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The Kings Bay periscope ( 12-15-2011 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00242

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00242


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County helps with eort for children of deployed SailorsSanta arrived earlier than ex pected to drop o Christmas presents to family members of USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Blue) Dec. 6 at First Baptist Church in Saint Marys, Ga. Local community leaders and volunteers provided Christmas gifts to the children of the de ployed Ohio-class guided mis sile submarine to ensure they received a gift from their de ployed fathers. e event compared to a typical care package drive. However, instead of the community providing boxes of beef jerky and toiletries for deployed Sailors, some members in the Camden County community oered to provide the holiday packages for the children of the deployed Sailors. Naval Submarine Support Command Chaplain Lt. Joseph Wilburn coordinated the event between the squadron and community. Events like this help strength en family resiliency, Wilburn said. It also helps to build that bridge of faith between the base and community. Georgia (Blue) families may not be able to see their fathers in time for Christmas and local community leaders asked if it was possible to provide the fam ilies with Christmas presents so the children could have a pres ent from dad. With help from Submarine Squadron 16 and the Georgia (Blue) command ombudsman, Stephanie Kline, the message was sent to the deployed fathers if they would like to volunteer to participate in the event. ose who liked the idea, responded to the squadron positively and had their message relayed to both the volunteers asking to donate presents and, through the ombudsman, to the accept ing families. Our church community val ues our military families, said Pastor Steve Kegley of First Baptist Church in Saint Marys, THEkings bay, georgia Happy Holidays Homecoming Page 4Santa stops early for USS Georgia The Gift of Life Page 5Model for the Navy Friday last Toys for Tots pickup No. 1 PSD Volleyball, kickball decidede Kings Bay Intramural Sports Vol leyball playos come down to two teams Dec. 8 after Dig is dispatched the Blue Devil Aces and the Dominators of Medi cal, while the Ball Busters fought past the Free Agents and Smash of Medical to earn spots in the championship. e Ball Busters, led by Averi Stoner and Dig is, led by Stacy Maysonet, met for the title in a best 3-of-5 match. e Ball Busters came out ring, as HMC Roel Gerardo set up balls for YNC Rick English and Stoner to smash Bust ers took the rst set, 25-18. Dig regrouped and put on a show in the second set, as ET1 Rich Kostar (Ret.) served 10 consecutive points to build a big lead. ETC Josh Lima and his wife, Rachel, played strong de fense to thwart the Busters attack. Dig is went on to win, 25-15. It was all Busters in the third set, taking o from the start for the Intramural Sports By Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Final push begins to collect Christmas gis for childrenOnly today and Friday remain for the Marine Corps Reserves Toys for Tots accepting dona tions at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Collection points aboard NSB Kings Bay include the Fitness Center, the Navy Exchange and Navy Federal Credit Union. Col lection sites outside the gates are at e Big K Mart, Walgreens and the Navy Federal on Geor gia Spur 40. After Friday, last-minute donations can be made by phon ing Camden County Local Co ordinator Frank Fornili at (912) 674-9747. Toys for Tots collects new, un wrapped toys each year, distrib uting the toys as Christmas gifts to needy children in the com munity. e main objective of this program to is deliver, through a new toy at Christmas, a mes sage of hope to less fortunate children that will assist them into becoming responsible, pro ductive, patriotic citizens, said Lt. Col. Wendy Goyette, Marine Corps Security Force Battal ion Commanding Ocer while speaking at the annual CamdenKings Bay Navy League Toys for Tots Brunch.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Did too! Did not! DID TOO! DID NOT! DID TOO and INFINITY! Of course, we all recall that once someone said innity, that is the end of the discussion, period. Each of us probably recall moments like this one ... dont you? You and a friend were arguing over whose mom made the best cookies or whose dad was bigger than the other. Oh, that such discussions could be solved today just by saying innity, and that one word would settle it. Jesus very existence is often discussed like this by passionate people who have diering belief systems or theological points that dont fully line up with our own. I believe it is one of the reasons why King Herod wanted someone to go and seek out the Christ child. Truth is, that one word from King Herod would have ended all possible future ministries of Jesus. But, the one word from our Creator sent the wise men who were fortunate enough to worship the baby Jesus a word that they should not return to King Herod and tell him where Jesus was located. King Herod wanted this baby Jesus taken out of the picture, out of fear. Angels and prophets say in the Holy Bible do not be afraid, more than 76 times depending on the version read. It is enough occur rences to take notice of the thought that God does not want us to be fearful of things that can destroy our possessions, our bodies or our family. We should in fact be more concerned about what can destroy our souls, our well being. at my friends is something to be fearful about! So, the next time someone says or does something that hurts, remember that we once received a beautiful gift. Our diculty comes in remembering that the gift of life and our souls comes at a great price. e greatest compliment we can pay our Creator is to forgive with grace and humility, just like my redeemer Christ did. And innity! THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA NSB Vet Clinic Christmas Dec. 15Join the Kings Bay Veterinary Clinic 4 to 7 p.m., ursday, Dec. 15 for its second annual open house. Patrons will have the opportunity to meet the doctors, have complimentary pet pictures with Santa, enjoy childrens activities, refreshments, giveaways, and, if patrons bring in an item to do nate the humane shelter, in exchange the sta will perform a free toe nail trim. For more information, call the clinic 573-0755 or stop by 921 USS George Bancroft Ave., Building 1003. Items that will be happily accepted for the shelter are dog food, cat food, cat litter, chew toys, laundry soap, bleach, cat toys, postage, collars, leashes, paper towels, vine gar and Pine Sol.Relief Society sets holiday hourse Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay will close at noon on Friday, Dec. 23, and will resume normal business hours at 9 a.m., Tues day, Dec. 27. In the event of an emergency afterhours or during the holiday closure, contact the American Red Cross at (877)-272-7337. MOAA Christmas dinner Dec. 20Kings Bay Chapter of Military Ocers Asso ciation of America will hold its dinner meeting starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday Dec. 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Rd. Guest speaker will be Cheri Richter with the St. Marys-War of 1812 Bicentennial Commit tee. Dress is seasonal festive. Former and active duty ocers of the Armed Services as well Pub lic Health Service and NOAA are welcome. RSVP by Dec. 10 to Capt. Orren Crouch, (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Commissary posts holiday hourse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commis sary will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Monday be fore Christmas, Dec. 19. e commissary will be closed ursday, anksgiving, and Friday, Nov. 24 and 25,; Dec. 25 for Christmas and Dec. 26; and Jan. 1 for New Years Day and Jan. 2.Exchange explains return policyis holiday season, the Navy Exchange wants to make returning gifts as easy as possible. Since gifts may be purchased well before they are given during the holidays, all NEXs will accept returns through Jan. 29, 2012. is includes items typi cally covered by the 14-day return policy, such as computers, computer equipment, software, digital cameras and the 45-day return policy for all other merchandise. is extended return policy applies to original purchases made Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 either in a NEX or through the NEX Web store, www.myNavyExchange.com. Cus tomers are asked to include any packaging mate rial along with the receipt when making a return. Any returns without a receipt will be placed on a NEX Gift Card. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday through Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Take steps to prevent identity theHey Dollar Bill! I recently read in the local news that many Camden County residents have had their credit card numbers stolen and cash has disappeared from their bank accounts. How can I protect myself from this happening to me? Consumer Dear Consumer, You are correct. Information provided in the news by Camden County Sheris Oce indicated that credit card numbers and cash have been stolen from Camden County residents. CCSO reported that hundreds of thousands of dollars have been stolen in a matter of months. ere were 60 to 75 cases this past summer. With the holidays in full swing, now more than ever, it is critical to safeguard your identity. ere are several things you can start doing to protect yourself and your credit. Keep your personal information to yourself. Banks will not call or send an e-mail asking for nancial information. Shred mail, old receipts, documents and account information. Memorize your Personal Identication Number(s) (PIN) and passwords. If you must write them down, keep them separate from your account information. Always review your monthly statements. With online banking available, you should review your accounts several times during the week for any suspicious activity. Report any unauthorized transac tions to your bank or credit card agency. Pay attention to your credit or debit card every time you make a purchase. Make sure the cashier or anyone nearby isnt recording your information. If your credit card leaves your sight, make sure the card you get back is yours. Check your credit report at least yearly through www.annualcreditreport.com. is Web site provides a free credit report from all three credit bureaus annually. Beware of Phishing/Vishing. Phishing is when someone is trying to get usernames, passwords and credit card details electronically. Vishing is the same as Phishing but using the telephone. Shop trusted Web sites from reputable companies. When you or der online, make sure the Web site address begins with https://, which indicates a secure Web site. Use your credit card to shop on line, because you can dispute the charges if something goes wrong. Beware of meeting people online or on social Web sites who suddenly need help with money. ey may claim to be a relative, for example grandson, nephew or niece, or someone you knew from years ago. Watch out for these tricks and e-mails saying you stand to inherit lots of money from a relative or announcements that youve won a prize or lottery you never entered. If you think that you have been the victim of identity theft, I recommend that you contact your local law enforcement ocials and le a report. You will also need to le a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov and contact each of the Credit Bureaus to place a fraud alert on your le. As a Certied Credit Report Reviewer for the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, I can review your credit le and assist with ling complaints of identity theft. I can possibly provide you a free copy of your credit score. Please contact me at the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-9783 or 573-4513 for more information or to schedule an appointment. I look forward to working with you to understand your credit report and credit scores and in helping you get any possible errors corrected. Very respectfully, Dollar Bill Ask Dollar Bill! By William Dollar Bill Snook Kings Bay FFSC Over the past few years, synthetic THC the hallucinogenic chemical in marijuana known as Spice, K2 and Blaze, as well as the synthetic stimulants commonly called bath salts or plant food, have seen in creased use by service members. On Oct. 21, the Drug Enforcement Agency placed the synthetic stimu lants in bath salts and plant food onto the same list of banned sub stances as heroin and marijuana. is means that the same federal criminal penalties that apply to use of heroin and marijuana will now apply to use of bath salts and similar drugs. e DEA took the same action for the synthetic THC in Spice and simi lar drugs on 1 Mar. 1. DEA noted that these actions are necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. While the federal government only recently banned these sub stances, they have been banned by the Navy since 2005. Use or pos session of these substances by Navy personnel is forbidden and could possibly subject a Sailor to non-ju dicial punishment, administrative separation or court-martial under UCMJ Art. 112a or UCMJ Art. 92 (for violation of OPNAVINST 5350.4D, SECNAVINST 5300.28E and/or NA VADMIN 108/10). However, in addition to the pos sible severe legal consequences, in dividual Sailors and Navy leadership should understand the harmful and potentially deadly eects of using these drugs. e DEA states that they have re ceived an increasing number of re ports from poison control centers, hospitals and law enforcement or ganizations citing examples of individuals using synthetic THC and experiencing serious side eects such as convulsions, anxiety attacks, dangerously elevated heart rates, increased blood pressure, vomiting and disorientation. e reported side eects of bath salts include agi tation, paranoia, high blood pres sure, hallucinations, chest pain, sui cidality and psychosis. Sailors should be aware that ingest ing these synthetic drugs can lead to bad reactions and deadly results. e manufacturers of these banned substances actually label many of these substances as not t for human consumption. For example, police in West Vir ginia recently arrested a man after they found him dressed in womens clothing, standing with his pants down over a blood-soaked goat that he allegedly stole and killed. He blamed his bizarre behavior on the use of bath salts. Additionally, Re uters News Agency reported claims from the European Union that mephedrone, a chemical often found in bath salts, was directly linked to the deaths of two people and is possibly tied to the deaths of 37 more. ere are many more such stories. Very few scientic studies have been done on these synthetic drugs, so the immediate and long term ef fects on the body and human brain are mostly unknown. e few studies that have been done on JWH018, the compound generally found in Spice, indicate that it is more po tent and ecacious than THC. is means that lower concentrations of JWH-018 can have a greater and Synthetic THC poses dangerous risk Navy Region Southeast Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay ChapelForgiving with grace and humility

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NSB Kings Bays Fitness Center worked with the program by having a 5K run Dec. 7. Approximately 250 participants donated toys and raised $385 for the program. Ian Christian and Deanna rasher ran to rstplace nishes in the respective male and female divisions. Fornili said this years drive has gone well. As usual in Camden County, the community comes together very nice ly for us to help those in need, he said. Spouse 101 e U.S. Coast Guard, as a public service to holiday gift shoppers, announced its recommended gift ideas for 12 nautical days of Christmas. Nothing says I love you to a mariner like the gift of a marine GPS navi gation system, a Coast Guard approved life jack et, boating safety course or 406 MHz electronic position indicating radio beacon, said Lt. Cmdr. Chris ONeil, the Coast Guards chief of media relations. Regardless of the occasion or holiday, the gifts we recommend this year can save a loved ones life, making them the perfect gift this sea son, or throughout the year. Diamonds are pret ty, and big-screen, highdenition televisions are great for watching the big game, but they wont help you prevent a boating ac cident, or survive after youve been in one. Among the Coast Guards recommended nautical gifts are: A Marine GPS naviga tion system A 406 MHz EPIRB (make sure you register it after purchase, or res cuers may be delayed in reaching you!) A Coast Guardapproved life jacket (they float, you dont...) A handheld VHF-FM radio A Boating Safety Course (boater education saves lives its a fact) Vessel Safety Check from the Coast Guard Auxiliary (its free!) A Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher A first aid kit in a watertight container A seamanship book Nautical charts for the areas your favorite mari ner frequents A signaling kit A life raft with a sur vival kit Some of the most valu able gifts dont cost any thing but time, such as scheduling a free vessel safety check with mem bers of your local Coast Guard Auxiliary. From the Coast Guard family to yours, Happy Holidays!12 Nautical Days of Christmas ideas Coast Guard higher maximal psycho logical eect on the brain than that of THC. In short, the greater potency of the synthetic sub stances means there is a much greater risk of over dose. Adding to their dan gerous nature is the lack of quality control in their manufacture. Most of the products sold are simply plant mat ter soaked in the synthetic compounds in a nonuniform manner, so its impossible for the Sailor to know how much of the synthetic drug he or she is actually ingesting. at also greatly increases the risk of overdose. e bottom line point that Sailors need to un derstand that there are enormous consequences to using these synthetic drugs, and that they go beyond legal, disciplinary, or career consequences. It is important for Sailors to know the risks they take when putting these chem icals in their bodies, and the potentially disastrous long-term eects it may have on their lives.THC Toys THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Linehandlers on the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) await final inspections after returning to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Dec. 6. Machinists Mate 1st Class Thomas Bolin, USS Wyoming Gold machin ery division, hugs his wife, Megan, on the pier. xxx 06 DEC 11 Arriving USS Wyoming Chief Sonar Technician Tim Walker, USS Wyoming Gold sonar division chief, greets his wife, Kelly. USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) returned from a three-month deployment. Navy photos by MC1 James KimberSonar Technician 3rd Class Brian Finch, USS Wyoming Gold gets the first kiss with his wife, Danae, and 2-year-old daughter, Catalina. Ama Spisiak holds on to her father, Missilie Technician 3rd Class John Spisiak, USS Wyoming Gold, as he greets his wife, Sarah.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 5 Army Specialist Santiago Rueda, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Miami, prepares labels to issue a blood bag to a donor. Army Specialist Victor Castillo, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Laredo, Texas, prepares blood samples for testing. Army Staff Sgt. Marlin Watson, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Montgomery, Ala., segments and seals blood bags. Musician 2nd Class Justin Glenn, Navy Band Southeast, of Chino Hills, Calif., plays Christmas carols during the Armed Services Blood Program drive. Pfc. John Schon of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay donates blood to the Armed Services Blood Program Dec. 5 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. The blood donated will be in the Sixth Fleet area of operations by the end of the week for uni formed personnel serving in combat areas. Coast Guard Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jon Gilliand, Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay, and his wife, Erica, donate.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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25-15 win. e fourth set was back-and-forth, with neither team taking more than a four-point lead. e Busters fell behind 18-14 before calling a timeout to regroup. e team won the set and the championship, 25-23. It was a great game all around e Ball Busters will look to defend the title in January when the next vol leyball season begins. Kickball tournament a huge success On Saturday, Dec. 10, eight teams from Kings Bay came out to relive their childhood and experience the exciting sport of kickball. e double-elimination kickball tournament fea tured the Red Solo Cups of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, the Balls & Gals of Medical, e TTF Dudes & e Ladies, the MWRollers, Les Boules of Trident Re t Facility, Security Ball Busters, Da Bravo Bears of MCSFB and the Foot Clan of NSB. Everybody came out pumped up and ready to play. e afternoon progressed in excellent fash ion, as teams started to deploy strategies and planned to score runs and win games. Kickball isnt like softball, the average score for the games was 5-4, so every run is pre cious. It came down to the MWRollers, coached by MWRs very own tness instructor Carolyn Chap pell and the TTF Dudes & e Ladies, coached by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Lee, for the championship, with TTF scoring ve runs early and holding on for the 5-3 win. After the games, the teams enjoyed Dominos pizza and socialized at KB Finnegans Irish Pub, the post-game gathering place of KB Sports. anks to all teams for making the event a huge success. ose interested can view photos of all the ac tion at www.facebook. com/kingsbaysports. KB Sports will be starting a kickball league in January that will play one or two nights a week. Contact the sports oce at (912) 573 8908 or www.kingsbaysports.leagueapps.com to learn more.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.What About The Kids workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed for parents whose children have been or may currently be exposed to domestic violence. Pre-registration is required. The workshop is scheduled for 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 21. For more information call 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through the month. The next is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 20. To register, call 573-4512.Parenting classes offered on Mondays Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 19. Enrollment is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar Dec. 28Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 28. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Gambling awareness class set for Dec. 16Participants will complete a gambling self-assessment. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Registration is rec ommended. For more informa tion call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Holiday helpers Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 7

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A New Years Eve Bash is at Rack-N-Roll Entertainment Center, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Satur day, Dec. 31. Cost is $25 per per son or $150 for a lane and up to six people. ere will be pizza, nger foods, champagne toast at midnight and more, plus a prize for the Worst Holiday Sweater. Drink specials, door prizes and a balloon drop. Make your reser vations today at (912) 573-9492. Kings Bay Drive-In Movie Night Showtime is 5:45 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Football/Track Field Parking Lot, with our holiday feature Polar Express. Space is limit ed, so it will be first come, first serve. Sound is through your car radio. Pack up the family car, get the goodies and dont forget the kids. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Adult Sports Co-ed kick ball, dodgeball, indoor soc cer and volleyball leagues will be starting in January. These leagues are open to all active duty, Department of Defense members, dependents and civil ians 18 and older. Captains meetings for all will be on Wednesday, will be at 5:15 p.m., Jan. 11 at the Fitness Complex classroom. Check out Morale, Welfare and Recreations new Web site at kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com for all upcom ing leagues, tournaments and news. For more information on Adult Sports, call (912) 573-8908. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Punch Card Blowout This offer is back through Dec. 31 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Check out the Early Bird Specials and great rates on green fees. You can save even more when you buy your cart. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-8475. Holiday Happenings at the Big EZ & Oscars Check out the December calendar for a list of fun events, trips and holiday fun. For more information, call (912) 573-4548. Holiday Cheer at K.B. Finnegans Its 3:30 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15. All hands are invited for a holiday social including hors doeuvres, drink specials, door prizes and holi day music. Enjoy some laugh ter with friends and co-workers. Drawings for prizes will be every 15 minutes, but you must be present to win. For more infor mation call 912-573-9492/4564. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Sunday NFL Ticket Doors open at noon at KB Finnegans. Over nine screens to watch all the games including two outdoor screens. A $5 buffet includes a hamburger or two dogs, chips and a draft beer or soda. Bar Bingo, Jello Shots, drink specials, prizes and more. Check out the calendar for more specials. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9429. Are you ready for some foot ball? Information, Tickets and Travel now has Jacksonville Jaguar single game and season tickets on sale. Get your favorite game before they are gone. For more information, call ITT at (912) 573-2289. Tuesday Trivia Night Trivia returns to KB Finnegans from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday nights with prizes for first, second and third place. For more information call (912) 573-9429/9492. Karaoke Returns Thursday Nights to KB Finnegans, fea turing The Big Show. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Winter Break 2011 at the Youth Center is for ages kindergarten to 12, Dec. 19 to Jan. 6, but closed on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Cost is based on total family income. Lunch, morning and after noon snacks will be provided. For more information, contact the Youth Center at (912) 5732380. Open Recreation at the Teen Center Its 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years or older, have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more informa tion.Winter Break to start Just for kids New Years Eve Bash Dec. 31 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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Ga., site of the reverse care package event. Our members want to let the kids know that everything is OK even if daddy isnt home. We hope it helps give the families some peace of mind. Another church in Saint Marys, Point Peter Baptist Church, helped with the project. We have a deep ap preciation for the men on the ships and the spouses and children who wait for them at home, said Pastor Doran Womack, Point Peters pastor. So we worked together with First Baptist to provide the Georgia families with some Christ mas presents. e two churches combined eorts to provide volunteers to shop, bake and decorate the church to ensure the event was a success. Cap. Stephen Gillespie, commodore, Submarine Squadron 16, then had the job of asking Santa to de liver the gifts to the partic ipating deployed fathers children. It was actually very easy, Gillespie said. When Santa heard that some of the Georgia (Blue) fathers were supporting the United States and the Navy at sea and may not be home for Christmas to personally give their chil dren a gift, he felt only a personal Santa visit and early gift would be a good temporary substitute until the fathers get home. Santa really appreciates our military and the sacrices all the families make to protect people every where. Gillespie continued by saying events like this are intended to pull together the Navy family through the support and fellow ship that is critical to mis sion success. Virtually all of us have sacriced time and missed important life events with our families to support the Nation, Gillespie said. Georgia (Blue) families, and all of our Squadron crews, provide great fam ily support to allow their Sailors to defend our Na tion. We were very happy Santa chose to provide that extra level of support to improve the morale of the Georgia (Blue) chil dren. Gillespie also added that the support from the Camden County community is phenomenal. e Navy could not achieve many of its mis sions without the family sacrices and certainly the support of the communi ties in which they live, Gillespie said. is is a very busy season for Santa and his elves and the ex tra eort provided by the Camden County community to support this special event made it all possible. We again thank all those who volunteered time to help us welcome Santa, deliver the gifts, and improve family support to our deployed Sailors. In all, about 30 chil dren received their fathers Christmas presents with help from Santa and his Camden County friends. Everything ranging from footballs and dolls to chocolate candy bars were in the numerous, brightly colored, various wrapped gifts. Santa Santas here! Navy photos by MC2 Cory RoseAdalyn Quintana was not amused by Santas visit. Twins Emily, left, and Lauren Ott enjoy their visit with Santa Claus. CS1 Todd Dennis and daughter Hailey make Christmas tree ornaments. Hunter Rose takes things in while awaiting Santa. Santa arrives at the Kids Christmas Party put on by Naval Submarine Base King Bays First Class Association at the Big EZs Sports Zone, Dec. 10. Families fill up their plates during Breakfast With Santa on Dec. 10 at the conference center. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 9

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Last year I told you about getting that toy subma rine and sailing it through the wall of my brother Daves Fort Apache and nuking all the cavalry and Indians, and making him cry, and getting a swat and being told to play nice. This year, let me tell you about bad stuff ... socks and underwear. What kid wants socks and underwear, or shirts and trousers, for Christmas? I never wanted that as an adult either, until now. Ironically, now I really need new socks and underwear! Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Lt. Curt Montano USS Tennessee Blue Albuquerque, N.M. I got a bow and arrows from my dad when I was about 15. That was really neat. Stephanie Kalajainen Family member Dunedin, Fla. A Glow Worm. I still have it, too. ET2 Ben Cook USS Wyoming Gold Tavares, Fla. Probably an ice box, when I was little. ITC Angela Beal Submarine Group 10 Chattahoochee, Fla. A gathering of friends and family I hadnt seen for years when I came back from a deployment. Chief of the Boat John Adam HMS Astute Old Kilpatrick, Scotland The good news that everybody is well and healthy at home. Naida McDowell Family member Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua A tricycle. I remember vividly. It was the best day of my life. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Service Members of the Month THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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Navy College Educational Information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chow der Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasDec. 22 to 28 ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chow der Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach Italian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusDec. 29 to Jan. 5 ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast hours 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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More than 5,000 distinguished guests and the general public joined cur rent and former military personnel for the 70th an niversary of Pearl Harbor Day at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center at the World War II Valor in the Pacic National Monument, Dec. 7. Hosted by the National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, the joint memorial ceremony had the theme: e Enduring Legacy: Pearl Harbor 1941-2011. Two of the guest speak ers for the ceremony were Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Pearl Har bor Survivor Mal Middlesworth. It is important for us to thank the survivors of Pearl Harbor. It is impor tant for us to remember the ones who didnt sur vive, Mabus said. It is important for us to carry on the legacy of the things that were started here on Dec. 7, 1941, the heroism, the dedication, the patrio tism to carry on for future generations. e ceremony was held on the lawn of the visitor center, which looks direct ly out to the USS Arizona Memorial situated in Pearl Harbor. More than 300 Pearl Harbor survivors and oth er WWII veterans attend ed the annual observance. At the ceremony, National Pearl Harbor Survivors Association President William Muehleib announced that the association will disband on Dec. 31, 2011. Muehleib said that due to the apparent diminish ing health and age of its members, the organization will not be able to continue to operate. He, however, reassured that the remaining Pearl Har bor survivors will con tinue to keep close ties with the community and attend future Pearl Harbor events whenever possible. Ninety-one-year-old John Murphy, a Pearl Har bor survivor from USS Vestal, said he would still try to come back to Hawaii next year for the 71st Pearl Harbor anniversary. During the ceremony, four F-22 Raptors of the U.S. Air Force and Hawaii Air National Guard con ducted a missing man for mation yover. e guided-missile de stroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) performed a pass-in-review with the crew manning the rails as the ship passed alongside the USS Arizona Memorial. Guests observed a Marine Corps rie salute and Pacic Fleet Bands pre sentation of Echo Taps. A wreath-laying cer emony and recognition was performed for all the major warships and battle sites. Each Pearl Harbor survivor stood when the name of their respective locations were called. After the ceremony Ma bus led the ocial party and Pearl Harbor survi vors, who traveled aboard a Navy biodiesel boat, in a oral tribute aboard the USS Arizona Memorial. In Washington, D.C., rain could not stop a wreath laying ceremony, hosted by the Navy Me morial Historical Society, taking place at the Lone Sailor Statue Dec.. Among those in attendance were Pearl Harbor survivors and their family members as well as retired Rear Admiral Edward K. Walker Jr. At the time of the attacks Walker was just 9 years old and stationed with his family at Pearl Harbor. At the time Walkers fa ther was a Lt. Cmdr. as the operations ocer of a sta command. Walker said he remembers watching the smoke rise. I climbed up on the roof of our house and from there I could see the smoke. I was close enough that I could feel the con cussions from the bombs, that went on for about an hour, Walker said. en the second wave came in. e planes ew over the mountain behind our house and on into Pearl Harbor. Walker said he was hon ored to be a part of the wreath laying and that it was very personal to him. Im very emotionally involved in the wreath lay ing, Walker said. I served 38 years in the Navy and my father served 33. Walker also said that re membering Pearl Harbor is important for several reasons. Most important is remembering the sacrices, dedication and courage of the nearly 2,400 people who lost their lives that day, Walker said. Pearl Harbor teaches us that we as military people must al ways be prepared to meet an enemy capability. Walker invited retirees to come and enjoy the Navy Memorial. I want to ask all of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard veterans to please visit your Navy Memorial, he said. You helped build it, you help keep it running. is me morial represents you, your dedication, your sac rices, and your courage. Following the wreath laying a panel discussion was held in the Navy Me morial Historical Society with Pearl Harbor survi vors sharing their memo ries of that day. Navy ceremonies remember Pearl Harbor Survivor nds nal resting place at PearlOn Dec. 5, two days before the 70th Anniversary Pearl Harbor Day, a memorial ceremony was held for 81-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, Boatswains Mate 1st Class Jack Gordon Franklin, at the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island. e ceremony included a short religious ser vice, the scattering of ashes and a three-volley rie salute provided by the Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam Navy Detachment Honor Guard. A bugler from the Pacic Fleet Band was also on hand to sound Taps and at the end of the ceremony a Sail or presented an American ag to Franklins eldest daughter, Joey Elaine Duncan. It was really beautiful, Duncan said. I havent stopped crying yet. It was a beautiful day too and I appreciate the military doing this for us. It just means so much. Its closure for us. Franklin, who died July 12, 2005, was a 17-yearold Sailor aboard USS West Virginia (BB 48) during the Dec. 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attacks. Retired Command Master Chief James Tay lor, a volunteer at Commander, Navy Region Ha waii Public Aairs, hosted the ceremony and said Franklin expressed desire to his children to have his remains returned to Pearl Harbor so he could be with his friends and shipmates who were lost during the attack. anks to his three children, Joey, Tim and Pat, his wish has come true, Taylor said. Born, on Jan. 31, 1924, Franklin joined the Navy a few days after his 17th birthday in January 1941. He was a mess cook on West Virginia when the at tack started. Duncan said when Franklin went topside he was wandering around the ship looking for people. A chief was the one who signaled him to get to the gun, Duncan said. I havent been able to nd out but they used to call him Chief Smithy. Franklin reached an anti-aircraft battery and red the only shots from the battery during the raid. e West Virginia was hit by numerous torpe does and two bombs. More than 100 crew mem bers, including the ships commanding ocer, were killed that day. Franklin continued to serve throughout the war eort, participating in major battles such as the Battle of Midway and the Battle of Coral Sea. He saw his last action at Buckner Bay in Okinawa, Ja pan, ducking Japanese Kamikaze planes. Franklin was such a devout Christian that his shipmates called him Holy Joe because he preached to anyone who would listen. After serving, he dove into several ventures in cluding ministry, operating a caf, doing public re lations work for the Southern Pacic Railroad and managing an art gallery until his death in 2005. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.org Cyber security at issue Director of Program In tegration for Information Dominance, Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, the guest speaker for the fall 2011 Navy Now forum net working luncheon. Leigher focused on the Navys current and future endeavors in information dominance and cyber security, and usage of cyber space as an operational tool, at the Ronald Reagan Building and Internation al Trade Center in Wash ington, D.C.. We are currently seeing a lot of conversions because handheld devices are allowing for easy ac cess to cyberspace from almost anywhere on the planet, Leigher said. e challenge for us right now is trying to secure that so we can use these smart devices in our environ ment, but also look for ways to attack it in a con tinual way. During a question and answer portion of the lun cheon, Leigher touched on many key topics to in clude increasing aware ness of integration of do mains, as well as providing Naval forces with the ability for command control and freedom of navigation in cyberspace. When you look across cyberspace there are a few things that make it unique, said Leigher. We attack and defend on ex actly the same platform that our adversaries attack and defend on. You have to understand what that thin line is and make sure that we can assure security twenty-four hours a day, three hundred and sixty ve days a year because without that we cannot operate eectively. e event, sponsored by the Association of the United States Navy, gives senior Navy ocials and business leaders the op portunity to enhance and develop relationships that will strengthen current and future functions of the Navy. is is always a great opportunity for Navy and business leaders to gather together and chart out the future, said AUSN Nation al President and retired Rear Adm. Timothy Moon. ings like Internet se curity and Sailors benets are under attack every day. We get our strength from the number of mem bers we have advocating to protect the rights and benets of the Navy and its personnel. is was the fourth Navy Now forum held by AUSN. e association has been active since 1957, and their mission is to advance inter ests of all members of the Navy community by sup porting personal and professional needs of Sailors. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 15

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USS Oklahoma (BB 37) sank in Pearl Harbor dur ing the Japanese attacks Dec. 7, 1941, taking more than 400 crew members with her. Seaman Apprentice Gene Dick was one of 32 Sailors who survived the sinking. He was perform ing routine tasks in sick bay that Sunday morn ing when the battle alarm sounded and the ocer of the deck announced that it was not a drill. Dick was preparing to assist injured personnel at his battle station in triage when the rst torpedo hit. [It] just picked that ship up, and shook it like that, and slammed it down into the water, he said. By the time he picked himself up from the deck, the second torpedo hit and shook the ship again. When the water started pouring in, Dick and an other Sailor left their sta tion and headed aft in or der to reach the open deck and escape the ship. ey made it to a supply berthing, where they were about to make it outside the skin of the ship, as it continued to roll. When we got about three people from the door, water started pour ing in through the hatch and just knocked us over and over and over, Dick said. He then began climbing bunks to escape the rising water. By that time the ship had turned completely over, he said. I didnt know it, of course. I was absolutely disoriented. It felt like hours later, but it wasnt that long, I ended up in an air pocket be tween the deck and the bulkhead. Temporarily safe, Dick said he then took in his surroundings to gure out what to do next. Full of salt water and fuel oil, and I couldnt see a thing, he said. It was black, black, black, dark, dark. ere were bodies oating all around me. en I saw a light back in the back. Someone had found a battle lantern, and Dick could hear some voices so he swam in that direction. ey started talking about how to get out. We didnt even know which way was up, Dick said. We just knew we were in an air pocket. Somebody found a port hole. Still disoriented, the Sailors did not know if the porthole went inside or outside the ship. I decided by then I didnt care, Dick said. I was going to go through that porthole, because I was just as dead out there as I was in here. Some people made it through the small port hole easily, while others needed help. Dick was fth in line to get out. Wed been down there for about four hours then, he said. We didnt know it. We were scared to death, you know. He attempted to exit the porthole feet rst, but his clothing got caught and he came back in to try again. I said, Well Ill try to go out head rst, Dick said. I took o my skivvy shirt and headed down. I got down. I could get one shoulder through, then the other shoulder through. I took a deep breath and got down and started through, and my shorts caught. It was only a 21 inch porthole, but I got my hands on the outside and pushed; the guys pushed on me. And nally my shorts ripped o. Dick said as soon as he hit the open water he began swimming upward. We were down about 50 feet deep in the depths of Pearl Harbor, he said. I swam and swam and swam and nally got to the surface. ere was burn ing fuel oil all around me. Dick was rescued by a motor whaleboat crew who picked him up from the water and took him to get medical care. Dicks day started in sick bay, where he was car ing for others, but ended in the hospital, where he was one of many receiving treatment. He nished his Navy career 22 years later as a chief warrant ocer in the medical service. He said he is grateful for every moment he has had since Pearl Harbor. So Ive been living on borrowed time for about 70 years, Dick said. Pearl survivor escaped capsized USS Oklahoma Navys special pay revised A Navy message released Nov. 22 announced revisions in special duty assignment pay. NAVADMIN 356/11 lists updated SDAP levels for active-duty and Reserve component full-time support and qualied select ed Reserve Sailors on ac tive duty. Increases to existing SDAP levels are eec tive immediately and re ductions are eective 60 days from release of NA VADMIN 356/11. Sailors whose SDAP will be elimi nated will receive half of their previous SDAP enti tlement for 12 months, or until the Sailor completes the tour, whichever comes rst. e SDAP program is an incentive pay ranging from $75 to $450 a month used to entice qualied Sailors to serve in desig nated billets that are con sidered extremely dicult or entail arduous duty. Program levels change to reect the current envi ronment associated with each billet and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be as signed to and working in a valid billet on the Com mand Manpower Autho rization Listing. is billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a special duty assignment billet. Commands holding SDAP billets are required to complete an annual recertication. NAVADMIN 356/11 supersedes previously released SDAP rates. More than 25,000 Sailors receive SDAP. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6 and talk with their com mand career counselor to learn more about SDAP. 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011



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County helps with eort for children of deployed SailorsSanta arrived earlier than expected to drop o Christmas presents to family members of USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Blue) Dec. 6 at First Baptist Church in Saint Marys, Ga. Local community leaders and volunteers provided Christmas gifts to the children of the deployed Ohio-class guided missile submarine to ensure they received a gift from their deployed fathers. e event compared to a typical care package drive. However, instead of the community providing boxes of beef jerky and toiletries for deployed Sailors, some members in the Camden County community oered to provide the holiday packages for the children of the deployed Sailors. Naval Submarine Support Command Chaplain Lt. Joseph Wilburn coordinated the event between the squadron and community. Events like this help strengthen family resiliency, Wilburn said. It also helps to build that bridge of faith between the base and community. Georgia (Blue) families may not be able to see their fathers in time for Christmas and local community leaders asked if it was possible to provide the families with Christmas presents so the children could have a present from dad. With help from Submarine Squadron 16 and the Georgia (Blue) command ombudsman, Stephanie Kline, the message was sent to the deployed fathers if they would like to volunteer to participate in the event. ose who liked the idea, responded to the squadron positively and had their message relayed to both the volunteers asking to donate presents and, through the ombudsman, to the accepting families. Our church community values our military families, said Pastor Steve Kegley of First Baptist Church in Saint Marys, THEkings bay, georgia Happy Holidays Homecoming Page 4Santa stops early for USS Georgia The Gift of Life Page 5Model for the Navy Friday last Toys for Tots pickup No. 1 PSD Volleyball, kickball decidede Kings Bay Intramural Sports Volleyball playos come down to two teams Dec. 8 after Dig is dispatched the Blue Devil Aces and the Dominators of Medical, while the Ball Busters fought past the Free Agents and Smash of Medical to earn spots in the championship. e Ball Busters, led by Averi Stoner and Dig is, led by Stacy Maysonet, met for the title in a best 3-of-5 match. e Ball Busters came out ring, as HMC Roel Gerardo set up balls for YNC Rick English and Stoner to smash Busters took the rst set, 25-18. Dig regrouped and put on a show in the second set, as ET1 Rich Kostar (Ret.) served 10 consecutive points to build a big lead. ETC Josh Lima and his wife, Rachel, played strong defense to thwart the Busters attack. Dig is went on to win, 25-15. It was all Busters in the third set, taking o from the start for the Intramural Sports By Ryan Leavy Sports Coordinator Final push begins to collect Christmas gis for childrenOnly today and Friday remain for the Marine Corps Reserves Toys for Tots accepting donations at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Collection points aboard NSB Kings Bay include the Fitness Center, the Navy Exchange and Navy Federal Credit Union. Collection sites outside the gates are at e Big K Mart, Walgreens and the Navy Federal on Georgia Spur 40. After Friday, last-minute donations can be made by phoning Camden County Local Coordinator Frank Fornili at (912) 674-9747. Toys for Tots collects new, unwrapped toys each year, distributing the toys as Christmas gifts to needy children in the community. e main objective of this program to is deliver, through a new toy at Christmas, a message of hope to less fortunate children that will assist them into becoming responsible, productive, patriotic citizens, said Lt. Col. Wendy Goyette, Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Commanding Ocer while speaking at the annual CamdenKings Bay Navy League Toys for Tots Brunch.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Did too! Did not! DID TOO! DID NOT! DID TOO and INFINITY! Of course, we all recall that once someone said innity, that is the end of the discussion, period. Each of us probably recall moments like this one ... dont you? You and a friend were arguing over whose mom made the best cookies or whose dad was bigger than the other. Oh, that such discussions could be solved today just by saying innity, and that one word would settle it. Jesus very existence is often discussed like this by passionate people who have diering belief systems or theological points that dont fully line up with our own. I believe it is one of the reasons why King Herod wanted someone to go and seek out the Christ child. Truth is, that one word from King Herod would have ended all possible future ministries of Jesus. But, the one word from our Creator sent the wise men who were fortunate enough to worship the baby Jesus a word that they should not return to King Herod and tell him where Jesus was located. King Herod wanted this baby Jesus taken out of the picture, out of fear. Angels and prophets say in the Holy Bible do not be afraid, more than 76 times depending on the version read. It is enough occurrences to take notice of the thought that God does not want us to be fearful of things that can destroy our possessions, our bodies or our family. We should in fact be more concerned about what can destroy our souls, our well being. at my friends is something to be fearful about! So, the next time someone says or does something that hurts, remember that we once received a beautiful gift. Our diculty comes in remembering that the gift of life and our souls comes at a great price. e greatest compliment we can pay our Creator is to forgive with grace and humility, just like my redeemer Christ did. And innity! THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA NSB Vet Clinic Christmas Dec. 15Join the Kings Bay Veterinary Clinic 4 to 7 p.m., ursday, Dec. 15 for its second annual open house. Patrons will have the opportunity to meet the doctors, have complimentary pet pictures with Santa, enjoy childrens activities, refreshments, giveaways, and, if patrons bring in an item to do nate the humane shelter, in exchange the sta will perform a free toe nail trim. For more information, call the clinic 573-0755 or stop by 921 USS George Bancroft Ave., Building 1003. Items that will be happily accepted for the shelter are dog food, cat food, cat litter, chew toys, laundry soap, bleach, cat toys, postage, collars, leashes, paper towels, vine gar and Pine Sol.Relief Society sets holiday hourse Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay will close at noon on Friday, Dec. 23, and will resume normal business hours at 9 a.m., Tuesday, Dec. 27. In the event of an emergency afterhours or during the holiday closure, contact the American Red Cross at (877)-272-7337. MOAA Christmas dinner Dec. 20Kings Bay Chapter of Military Ocers Association of America will hold its dinner meeting starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday Dec. 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Rd. Guest speaker will be Cheri Richter with the St. Marys-War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee. Dress is seasonal festive. Former and active duty ocers of the Armed Services as well Public Health Service and NOAA are welcome. RSVP by Dec. 10 to Capt. Orren Crouch, (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Commissary posts holiday hourse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commis sary will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Monday be fore Christmas, Dec. 19. e commissary will be closed ursday, anksgiving, and Friday, Nov. 24 and 25,; Dec. 25 for Christmas and Dec. 26; and Jan. 1 for New Years Day and Jan. 2.Exchange explains return policyis holiday season, the Navy Exchange wants to make returning gifts as easy as possible. Since gifts may be purchased well before they are given during the holidays, all NEXs will accept returns through Jan. 29, 2012. is includes items typically covered by the 14-day return policy, such as computers, computer equipment, software, digital cameras and the 45-day return policy for all other merchandise. is extended return policy applies to original purchases made Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 either in a NEX or through the NEX Web store, www.myNavyExchange.com. Customers are asked to include any packaging material along with the receipt when making a return. Any returns without a receipt will be placed on a NEX Gift Card. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday through Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Take steps to prevent identity theHey Dollar Bill! I recently read in the local news that many Camden County residents have had their credit card numbers stolen and cash has disappeared from their bank accounts. How can I protect myself from this happening to me? Consumer Dear Consumer, You are correct. Information provided in the news by Camden County Sheris Oce indicated that credit card numbers and cash have been stolen from Camden County residents. CCSO reported that hundreds of thousands of dollars have been stolen in a matter of months. ere were 60 to 75 cases this past summer. With the holidays in full swing, now more than ever, it is critical to safeguard your identity. ere are several things you can start doing to protect yourself and your credit. Keep your personal information to yourself. Banks will not call or send an e-mail asking for nancial information. Shred mail, old receipts, documents and account information. Memorize your Personal Identication Number(s) (PIN) and passwords. If you must write them down, keep them separate from your account information. Always review your monthly statements. With online banking available, you should review your accounts several times during the week for any suspicious activity. Report any unauthorized transactions to your bank or credit card agency. Pay attention to your credit or debit card every time you make a purchase. Make sure the cashier or anyone nearby isnt recording your information. If your credit card leaves your sight, make sure the card you get back is yours. Check your credit report at least yearly through www.annualcreditreport.com. is Web site provides a free credit report from all three credit bureaus annually. Beware of Phishing/Vishing. Phishing is when someone is trying to get usernames, passwords and credit card details electronically. Vishing is the same as Phishing but using the telephone. Shop trusted Web sites from reputable companies. When you order online, make sure the Web site address begins with https://, which indicates a secure Web site. Use your credit card to shop on line, because you can dispute the charges if something goes wrong. Beware of meeting people online or on social Web sites who suddenly need help with money. ey may claim to be a relative, for example grandson, nephew or niece, or someone you knew from years ago. Watch out for these tricks and e-mails saying you stand to inherit lots of money from a relative or announcements that youve won a prize or lottery you never entered. If you think that you have been the victim of identity theft, I recommend that you contact your local law enforcement ocials and le a report. You will also need to le a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov and contact each of the Credit Bureaus to place a fraud alert on your le. As a Certied Credit Report Reviewer for the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, I can review your credit le and assist with ling complaints of identity theft. I can possibly provide you a free copy of your credit score. Please contact me at the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-9783 or 573-4513 for more information or to schedule an appointment. I look forward to working with you to understand your credit report and credit scores and in helping you get any possible errors corrected. Very respectfully, Dollar Bill Ask Dollar Bill! By William Dollar Bill Snook Kings Bay FFSC Over the past few years, synthetic THC the hallucinogenic chemical in marijuana known as Spice, K2 and Blaze, as well as the synthetic stimulants commonly called bath salts or plant food, have seen increased use by service members. On Oct. 21, the Drug Enforcement Agency placed the synthetic stimulants in bath salts and plant food onto the same list of banned substances as heroin and marijuana. is means that the same federal criminal penalties that apply to use of heroin and marijuana will now apply to use of bath salts and similar drugs. e DEA took the same action for the synthetic THC in Spice and similar drugs on 1 Mar. 1. DEA noted that these actions are necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. While the federal government only recently banned these substances, they have been banned by the Navy since 2005. Use or possession of these substances by Navy personnel is forbidden and could possibly subject a Sailor to non-judicial punishment, administrative separation or court-martial under UCMJ Art. 112a or UCMJ Art. 92 (for violation of OPNAVINST 5350.4D, SECNAVINST 5300.28E and/or NAVADMIN 108/10). However, in addition to the possible severe legal consequences, individual Sailors and Navy leadership should understand the harmful and potentially deadly eects of using these drugs. e DEA states that they have received an increasing number of reports from poison control centers, hospitals and law enforcement organizations citing examples of individuals using synthetic THC and experiencing serious side eects such as convulsions, anxiety attacks, dangerously elevated heart rates, increased blood pressure, vomiting and disorientation. e reported side eects of bath salts include agitation, paranoia, high blood pressure, hallucinations, chest pain, suicidality and psychosis. Sailors should be aware that ingest ing these synthetic drugs can lead to bad reactions and deadly results. e manufacturers of these banned substances actually label many of these substances as not t for human consumption. For example, police in West Virginia recently arrested a man after they found him dressed in womens clothing, standing with his pants down over a blood-soaked goat that he allegedly stole and killed. He blamed his bizarre behavior on the use of bath salts. Additionally, Reuters News Agency reported claims from the European Union that mephedrone, a chemical often found in bath salts, was directly linked to the deaths of two people and is possibly tied to the deaths of 37 more. ere are many more such stories. Very few scientic studies have been done on these synthetic drugs, so the immediate and long term effects on the body and human brain are mostly unknown. e few studies that have been done on JWH018, the compound generally found in Spice, indicate that it is more potent and ecacious than THC. is means that lower concentrations of JWH-018 can have a greater and Synthetic THC poses dangerous risk Navy Region Southeast Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay ChapelForgiving with grace and humility

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NSB Kings Bays Fitness Center worked with the program by having a 5K run Dec. 7. Approximately 250 participants donated toys and raised $385 for the program. Ian Christian and Deanna rasher ran to rstplace nishes in the respective male and female divisions. Fornili said this years drive has gone well. As usual in Camden County, the community comes together very nicely for us to help those in need, he said. Spouse 101 e U.S. Coast Guard, as a public service to holiday gift shoppers, announced its recommended gift ideas for 12 nautical days of Christmas. Nothing says I love you to a mariner like the gift of a marine GPS navigation system, a Coast Guard approved life jacket, boating safety course or 406 MHz electronic position indicating radio beacon, said Lt. Cmdr. Chris ONeil, the Coast Guards chief of media relations. Regardless of the occasion or holiday, the gifts we recommend this year can save a loved ones life, making them the perfect gift this season, or throughout the year. Diamonds are pretty, and big-screen, highdenition televisions are great for watching the big game, but they wont help you prevent a boating accident, or survive after youve been in one. Among the Coast Guards recommended nautical gifts are: A Marine GPS navigation system A 406 MHz EPIRB (make sure you register it after purchase, or rescuers may be delayed in reaching you!) A Coast Guardapproved life jacket (they float, you dont...) A handheld VHF-FM radio A Boating Safety Course (boater education saves lives its a fact) Vessel Safety Check from the Coast Guard Auxiliary (its free!) A Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher A first aid kit in a watertight container A seamanship book Nautical charts for the areas your favorite mariner frequents A signaling kit A life raft with a survival kit Some of the most valuable gifts dont cost anything but time, such as scheduling a free vessel safety check with members of your local Coast Guard Auxiliary. From the Coast Guard family to yours, Happy Holidays!12 Nautical Days of Christmas ideas Coast Guard higher maximal psychological eect on the brain than that of THC. In short, the greater potency of the synthetic substances means there is a much greater risk of overdose. Adding to their dangerous nature is the lack of quality control in their manufacture. Most of the products sold are simply plant matter soaked in the synthetic compounds in a nonuniform manner, so its impossible for the Sailor to know how much of the synthetic drug he or she is actually ingesting. at also greatly increases the risk of overdose. e bottom line point that Sailors need to understand that there are enormous consequences to using these synthetic drugs, and that they go beyond legal, disciplinary, or career consequences. It is important for Sailors to know the risks they take when putting these chemicals in their bodies, and the potentially disastrous long-term eects it may have on their lives.THC Toys THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Linehandlers on the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) await final inspections after returning to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Dec. 6. Machinists Mate 1st Class Thomas Bolin, USS Wyoming Gold machin ery division, hugs his wife, Megan, on the pier. xxx 06 DEC 11 Arriving USS Wyoming Chief Sonar Technician Tim Walker, USS Wyoming Gold sonar division chief, greets his wife, Kelly. USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) returned from a three-month deployment. Navy photos by MC1 James KimberSonar Technician 3rd Class Brian Finch, USS Wyoming Gold gets the first kiss with his wife, Danae, and 2-year-old daughter, Catalina. Ama Spisiak holds on to her father, Missilie Technician 3rd Class John Spisiak, USS Wyoming Gold, as he greets his wife, Sarah.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 5 Army Specialist Santiago Rueda, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Miami, prepares labels to issue a blood bag to a donor. Army Specialist Victor Castillo, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Laredo, Texas, prepares blood samples for testing. Army Staff Sgt. Marlin Watson, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Facility, of Montgomery, Ala., segments and seals blood bags. Musician 2nd Class Justin Glenn, Navy Band Southeast, of Chino Hills, Calif., plays Christmas carols during the Armed Services Blood Program drive. Pfc. John Schon of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay donates blood to the Armed Services Blood Program Dec. 5 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. The blood donated will be in the Sixth Fleet area of operations by the end of the week for uni formed personnel serving in combat areas. Coast Guard Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jon Gilliand, Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay, and his wife, Erica, donate.

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25-15 win. e fourth set was back-and-forth, with neither team taking more than a four-point lead. e Busters fell behind 18-14 before calling a timeout to regroup. e team won the set and the championship, 25-23. It was a great game all around e Ball Busters will look to defend the title in January when the next volleyball season begins. Kickball tournament a huge success On Saturday, Dec. 10, eight teams from Kings Bay came out to relive their childhood and experience the exciting sport of kickball. e double-elimination kickball tournament featured the Red Solo Cups of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, the Balls & Gals of Medical, e TTF Dudes & e Ladies, the MWRollers, Les Boules of Trident Ret Facility, Security Ball Busters, Da Bravo Bears of MCSFB and the Foot Clan of NSB. Everybody came out pumped up and ready to play. e afternoon progressed in excellent fashion, as teams started to deploy strategies and planned to score runs and win games. Kickball isnt like softball, the average score for the games was 5-4, so every run is precious. It came down to the MWRollers, coached by MWRs very own tness instructor Carolyn Chappell and the TTF Dudes & e Ladies, coached by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Lee, for the championship, with TTF scoring ve runs early and holding on for the 5-3 win. After the games, the teams enjoyed Dominos pizza and socialized at KB Finnegans Irish Pub, the post-game gathering place of KB Sports. anks to all teams for making the event a huge success. ose interested can view photos of all the action at www.facebook. com/kingsbaysports. KB Sports will be starting a kickball league in January that will play one or two nights a week. Contact the sports oce at (912) 573 8908 or www.kingsbaysports.leagueapps.com to learn more.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.What About The Kids workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed for parents whose children have been or may currently be exposed to domestic violence. Pre-registration is required. The workshop is scheduled for 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 21. For more information call 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through the month. The next is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 20. To register, call 573-4512.Parenting classes offered on Mondays Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 19. Enrollment is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar Dec. 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 28. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Gambling awareness class set for Dec. 16Participants will complete a gambling self-assessment. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Holiday helpers Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 7

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A New Years Eve Bash is at Rack-N-Roll Entertainment Center, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 31. Cost is $25 per person or $150 for a lane and up to six people. ere will be pizza, nger foods, champagne toast at midnight and more, plus a prize for the Worst Holiday Sweater. Drink specials, door prizes and a balloon drop. Make your reservations today at (912) 573-9492. Kings Bay Drive-In Movie Night Showtime is 5:45 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Football/Track Field Parking Lot, with our holiday feature Polar Express. Space is limit ed, so it will be first come, first serve. Sound is through your car radio. Pack up the family car, get the goodies and dont forget the kids. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Adult Sports Co-ed kick ball, dodgeball, indoor soc cer and volleyball leagues will be starting in January. These leagues are open to all active duty, Department of Defense members, dependents and civil ians 18 and older. Captains meetings for all will be on Wednesday, will be at 5:15 p.m., Jan. 11 at the Fitness Complex classroom. Check out Morale, Welfare and Recreations new Web site at kingsbaysports. leagueapps.com for all upcom ing leagues, tournaments and news. For more information on Adult Sports, call (912) 573-8908. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes is now open. Come in and see the new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save your tickets for big prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Punch Card Blowout This offer is back through Dec. 31 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Check out the Early Bird Specials and great rates on green fees. You can save even more when you buy your cart. For more information, call (912) 573-8475. Holiday Happenings at the Big EZ & Oscars Check out the December calendar for a list of fun events, trips and holiday fun. For more information, call (912) 573-4548. Holiday Cheer at K.B. Finnegans Its 3:30 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15. All hands are invited for a holiday social including hors doeuvres, drink specials, door prizes and holiday music. Enjoy some laughter with friends and co-workers. Drawings for prizes will be every 15 minutes, but you must be present to win. For more information call 912-573-9492/4564. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Sunday NFL Ticket Doors open at noon at KB Finnegans. Over nine screens to watch all the games including two outdoor screens. A $5 buffet includes a hamburger or two dogs, chips and a draft beer or soda. Bar Bingo, Jello Shots, drink specials, prizes and more. Check out the calendar for more specials. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9429. Are you ready for some football? Information, Tickets and Travel now has Jacksonville Jaguar single game and season tickets on sale. Get your favorite game before they are gone. For more information, call ITT at (912) 573-2289. Tuesday Trivia Night Trivia returns to KB Finnegans from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday nights with prizes for first, second and third place. For more information call (912) 573-9429/9492. Karaoke Returns Thursday Nights to KB Finnegans, fea turing The Big Show. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Winter Break 2011 at the Youth Center is for ages kindergarten to 12, Dec. 19 to Jan. 6, but closed on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Cost is based on total family income. Lunch, morning and afternoon snacks will be provided. For more information, contact the Youth Center at (912) 5732380. Open Recreation at the Teen Center Its 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years or older, have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more informa tion.Winter Break to start Just for kids New Years Eve Bash Dec. 31 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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Ga., site of the reverse care package event. Our members want to let the kids know that everything is OK even if daddy isnt home. We hope it helps give the families some peace of mind. Another church in Saint Marys, Point Peter Baptist Church, helped with the project. We have a deep appreciation for the men on the ships and the spouses and children who wait for them at home, said Pastor Doran Womack, Point Peters pastor. So we worked together with First Baptist to provide the Georgia families with some Christmas presents. e two churches combined eorts to provide volunteers to shop, bake and decorate the church to ensure the event was a success. Cap. Stephen Gillespie, commodore, Submarine Squadron 16, then had the job of asking Santa to deliver the gifts to the participating deployed fathers children. It was actually very easy, Gillespie said. When Santa heard that some of the Georgia (Blue) fathers were supporting the United States and the Navy at sea and may not be home for Christmas to personally give their children a gift, he felt only a personal Santa visit and early gift would be a good temporary substitute until the fathers get home. Santa really appreciates our military and the sacrices all the families make to protect people everywhere. Gillespie continued by saying events like this are intended to pull together the Navy family through the support and fellowship that is critical to mission success. Virtually all of us have sacriced time and missed important life events with our families to support the Nation, Gillespie said. Georgia (Blue) families, and all of our Squadron crews, provide great family support to allow their Sailors to defend our Nation. We were very happy Santa chose to provide that extra level of support to improve the morale of the Georgia (Blue) children. Gillespie also added that the support from the Camden County community is phenomenal. e Navy could not achieve many of its missions without the family sacrices and certainly the support of the communities in which they live, Gillespie said. is is a very busy season for Santa and his elves and the extra eort provided by the Camden County community to support this special event made it all possible. We again thank all those who volunteered time to help us welcome Santa, deliver the gifts, and improve family support to our deployed Sailors. In all, about 30 children received their fathers Christmas presents with help from Santa and his Camden County friends. Everything ranging from footballs and dolls to chocolate candy bars were in the numerous, brightly colored, various wrapped gifts. Santa Santas here! Navy photos by MC2 Cory RoseAdalyn Quintana was not amused by Santas visit. Twins Emily, left, and Lauren Ott enjoy their visit with Santa Claus. CS1 Todd Dennis and daughter Hailey make Christmas tree ornaments. Hunter Rose takes things in while awaiting Santa. Santa arrives at the Kids Christmas Party put on by Naval Submarine Base King Bays First Class Association at the Big EZs Sports Zone, Dec. 10. Families fill up their plates during Breakfast With Santa on Dec. 10 at the conference center. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 9

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Last year I told you about getting that toy subma rine and sailing it through the wall of my brother Daves Fort Apache and nuking all the cavalry and Indians, and making him cry, and getting a swat and being told to play nice. This year, let me tell you about bad stuff ... socks and underwear. What kid wants socks and underwear, or shirts and trousers, for Christmas? I never wanted that as an adult either, until now. Ironically, now I really need new socks and underwear! Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Lt. Curt Montano USS Tennessee Blue Albuquerque, N.M. I got a bow and arrows from my dad when I was about 15. That was really neat. Stephanie Kalajainen Family member Dunedin, Fla. A Glow Worm. I still have it, too. ET2 Ben Cook USS Wyoming Gold Tavares, Fla. Probably an ice box, when I was little. ITC Angela Beal Submarine Group 10 Chattahoochee, Fla. A gathering of friends and family I hadnt seen for years when I came back from a deployment. Chief of the Boat John Adam HMS Astute Old Kilpatrick, Scotland The good news that everybody is well and healthy at home. Naida McDowell Family member Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua A tricycle. I remember vividly. It was the best day of my life. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Service Members of the Month THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 11

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Navy College Educational Information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 13

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ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliFridayBreakfast Grits Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Sausage Links Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni and Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Turkey gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned CornSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs Hot Dog Bar Chili without beans Chicken Nuggets French fries Steamed Broccoli Oven Fried bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Chicken Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Lyonnaise Carrots Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef with Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fried Vegetables Egg Rolls Speed Line Pizza Chicken Tenders Potato Bar Dinner Crab Bisque Fried Fish Roast Beef French Fries Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered PeasTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Texas Tortilla Soup Barbecue Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Macaroni and Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Speed Line Chicken Quesadias Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Au Gratin Potatoes Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed BroccoliWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Grilled Steak Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Marinara Sauce Cheesy Mashed Potatoes Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Speed Line Hot Dogs Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Rice Pilaf Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy California Medley Steamed PeasDec. 22 to 28 ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Lemon Pepper Fish Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Italian Style Kidney Beans Steamed Wax Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Tossed Green Rice Mixed Vegetables FridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs To Order Omelets to Order Pancakes with Syrup Grilled Bacon Sausage Egg & Cheese Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Beef Vegetable Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Wild Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner French Onion Soup Grilled T-bone Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed AsparagusSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Steamed Broccoli Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green BeansSundayBrunch Knickerbocker Soup Barbecue Pork Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Cole Slaw Cereal Oven fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauteed Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burrito Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Roast Beef Rissole Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Calico Corn Collard Greens Speed Line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Seafood Newberg Teriyaki Beef Strips Rice Pilaf Noodles Jefferson Club Spinach It alian Style Baked BeansTuesdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Confetti Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes Mac and Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage with Bacon Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Barbecue Beef Cubes Chicken Pot Pie Parsley Buttered Potatoes Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans WednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Doubly Good Chicken Soup Braised Beef Tips Stuffed Flounder Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Brown Gravy Simmered Lima Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Roast Pork Teriyaki chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed AsparagusDec. 29 to Jan. 5 ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast hours 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus Dont accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011

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More than 5,000 distinguished guests and the general public joined current and former military personnel for the 70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center at the World War II Valor in the Pacic National Monument, Dec. 7. Hosted by the National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, the joint memorial ceremony had the theme: e Enduring Legacy: Pearl Harbor 1941-2011. Two of the guest speakers for the ceremony were Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Pearl Harbor Survivor Mal Middlesworth. It is important for us to thank the survivors of Pearl Harbor. It is important for us to remember the ones who didnt survive, Mabus said. It is important for us to carry on the legacy of the things that were started here on Dec. 7, 1941, the heroism, the dedication, the patriotism to carry on for future generations. e ceremony was held on the lawn of the visitor center, which looks directly out to the USS Arizona Memorial situated in Pearl Harbor. More than 300 Pearl Harbor survivors and other WWII veterans attended the annual observance. At the ceremony, National Pearl Harbor Survivors Association President William Muehleib announced that the association will disband on Dec. 31, 2011. Muehleib said that due to the apparent diminishing health and age of its members, the organization will not be able to continue to operate. He, however, reassured that the remaining Pearl Harbor survivors will continue to keep close ties with the community and attend future Pearl Harbor events whenever possible. Ninety-one-year-old John Murphy, a Pearl Harbor survivor from USS Vestal, said he would still try to come back to Hawaii next year for the 71st Pearl Harbor anniversary. During the ceremony, four F-22 Raptors of the U.S. Air Force and Hawaii Air National Guard conducted a missing man formation yover. e guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) performed a pass-in-review with the crew manning the rails as the ship passed alongside the USS Arizona Memorial. Guests observed a Marine Corps rie salute and Pacic Fleet Bands presentation of Echo Taps. A wreath-laying ceremony and recognition was performed for all the major warships and battle sites. Each Pearl Harbor survivor stood when the name of their respective locations were called. After the ceremony Mabus led the ocial party and Pearl Harbor survivors, who traveled aboard a Navy biodiesel boat, in a oral tribute aboard the USS Arizona Memorial. In Washington, D.C., rain could not stop a wreath laying ceremony, hosted by the Navy Memorial Historical Society, taking place at the Lone Sailor Statue Dec.. Among those in attendance were Pearl Harbor survivors and their family members as well as retired Rear Admiral Edward K. Walker Jr. At the time of the attacks Walker was just 9 years old and stationed with his family at Pearl Harbor. At the time Walkers father was a Lt. Cmdr. as the operations ocer of a sta command. Walker said he remembers watching the smoke rise. I climbed up on the roof of our house and from there I could see the smoke. I was close enough that I could feel the concussions from the bombs, that went on for about an hour, Walker said. en the second wave came in. e planes ew over the mountain behind our house and on into Pearl Harbor. Walker said he was honored to be a part of the wreath laying and that it was very personal to him. Im very emotionally involved in the wreath laying, Walker said. I served 38 years in the Navy and my father served 33. Walker also said that remembering Pearl Harbor is important for several reasons. Most important is remembering the sacrices, dedication and courage of the nearly 2,400 people who lost their lives that day, Walker said. Pearl Harbor teaches us that we as military people must always be prepared to meet an enemy capability. Walker invited retirees to come and enjoy the Navy Memorial. I want to ask all of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard veterans to please visit your Navy Memorial, he said. You helped build it, you help keep it running. is memorial represents you, your dedication, your sacrices, and your courage. Following the wreath laying a panel discussion was held in the Navy Memorial Historical Society with Pearl Harbor survivors sharing their memories of that day. Navy ceremonies remember Pearl Harbor Survivor nds nal resting place at PearlOn Dec. 5, two days before the 70th Anniversary Pearl Harbor Day, a memorial ceremony was held for 81-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, Boatswains Mate 1st Class Jack Gordon Franklin, at the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island. e ceremony included a short religious service, the scattering of ashes and a three-volley rie salute provided by the Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam Navy Detachment Honor Guard. A bugler from the Pacic Fleet Band was also on hand to sound Taps and at the end of the ceremony a Sailor presented an American ag to Franklins eldest daughter, Joey Elaine Duncan. It was really beautiful, Duncan said. I havent stopped crying yet. It was a beautiful day too and I appreciate the military doing this for us. It just means so much. Its closure for us. Franklin, who died July 12, 2005, was a 17-yearold Sailor aboard USS West Virginia (BB 48) during the Dec. 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attacks. Retired Command Master Chief James Taylor, a volunteer at Commander, Navy Region Hawaii Public Aairs, hosted the ceremony and said Franklin expressed desire to his children to have his remains returned to Pearl Harbor so he could be with his friends and shipmates who were lost during the attack. anks to his three children, Joey, Tim and Pat, his wish has come true, Taylor said. Born, on Jan. 31, 1924, Franklin joined the Navy a few days after his 17th birthday in January 1941. He was a mess cook on West Virginia when the attack started. Duncan said when Franklin went topside he was wandering around the ship looking for people. A chief was the one who signaled him to get to the gun, Duncan said. I havent been able to nd out but they used to call him Chief Smithy. Franklin reached an anti-aircraft battery and red the only shots from the battery during the raid. e West Virginia was hit by numerous torpedoes and two bombs. More than 100 crew members, including the ships commanding ocer, were killed that day. Franklin continued to serve throughout the war eort, participating in major battles such as the Battle of Midway and the Battle of Coral Sea. He saw his last action at Buckner Bay in Okinawa, Japan, ducking Japanese Kamikaze planes. Franklin was such a devout Christian that his shipmates called him Holy Joe because he preached to anyone who would listen. After serving, he dove into several ventures including ministry, operating a caf, doing public relations work for the Southern Pacic Railroad and managing an art gallery until his death in 2005. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.You are helping turn research into reality. Call 800.533.CURE or visit www.jdrf.org Cyber security at issue Director of Program Integration for Information Dominance, Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, the guest speaker for the fall 2011 Navy Now forum networking luncheon. Leigher focused on the Navys current and future endeavors in information dominance and cyber security, and usage of cyberspace as an operational tool, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C.. We are currently seeing a lot of conversions because handheld devices are allowing for easy access to cyberspace from almost anywhere on the planet, Leigher said. e challenge for us right now is trying to secure that so we can use these smart devices in our environment, but also look for ways to attack it in a continual way. During a question and answer portion of the luncheon, Leigher touched on many key topics to include increasing awareness of integration of domains, as well as providing Naval forces with the ability for command control and freedom of navigation in cyberspace. When you look across cyberspace there are a few things that make it unique, said Leigher. We attack and defend on exactly the same platform that our adversaries attack and defend on. You have to understand what that thin line is and make sure that we can assure security twenty-four hours a day, three hundred and sixty ve days a year because without that we cannot operate eectively. e event, sponsored by the Association of the United States Navy, gives senior Navy ocials and business leaders the opportunity to enhance and develop relationships that will strengthen current and future functions of the Navy. is is always a great opportunity for Navy and business leaders to gather together and chart out the future, said AUSN National President and retired Rear Adm. Timothy Moon. ings like Internet security and Sailors benets are under attack every day. We get our strength from the number of members we have advocating to protect the rights and benets of the Navy and its personnel. is was the fourth Navy Now forum held by AUSN. e association has been active since 1957, and their mission is to advance inter ests of all members of the Navy community by sup porting personal and professional needs of Sailors. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011 15

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USS Oklahoma (BB 37) sank in Pearl Harbor during the Japanese attacks Dec. 7, 1941, taking more than 400 crew members with her. Seaman Apprentice Gene Dick was one of 32 Sailors who survived the sinking. He was performing routine tasks in sick bay that Sunday morning when the battle alarm sounded and the ocer of the deck announced that it was not a drill. Dick was preparing to assist injured personnel at his battle station in triage when the rst torpedo hit. [It] just picked that ship up, and shook it like that, and slammed it down into the water, he said. By the time he picked himself up from the deck, the second torpedo hit and shook the ship again. When the water started pouring in, Dick and another Sailor left their station and headed aft in order to reach the open deck and escape the ship. ey made it to a supply berthing, where they were about to make it outside the skin of the ship, as it continued to roll. When we got about three people from the door, water started pouring in through the hatch and just knocked us over and over and over, Dick said. He then began climbing bunks to escape the rising water. By that time the ship had turned completely over, he said. I didnt know it, of course. I was absolutely disoriented. It felt like hours later, but it wasnt that long, I ended up in an air pocket between the deck and the bulkhead. Temporarily safe, Dick said he then took in his surroundings to gure out what to do next. Full of salt water and fuel oil, and I couldnt see a thing, he said. It was black, black, black, dark, dark. ere were bodies oating all around me. en I saw a light back in the back. Someone had found a battle lantern, and Dick could hear some voices so he swam in that direction. ey started talking about how to get out. We didnt even know which way was up, Dick said. We just knew we were in an air pocket. Somebody found a porthole. Still disoriented, the Sailors did not know if the porthole went inside or outside the ship. I decided by then I didnt care, Dick said. I was going to go through that porthole, because I was just as dead out there as I was in here. Some people made it through the small porthole easily, while others needed help. Dick was fth in line to get out. Wed been down there for about four hours then, he said. We didnt know it. We were scared to death, you know. He attempted to exit the porthole feet rst, but his clothing got caught and he came back in to try again. I said, Well Ill try to go out head rst, Dick said. I took o my skivvy shirt and headed down. I got down. I could get one shoulder through, then the other shoulder through. I took a deep breath and got down and started through, and my shorts caught. It was only a 21 inch porthole, but I got my hands on the outside and pushed; the guys pushed on me. And nally my shorts ripped o. Dick said as soon as he hit the open water he began swimming upward. We were down about 50 feet deep in the depths of Pearl Harbor, he said. I swam and swam and swam and nally got to the surface. ere was burning fuel oil all around me. Dick was rescued by a motor whaleboat crew who picked him up from the water and took him to get medical care. Dicks day started in sick bay, where he was caring for others, but ended in the hospital, where he was one of many receiving treatment. He nished his Navy career 22 years later as a chief warrant ocer in the medical service. He said he is grateful for every moment he has had since Pearl Harbor. So Ive been living on borrowed time for about 70 years, Dick said. Pearl survivor escaped capsized USS Oklahoma Navys special pay revised A Navy message released Nov. 22 announced revisions in special duty assignment pay. NAVADMIN 356/11 lists updated SDAP levels for active-duty and Reserve component full-time support and qualied selected Reserve Sailors on active duty. Increases to existing SDAP levels are eective immediately and reductions are eective 60 days from release of NAVADMIN 356/11. Sailors whose SDAP will be eliminated will receive half of their previous SDAP entitlement for 12 months, or until the Sailor completes the tour, whichever comes rst. e SDAP program is an incentive pay ranging from $75 to $450 a month used to entice qualied Sailors to serve in designated billets that are considered extremely dicult or entail arduous duty. Program levels change to reect the current environment associated with each billet and to sustain adequate manning levels. In order to qualify for SDAP, Sailors must be assigned to and working in a valid billet on the Command Manpower Authorization Listing. is billet must be authorized by the Bureau of Naval Personnel as a special duty assignment billet. Commands holding SDAP billets are required to complete an annual recertication. NAVADMIN 356/11 supersedes previously released SDAP rates. More than 25,000 Sailors receive SDAP. Sailors can read OPNAVINST 1160.6 and talk with their command career counselor to learn more about SDAP. 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 15, 2011