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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-02-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00243

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00243


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FFSC oers tips for Military Saves Week, coming Feb. 19 to 26 How we handle our nanc es and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nancially secure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Support Center oers many nancial classes de signed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. Think about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times five days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eating out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of heading to the bookstore, go to the library and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average electrical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Support Center, in support of the Military Saves Campaign, oers nancial classes for military members and their families. Here are just a few of the nancial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This workshop prepares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehensive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will understand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the important dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing, high-pressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more informa tion, contact the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 5734513. Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Dodgeball Page 5 Phase II Page 4 Kings Bay duo earn Sailor of Year honors Small steps can save big money over the long haul Sub Force Atlantic hails YN1 Scott Biden, FT2 Mike Blizzard e 2011 Commander, Sub marine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced Jan. 25. Among those honored were Yeoman First Class Scott Biden of Submarine Group 10, Kings Bay, and Fire Control Technician Second Class Mike Blizzard of USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) homeported in Kings Bay, but currently undergoing Engineered Refueling Overhaul at Norfolk Naval Ship yard in Portsmouth, Va. e winners were recognized by Vice Adm. John Richardson, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, during a luncheon held at the Vista Point Center, Naval Station Norfolk. We are here today to celebrate excellence, Richardson said. ese Sailors are the Submarine Forces equivalent to the Plays of the Day. ese Sailors are the folks that make up our highlight reels, the very best of the best. eir dedication and talent in spires us all to dig deeper and achieve moreto raise our game up a notch or two. ey are the examples that we look to. Its a privilege to be amongst our su USS Alaska in dry dock Panetta surveys future threatsForce reduction ups risk levele military must accept greater risks as a result of the new defense strategy and the constrained scal environment, but they are manage able, Defense Department leaders said in Washington, D.C., DJan. 26. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, said that the greatest risk comes from having a smaller force. Over the next ve years, the Army will drop from 562,000 to 490,000 soldiers, and the Marine Corps from 202,000 to 182,000. e risks come with the fact that we will have a smaller force, Panetta said during a brieng on scal 2013 defense budget priorities. e force still will be larger than at 9/11, and will still be able to do its many missions. But when you have a smaller force, there are risks associated with that in terms of our capability to respond, Panetta said. We think weve dealt with those risks because the combination of the forces we

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Black History Month feted Feb. 9e Black History Month Celebration will be at 10 a.m., ursday, Feb. 9 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays chapel. Pirates Cove Galley will be open for a $4.55 per person Black History lunch following.Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.USS Tennessee scholarship paid oute USS Tennessee Scholarship Fund has been paid out and is no longer available. e NavyMarine Corps Relief Society administered the scholarship for 21 years. e original contribu tion of $40,000 grew to $119,842 and provided 44 scholarships. USS Tennessee families will continue to be eligible for other NMCRS education programs. e most current information is available at:www.nmcrs.org/education.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday-Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Ability is what youre capable of doing. Motivation deter mines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it. Lou Holtz Growing up, my dad would always tell me, Attitude is everything, but it wasnt until I became an adult that I fully understood the power of this phrase. rough experiences in my own life, I learned that my outlook, whether positive or negative, inuenced the outcome of many situations. When I started working as a personal trainer, I quickly noticed that those clients who maintained a positive attitude, from start to nish, achieved the best results. at is not to say that these people didnt stumble from time to time. But their attitude when they did fall was to get back up, dust o and keep work ing towards their goal. When it comes to tness and other health-related goals, I believe the attitude we adopt will have the greatest impact on our success or failure. Although it may be easy to have a positive attitude when we rst begin, we will undoubtedly face challenges along the way that will test our fortitude and our ability to maintain that attitude. Whether you sustain an injury, have a setback in your training, do not see the results you expected to see or simply cannot nd the motivation you need to get started, take a moment to reect on your attitude. Do you feel defeated? Are you focusing on the negative? Are you stuck in the I cant frame of mind? I believe a critical step towards success is choosing a more produc tive and positive attitude. Here are a few tips to help you take that step. First, focus on what you do right instead of what you do wrong. When you make a mistake, forgive yourself and move on. Dwelling on what we do not achieve and beating ourselves up over every little slip only brings us down, destroys our motivation and derails our eorts. Instead, practice positive selftalk and celebrate your victories, however large or small. Set many goals for yourself and when you reach one, reward yourself with a little, simple pleasure. Doing this will serve as a motivator to continue your journey and will provide a boost to your condence, helping to strengthen your self-ecacy and secure that positive attitude. In his famous speech titled, e Last Lecture, professor and eternal optimist Randy Pausch said, We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand. Life is full of trials and tribulations, many of which are out of our control. But our reaction and subsequent approach to dealing with challenging times is largely up to us. Whatever your goal might be, having a positive attitude will help you break through barriers and forge ahead to nish what you have started. Remember, you can choose to throw in the towel, or you can use it to wipe o the sweat!eres power in a positive attitude Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Policy changes to the Department of Defense Tuition Assistance pro gram and Navy Voluntary Education were announced in NAVADMIN 029/12, released Jan. 24. e changes were needed to provide better quality control over courses taken by service members as well as to reect the realities of scal pressure to reduce Depart ment of Defense spending. Navy leadership is committed to providing Sailors the opportunity to pursue their education goals, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. We know the investment we make in Sailors comes back to the Navy in numerous ways. Its an investment well made in our workforce to make them better criti cal thinkers, performers and ulti mately, better Sailors. DoD instruction 13222.25 re leased in March 2011 required a signed Memorandum of Under standing with academic institutions and DoD by Jan. 1 to be eligible to receive TA funding. DoD recently moved the due date to April 1. As a result, the Navys policies for authorizing Tuition Assistance have changed and Sailors will not be able to use TA for courses at intuitions without a signed MOU by April 1. To help Sailors through this transition process, Sailors who meet all requirements for TA and submit a command-approved TA request prior to April 1 for courses beginning between April 1 and May 1 will be approved for TA regardless of their institutions DoD MOU status. Sailors who meet all the above re quirements but whose TA request is submitted after April 1 will be approved for TA only if their institu tion has a signed DoD MOU. Sailors can check the DoD MOU status of the academic institution they are attending by going to www.DOD MOU.com and clicking on the Par ticipating Institutions tab. Sailors enrolled in Navy College Program for Aoat College Education courses will not be aected by the DoD MOU requirement. e NAVADMIN also outlines the requirement for Sailors to obtain a satisfactory grade of a D for under graduate-level courses and a C for graduate-level courses. Sailors who fail to obtain a satisfactory grade will be required to payback TA funds. e Navy will continue to provide TA funds up through the masters degree level for both ocers and en listed personnel. However, eective with the release of the NAVADMIN, the Navy will no longer authorize TA funding for new program starts above the masters degree level. e approximately 550 ocers and enlisted actively pursuing doc toral-level degrees before the release of the NAVADMIN will be able to continue until completion of their degree program. e combined cap for tuition and fees remains at $250 per semester hour for up to 16 semester hours of course work a year. Sailors are encouraged to talk with the Navy College Oce or Virtual Education Center counselors about their op tions, including changing schools, and use of GI Bill benets or schol arships. Another consideration for Sailors in pursuit of a degree is to choose academic institutions that award maximum credit for military train ing and ratings as evaluated by the American Council on Education. ose credits, along with the college credit exam program oered by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support, can help Sailors maximize non-traditional credits and may get them closer to a degree with less expense. With the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility requirements for Involuntary Separation Pay. ISP has Navy Reserve require ments and obligations. Career counselors and command leader ship can assist Sailors on applying for aliation in conjunction with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Re serve for a minimum of three years past their initial military service obligation. e Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve. e SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. ese desig nated Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulll the tra ditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. e IRR oers Reserve alia tion benets without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to main tain mobilization readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or condi tions that may aect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to af ford every Sailor an opportunity to transition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily separated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Perform-toServe/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can contact the Career Transition Oce to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to aliate with the IRR. A Sailor who aliates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their support ing personnel oce. is must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benet, according to the message. If a signed Reserve aliation contract is not completed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Under current legislation, Sail ors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retire ment must repay their ISP upon retirement. e Defense Finance and Ac counting Service will reduce re tirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid.Navys Tuition Assistance updated Separation pay has requirements Navy Transition Benets 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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have in place and the abil ity, if we have to, to mobilize quickly will give us the capability to deal with any threat. ere are other risks associated with U.S. de pendence on technology, the secretary said. Were depending a great deal on being at the technological edge of the future, he said. Can we develop the kind of technology were going to need to confront the future? Im condent we can, but there are risks associated with that. Even with the risks, not taking them is itself a greater risk, Dempsey said. e greater risk would be had we decided that we would just wish away any particular ca pability or any particular form of conict, he said. So, say, no, were just never going to do that. What youre expressing here is the recognition that we are retaining our full-spectrum capability, and that we didnt take any risk with that. is is a dierent situa tion for a drawdown than in the past, Panetta said, when the military drew down because the threat itself was gone. e reality is that as we draw down from Iraq and Afghanistan, we still face a number of very important threats in the world, he said. Obvi ously were continuing to ght a war in Afghanistan, and we con tinue to face the threat of ter rorism. There are threats in the tribal area of Pakistan, as well as in Yemen and So malia, Panetta said. We see the threats coming from Iran, and a nuclearcapable Iran represents a threat to us and to the world, he said. Weapons of mass destruction and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are a concern. North Korea is a concern because they, too, are developing a nu clear capability. Other threats come from continued turmoil in the Middle East and the potential for cyber war fare. You can see the vast array of threats that we have to confront with the force that weve designed here, Panetta said. So its all of those that are my concern for the future. reatsNavy committed to energy policy e Department of the Navys energy security goals, including its eorts to produce or consume one gigawatt of new, renewable energy on its na val installations was one of two U.S. Navy highlights during President Barack Obamas State of the Union address Jan. 24. Im proud to announce that the Department of Defense, the worlds larg est consumer of energy, will make one of the largest commitments to clean energy in history with the Navy purchasing enough capacity to power a quarter of a million homes a year, the Presi dent said. is initiative continues progress toward the ve energy goals outlined in 2009 by the Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus, the broadest goal being by no later than 2020, at least half of all Navy energy, aoat and ashore, would come from non-traditional sources. Changing the way we get and use energy is a pri ority for the Navy because energy security is critical to our national security, Mabus said. One gigawatt of renewable energy pro duced from sources like solar, wind, and geother mal could power a city the size of Orlando, Florida, while increasing the security and exibility of the energy grid. Secretary Mabus has established a GW Task Force to assess and select renewable energy projects that will achieve this goal. e Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installations and Environment, Jackalyne Pfannenstiel, will chair the task force. e Navy has implemented a variety of energy initiatives in pursuit of that goal, including using advanced drop-in biofuel to power the eet and re newable energy to power naval installations. All of which is part of President Obamas Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future. e other Navy highlight from the Presidents address to the nation was at the end of his speech when he referred to the U.S. Navy SEALs success ful mission against Osama Bin Laden. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 Following the lesson and tour, the DEFY members pose for a picture with the firefighters. Firefighter Roy Ellis shows the kids around the fire engine. DEFYs big day out Phase II FunCommunity Service and a lesson on re prevention were the topics of Januarys Drug Education for Youth Phase II meeting Saturday, Jan. 21. DEFY is a self-esteem building program that provides kids with the tools they need to resist drugs, gangs and alcohol. e program has two phases. Phase I is an intensive eight-day summer camp. Phase II has monthly followup meetings to reiterate what the youths were taught during the summer. is month we wanted to focus on the importance of community service and talk about re prevention, said Kelly Wirfel, who serves as the base Community Relations Manager and DEFY lead program coordinator. Approximately 18 youths and six sta members traveled to Magnolia Manor Assisted Living Center to conduct a carwash for the residents. e group ate lunch at Pirates Cove Galley and then the Kings Bay Fire Department gave DEFY members a lesson on re safety and showed them equipment on the re truck. e kids had an awesome time at the re station, Wirfel said. It was hard getting them out of there, they didnt want to leave. e main goal of DEFY is to show kids the positive aspects of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and to remain drug-free citizens. DEFY also focuses on building self-image and setting goals. It stresses interpersonal relations, emphasizes leadership and raises awareness of the harmful eects of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the dangerous eects of peer pressure to join gangs. Participants in DEFY are required to attend Phase II meetings each month until they graduate from the program in June. Phase II is extremely important because it gives the kids an opportunity to see their peers and mentors who they spent time with during DEFY camp, and continue to build upon the positive relationships that they established dur ing the summer, Wirfel said.DEFY mem ber Eric Larson, helps wash cars at Magnolia Manor Assisted Living Center. Firefighter Chad Taylor talks to the youth about the equipment on the fire engine. Photos by Kelly Wirfel Taylor answers questions from DEFY members.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 perstars. ey are an inspiration to me, our Force and our Navy. e 2011 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer First Class William Na gel, a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied elec tricians mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Albany (SSN 753), home ported in Norfolk, Va. e 31-year-old Sailor is from Montgomery County, Tex as, and joined the Navy in August 1998. He was also the Commander, Subma rine Group Two Senior Sea Sailor of the Year. CSG2s headquarters are in Groton, Conn. It is just a tremendous honor to be nominated, and for being selected I am lost for words, Nagel said. is means everything because of the great support I got from my wife and family. I dont know what separated me from the other Sailors, but be ing the Educational Ser vices Ocer onboard helped. As the ESO, I mentored a lot of junior Sailors and was involved with every junior Sailor in providing them tools for advancement. Petty Ocer First Class Scott Biden was recog nized as the 2011 SUB LANT Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a sub marine-qualied yeoman assigned to sta at Commander, Submarine Group 10, headquartered in Kings Bay. He was born in Monica, Calif., but raised in Upland, Ca lif., and joined the Navy in February 2000. e 31-year-old was also the Commander, Submarine Group Ten (CSG10) Shore Sailor of the Year. Without the support and guidance of my wife, and the support of my shipmates, I would not be standing here today, Biden said. is is a tre mendous award for all my mentors who have helped me get here, and continue to help me. As the Senior Shore and Sea Sailors of the Year, Nagel and Biden will represent SUBLANT in the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Sailor of the Year competition. e USFFC competi tion will be in March with other Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet sea win ner from that competi tion will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet shore winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations competition in Washington, D.C. e 2011 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Mike Blizzard, a 25-year-old submarinequalied re control tech nician assigned to the Ohio-class ballistic sub marine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), homeported in Kings Bay. He is from Scranton, N.C., and joined the Navy in February 2007. He was also the CSG10 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. We have a great com mand, Blizzard said. is means a lot and cant real ly think of any additional words to describe emo tions. Amazing and shows what hard work can do for someones career. Petty Ocer Second Class Alexander Hiller was honored as the 2011 SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a 25-year-old surface-war fare qualied boatswains mate assigned to the sta at Commander, Naval Submarine Support Facility, home based in New London, Conn. Hiller is from Dunkirk, N.Y., and joined the Navy in Au gust 2003. He was also the CSG2 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. is is a great honor, particularly being a sur face Sailor working in the submarine eet, Hiller said. It was not just the award, but coming here and meeting all the highlevel people and achiev ers. is was signicant because it is indicates the impartiality of the submarine eet, and their willingness to recognize excellence. Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, stated he was proud of the professionalism, civic-mindedness, and family-orient ed focus always exhibited by all enlisted submarine force Sailors. But he said this group was special and possessed a sharper edge. e Sailor of the Year program is an excellent forum to recognize our top performers, Saunders said. For the past several days during the selection process, I have gotten to know the Sailors and their families. I have truly been honored and inspired by them. ese Sailors are carrying the torch in lead ing our commanders vi sion for the submarine force. ey are preparing and ensuring our submariners are ready forces able to engage in current, forward, and future opera tions and warghting. e other candidates for Senior Sea Sailor and Senior Shore Sailor of the year were Petty Ocer First Class Jessy White and Petty Ocer First Class Sean McLaughlin, respectively. White is a 31-year-old submarine-qualied elec tricians mate assigned to the USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). He is from Marion, Ohio, and entered the Navy in 1998. He was also the CSG10 Sea Sailor of the Year. McLaughlin, a native of Silver Spring, Md., is a surface-warfare and expeditionary-warfare qualied boatswains mate assigned to the sta at Commander, Submarine Squadron Six, headquartered in Norfolk, Va. e 36-year-old was also the CSG2 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year e other candidate for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Sec ond Class Clair Dopson, IV, while Petty Ocer Sec ond Class Edward Martin was the other Junior Shore Sailor of the year. A submarine-qualied electronics technician as signed to the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), homeported in Groton, Conn, the 23-year-old Dopson was also the CSG2 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. He is from Charles ton, S.C. Martin, is a dual sur face and aviation warfarequalied machinists mate assigned to the Trident Ret Facility, home based in Kings Bay. e 26-yearold is a native of Rock Hill, S.C., and enlisted in the Navy in February 2005. He was also the CSG10 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. Observing Colors For more than 200 years, the American dered. render the When the raised in the at attention Reveille Retreat To the Colors Colors Retreat is heard Duo When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in 1979, Mirali was 27 years old. He took up arms to protect his country and his family in Daykundi, located in south central Afghanistan. While ghting against the Soviet Army, Miralis leg was injured when he took shrapnel from a rock et. He was later captured in his village and tortured by the Russians. ey would persecute me and beat my ngers and they knocked out my teeth, Mirali explained. ey captured me because I was supporting the [Afghan] government and protecting my country. Mirali escaped from the Russians and ed to Paki stan. He stayed there for a year before returning to Afghanistan. God kept me alive be cause it wasnt my time, Mirali said. His parents had passed away and two of his broth ers immigrated to Iran. e remainder of his fam ily was killed during the Soviet invasion. After enduring the hard ship of the Russian inva sion, the Taliban rose to power and Mirali had to endure another storm un der the regimes rule. His family had left him a small home with some land but that was taken from him when the Taliban came to power. Before the Taliban were here, we had a good, comfortable life and the farming was good, Mirali recalled. As soon as the Taliban came in life became hard. Mirali did everything in his power to continue to live in Afghanistan, per forming labor-intense jobs to make ends meet. He married his rst wife and they had two daugh ters together. However, his wife and oldest daughter died from natural causes. Once this happened, Mi rali moved to Iran, where his youngest daughter still lives today. He met his second wife while in Iran and they moved back to Afghanistan and had a son. However, without land to farm, making a suf cient living was nearly impossible for Mirali and his family. So he left them in Daykundi and went back to Iran to nd a job. After working there for a short period of time, he re turned to his village to nd that his wife and son had been murdered during a civil war between villages. at is when Mirali took matters into his own hands and joined the Af ghan National Army. Afghanistan is my country and these are my people, Mirali said. As long as Im alive I just want to serve them. He has been serving in the Army for the past ve years as an infantry and artillery soldier in the 215th Corps. During this time, Sta Sgt. Mirali received the opportunity to go to the Joint Sustainment Academy Southwest, on Camp Leatherneck, and take part in the Small Arms Weap ons Instructor Course, where he excelled as a student, quickly learning the dierent weapons sys tems. JSAS oers Afghan Na tional Security Forces troops the opportunity to continue their military edu cation past initial training. e academy oers a variety of skills of Afghan Afghan soldier in ght for life Social sports become huge hit at Kings BayKings Bay Sports recently added two new sports to its league catalog, with stun ning success. Dodgeball and kickball have taken center stage and have ex ceeded expec tations when it comes to teams and participation. We wanted to bring more social sports into the fold, sports that dont re quire great skill or athletic ability that everyone could play said Ryan Leavy, Morale, Welfare and Rec reation Sports Coordina tor. Enter Kickball. On Dec. 10, Kings Bay Intramu ral Sports hosted a dou ble-elimination Kickball Tournament. Nine teams signed up and came out to play. e beauty of kick ball is that anyone and everyone can play. Ten players play in the eld, but everyone on the team kicks. It took a game or two for some teams to de vise strategy and become familiar with the rules, but teams picked it up fast and had a blast. After the success of the tournament, a league was recently launched that plays one night a week. Teams like that they only play one night a week, because the wives can nd a babysitter and then come out to play. Its been great to see new fac es out there, Leavy said. A dodgeball league also recently launched as well. I thought Id get a few of the younger guys out and it would be more of an open dodgeball night, then a league, but it kept growing as word got out, Leavy said. ere are currently 16 teams signed up, and the league expanded from one night a week to two to accommodate all the teams. e games are played best seven out of 13, and matches last 30 to 40 minutes. Still, teams get a great workout from it. Its another sport that does not require a ton of skill, and anyone can play, Leavy said. Ive also heard enough quotes from that dodgeball movie to recite the whole thing! You can nd more pic tures of Intramural Sports at www.facebook.com/ kingsbaysports in the albums section. Intramural Sports With Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Kings Bay Intramural Sports

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 6, 13 and 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deploy ment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of oper ational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 9.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Feb. 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, infor mation and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family mem bers of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 6 to 9 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the informa tion and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 15. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regard ing the military lifestyle, edu cation, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or contribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. a CFC participant Provided as a public service healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W healthy b a b yA P ar tnership of the March of Dimes and the V F W A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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ere will be two days of ice skating at the Winter Blues Breakout, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 4 and 5 the Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts. Inatables also will be set up for the childrens enjoyment, as well as a color ing mural so they can show their artistic side. ere will be free hot cocoa and cookies available. Also at 6:30 p.m., Feb. 4, Movie Under the Stars is back and will be featuring Puss In Boots (PG) on the Under the Pines grassy area. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Maggie Valley Ski & Snowboard Trip In need of some real winter sports? Outdoor Recreation Center is offering this ski weekend at Maggie Valley, N.C., Friday, Feb. 10 through Sunday, Feb. 12 for $180 per skier and $200 per snowboarder. Price includes transportation, two-night hotel stay, ski lift ticket, equipment rental and free lessons for beginners. Register at Outdoor Adventure Center by Friday, Jan. 27. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Ask about special pricing for single service members. My Sweet Valentine Father & Daughter Dance It will be 5 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy an evening with your daughter, dining on a fab ulous menu. Adult tickets are only $10 and for children 12 and under tickets are $6. Children 2 and under are free with a paying adult. Tickets will be avail able at the conference center, Child Development Center, Youth Center and Information, Tickets and Travel office. There will be music, dancing, photos and a door prize drawing. Each daughter will receive a flower. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. So Full, Soul Food Social It will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy a feast of southern fried chicken, baked barbecue chicken and smothered pork chops with more for $10. Enjoy music and some historical soul food dis plays. Tickets will be available at the Kings Bay Conference Center and Information, Ticekts and Travel office. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Valentiness Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowl ing and shoes, personal onetopping pizza, chips and unlim ited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for first, second and third place. Also drawings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay but ton and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their fam ily members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. The Greybeard Basketball League Its for ages 30 and older, and open to active duty, retirees, reservists, DoD employees and family members over age 30. The league begins Wed., Feb. 8, with a captains meeting at 5:15 p.m., Wed., Feb. 1 at KB Finnegans. Games are played at lunchtime every Wednesday. You can register at www.kings baysports.leagueapps.com or call (912) 573-8908. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Regis tration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Chil dren must have turned 3 be fore Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Baseball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soccer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, reserv ists, military retirees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active mili tary only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registration fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is avail able. ere will be a mandato ry skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice begin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more information, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more infor mation.Spring sports opens Just for kids Winter Bliss coming Feb. 4, 5 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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Guardian ies in space More than 100 cadets sat eagerly waiting while NASAs live video stream played out on the screen in front of the small audi torium. On Jan. 24, members of the Coast Guard Academys Aviation Club gath ered to participate in a live video discussion with Daniel Burbank, a retired Coast Guard captain and commander of Interna tional Space Station Expedition 30. e room of cadets re mained silent as Mission Control, Houston, began its radio checks with the ISS as it ew more than 240 miles above the Earth. Almost instantly, the scene on the screen jumped from mission control to the ISS, and Burbank appeared, larger than life, wearing a Coast Guard sweatshirt. He addressed the group of cadets, Coast Guard Academy, this is Interna tional Space Station. Ron, weve got you loud and clear. e room erupted with applause, and a smiling Burbank remarked quietly over the noise, How cool is that? e 20-minute conver sation with Burbank provided the cadets with a rare opportunity to learn more about the ISS expedition directly from a for mer academy graduate. Coast Guard Cmdr. Charles Chip Hateld is an advisor for the aviation club and began coordinat ing the event with NASA personnel last November. He said speaking with Burbank provided a learn ing experience cadets can take with them throughout their careers. is was an important event for the aviation club and the academy. It was a rst at the academy, Hateld said. Capt. Bur bank clearly illustrated the importance of exploring the edge of the unknown and demonstrated supe rior leadership by commanding the ISS. During his presentation, Burbank tied many of the things he learned as a Coast Guard ocer and aviator directly to his astronaut training and experiences. During the discussion, Burbank stressed the im portance of the education and experience cadets will receive as they become Coast Guard ocers, noting everything Bur bank learned in the Coast Guard was applicable to his career as an astronaut. When you have an aviation or operational background you have a skill set that is applicable to space ight, Burbank said. e way you think about a task, such as hov ering a helicopter over a boat in a dark and stormy night, is similar enough to how youd move a robot arm. ose skills map very nicely from one arena to the next. Burbank also elded several questions from the cadets. Cadet 2nd Class Rachel Cuthrell was one of the cadets who spoke with Bur bank and asked about the physical toll space travel has on the body. e research into the ef fects of the human body in a weightless environment is one of the areas Burbank is in space studying. He said understanding how the human body adapts in space is essential to fu ture space missions and possible manned ights to other planets. Marine nds his old CH-46 A vacation in Japan, visiting with his son and grandchildren, reminisc ing about the past that is what Ron Maines, a Rogers, Ark. native, had planned when he came to Okinawa. What he found while taking a stroll down memory lane, however, was not what he expected. While visiting Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Maines found four CH-46E helicopters that he ew in Vietnam. He even has the serial num bers to prove they are the same birds. Maines, a former cap tain in the Marine Corps, was a member of Ma rine Medium Helicopter Squadron 164 attached to Marine Aircraft Group 16 in Vietnam. Forty years later, Maines son, Navy Lt. Mark T. Maines, is the base chap lain for Marine Corps Base Camp Kinser. Mark ar ranged for his father to be able to look at the aircraft on Futenma. Neither of them thought they would nd the same helicopters he ew. I didnt expect them to still be ying, they were manufactured in 1966, its great to see that they are still around, Maines said. Seeing the old helicop ters gave Maines the op portunity to reminisce about his past. Seeing my old 46s made me feel young again. It reminded me what it was like to be in the Ma rine Corps and it makes me very proud, he said. After nding his old he licopter, Maines met with sta noncommissioned ocers and ocers from Marine Medium Helicop ter Squadron 262 to share a few of his stories and ex periences from Vietnam. Its great to know that this air station has such a deep history, said Capt. Michael Bryant, the main tenance material control ocer for HMM-262. e trip not only helped Maines reminisce, but it served as a way for him and his son to bond. is was a very special moment for my dad, its great to share this cultural history together and have this military connection, said Mark. After leav ing the military in 1972, Maines joined the Mis sion Aviation Fellowship for 12 years, where he ew single engine Cessnas on missions for church and government. After that he became self-employed as a strategy consultant for businesses while still ying his personal plane. In 2008, after 40 years and 7,000 hours of ight, Maines gave up ying. I now have a boat and nine grandchildren, its not quite as fast, but if I run out of gas Im in much less trouble, he said. troops to learn; everything from leadership, to weapons handling, and tech niques, to generator me chanic courses. roughout the course at JSAS, Mirali learned to op erate and maintain at least 10 dierent weapon sys tems ranging from a pistol to a heavy machine gun. After completing the course, Mirali was select ed to stay at JSAS and serve as an Afghan instructor alongside coalition troops. Im healthy and my body is still good, so no matter where I am I just try my hardest to be happy and good, said Mirali. Death is in Gods hand, but as long as Im alive and here, Im just hoping and praying that Afghanistan will be able to move forward and take respon sibility for its defense.Afghan 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Im thinking this should be a pretty good Super Bowl. Its an interesting matchup. Most of this years playoff games have gone down to the wire or into overtime, which makes me expect another close game. Both the New England Patriots and New York Giants have good offenses. But the Jints, as dey say in da Bronx, seem to hold the edge on defense, which is enough for me to pick them this years winner. The score? Howz bout toity-ate ta toity-twee?Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Pfc. Stetson Sisco Security Force Battalion Ponca City, Okla. Patriots. I just think theyre going to win. I cant see them losing honestly. ET3 Kevin Crawford USS Wyoming Gold Riverside, Calif. Giants, 37-30, because they won before and they have the better overall team. CS1 Jo Stafford Trident Training Facility Annapolis, Md. The Giants are in it. So any team that plays the Giants is the team I want to win. AMCS Frank Harbison Trident Training Facility Nashville, Tenn. Giants, 24-17. I just think the Giants are playing too well right now. Theyre peaking at the right time. MASN Mack Caldrup Kings Bay Security Houston My team, the Houston Texans, is not even in it, so Im not going to watch it. Cpl. Jake Vanspyker Security Force Battalion Zeeland, Mich. Patriots, 24-21, because they lost to the Giants the last time and Tom Brady wants some revenge. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Sixth Northeast Florida All Service Acade my Ball hosted the largest attendance ever for this years annual event, held at Jacksonvilles Riverfront Crowne Plaza Hotel on Dec. 27. And for the second year, e Brumos Companies was the major sponsor for the local military ball which honors young men and women from as far away as St. Simons Island and Daytona Beach, who are enrolled in the United States Service Academies. More than 60 Cadets, Midshipmen and alumni from Americas academic military institutions, the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Coast Guard Academy joined with the U.S. Naval Academy and U.S. Mer chant Marine Academy for a festive formal event far away from rigorous routines and cold weather. Mayor Alvin Browns Ocial Proclamation de clared Dec. 27th All Ser vice Academy Ball Day stating, Jacksonville is proud to be home of such a large and prestigious military community. e ve Service Acad emies were represented by local Cadets William Alpert, Adam Despang, Kurt Musser, Karlos Fe bus-Traphagen, Sarah Pendergraft, Brendon Gregory, Ryan Evans, Wil liam Myers, attending the Future ocers enjoy annual ball THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sand wich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Friday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMonday Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked Beans Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Wednesday Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, in stant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various des sert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus U.S. Military Academy, Midshipmen Katherine Castro, Christopher Den dor, Robyn Draughon, Kiley Switanek, Kameron Wright, David Towle, Jason Infante, Conor White and Delano Martins, at tending U.S. Naval Academy; Also, Cadets Adam Guarno, Charles W. Lef er, Walter Andrew He aney and Charles Totten attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Midshipman Tom Fossa attending the U.S. Merchant Ma rine Academy and Ca dets James Bloch, Karolyn Capes, Jordan Bresnahan, Bradley Frost, Loren Van Rassen, Brian Collett, Ste ven Joseph, Garrett Soileau, Alexander Mitchell, Paige Shirley, Kyle Casias, Demario Kohn, Malcolm Williams and Kathleen McQueeney attending the U.S. Air Force Academy. Speakers included Captain Kassandra Merritt, Lt. j.g. Grant Johnson, 1st Lt. Christopher Simpkins, 2nd Lt. Chelsea Agee, and Ensign Sean Conkle. e Gatorbowl Commit tee and Taxslayer hosted these local cadets and midshipmen and honored them at the Gatorbowl on Jan. 2. More than half were able to attend, along with family members, and enjoy the game between the Ohio State Buckeyes and the University of Flor ida Gators. e non-prot All Ser vice Academy Ball has raised donations for Jack sonville-based Wounded Warrior Project that honors and empowers wounded warriors, as well the USO and Fisher Houses, which serve the families of patients need ing medical care at major military and Veterans Af fairs medical centers. Ball 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11



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FFSC oers tips for Military Saves Week, coming Feb. 19 to 26 How we handle our nances and the decisions we make about money will signicantly impact our quality of life. We all want to be nancially secure and to enjoy the good things that life has to oer, yet most of us have little education in nancial management. Fleet and Family Support Center oers many nancial classes de signed to educate and assist you in attaining your nancial goals. Here are some nancial facts: Pack your lunch. Think about it, ordering out for lunch every day $5 per day times five days a week equals $25 per week. $25 per week times 52 weeks equals $1,300 a year. Eating out two fewer times per a week can save you $10 per week or $520 per a year. Instead of heading to the bookstore, go to the library and borrow a book. Buying one less soda from the vending machine daily can save you $456.25 a year. Reducing your energy use by 10 to 20 percent in your home can reduce your electrical bill from $240 to $480 per a year based on an average electrical cost of $200 per a month. Compact uorescent bulbs use up to 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. If you invest $7 a day for 30 years at 8 percent interest, you will have about $500,000 in retirement. Fleet and Family Support Center, in support of the Military Saves Campaign, oers nancial classes for military members and their families. Here are just a few of the nancial classes: Financial Planning for Deployment: This workshop prepares you for deployment. It provides you with a comprehensive to do list. This is for active duty single and married service members and their spouses. Credit Management: Participants will understand the importance of credit risk and how that aects their credit and their overall credit score. Basic Savings and Investing: is program develops skills that will enable participants to save and invest eectively to achieve their nancial goals. Car Buying: Looking for a car? Learn all the important dos and donts before you buy. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing, high-pressure sales tactics, and tricks to watch out for. For more informa tion, contact the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 5734513. Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Dodgeball Page 5 Phase II Page 4 Kings Bay duo earn Sailor of Year honors Small steps can save big money over the long haul Sub Force Atlantic hails YN1 Scott Biden, FT2 Mike Blizzard e 2011 Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced Jan. 25. Among those honored were Yeoman First Class Scott Biden of Submarine Group 10, Kings Bay, and Fire Control Technician Second Class Mike Blizzard of USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) homeported in Kings Bay, but currently undergoing Engineered Refueling Overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va. e winners were recognized by Vice Adm. John Richardson, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, during a luncheon held at the Vista Point Center, Naval Station Norfolk. We are here today to celebrate excellence, Richardson said. ese Sailors are the Submarine Forces equivalent to the Plays of the Day. ese Sailors are the folks that make up our highlight reels, the very best of the best. eir dedication and talent in spires us all to dig deeper and achieve moreto raise our game up a notch or two. ey are the examples that we look to. Its a privilege to be amongst our su USS Alaska in dry dock Panetta surveys future threatsForce reduction ups risk levele military must accept greater risks as a result of the new defense strategy and the constrained scal environment, but they are manageable, Defense Department leaders said in Washington, D.C., DJan. 26. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, said that the greatest risk comes from having a smaller force. Over the next ve years, the Army will drop from 562,000 to 490,000 soldiers, and the Marine Corps from 202,000 to 182,000. e risks come with the fact that we will have a smaller force, Panetta said during a brieng on scal 2013 defense budget priorities. e force still will be larger than at 9/11, and will still be able to do its many missions. But when you have a smaller force, there are risks associated with that in terms of our capability to respond, Panetta said. We think weve dealt with those risks because the combination of the forces we

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Black History Month feted Feb. 9e Black History Month Celebration will be at 10 a.m., ursday, Feb. 9 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays chapel. Pirates Cove Galley will be open for a $4.55 per person Black History lunch following.Volunteer income tax help availableTax season is just around the corner. Now is the time to begin preparing. Navy Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Tax will be providing a self-help of ce and will include all the software and comput ers to aid service members, retirees and depen dents with tax preparation and ling at the Navy Legal building, located near the Personnel Sup port Detachment and is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with last walk-in at 3 p.m. Trained volunteers will be on hand to assist with ling if needed. Ap pointments are available but not mandatory. To make an appointment, call (912) 573-9546.USS Tennessee scholarship paid oute USS Tennessee Scholarship Fund has been paid out and is no longer available. e NavyMarine Corps Relief Society administered the scholarship for 21 years. e original contribution of $40,000 grew to $119,842 and provided 44 scholarships. USS Tennessee families will continue to be eligible for other NMCRS education programs. e most current information is available at:www.nmcrs.org/education.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday-Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Ability is what youre capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it. Lou Holtz Growing up, my dad would always tell me, Attitude is everything, but it wasnt until I became an adult that I fully understood the power of this phrase. rough experiences in my own life, I learned that my outlook, whether positive or negative, inuenced the outcome of many situations. When I started working as a personal trainer, I quickly noticed that those clients who maintained a positive attitude, from start to nish, achieved the best results. at is not to say that these people didnt stumble from time to time. But their attitude when they did fall was to get back up, dust o and keep working towards their goal. When it comes to tness and other health-related goals, I believe the attitude we adopt will have the greatest impact on our success or failure. Although it may be easy to have a positive attitude when we rst begin, we will undoubtedly face challenges along the way that will test our fortitude and our ability to maintain that attitude. Whether you sustain an injury, have a setback in your training, do not see the results you expected to see or simply cannot nd the motivation you need to get started, take a moment to reect on your attitude. Do you feel defeated? Are you focusing on the negative? Are you stuck in the I cant frame of mind? I believe a critical step towards success is choosing a more productive and positive attitude. Here are a few tips to help you take that step. First, focus on what you do right instead of what you do wrong. When you make a mistake, forgive yourself and move on. Dwelling on what we do not achieve and beating ourselves up over every little slip only brings us down, destroys our motivation and derails our eorts. Instead, practice positive selftalk and celebrate your victories, however large or small. Set many goals for yourself and when you reach one, reward yourself with a little, simple pleasure. Doing this will serve as a motivator to continue your journey and will provide a boost to your condence, helping to strengthen your self-ecacy and secure that positive attitude. In his famous speech titled, e Last Lecture, professor and eternal optimist Randy Pausch said, We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand. Life is full of trials and tribulations, many of which are out of our control. But our reaction and subsequent approach to dealing with challenging times is largely up to us. Whatever your goal might be, having a positive attitude will help you break through barriers and forge ahead to nish what you have started. Remember, you can choose to throw in the towel, or you can use it to wipe o the sweat!eres power in a positive attitude Trainers Tips By Rachel Roessler-Mumma Kings Bay Fitness Coordinator Policy changes to the Department of Defense Tuition Assistance program and Navy Voluntary Education were announced in NAVADMIN 029/12, released Jan. 24. e changes were needed to provide better quality control over courses taken by service members as well as to reect the realities of scal pressure to reduce Department of Defense spending. Navy leadership is committed to providing Sailors the opportunity to pursue their education goals, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. We know the investment we make in Sailors comes back to the Navy in numerous ways. Its an investment well made in our workforce to make them better critical thinkers, performers and ultimately, better Sailors. DoD instruction 13222.25 released in March 2011 required a signed Memorandum of Understanding with academic institutions and DoD by Jan. 1 to be eligible to receive TA funding. DoD recently moved the due date to April 1. As a result, the Navys policies for authorizing Tuition Assistance have changed and Sailors will not be able to use TA for courses at intuitions without a signed MOU by April 1. To help Sailors through this transition process, Sailors who meet all requirements for TA and submit a command-approved TA request prior to April 1 for courses beginning between April 1 and May 1 will be approved for TA regardless of their institutions DoD MOU status. Sailors who meet all the above requirements but whose TA request is submitted after April 1 will be approved for TA only if their institution has a signed DoD MOU. Sailors can check the DoD MOU status of the academic institution they are attending by going to www.DODMOU.com and clicking on the Participating Institutions tab. Sailors enrolled in Navy College Program for Aoat College Education courses will not be aected by the DoD MOU requirement. e NAVADMIN also outlines the requirement for Sailors to obtain a satisfactory grade of a D for undergraduate-level courses and a C for graduate-level courses. Sailors who fail to obtain a satisfactory grade will be required to payback TA funds. e Navy will continue to provide TA funds up through the masters degree level for both ocers and enlisted personnel. However, eective with the release of the NAVADMIN, the Navy will no longer authorize TA funding for new program starts above the masters degree level. e approximately 550 ocers and enlisted actively pursuing doctoral-level degrees before the release of the NAVADMIN will be able to continue until completion of their degree program. e combined cap for tuition and fees remains at $250 per semester hour for up to 16 semester hours of course work a year. Sailors are encouraged to talk with the Navy College Oce or Virtual Education Center counselors about their options, including changing schools, and use of GI Bill benets or scholarships. Another consideration for Sailors in pursuit of a degree is to choose academic institutions that award maximum credit for military training and ratings as evaluated by the American Council on Education. ose credits, along with the college credit exam program oered by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support, can help Sailors maximize non-traditional credits and may get them closer to a degree with less expense. With the release of NAVADMIN 036/12 Jan. 27, Sailors are reminded of eligibility requirements for Involuntary Separation Pay. ISP has Navy Reserve requirements and obligations. Career counselors and command leadership can assist Sailors on applying for aliation in conjunction with ISP. All Sailors who apply for ISP must obligate in the Ready Reserve for a minimum of three years past their initial military service obligation. e Ready Reserve has two branches, the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve. e SELRES consists of drilling reservists and units. ese designated Reservists are available for recall to active duty status. SELRES typically fulll the traditional service commitment of one weekend a month and two weeks a year. e IRR oers Reserve aliation benets without the SELRES drill requirements or Reserve pay. Sailors in the IRR have to maintain mobilization readiness and must keep the Navy informed of any address changes or conditions that may aect their readiness. While the Navy wishes to afford every Sailor an opportunity to transition to the Navy Reserve, SELRES billets are limited. Involuntarily separated Sailors E3 through E6 can apply for a SELRES quota via Perform-toServe/Fleet RIDE. Once approved for a quota, Sailors can contact the Career Transition Oce to complete the process. If a SELRES quota is not available, Sailors can request to aliate with the IRR. A Sailor who aliates with the IRR must have their command complete a NAVPERS 1070/613 form and send it to their supporting personnel oce. is must be accomplished prior to separation to ensure payment of this benet, according to the message. If a signed Reserve aliation contract is not completed prior to separation, Sailors must petition the Board of Correction for Naval Records to receive ISP. Under current legislation, Sailors who collect ISP and later qualify and collect a military retirement must repay their ISP upon retirement. e Defense Finance and Accounting Service will reduce retirement payments until the ISP amount is repaid.Navys Tuition Assistance updated Separation pay has requirements Navy Transition Benets 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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have in place and the ability, if we have to, to mobilize quickly will give us the capability to deal with any threat. ere are other risks associated with U.S. dependence on technology, the secretary said. Were depending a great deal on being at the technological edge of the future, he said. Can we develop the kind of technology were going to need to confront the future? Im condent we can, but there are risks associated with that. Even with the risks, not taking them is itself a greater risk, Dempsey said. e greater risk would be had we decided that we would just wish away any particular capability or any particular form of conict, he said. So, say, no, were just never going to do that. What youre expressing here is the recognition that we are retaining our full-spectrum capability, and that we didnt take any risk with that. is is a dierent situation for a drawdown than in the past, Panetta said, when the military drew down because the threat itself was gone. e reality is that as we draw down from Iraq and Afghanistan, we still face a number of very important threats in the world, he said. Obviously were continuing to ght a war in Afghanistan, and we con tinue to face the threat of terrorism. There are threats in the tribal area of Pakistan, as well as in Yemen and Somalia, Panetta said. We see the threats coming from Iran, and a nuclearcapable Iran represents a threat to us and to the world, he said. Weapons of mass destruction and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are a concern. North Korea is a concern because they, too, are developing a nuclear capability. Other threats come from continued turmoil in the Middle East and the potential for cyber warfare. You can see the vast array of threats that we have to confront with the force that weve designed here, Panetta said. So its all of those that are my concern for the future. reatsNavy committed to energy policy e Department of the Navys energy security goals, including its eorts to produce or consume one gigawatt of new, renewable energy on its naval installations was one of two U.S. Navy highlights during President Barack Obamas State of the Union address Jan. 24. Im proud to announce that the Department of Defense, the worlds largest consumer of energy, will make one of the largest commitments to clean energy in history with the Navy purchasing enough capacity to power a quarter of a million homes a year, the President said. is initiative continues progress toward the ve energy goals outlined in 2009 by the Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus, the broadest goal being by no later than 2020, at least half of all Navy energy, aoat and ashore, would come from non-traditional sources. Changing the way we get and use energy is a priority for the Navy because energy security is critical to our national security, Mabus said. One gigawatt of renewable energy produced from sources like solar, wind, and geothermal could power a city the size of Orlando, Florida, while increasing the security and exibility of the energy grid. Secretary Mabus has established a GW Task Force to assess and select renewable energy projects that will achieve this goal. e Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installations and Environment, Jackalyne Pfannenstiel, will chair the task force. e Navy has implemented a variety of energy initiatives in pursuit of that goal, including using advanced drop-in biofuel to power the eet and renewable energy to power naval installations. All of which is part of President Obamas Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future. e other Navy highlight from the Presidents address to the nation was at the end of his speech when he referred to the U.S. Navy SEALs successful mission against Osama Bin Laden. 80 800533 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 Following the lesson and tour, the DEFY members pose for a picture with the firefighters. Firefighter Roy Ellis shows the kids around the fire engine. DEFYs big day out Phase II FunCommunity Service and a lesson on re prevention were the topics of Januarys Drug Education for Youth Phase II meeting Saturday, Jan. 21. DEFY is a self-esteem building program that provides kids with the tools they need to resist drugs, gangs and alcohol. e program has two phases. Phase I is an intensive eight-day summer camp. Phase II has monthly followup meetings to reiterate what the youths were taught during the summer. is month we wanted to focus on the importance of community service and talk about re prevention, said Kelly Wirfel, who serves as the base Community Relations Manager and DEFY lead program coordinator. Approximately 18 youths and six sta members traveled to Magnolia Manor Assisted Living Center to conduct a carwash for the residents. e group ate lunch at Pirates Cove Galley and then the Kings Bay Fire Department gave DEFY members a lesson on re safety and showed them equipment on the re truck. e kids had an awesome time at the re station, Wirfel said. It was hard getting them out of there, they didnt want to leave. e main goal of DEFY is to show kids the positive aspects of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and to remain drug-free citizens. DEFY also focuses on building self-image and setting goals. It stresses interpersonal relations, emphasizes leadership and raises awareness of the harmful eects of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the dangerous eects of peer pressure to join gangs. Participants in DEFY are required to attend Phase II meetings each month until they graduate from the program in June. Phase II is extremely important because it gives the kids an opportunity to see their peers and mentors who they spent time with during DEFY camp, and continue to build upon the positive relationships that they established during the summer, Wirfel said.DEFY mem ber Eric Larson, helps wash cars at Magnolia Manor Assisted Living Center. Firefighter Chad Taylor talks to the youth about the equipment on the fire engine. Photos by Kelly Wirfel Taylor answers questions from DEFY members.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 5 perstars. ey are an inspiration to me, our Force and our Navy. e 2011 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer First Class William Nagel, a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied electricians mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Albany (SSN 753), homeported in Norfolk, Va. e 31-year-old Sailor is from Montgomery County, Texas, and joined the Navy in August 1998. He was also the Commander, Submarine Group Two Senior Sea Sailor of the Year. CSG2s headquarters are in Groton, Conn. It is just a tremendous honor to be nominated, and for being selected I am lost for words, Nagel said. is means everything because of the great support I got from my wife and family. I dont know what separated me from the other Sailors, but being the Educational Services Ocer onboard helped. As the ESO, I mentored a lot of junior Sailors and was involved with every junior Sailor in providing them tools for advancement. Petty Ocer First Class Scott Biden was recognized as the 2011 SUBLANT Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a submarine-qualied yeoman assigned to sta at Commander, Submarine Group 10, headquartered in Kings Bay. He was born in Monica, Calif., but raised in Upland, Calif., and joined the Navy in February 2000. e 31-year-old was also the Commander, Submarine Group Ten (CSG10) Shore Sailor of the Year. Without the support and guidance of my wife, and the support of my shipmates, I would not be standing here today, Biden said. is is a tremendous award for all my mentors who have helped me get here, and continue to help me. As the Senior Shore and Sea Sailors of the Year, Nagel and Biden will represent SUBLANT in the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Sailor of the Year competition. e USFFC competition will be in March with other Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet sea winner from that competition will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet shore winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations competition in Washington, D.C. e 2011 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Mike Blizzard, a 25-year-old submarinequalied re control technician assigned to the Ohio-class ballistic submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), homeported in Kings Bay. He is from Scranton, N.C., and joined the Navy in February 2007. He was also the CSG10 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. We have a great command, Blizzard said. is means a lot and cant really think of any additional words to describe emotions. Amazing and shows what hard work can do for someones career. Petty Ocer Second Class Alexander Hiller was honored as the 2011 SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a 25-year-old surface-warfare qualied boatswains mate assigned to the sta at Commander, Naval Submarine Support Facility, home based in New London, Conn. Hiller is from Dunkirk, N.Y., and joined the Navy in August 2003. He was also the CSG2 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. is is a great honor, particularly being a surface Sailor working in the submarine eet, Hiller said. It was not just the award, but coming here and meeting all the highlevel people and achievers. is was signicant because it is indicates the impartiality of the submarine eet, and their willingness to recognize excellence. Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, stated he was proud of the professionalism, civic-mindedness, and family-oriented focus always exhibited by all enlisted submarine force Sailors. But he said this group was special and possessed a sharper edge. e Sailor of the Year program is an excellent forum to recognize our top performers, Saunders said. For the past several days during the selection process, I have gotten to know the Sailors and their families. I have truly been honored and inspired by them. ese Sailors are carrying the torch in leading our commanders vision for the submarine force. ey are preparing and ensuring our submariners are ready forces able to engage in current, forward, and future operations and warghting. e other candidates for Senior Sea Sailor and Senior Shore Sailor of the year were Petty Ocer First Class Jessy White and Petty Ocer First Class Sean McLaughlin, respectively. White is a 31-year-old submarine-qualied electricians mate assigned to the USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). He is from Marion, Ohio, and entered the Navy in 1998. He was also the CSG10 Sea Sailor of the Year. McLaughlin, a native of Silver Spring, Md., is a surface-warfare and expeditionary-warfare qualied boatswains mate assigned to the sta at Commander, Submarine Squadron Six, headquartered in Norfolk, Va. e 36-year-old was also the CSG2 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year e other candidate for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Clair Dopson, IV, while Petty Ocer Second Class Edward Martin was the other Junior Shore Sailor of the year. A submarine-qualied electronics technician assigned to the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), homeported in Groton, Conn, the 23-year-old Dopson was also the CSG2 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. He is from Charleston, S.C. Martin, is a dual surface and aviation warfarequalied machinists mate assigned to the Trident Ret Facility, home based in Kings Bay. e 26-yearold is a native of Rock Hill, S.C., and enlisted in the Navy in February 2005. He was also the CSG10 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. Observing Colors For more than 200 years, the American dered. render the When the raised in the at attention Reveille Retreat To the Colors Colors Retreat is heard Duo When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in 1979, Mirali was 27 years old. He took up arms to protect his country and his family in Daykundi, located in south central Afghanistan. While ghting against the Soviet Army, Miralis leg was injured when he took shrapnel from a rocket. He was later captured in his village and tortured by the Russians. ey would persecute me and beat my ngers and they knocked out my teeth, Mirali explained. ey captured me because I was supporting the [Afghan] government and protecting my country. Mirali escaped from the Russians and ed to Pakistan. He stayed there for a year before returning to Afghanistan. God kept me alive because it wasnt my time, Mirali said. His parents had passed away and two of his brothers immigrated to Iran. e remainder of his family was killed during the Soviet invasion. After enduring the hardship of the Russian invasion, the Taliban rose to power and Mirali had to endure another storm under the regimes rule. His family had left him a small home with some land but that was taken from him when the Taliban came to power. Before the Taliban were here, we had a good, comfortable life and the farming was good, Mirali recalled. As soon as the Taliban came in life became hard. Mirali did everything in his power to continue to live in Afghanistan, performing labor-intense jobs to make ends meet. He married his rst wife and they had two daughters together. However, his wife and oldest daughter died from natural causes. Once this happened, Mi rali moved to Iran, where his youngest daughter still lives today. He met his second wife while in Iran and they moved back to Afghanistan and had a son. However, without land to farm, making a sufcient living was nearly impossible for Mirali and his family. So he left them in Daykundi and went back to Iran to nd a job. After working there for a short period of time, he returned to his village to nd that his wife and son had been murdered during a civil war between villages. at is when Mirali took matters into his own hands and joined the Afghan National Army. Afghanistan is my country and these are my people, Mirali said. As long as Im alive I just want to serve them. He has been serving in the Army for the past ve years as an infantry and artillery soldier in the 215th Corps. During this time, Sta Sgt. Mirali received the opportunity to go to the Joint Sustainment Academy Southwest, on Camp Leatherneck, and take part in the Small Arms Weapons Instructor Course, where he excelled as a student, quickly learning the dierent weapons systems. JSAS oers Afghan Na tional Security Forces troops the opportunity to continue their military education past initial training. e academy oers a variety of skills of Afghan Afghan soldier in ght for life Social sports become huge hit at Kings BayKings Bay Sports recently added two new sports to its league catalog, with stunning success. Dodgeball and kickball have taken center stage and have exceeded expectations when it comes to teams and participation. We wanted to bring more social sports into the fold, sports that dont require great skill or athletic ability that everyone could play said Ryan Leavy, Morale, Welfare and Recreation Sports Coordinator. Enter Kickball. On Dec. 10, Kings Bay Intramural Sports hosted a double-elimination Kickball Tournament. Nine teams signed up and came out to play. e beauty of kickball is that anyone and everyone can play. Ten players play in the eld, but everyone on the team kicks. It took a game or two for some teams to devise strategy and become familiar with the rules, but teams picked it up fast and had a blast. After the success of the tournament, a league was recently launched that plays one night a week. Teams like that they only play one night a week, because the wives can nd a babysitter and then come out to play. Its been great to see new faces out there, Leavy said. A dodgeball league also recently launched as well. I thought Id get a few of the younger guys out and it would be more of an open dodgeball night, then a league, but it kept growing as word got out, Leavy said. ere are currently 16 teams signed up, and the league expanded from one night a week to two to accommodate all the teams. e games are played best seven out of 13, and matches last 30 to 40 minutes. Still, teams get a great workout from it. Its another sport that does not require a ton of skill, and anyone can play, Leavy said. Ive also heard enough quotes from that dodgeball movie to recite the whole thing! You can nd more pictures of Intramural Sports at www.facebook.com/ kingsbaysports in the albums section. Intramural Sports With Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Kings Bay Intramural Sports

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 6, 13 and 27. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Individual Augmentee return workshop offeredThis workshop prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. It is tai lored to the uniqueness of the IA deployment. Topics include expectations, cycles of deployment, returning to children and being aware of the signs of operational stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. The first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 9.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Feb. 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28 and 31. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume stuff, including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 22. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 7A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 7. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13 to 17. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 6 to 9 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 27The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 27. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.PCSing with Special Needs Workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed to provide service members and their families with the information and resources available to assist them in relocating with an Exceptional Family Member. It will touch on the basics of the EFM Program, pre-departure considerations, recommenda tions for your arrival at your new base and resources available to help you throughout your move. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 15. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Coffee and Conversation covers many subjectsCome to the Fleet and Family Support Centers Coffee and Conversation. This class is set in a casual environment to discuss the most current topics regarding the military lifestyle, edu cation, transition, employment and more. If you want to learn more about any of these topics or contribute some of your knowledge, come and join the conversation. For additional information or to register, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseThe Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. For more information, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Operation: IdenticationA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Cancer is one of our childrens biggest enemies. Chances of survival are greatly enhanced if it is identied early. Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more. a CFC participantProvided as a public service healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW healthy babyA Partnership of the March of Dimes and the VFW A free wellness program that supports military moms before, during and after pregnancy. Created by the March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW. marchofdimes.com/vfw 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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ere will be two days of ice skating at the Winter Blues Breakout, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 4 and 5 the Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts. Inatables also will be set up for the childrens enjoyment, as well as a coloring mural so they can show their artistic side. ere will be free hot cocoa and cookies available. Also at 6:30 p.m., Feb. 4, Movie Under the Stars is back and will be featuring Puss In Boots (PG) on the Under the Pines grassy area. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Maggie Valley Ski & Snowboard Trip In need of some real winter sports? Outdoor Recreation Center is offering this ski weekend at Maggie Valley, N.C., Friday, Feb. 10 through Sunday, Feb. 12 for $180 per skier and $200 per snowboarder. Price includes transportation, two-night hotel stay, ski lift ticket, equipment rental and free lessons for beginners. Register at Outdoor Adventure Center by Friday, Jan. 27. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Ask about special pricing for single service members. My Sweet Valentine Father & Daughter Dance It will be 5 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy an evening with your daughter, dining on a fabulous menu. Adult tickets are only $10 and for children 12 and under tickets are $6. Children 2 and under are free with a paying adult. Tickets will be available at the conference center, Child Development Center, Youth Center and Information, Tickets and Travel office. There will be music, dancing, photos and a door prize drawing. Each daughter will receive a flower. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. So Full, Soul Food Social It will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Enjoy a feast of southern fried chicken, baked barbecue chicken and smothered pork chops with more for $10. Enjoy music and some historical soul food displays. Tickets will be available at the Kings Bay Conference Center and Information, Ticekts and Travel office. For more information, call (912) 573-4559. Daytona 500 & Monster Truck Jam 2012 Tickets are now on sale at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel office. Monster Truck Jam is March 3 and tickets are $41 for club seats in Section 211 and a pit pass. The pit is opens from 2 to 5 p.m. The Daytona 500 is Feb. 26 and several different ticket prices are available, as well as tickets for other races such as the Budweiser Shoot Out and Rolex 24. Call (912) 573-2289 for information. Valentiness Scotch Doubles Bowling starts at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 17. Its $30 per couple, price includes bowling and shoes, personal onetopping pizza, chips and unlimited fountain drinks. Cash prizes for first, second and third place. Also drawings for free game passes and more. You must be registered by Feb. 16. For more information, call Rack-N-Roll lanes at (912) 573-9492. Win one of 10 iPad2s or Galaxy Tabs Play the new free SCVNGR app from CNIC and learn about your base Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The app is for smart phones only and data rates may apply. Its as easy as downloading the app, clicking on Trek Kings Bay button and start to play. All MWR patrons, ages 18 years and older, are eligible with the exception of MWR employees and their family members. As an additional incentive, all Kings Bay single service members that sign up through the Liberty Program will be able to get their names in for an additional $100 NEX card. Call (912) 573-8999 for more detailed information. The Greybeard Basketball League Its for ages 30 and older, and open to active duty, retirees, reservists, DoD employees and family members over age 30. The league begins Wed., Feb. 8, with a captains meeting at 5:15 p.m., Wed., Feb. 1 at KB Finnegans. Games are played at lunchtime every Wednesday. You can register at www.kingsbaysports.leagueapps.com or call (912) 573-8908. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Spring Registration for Baseball, T-ball and Soccer sign-ups run through Feb. 17 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays. New this season is a U-4 Soccer League for 3 year olds. Children must have turned 3 before Aug. 1, 2011. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, who turn 4 prior to April 1, 2012. Baseball is for ages 6 to 8 and Soccer for ages 3 to 15. eres a $60 fee for children of active duty, reservists, military retirees & family members and a $65 fee for DoD civilians and base contractors and family members. e family max for active military only is $215. Cost includes a complete uniform. A $5 late registration fee will be taken after Feb. 17 if space is available. ere will be a mandatory skills assessment for 7and 8-year-old baseball players and 8-year-old and older for soccer players. Practice begin in March. All games are played on base. Coaches are needed. For more information, call (912) 573-8202. Open Recreation The Teen Center is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be made available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years old or older and have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more information.Spring sports opens Just for kids Winter Bliss coming Feb. 4, 5 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 7

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Guardian ies in space More than 100 cadets sat eagerly waiting while NASAs live video stream played out on the screen in front of the small auditorium. On Jan. 24, members of the Coast Guard Academys Aviation Club gathered to participate in a live video discussion with Daniel Burbank, a retired Coast Guard captain and commander of International Space Station Expedition 30. e room of cadets remained silent as Mission Control, Houston, began its radio checks with the ISS as it ew more than 240 miles above the Earth. Almost instantly, the scene on the screen jumped from mission control to the ISS, and Burbank appeared, larger than life, wearing a Coast Guard sweatshirt. He addressed the group of cadets, Coast Guard Academy, this is International Space Station. Ron, weve got you loud and clear. e room erupted with applause, and a smiling Burbank remarked quietly over the noise, How cool is that? e 20-minute conversation with Burbank provided the cadets with a rare opportunity to learn more about the ISS expedition directly from a former academy graduate. Coast Guard Cmdr. Charles Chip Hateld is an advisor for the aviation club and began coordinating the event with NASA personnel last November. He said speaking with Burbank provided a learning experience cadets can take with them throughout their careers. is was an important event for the aviation club and the academy. It was a rst at the academy, Hateld said. Capt. Burbank clearly illustrated the importance of exploring the edge of the unknown and demonstrated superior leadership by commanding the ISS. During his presentation, Burbank tied many of the things he learned as a Coast Guard ocer and aviator directly to his astronaut training and experiences. During the discussion, Burbank stressed the importance of the education and experience cadets will receive as they become Coast Guard ocers, noting everything Burbank learned in the Coast Guard was applicable to his career as an astronaut. When you have an aviation or operational background you have a skill set that is applicable to space ight, Burbank said. e way you think about a task, such as hovering a helicopter over a boat in a dark and stormy night, is similar enough to how youd move a robot arm. ose skills map very nicely from one arena to the next. Burbank also elded several questions from the cadets. Cadet 2nd Class Rachel Cuthrell was one of the cadets who spoke with Burbank and asked about the physical toll space travel has on the body. e research into the effects of the human body in a weightless environment is one of the areas Burbank is in space studying. He said understanding how the human body adapts in space is essential to future space missions and possible manned ights to other planets. Marine nds his old CH-46 A vacation in Japan, visiting with his son and grandchildren, reminiscing about the past that is what Ron Maines, a Rogers, Ark. native, had planned when he came to Okinawa. What he found while taking a stroll down memory lane, however, was not what he expected. While visiting Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Maines found four CH-46E helicopters that he ew in Vietnam. He even has the serial numbers to prove they are the same birds. Maines, a former captain in the Marine Corps, was a member of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 164 attached to Marine Aircraft Group 16 in Vietnam. Forty years later, Maines son, Navy Lt. Mark T. Maines, is the base chaplain for Marine Corps Base Camp Kinser. Mark arranged for his father to be able to look at the aircraft on Futenma. Neither of them thought they would nd the same helicopters he ew. I didnt expect them to still be ying, they were manufactured in 1966, its great to see that they are still around, Maines said. Seeing the old helicopters gave Maines the opportunity to reminisce about his past. Seeing my old 46s made me feel young again. It reminded me what it was like to be in the Marine Corps and it makes me very proud, he said. After nding his old helicopter, Maines met with sta noncommissioned ocers and ocers from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 262 to share a few of his stories and experiences from Vietnam. Its great to know that this air station has such a deep history, said Capt. Michael Bryant, the maintenance material control ocer for HMM-262. e trip not only helped Maines reminisce, but it served as a way for him and his son to bond. is was a very special moment for my dad, its great to share this cultural history together and have this military connection, said Mark. After leaving the military in 1972, Maines joined the Mission Aviation Fellowship for 12 years, where he ew single engine Cessnas on missions for church and government. After that he became self-employed as a strategy consultant for businesses while still ying his personal plane. In 2008, after 40 years and 7,000 hours of ight, Maines gave up ying. I now have a boat and nine grandchildren, its not quite as fast, but if I run out of gas Im in much less trouble, he said. troops to learn; everything from leadership, to weapons handling, and techniques, to generator mechanic courses. roughout the course at JSAS, Mirali learned to op erate and maintain at least 10 dierent weapon sys tems ranging from a pistol to a heavy machine gun. After completing the course, Mirali was selected to stay at JSAS and serve as an Afghan instructor alongside coalition troops. Im healthy and my body is still good, so no matter where I am I just try my hardest to be happy and good, said Mirali. Death is in Gods hand, but as long as Im alive and here, Im just hoping and praying that Afghanistan will be able to move forward and take responsibility for its defense.Afghan 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Im thinking this should be a pretty good Super Bowl. Its an interesting matchup. Most of this years playoff games have gone down to the wire or into overtime, which makes me expect another close game. Both the New England Patriots and New York Giants have good offenses. But the Jints, as dey say in da Bronx, seem to hold the edge on defense, which is enough for me to pick them this years winner. The score? Howz bout toity-ate ta toity-twee?Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Pfc. Stetson Sisco Security Force Battalion Ponca City, Okla. Patriots. I just think theyre going to win. I cant see them losing honestly. ET3 Kevin Crawford USS Wyoming Gold Riverside, Calif. Giants, 37-30, because they won before and they have the better overall team. CS1 Jo Stafford Trident Training Facility Annapolis, Md. The Giants are in it. So any team that plays the Giants is the team I want to win. AMCS Frank Harbison Trident Training Facility Nashville, Tenn. Giants, 24-17. I just think the Giants are playing too well right now. Theyre peaking at the right time. MASN Mack Caldrup Kings Bay Security Houston My team, the Houston Texans, is not even in it, so Im not going to watch it. Cpl. Jake Vanspyker Security Force Battalion Zeeland, Mich. Patriots, 24-21, because they lost to the Giants the last time and Tom Brady wants some revenge. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Sixth Northeast Florida All Service Academy Ball hosted the largest attendance ever for this years annual event, held at Jacksonvilles Riverfront Crowne Plaza Hotel on Dec. 27. And for the second year, e Brumos Companies was the major sponsor for the local military ball which honors young men and women from as far away as St. Simons Island and Daytona Beach, who are enrolled in the United States Service Academies. More than 60 Cadets, Midshipmen and alumni from Americas academic military institutions, the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Coast Guard Academy joined with the U.S. Naval Academy and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy for a festive formal event far away from rigorous routines and cold weather. Mayor Alvin Browns Ocial Proclamation declared Dec. 27th All Service Academy Ball Day stating, Jacksonville is proud to be home of such a large and prestigious military community. e ve Service Academies were represented by local Cadets William Alpert, Adam Despang, Kurt Musser, Karlos Febus-Traphagen, Sarah Pendergraft, Brendon Gregory, Ryan Evans, William Myers, attending the Future ocers enjoy annual ball THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 9

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Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables Friday Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMonday Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked Beans Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Wednesday Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No Breakfast Served. Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus U.S. Military Academy, Midshipmen Katherine Castro, Christopher Dendor, Robyn Draughon, Kiley Switanek, Kameron Wright, David Towle, Jason Infante, Conor White and Delano Martins, attending U.S. Naval Academy; Also, Cadets Adam Guarno, Charles W. Lefer, Walter Andrew Heaney and Charles Totten attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Midshipman Tom Fossa attending the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and Cadets James Bloch, Karolyn Capes, Jordan Bresnahan, Bradley Frost, Loren VanRassen, Brian Collett, Steven Joseph, Garrett Soileau, Alexander Mitchell, Paige Shirley, Kyle Casias, Demario Kohn, Malcolm Williams and Kathleen McQueeney attending the U.S. Air Force Academy. Speakers included Captain Kassandra Merritt, Lt. j.g. Grant Johnson, 1st Lt. Christopher Simpkins, 2nd Lt. Chelsea Agee, and Ensign Sean Conkle. e Gatorbowl Committee and Taxslayer hosted these local cadets and midshipmen and honored them at the Gatorbowl on Jan. 2. More than half were able to attend, along with family members, and enjoy the game between the Ohio State Buckeyes and the University of Florida Gators. e non-prot All Service Academy Ball has raised donations for Jacksonville-based Wounded Warrior Project that honors and empowers wounded warriors, as well the USO and Fisher Houses, which serve the families of patients needing medical care at major military and Veterans Affairs medical centers. Ball 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 2, 2012 11