet. e F-35 joint strike ghter is key to maintaining domain superiority, and the military remains committed to the program, Panetta said. But in this budget, we have slowed procurement to complete more testing and allow for developmental changes before buying in signicant quantities, he added. e budget will maintain all legs of the nuclear triad bombers, ICBMs and submarines and will invest in signicantly more capability in the cyber world, Panetta said. Panetta stressed the budget is based on strategy and will shape the force for the future. While the pain of cuts will be felt across the country, he said, it will also ensure a strong, agile military for the future. e budget must pass Congress, and the secretary said he hopes members of Congress understand the strategy and nuances of the budget. My hope is that when members understand the sacrice involved in reducing the defense budget by half a trillion dollars, it will convince Congress to avoid sequestration, a further round of cuts that would inict severe damage to our national defense for generations, Panetta said. Panetta announces defense budget priorities President Barack Obama has nominated Marine Corps Lt. Gen. John F. Kelly to be the next commander of U.S. Southern Command, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Jan. 27. If conrmed by the Senate, Kelly would replace Air Force Gen. Douglas M. Fraser at the Miami-based command. Fraser, who took over command of Southcom in June 2009, has not announced his future plans, a Southcom spokesman said today. If promoted to the four-star position, Kelly will be the third Marine Corps commander of Southcom, following Gen. Peter Pace, who held the command for 12 months ending in September 2001, and Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who commanded Southcom from 1997 to 2000. Kelly is the former commander of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, based at Camp Pendleton, Calif. He commanded the 1st MEF through a year-long mission in Iraqs al Anbar and Ninewa provinces beginning in early 2008. He returned stateside to command Marine Forces Reserve and Marine Forces North from October 2009 to March 2011. Since then, he has served as the senior military advisor to the secretary of defense. Southcom comprises a multinational sta of about 1,200 military members, civilians and contractors, including representatives of more than a dozen federal agencies, with a primary mission of protecting southern approaches into the United States, a spokesman said. e command works with 31 countries and 15 territories on regional security challenges. President nominates Kelly to lead Southern Command 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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I met x1 in high school. The funny thing was, she went to a different junior high school than I did, and when I asked a football teammate who went to that school to introduce me to that (last name)-chick he introduced me to her cousin and not the girl I wanted to meet. When after 24 years of marriage we divorced, I wisely made a vow not to return to high school for my next spouse but instead to meet her in church. But there was x2, sitting on that bar stool ... You dont want to know the rest.Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.HM2 Arlene Elliott NSB Naval Branch Health Clinic Jackson, N.J. I met my boy friend at Jackson Memorial High School. CS2 Jerrod Pearce NSB Barracks Eureka, Calif. I met my wife through a friend who was stationed on the USS Tennessee, who was born and raised in Fernandina and knew local girls. JoAnne Thomas Family member Lafayette, Ind. I met my husband on a blind date. I worked for someone and she connected me up with a friend of her husband. Freddie Esparagoza Retired Navy Manila, Philipines My wife was my next-door neighbor, and my best friend growing up was her brother. FTC Will Corey USS Alaska Gold Newport News, Va. I met my wife in high school, Denbigh High School in Newport News, Virginia. She was a friend of mine. Leading Hand Alan Waterson HMS Astute Dundee, Scotland Through friends, that was it, really. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Jaguars visit Enterprise Cheerleaders and football players from the NFLs Jacksonville Jaguars visited aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) while the ship was in port at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Jan. 31. e players and cheerleaders took photos with Sailors and Marines, signed autographs and toured the ight deck during their visit to the 50-year-old ship. is is something that a lot of us have never done before, so it was a great experience to get to tour the actual ship and see all the aircraft, said Chelsea Belloit, Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleader. We denitely had a great time and we hope to come back and tour again. e Sailors and Marines aboard Big E were pleased about the visit and enjoyed having the chance to have their photos taken with the special guests. We had the Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleaders and a couple of their players come on board and it was awesome, said Aviation Machinists Mate Airman Michael Foster. I just got my picture taken with a couple of the cheerleaders and an autographed calendar. Im loving it. Not only did the ships crew appreciate the opportunity to meet and greet the football players and cheerleaders, the athletes had a memorable experience as well. is is my rst time on an aircraft carrier and this thing is huge. Its amazing, said Samantha Snyder, a Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleader. Being here is a very unique opportunity. is is probably the best part of our job. is is my rst time aboard Enterprise, said Zach Miller, tight end for the Jacksonville Jaguars. Its eye-opening THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 9

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e state of military logistics is healthy and service members are doing amazing things to supply operations around the world, but the system is strained as a result of 10 years of war, the Joint Stas director of logistics said Jan. 10 in Washington, D.C. Air Force Lt. Gen. Brooks L. Bash said military logisticians are, in many respects, the unsung heroes of Americas 21st-century wars. In the past year alone, they orchestrated the withdrawal of tens of thousands of American service members and millions of pieces of equipment from Iraq. ey supplied forces ghting in Afghanistan, even as political considerations closed a key route into the landlocked country. ey did all this while continuing their everyday missions handling permanent changes of station for tens of thousands of service members, ensuring training requirements are met and ensuring that forward-deployed personnel around the world have what they need to do their missions. ey also have supplied allies and other U.S. government agencies, and they have kicked into even higher gear to aid people around the world hit by natural disasters. No other country in the world can do what were doing, Bash said. Were ying and taking stu halfway around the world. e fact that Afghanistan is a landlocked country adds to the challenge. Simultaneously completing the Iraq drawdown and then, oh, by the way, doing Navy College educational information At a moment of national transition, the United States is reshaping defense priorities and its military force to sustain U.S. global leadership and respond to changing security and scal needs, President Barack Obama said Jan. 5 at the Pentagon. Obama, the rst president to address reporters in the Pentagon brieng room, joined Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, to introduce a new military strategy that sets priori ties for a 21st-century defense. e United States of America is the greatest force for freedom and security that the world has ever known, Obama said. In no small measure, thats because weve built the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped military in history and as commander in chief, Im going to keep it that way. Even as the tide of war recedes and U.S. forces prevail in todays missions, he added, we have the opportunity and the responsibility to look ahead to the force we need for the future. Looking beyond the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and longterm nation-building with large military footprints, Obama said, the United States will be able to ensure its security with smaller conventional ground forces and by investing in capabilities that include intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and the ability to operate in environments where adversaries try to deny access. Yes, our military will be leaner, he said, but the world must know the United States is going to maintain our military superiority with armed forces that are agile, exible and ready for the full range of contingencies and threats. Panetta said the department would need to make a strategic shift regardless of the nations scal situation. We are at that point in history, the secretary added. ats the reality of the world we live in. But he stressed that the U.S. military will remain capable across the spectrum. We will continue to conduct a complex set of missions ranging from counterterrorism, ranging from countering weapons of mass destruction to maintaining a safe, secure and eective nuclear deterrent, Panetta said, adding that the department will be fully prepared to protect our interests, defend our homeland and support civil authorities. e Defense Strategic Guidance document released today says the future force will be led by the worlds nest, best cared for and battle-tested all-volunteer military one that will be smaller, but that also will be exible, agile and ready. e force will be leaner, further reducing the cost of doing business and nding eciencies in overhead, business practices and other support activities, according to the guidance. It also will be technologically superior, the document adds, and networked across the services as well as with diplomatic, development and intelligence agencies, allies and partners. e strategy also outlines a force that will be able to regenerate and mobilize for an unpredictable future, preserving the U.S. industrial base. Military faced with priority force reshaping Logistics remain healthy 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Recently a contingent of logistics ocers from Marine Forces Europe led a group of Army, Navy, Air Force and United States Embassy ocials traveled to Trondheim, Norway, for briefs and a site survey of the Marine Corps Pre-positioning ProgramNorway facility. e MFE logistics ocers teamed up with Norwegian logisticians and US Embassy ocials to deliver briefs outlining the history of the program and unveil the Marine Corps intent for the future. Ambassador Barry B. White, United States Ambassador to Norway, was present for the briefs and accompanied the service members on a tour of the caves. e Marine Corps, with the help of our Norwegian partners, has worked hard to ensure that the equipment stored in this facility is not a relic of the Cold War, but responds directly to todays security and crisis response needs, said Ambassador White. In the late 1970s, the United States needed a place to stage vast amounts of equipment and Norway had a need for a security partnership due to Cold War tensions with Russia. is developed into a friendship and partnership between the Norwegian military and the United States Marine Corps. e result was the establishment of the Norway Air-Landed Marine Expeditionary Brigade which after extensive research was declared operational in 1990. For the next 15 years, NALMEB operated and supported the Marine Corps until the shift to the Marine Air Ground Task Force became the primary model for deployments and operations across the board. e sta took this shift in stride and NALMEB morphed into what is now known as the Marine Corps Pre-Positioning ProgramNorway. e United States Marine Corps has maintained a strong relationship with the Norwegian military since the inception of the Norway Air-Landed MEB Program and its re-designation as MCPP-N in 2004 which signied its change in focus to a theater and global responsive capability, said Lt. Col. Kenneth Oldham, a logistics ocer with MFE. e Norwegian military provides us access to modern climate controlled storage facilities and a highly skilled and motivated workforce. is, coupled with the signicant burden-sharing contribution provided by Norway, who pays for 50 percent of all operating costs, and access to modern multi-modal transportation hubs for quick deployments, make this a cost-eective program for the Marine Corps, with proven operational value for our forward-deployed forces. e MCPP-N facility is comprised of seven locations totaling more than 900,000 square feet of storage. e actual caves make up 471,445 sq. ft. of climate controlled storage, regulated to between 45 to 55 percent humidity and a regulated temperature of between 45 to 50 degrees. is precise regulation allows tents, vehicle tires and other climate sensitive equipment to be stored safely, and maintain a high level of readiness to be readily deployable for any contingency that may arise. ere are common items in our inventory that can and will continue to support any service, as well as other nations. Our program provides sustainment as well as unique Marine Corps equipment. Whether its sandbags, MREs, or ammunition, our total package concept has cross-service capabilities, said Neil Hagen, prepositioning analyst, Headquarters Marine Corps. But our primary goal continues to be supporting a Marine AirGround Task Force, One of the main goals of MCPP-N is the rapid deployment and issuance of equipment in support of the Marine Corps, regardless of the contingency. e caves house vehicles, rations, ammunition and other assorted equipment, enough to support approximately 13,000 Marines for thirty days. With the sun setting on combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, MCPP-N is posturing to transform itself for the post Operation Enduring Freedom battleeld and continue to support emergency, disaster relief and annual exercises as needed by U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command, MARFOREUR and Marine Forces Africa. Recently, MARFOREUR was called upon to provide humanitarian assistance to the earthquake victims in Turkey. Together with their MCPP-N counterparts, Marines from Stuttgart, Germany, ew to Norway to withdraw more than 300 tents and space heaters to palletize and ship to Turkey. In the space of about 72 hours from notication to completion the Marines prepared more than 91,000 lbs. of equipment and shuttled it o to help in the relief eort. Because it works as it did in Turkey and elsewhere, and because it is a visible symbol of our mutual security commitment, MCPP-N is enormously important for U.S.-Norway relations, said the ambassador. Humanitarian relief isnt only one piece of the operational puzzle; there are a host of annual exercises with partner nations who receive gear to support their training. Equipment is pulled from the caves every year to support ongoing operations and exercises, Oldham said. ere are more than 350 items standing ready for receipt by Marines of the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Black Sea Rotational Force. is equipment will be inspected and signed for next week by BSRF Marines, then transported to both Georgia and Romania to support their operations during their six-month deployment. Equipment will also be pulled in March to support Marines, participation in the upcoming Norwegian Exercise Cold Response 12 in as well as during the summer to support Exercises Sabre Strike and BALTOPS in the Baltics. As combat operations wind down this becomes a pivotal year for the MCPPN program as the Norwegian and US military logistics, and plans communities put their heads together and attempt to forecast how MCPP-N factors into future operations. For the past 40 years this solid bond has weathered not only the icy chill of Norway, but the often short-fused and vital logistic support tempo that requires a high state of vigilance and a readiness to deploy equipment to not just Europe and Africa, but virtually anywhere in the world. e attendees from both the EUCOM and AFRICOM stas left with a much greater appreciation of what MCCP-N does and how it can enable operational capabilities for both theater security cooperation activities and crisis response throughout their areas of responsibility while also assuring our Northern European partners of our continued commitment to their national security, Oldham said.Corps gear kept in caves Home loans guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Aairs continue to have the lowest serious delinquency and foreclosure rates in the mortgage industry. Veterans have also taken advantage of their home loan benet in record numbers, as VA loan originations reached their highest total in eight years. e continued strong performance and high volume of VA loans are a testament to the importance of VAs home loan program and a tribute to the skilled VA professionals who help homeowners in nancial trouble keep their homes, said Secretary of Veterans Aairs, Eric K. Shinseki. Last year, VA helped 72,391 veterans and servicemembers who were in default on their mortgage loan retain their homes or avoid foreclosure, an increase from 66,030 from the prior year.At the same time, foreclosures on VA guaranteed loans dropped by 28 percent. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association National Delinquency Survey, VAs foreclosure rate for the last 14 quarters and serious delinquency rate for the last 11 quarters have been the lowest of all measured loan types, even prime loans. In scal year 2011, VA guaranteed 357,594 loans, an increase of nearly 14 percent over last year. ere are currently over 1.5 million active VA home loans.e program makes home ownership more affordable for veterans, active duty Servicemembers, and eligible surviving spouses by permitting nodownpayment loans and by protecting lenders from loss if the borrower fails to repay the loan. Much of the pro grams strength stems from the eorts of VA employees and loan servicers nationwide, whose mission is to ensure all veterans receive every possible opportunity to remain in their homes, avoid foreclosure, and protect their credit from the consequences of a foreclosure. We are committed to making even more Veterans and Servicemembers aware of this important benet and delivering the assistance they deserve when nancial diculties arise, said VAs Under Secretary for Benets Allison A. Hickey. For veterans and servicemembers who have trouble meeting their mortgage obligations or anticipate problems in the near future, VA rst recommends contacting their loan servicer. Depending on the situation, VAs loan specialists can intervene on a veterans behalf to help pursue home-retention options such as repayment plans, forbearances, and loan modications. Veterans and servicemembers can also call VA toll-free at (877) 827-3702 to speak with a VA specialist concerning foreclosure avoidance. Veterans may obtain a certicate of eligibilityand sign up for eBenets through the Web portal at www.ebenets. va.gov. e Department of Defense and VA jointly developed the eBenets portal as a single secure point of access for online benet information and tools to perform multiple selfservice functions such as checking the status of their claim. Servicemembers may enroll in eBenets using their Common Access Card at any time during their military service, or before they leave during their Transition Assistance Program briengs. Veterans may also enroll in eBenets and obtain a premium account by verifying their identity in-person at the nearest regional oce or online depending on their status, or calling VAs toll free number at (800) 827-1000. Since 1944, when home loan guaranties were rst oered under the original GI Bill, VA has guaranteed more than 19.4 million home loans worth over $1.1 trillion. standing next to some of these ghter pilots and these jets. Its fun for me. Miller thanked the Sailors and Marines for their service on behalf of the Jaguars and expressed the team members appreciation for the sacrices servicemembers make for their country. During their time aboard Enterprise, the Jaguars representatives gave away more than 300 calendars and 1,000 personally auto graphed posters. Enterprise is underway participating in exercise Bold Alligator 2012. is exercise will take place Jan. 30 to Feb 12 aoat and ashore in and around Virginia and North Carolina.VA home loans do wellJaguars THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 11

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Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFriday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMonday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style Greens Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. As the U.S. Navy prepares to celebrate the bicentennial of the War of 1812, a book authored by U.S. Na val War College professor entitled, Utmost Gallantry: e U.S. and Royal Navies at Sea in the War of 1812 hit the bookstands in time for the holidays. After Prof. Kevin McCranies book Admiral Lord Keith and the Naval War Against Napoleon was published ve years ago, he began to search for something new to write about. Despite a growing list of topics to consider, McCranie said the War of 1812 was not one of them. About four years ago, I thought the War of 1812 might be a good topic for a professional journal article, McCranie said. e more I researched, the more I discovered previous authors didnt deal with the important aspects of the naval war or simply espoused biased opinions or a nationalistic perspective. McCranies knowledge of British naval history and the Napoleonic wars led him to conclude much of the published material on the War of 1812 contained bias and served other purposes than providing a historic account. In writing Utmost Gallantry, McCranie said he wanted to make sure readers werent misguided by incorrect information or interpretations. e War of 1812 is signicant because it paved the way for future development of the U.S. Navy, McCranie said. Challenging the most dominant naval power of the time, the less powerful U.S. Navy found ways to protract the war and incurred signicant costs for Great Britain. ats why the War of 1812 is important for national leaders to study. e publication of McCranies book comes at a great time when people may have a renewed interest in this period of American history. is book really started out as an article until I started to dig, McCranie said. As I began to write, it did occur to me the bicentennial of the war was approaching. I hope this book provides a fresh perspective at a time where people might be interested in learning more. Starting in April 2012 through 2014 the United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard will celebrate the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 with events around the country. Large Navy celebration events are being planned for Baltimore, New York, Norfolk, Cleveland, Chicago, Boston and New Orleans. War of 1812 revisited in book Pirates Cove Galley menus 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012

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Haiti, tsunami, and whatever else pops up, and also supporting the combatant commanders in their regions with what theyre doing every day. And logisticians are sustaining the eort. Other countries can get troops to remote areas of the world, but they cannot sustain operations in those regions like the U.S. military can, the general said. Afghanistan is a case in point. It is one of the more remote areas on the planet. It is landlocked. Pakistan closed the border crossings from the port of Karachi to Afghanistan following an accident on the border that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. Even though those gates are closed, Bash noted, American, international and Afghan forces are still getting what they need. e American logistics effort supplies 91,000 U.S. personnel with the food, ammunition, fuel, spare parts, armored vehicles and whatever else they need. e rst thing we did was we planned for it, the general said. e Pakistanis had closed the gates to Afghanistan before, and logisticians planned for the possibility. Planners looked at alternatives to the Pakistani gates. ey examined supplying troops by air, Bash said, but that is expensive and can be limited. ey developed the Northern Distribution Network an eort that connects Baltic and Caspian Sea ports with Afghanistan through Russia and the countries of Central Asia and the Caucasus. We have shifted about 30 percent of what was coming in through Pakistan to the northern distribution, Bash said. It has more capability, and then we built up some of our stocks. Logisticians built up 60 days worth of stocks in Afghanistan. But because of the northern distribution being open, it is having little to no operational impact, he said. is is more expensive, but it is eective, the general said. About 85 percent of fuel, for example, comes through the Northern Distribution Network. Logisticians also are using more airlift, and that causes problems on its own, the general said. Allies, likewise, built up stocks. We have acquisition cross-servicing agreements with them so that, if they do come up short, then we can help them out through those sorts of agreements, Bash said. So while there are no shortages, the increased tempo imposes its own price on logisticians. ere are areas in logistics some of our specialty areas and our equipment and others that need to be recapitalized and reset, Bash said. Putting ight hours on airplanes and helicopters and putting miles on mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles, for example, takes a toll on the equipment, he explained. And there is a cost to the people in the logistics enterprise as well, Bash said, but they continue to get the job done. I would say our logisticians are the most experienced in history, he said. Logistics personnel are the greatest combat multiplier in the logistics enterprise, he added. Educating and training those personnel is key to success in the future, the general said. We might decrease the number of our people, but the people we do have, we need to make sure theyre experienced and trained properly, he said. Force structure adjustments will be necessary in the logistics eld, the general said, and the Defense Department must be careful to preserve what truly is necessary rst of all, the people needed for the eort regardless of the budget situation. Another necessity is access. e best ghting force in the world is no good if it cannot get to the scene of a ght and sustain itself, Bash noted. A nal multiplier is operational contract support. From the time of spears and arrows to modern warfare today, as technology has progressed so has the way we ght. Unmanned aerial vehicles give our troops an extra edge on the battleeld. Its important for the guys on the ground to be able to see over that wall that theyre about to go into and it keeps us from using manned vehicles and risking lives, said Sta Sgt. Chad Olsen, squadron weapons and tactical instructor, VMU-2. Its the eyes in the sky e Naval Air Systems Command demonstrated the next model UAV to be incorporated into the Marine Corps at the Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 3 aireld here Jan. 22. Ocials said they plan to have the RQ21A Small Tactical Unmanned Aerial System, better known as the Integrator, in production for the Marine Corps by scal year 2013. It ew for the rst time in a tactical environment in front of VMU-2 and VMU-3, two of its future operators. e VMU-2 Marines, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Combat Center in support of Enhanced Mojave Viper. ey got an unexpected treat when they found out the demonstration would take place on the same aireld they were operating on. We knew thered be another UAV out here, but we didnt expect it to be the Integrator, said Olsen. Coincidentally, the AAI RQ-7 Shadow, one of the current UAVs in operation, was also scheduled to run exercises alongside the Integrator, highlighting the crafts dierences even more. Visually, the Integrator is sleeker and features a attened tail, versus the upward bent tail of the shadow. Its awesome, said Cpl. Juan Reyes, eld radio operator, VMU-2, after seeing the Integrator for the rst time. Its smaller and more tactical. e Shadow also requires a longer launching pad and creates a noticeably louder noise, while the Integrators launching pad is nearly half the size of the Shadows and the noise more mued. But what sets the Integrator apart from most UAVs is not the launch, its the recovery. e biggest thing is were not tied to the runway like previous tactical unmanned aerial systems, said John F. Parks, deputy assistant program manager of logistics, PMA 263, NAVAIR. e Integrators retrieval system combines the use of global positioning systems with the high tension cables. e specially-made cable hangs from a 54-foottall receiver, attached at each end, with a dierential GPS pad located directly below it. e UAV operator lines up Integrators GPS with the one on the ground. As the two sync, the wing hooks onto the rope and comes to a complete stop approximately 20 feet from the ground. e Integrators acceler ometer senses the loss of forward momentum and shuts of the engine. e aircraft is lowered down by on a pulley system and dis connected from the cable. Using the Integrator of landing will change the role of VMUs on naval ships. e Shadow cant be recovered on ships because it could not land on the moving vessel. e Integrator will make that extra mobility possible. Its going to be an amazing capability for us with its size and being able to be deployed with the MEUs and own o of ships, Olsen said. Its going to expand our abilities exponentially.Marines await Integrator Logistics THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 9, 2012 13