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The Kings Bay periscope ( 12-08-2011 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00241

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00241


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THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Fun breakfast Page 6Kings Bay turns out for blood drive Arrive, depart Pages 4, 5 More authorized stops commuting between work, home Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform Type I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. ere has been a lot of inter est throughout the eet regard ing expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. e NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when com muting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding ocers. ese policies will take eect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam com mands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, o-base shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the workday. Since NWUs are not a liberty uniform, consumption of alcohol while obase in the NWUs is not permit ted. Area or regional commanders may further restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I, II and III are authorized Jan. 1 for wear at all locations with the exception of several National Capitol Region locations. ese include inside the Pentagon building and the National Mall area bounded by Capitol Hill and surrounding senate and house sta oces, the White House and executive oce building, State Department and all monuments and memorials. Slides depicting NCR pro hibited areas can be found at the Navy Uniform Matters Web site at www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/uni forms/Pages/default2.aspx. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized for wear on commercial travel such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-con tracted ights between military aireld installations, as well as commuter transportation such as city and commuter buses, subways and ferries. e uniforms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. Wear rules for Navy working uniform expandedLight Up Kings Bay No nukes for Iran a priorityDefense Secretary sees threat from Middle East countrye United States and its allies and partners in the international community must do everything possible to make sure Iran never obtains a nuclear weapon, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Dec. 2. Irans President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad insists his nations nuclear program is peaceful, but the Inter national Atomic Energy Agency reported in Novem ber about evidence indicating that Iran is trying to build a nuclear bomb. Irans continued drive to develop nuclear capabilities, including troubling enrichment activities and past work on weaponization documented by the IAEA, and its continued support to groups like Hezbollah, Hamas and other terrorist organizations, make clear that the regime in Tehran is a very grave threat to all of us, Panetta said. e key, he said, is for the interna tional community to work together to make sure Iran does not acquire a nuclear weapon. Armed Service program provides blood for troopse Armed Services Blood Program held a blood drive at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Dec. 5 and 6. e donated blood will arrive in combat zone theaters by Fri day to support deployed troops. For Capt. John ONeill, commanding ocer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, this drive was the rst time he said he has ever donated blood to the ASBP and was the rst uniformed donor of the drive. e blood donated today makes a great, immediate impact for our forces overseas, ONeill said. I encourage everyone who can to donate to this positive, long-standing pro gram. is is the rst time ASBP has held a blood drive in Kings Bay, said Erin Hawkins, an ASBP Blood Donor Recruiter from Fort Gordon, Ga. December is typically the tough est month to get blood donations, Hawkins said. With people pre paring for the holidays, travelling around the

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA NSB Vet Clinic Christmas Dec. 15Join the Kings Bay Veterinary Clinic 4 to 7 p.m., ursday, Dec. 15 for its second annual open house. Patrons will have the opportunity to meet the doctors, have complimentary pet pictures with Santa, enjoy childrens activities, refreshments, giveaways, and, if patrons bring in an item to do nate the humane shelter, in exchange the sta will perform a free toe nail trim. For more information, call the clinic 573-0755 or stop by 921 USS George Bancroft Ave., Building 1003. Items that will be happily accepted for the shelter are dog food, cat food, cat litter, chew toys, laundry soap, bleach, cat toys, postage, collars, leashes, paper towels, vine gar and Pine Sol.MOAA Christmas dinner Dec. 20Kings Bay Chapter of Military Ocers Asso ciation of America will hold its dinner meeting starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday Dec. 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Rd. Guest speaker will be Cheri Richter with the St. Marys-War of 1812 Bicentennial Commit tee. Dress is seasonal festive. Former and active duty ocers of the Armed Services as well Pub lic Health Service and NOAA are welcome. RSVP by Dec. 10 to Capt. Orren Crouch, (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Commissary posts holiday hourse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commis sary will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Monday be fore Christmas, Dec. 19. e commissary will be closed ursday, anksgiving, and Friday, Nov. 24 and 25,; Dec. 25 for Christmas and Dec. 26; and Jan. 1 for New Years Day and Jan. 2.St. Marys holiday home tour soone St. Marys Christmas Tour of Homes is a fes tive tradition that helps kick o the holiday season. is years tour will be 5:30 to 9 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10 and will feature six beautifully decorated private homes, three bed and breakfasts, and ve churches. ere will be a free, 6:30 to 9 p.m. special perfor mance in the St. Marys Waterfront Park, provided by a local Christian band, Ignite. Tour tickets are priced at $12 in advance or $15 on the day of the event and will be available at e Cottage Shop, Market on the Square, the St. Marys Welcome Center and Sheilas Hallmark. For information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at 912-882-4000 or info@st maryswelcome.com.Exchange explains return policyis holiday season, the Navy Exchange wants to make returning gifts as easy as possible. Since gifts may be purchased well before they are given during the holidays, all NEXs will accept returns through Jan. 29, 2012. is includes items typi cally covered by the 14-day return policy, such as computers, computer equipment, software, digital cameras and the 45-day return policy for all other merchandise. is extended return policy applies to original purchases made Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 either in a NEX or through the NEX Web store, www.myNavyExchange.com. Cus tomers are asked to include any packaging mate rial along with the receipt when making a return. Any returns without a receipt will be placed on a NEX Gift Card. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doc trine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday through Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Southeast names 2011 Sailor of Year e holiday season is upon us, and its a time when many people nd themselves celebrating at par ties where alcoholic beverages are being served. erefore, it is impor tant that everyone know what they are dealing with when it comes to consuming alcohol. e National Highway Transpor tation Safety Administration reports that in 2009, there were 1.4 million driving-under-the-inuence arrests and drunk drivers claimed the lives of 10,839 people. Binge drinking and drinking and driving are more likely to occur dur ing the holiday season when people are o work and celebrating the sea son. Binge drinking is drinking to get drunk, and is dened as ve or more drinks for a man and four or more drinks for a woman in a two-hour period. What is a drink? One drink is 1.5 ounces of distilled liquor, 5 ounces of wine or 12 ounces of beer. Binge drinking is linked to legal problems such as DUIs, public intoxication, drunk and disorderly, domestic violence and assaults. Pro longed or heavy use can lead to liver damage and heart disease. One unfortunate consequence of the holiday season is a sharp in crease in alcohol-related accidents and deaths. Many partygoers dont drink often, leaving them with low tolerance and more vulnerability to the alcohols eects, ocials said. If you are hosting a party and serv ing alcohol, here are some steps to ensure that all guests are comfort able and that alcohol does not be come a problem: Never pressure anyone to have a drink; Offer a selection of non-alcoholic beverages as well as plenty of food; Stop serving alcohol at least one hour before the party ends; Dont serve alcohol to an intoxi cated guest; Dont let anyone who is drunk or had more than the recommend ed drinking drive home; and Promote having a plan and a designated driver prior to attending the party. Because individuals are so dif ferent, it is dicult to give specic advice about drinking. But certain facts are clear theres no way to speed up the brains recovery from alcohol and no way to make good decisions when you are drinking too much, too fast. So this holiday season, do not un derestimate the eects of alcohol. If you drink have a plan: Set limits no more than three drinks for the evening. Keep count; Pace yourself. Have drink spac ers make every other drink a nonalcoholic one; Call a taxi/friend/family mem ber/supervisor; and Have a designated driver. Lastly, consider the consequenc es of an arrest or a potentially fatal crash, and make plans to get home safely and remember that a desig nated driver is someone who hasnt had any alcohol, not simply the per son in your group who drank the least. Have a safe holiday season!Holiday drinking and driving a threat Safety Hey Dollar Bill! I recently read in the local news that many Camden County residents have had their credit card numbers stolen and cash has disappeared from their bank accounts. How can I protect myself from this happening to me? Consumer Dear Consumer, You are correct. Information provided in the news by Camden County Sheris Oce indicated that credit card numbers and cash have been stolen from Camden County residents. CCSO reported that hundreds of thousands of dollars have been stolen in a matter of months. ere were 60 to 75 cases this past summer. With the holidays in full swing, now more than ever, it is critical to safeguard your identity. ere are several things you can start doing to protect yourself and your credit. Keep your personal information to yourself. Banks will not call or send an e-mail asking for nancial information. Shred mail, old receipts, documents and account information. Memorize your Personal Identication Number(s) (PIN) and passwords. If you must write them down, keep them separate from your account information. Always review your monthly statements. With online banking available, you should review your accounts several times during the week for any suspicious activity. Report any unauthorized transac tions to your bank or credit card agency. Pay attention to your credit or debit card every time you make a purchase. Make sure the cashier or anyone nearby isnt recording your information. If your credit card leaves your sight, make sure the card you get back is yours. Check your credit report at least yearly through www.annualcreditreport.com. is Web site provides a free credit report from all three credit bureaus annually. Beware of Phishing/Vishing. Phishing is when someone is trying to get usernames, passwords and credit card details electronically. Vishing is the same as Phishing but using the telephone. Shop trusted Web sites from reputable companies. When you or der online, make sure the Web site address begins with https://, which indicates a secure Web site. Use your credit card to shop on line, because you can dispute the charges if something goes wrong. Beware of meeting people online or on social Web sites who suddenly need help with money. ey may claim to be a relative, for example grandson, nephew or niece, or someone you knew from years ago. Watch out for these tricks and e-mails saying you stand to inherit lots of money from a relative or announcements that youve won a prize or lottery you never entered. If you think that you have been the victim of identity theft, I recommend that you contact your local law enforcement ocials and le a report. You will also need to le a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov and contact each of the Credit Bureaus to place a fraud alert on your le. As a Certied Credit Report Reviewer for the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, I can review your credit le and assist with ling complaints of identity theft. I can possibly provide you a free copy of your credit score. Please contact me at the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-9783 or 573-4513 for more information or to schedule an appointment. I look forward to working with you to understand your credit report and credit scores and in helping you get any possible errors corrected. Very respectfully, Dollar Bill Ask Dollar Bill! By William Dollar Bill Snook Kings Bay FFSC country in addition to deployments and regular operations, it tends to slip peoples minds. But the need never slips. e process to get blood from the donor to the desert is very ecient and maintains an extremely fast tempo. From the time the blood leaves the donors arm to the time its being stored in theater takes 72 hours, Hawkins said. e donors are interviewed on their medical history, given a quick but thorough check-up to ensure the member is healthy to donate before all of the paperwork is reviewed by the companys sta sergeant to issue a blood bag. Our process attempts to elimi nate error as much as possible, said SSgt. Eric Longacre, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medi cal Center, Fort Gordon, Ga. is makes it as safe as possible for the donor and the potential serviceman or woman who may need it. At that point, the donor will have their blood drawn and be given time to recover with high-sugar treats like juice and cookies. Its one of the few times a doctor will order a patient to consume more sugar. Once its bagged, the blood is mixed with an anticoagulant to en sure the blood doesnt clot in trans port or storage. e tube is then seg mented for testing and packed away for transport, all usually within an hour. e blood is tested and screened at the Armed Services Whole Blood Processing Laboratory at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey before being own into theater for those in need or stored on Navy ships. Its really a tri-service eort to take care of our Soldiers down range, Hawkins said. ere are other people out there who need [my blood] more than me, said Lt. Eric Goying, USS Geor gia (SSGN 729) (Gold). For Erica Gilliand of Lewiston, Idaho, the blood drive had a dier ent meaning. Its our anniversary today, Gil liand said about her and her hus band, Coast Guard Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jon Gilliand of Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay. e couple began to celebrate their fth anniversary with their donation. We decided not to give each other gifts for our anniversary because its so close to Christmas, Erica Gil liand said. So, were oering a gift to those who are serving overseas. I want to help out my fellow Ma rines over there [in combat], said Cleveland native Pfc. John Schon of Marine Corps Security Force Bat talion Kings Bay. I joined the Corps to go to over there, but the Marines need me here instead. is is the best way for me to help them right now. For more information on the Armed Services Blood Program, visit the Web site at www.militaryblood. dod.mil or visit the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/militaryblood.Blood

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Award winner Military kids visit White House In a gesture of gratitude for their service and sacrice, First Lady Michelle Obama Nov. 30 invited mili tary families, including families of the military fallen, to be among the rst to see the White House decked out for this years holiday season. I know for some of you this holi day season will be tough, Obama said. But hopefully its times like this that make you know that you live in a grateful nation, and that we are just so inspired by your sac rice. is holiday season, she said, the White House is oering a special tribute to those who serve. Among the White Houses 37 Christmas trees scattered along the visitor tour route are two special Christmas trees intended to honor service members and their families. e ocial White House Christ mas tree, which is a towering 18foot balsam r in the Blue Room, is a salute to service members of all branches. e tree is decorated with holiday cards created by military children around the world; service medals, badges and patches; and military images adorned with pine cone frames and ribbons. Some of those cards are inspiring, Obama said, sharing one of the writ ten messages. Five children in Medical Lake, Wash., wrote, No matter how many Christmases our dad misses, he makes every Christmas special and we love him. In another card is a more matterof-fact message, the rst lady noted. Hey Dad, its cool youre in Italy. So when are you coming back, be cause I already know what I want for Christmas. A Gold Star Christmas tree, bright with gold star ornaments and framed Purple Heart medals, graces the visitors entrance on the East Wing landing. e tree was decorat ed by families of military fallen and features photos of fallen heroes and messages from their loved ones. A mom from Anchorage, Alaska, wrote this note to her son, Obama said: I love and miss you, son. ank you for all of the great memo ries we shared. e tree is surrounded with photos and stories from more than 800 Gold Star families, the rst lady noted. Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) sits at its homeport of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 23. Tennessee returned to Kings Bay following a three-month deployment. Machinists Mate 3rd Class Anthony Coberley of Kerrville, Texas, and shipmates stand by at the ready. 1300 23 Nov 11 Arriving USS TennesseeBoatswains Mate 1st Class Travis White of West Palm Beach, Fla., waves to crew members of the USS Tennessee, returning to Kings Bay following a three-month deployment. Linehandlers start to tie off Tennessee. Tennessees off crew, the blue crew, assisted in linehandling efforts. Linehandlers pull in the boomer. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5 Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Antonio Archuleta of Pittsburgh takes a Thanksgiving dinner order from a shipmate aboard USS Tennessee as crewmembers spent Thanksgiving with their families. 1500 23 Nov 11 DeParting USS MarylandOhio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) begins to pull out of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 23. Linehandlers from USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Blue) wait for the submarine to return to its homeport. Maryland is the 13th of the 18 ballistic missile subma rines in the Navy fleet. Tugs makes preparations to move the boat. 24 Nov 11

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Breakfast with Santa is Sat urday, Dec. 10, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets, on sale at ITT, CDC, Youth Center and the Conference Center, are $5 per person, $3 per child 12 years old and under, and chil dren 2 and under free with a pay ing adult. Breakfast will be 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa there 9 to 10:30 a.m. for photo ops. Bring your camera. ere will be games, prizes, candy and a holiday mov ie. Come join in the fun and a delicious breakfast. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4559. Last Class of 2011 at the Fitness Complex Its 6 to 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 14 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Enjoy 90 minutes of Spin or Zumba Class, Free hor doeurvres, and a photo slide show of 2011 Year in Review after classes. There will be a Holiday Ugly Sweater or out fit contest so wear your worst. Come out and enjoy our last class of the year with friends and family. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Kings Bay Drive-In Movie Night Showtime is 5:45 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Football/Track Field Parking Lot, with our holiday feature Polar Express. Space is limit ed, so it will be first come, first serve. Sound is through your car radio. Pack up the family car, get the goodies and dont forget the kids. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Punch Card Blowout This offer is back through Dec. 31 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Check out the Early Bird Specials and great rates on green fees. You can save even more when you buy your cart. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-8475. Holiday Happenings at the Big EZ & Oscars Check out the December calendar for a list of fun events, trips and holiday fun. For more information, call (912) 573-4548. Holiday Cheer at K.B. Finnegans Its 3:30 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15. All hands are invited for a holiday social including hors doeuvres, drink specials, door prizes and holiday music. Enjoy some laugh ter with friends and co-workers. Drawings for prizes will be every 15 minutes, but you must be present to win. For more infor mation call 912-573-9492/4564. New Years Eve Bash Its at Rack-N-Roll Entertainment Center, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 31. Cost is $25 per person or $150 for a lane and up to 6 people. There will be pizza, finger foods, champagne toast at midnight and more. There will be a prize for the Worst Holiday Sweater. Drink specials, door prizes and a bal loon drop. Make your reservations today at (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Sunday NFL Ticket Doors open at noon at KB Finnegans. Over nine screens to watch all the games including two outdoor screens. A $5 buffet includes a hamburger or two dogs, chips and a draft beer or soda. Bar Bingo, Jello Shots, drink specials, prizes and more. Check out the calendar for more specials. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9429. Are you ready for some foot ball? Information, Tickets and Travel now has Jacksonville Jaguar single game and season tickets on sale. Get your favorite game before they are gone. For more information, call ITT at (912) 573-2289. Tuesday Trivia Night Trivia returns to KB Finnegans from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday nights with prizes for first, second and third place. For more informa tion call (912) 573-9429/9492. Karaoke Returns Thursday Nights to KB Finnegans, featuring The Big Show. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call A lacrosse clinic will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Youth Ball Fields. Registration is through Dec. 8 at the Youth Center, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays,, except holidays. Openings are limited. Its $5 per child pre-registered or $10 per child day of clinic. is is for ages 8 to 16. For more in formation call (912) 573-8202. Winter Break 2011 Its at the Youth Center for ages kindergarten to 12, Dec. 19 to Jan. 6, but closed on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Cost is based on total family income. Lunch, morning and afternoon snacks will be pro vided. For more information, contact the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Open Recreation at the Teen Center Its 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years or older, have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more informa tion.Lacrosse clinic coming Just for kids Breakfast with Santa Dec. 10 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysMeet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 12 and 19. Enrollment is ongoing. Attendees must complete six weeks to receive a certifi cate. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopThis workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 15. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.What About The Kids workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed for parents whose children have been or may currently be exposed to domestic vio lence. Pre-registration is required. The workshop is 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 21. For more information call 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention Dec. 12safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. This class is offered 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 12. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Transition Assistance Program seminar soonThe Transition Assistance Program, or TAP, is a semi nar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leav ing the military that provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writ ing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 12 to 15 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetThe New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 20. To register, call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop set for Dec. 13Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help per sonnel with military relocations and transfers. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 13. For more information, call 573-4513.Gambling awareness class set for Dec. 16Participants in this class will complete a gambling self-assessment. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment Dec. 15This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a comprehensive to-do list. This train ing is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 15. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops My Military Family While he works to protect the country,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2, and his daughter Delilah THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Christmas in the air In our Unscientific American favorite holiday movie poll, Jean Shepherds A Christmas Story wins for the second straight year. Hey, why not? Who doesnt love little Ralphie (my brother Dave) and Scut Farkus (me). I sure do. But, just to be contrary, Ill throw out Die Hard 2. Whats better during the holidays than watching Bruce Willis (my old chief) almost singlehandedly save his wife and the entire country by blow ing up a plane full of turncoat terrorists? Yippie-kai-yay!Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Jennifer Eastridge Family member Houston Miracle on 34th Street, but it bounces between that and White Christmas. Roy Ceci Retired Navy Mt. Clemens, Mich. Its a Wonderful Life. Averi Stover Family member Ridgeland, Miss. A Christmas Story. Its big with my family. Cpl. Timothy McKinney Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Elizabeth, N.J. How the Grinch Stole Christmas. EM2 George Stevenson USS Georgia Gold Fort Myers, Fla. National Lampoons Christmas Vacation. Cpl. Nicholas Tapp Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Phoenix A Christmas Story. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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Navy College Educational Information 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Work begins on new Arlington columbarium Arlington National Cemetery began its rst major construc tion project in nearly eight years Nov. 30 with a ground-breaking ceremony for a 20,000-niche co lumbarium that will extend the life of the cemeterys inurnment space to 2024. A columbarium is a structure that holds urns containing cremated remains. Construction on the cemeterys ninth columbarium be gins in January, with comple tion expected in June 2013, said Army Col. Victoria Bruzese, the cemeterys chief engineer. e new structure will dwarf the previous eight columbariums, she added, the largest of which con tains 8,000 niches and the small est 3,000. is will be 540 feet long, 116 feet wide, and at its highest elevation about 11 feet tall, Bru zese said following the groundbreaking. Well have more than 20,000 niches, which gives us the ability to have three to four inurnments within each niche -service member, spouse, chil dren -so were looking at more than 60,000 inurnments, so thats signicant. e new columbarium will be almost the length of two football elds. Kathryn Condon, executive director of the Army National Cemeteries Program, told the audience of mostly cemetery grounds-keepers and sta work ers that construction of the new columbarium would extend the life of our inurnment space out to 2024. Ocials also plan to expand the cemeterys grounds on two sides by another 70 acres. at will further extend the cemeterys ability to handle inurn ments, burials and possibly mausoleums out to the 2050s, Bruzese said. She noted the big gest challenge to overcome will be the lack of attention paid to the infrastructure over the years. ere are two expansion op portunities here on the hori zon -our Millennium Project, which is a 30-acre combination of land we acquired from Fort Myer and the National Park Ser vice, and already existing [cemetery] land that will increase our in-ground and niche burial capability, Bruzese said. e second expansion includes a 40-acre plot thats now occupied by the Navy Annex on the cem eterys south side. Bruzese said she requested the chief engineer position at the cemetery following a de ployment to Afghanistan. One reason she cited was that her father and her grandfather are inurned there. But when I heard about the challenges going on here, I want ed to be part of the solution, she said. I think thats what youll nd with anybody whos on the sta here. ey want to be part of the solution in returning the dignity and honor not only to the cemetery, but [also] to the veterans who lie here.ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sand wich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast hours 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunch es include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus More than 70 top-performing Sailors from the enlisted ranks were selected to pursue a commission through the Navys Seaman to Admiral-21 program, ocials said recently. STA-21 is a commissioning program that provides a path for qualied Sailors to receive a college education and earn a commission as a naval ocer. Selectees are authorized a maximum 36 months of full-time, year-round study to complete a baccalaureate degree. Participants in STA-21 remain on active duty while attending college and benet from an education voucher valued at up to $10,000 per year to cover tuition, fees and book costs. STA-21 participants must become members of and drill with a lo cal Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps unit while attending school. Upon graduation, STA-21 participants will be commissioned as ensigns and re turn to active duty in the eet.Sailors aim to become ocers 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13 Guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) assisted four stranded mari ners in the waters o San Clemente Is land Nov. 28 while conducting routine training operations in the Pacic Ocean. e United States Navy always stands ready to provide assistance, said Cmdr. David Oden, Benfolds commanding of cer. It was our privilege to help these seamen. Benfold initially detected the small shing craft using the ships state-of-theart optical sight sys tem. e ship deployed a rigid-hull inat able boat with engineers and medical personnel aboard to assess the condition of the vessel and crew, as well as render assistance. A helicopter assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 provided aerial support during the assistance operation. After determining that the small boat was no longer seaworthy, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Sea Otter quickly respond ed in order to take the mariners aboard and their vessel in tow. I couldnt be more proud of my crew for going above and beyond, Oden said. Particular credit was given to Fire Con trolman 3rd Class Lisa Stamp for rst sighting the craft. Its exceptional Sailors like FC3 Stamp that make this the best ship in the Navy and the best Navy in the world. Benfold is an Arleigh Burke-class de stroyer homeported in San Diego. Middies spread holiday spirit e Naval Academy Brigade of Midshipmen, faculty and sta gathered with representatives from the City of Annapolis and the Salvation Army in Bancroft Hall Nov. 29 for the 21st annual Giving Tree lighting ceremony. Coordinated by the Midshipmen of 6th Company, the Giving Tree is set up in the rotunda of Bancroft Hall each year and deco rated with paper angels, each with the name of an underprivileged child in the local community. Midshipmen, faculty and sta have the oppor tunity to spread holiday cheer to hundreds of children by selecting an angel on the tree and purchas ing gifts for the children represented by the angel ornaments. Last year, the Academy provided 600 gifts for children. is year, the num ber of paper ornaments on the tree increased to nearly 1,000. Each angel includes the age, gender and wish list of the child, giving the purchaser a good idea of what to buy. In 21 years of doing the Giving Tree program at the Academy, this is the 14th year that 6th company has been working in conjunction with the Salvation Army, said Mid shipman 1st Class Kristen Tellar, event coordinator. e Midshipmen love to participate and look for ward to this event every year. Im just so honored to be able to work with 6th Company for such a great cause. After choosing a pa per angel, the donor pur chases a gift for that child and places it unwrapped under the tree. All of the donations will be picked up by the Salvation Army Dec. 12. e gifts are wrapped and distributed to the children Dec. 22, just in time for Christmas. It is certainly a great project because it allows us to give back to the community, Tellar said. ere are children in An napolis who, if it werent for projects like the Giv ing Tree, wouldnt have a Christmas. e happi ness and joy we bring to the children represent the true holiday spirit of the season. Midshipman 2nd Class Ricky Rodriguez said the event is important to the Midshipmen and the community. e city of Annapolis gives so much to the brigade, he said. ey sup port us in many ways, and to be able to do this and bring smiles to the chil dren of the community its an honor for us to be a part of. Guardians use biometrics e U.S. Coast Guard is the rst-line protector of our nations 95,000 miles of coastline. In its law enforcement mission, verify ing the identity of foreign nationals de tained aboard a Coast Guard vessel following an interdiction or boarding at sea is especially important. Helping boarding team members to rapidly identify suspect ed migrants or smugglers at sea is one key piece of technology biometrics. As a relative newcomer to the technol ogy,Nov. 19 marks the ve-year anniver sary of the rst ever biometric taken at sea by the Coast Guard. Led by the Coast Guards Operations Directorate and Research and Develop ment Center,the Coast Guard estab lished a pilot project aboard its cutters operating in e Mona Passage, west of Puerto Rico, in November 2006. Increasing demands on law enforce ment, homeland security and defense missions highlighted the need for ex panded use and more advanced tech nologies to collect and transfer biometric data. Today, the Biometrics at Sea System is being used aboard 20 Coast Guard cut ters operating in e Mona Passage and southern Florida. Coast Guard Patrol Forces in Southwest Asia,, supporting Operation New Dawn, are also in the process of implementing mobile biometric capabilities. A biometric prole consists of bio graphic data, nger prints and a facial portrait. e biometric le is then sent through the Department of Homeland Security biometric database, where it is searched against their stored les. e results of the search are then sent back to the Coast Guard for proper law enforcement action to be taken. Lt j.g. Ken Franklin, commanding of cer of Coast Guard cutter Dolphin, cur rently uses the Biometrics at Sea System aboard his 87-foot patrol boat. Biometrics at Sea has increased our situational awareness aboard the cutter, said Franklin. e quicker we can collect and transmit biometrics data, the quicker we know amplifying information regard ing migrants and suspected smugglers. We use this information to adjust our se curity posture and ultimately attain dis position. While the system has been used for the past ve years, the Coast Guard is look ing to improve its capability in the near future. Testing is underway for the service to upgrade to the 10-print system, which is fast becoming the international stan dard for law enforcement. e 10-print system, consisting of all 10 ngers, would be a dramatic improvement from the current two-print system that the Coast Guard uses now. e Coast Guard also is researching the possible implementation of adding facial and iris recognition to the 10-print system. Robert Mocny, director of U.S. Vistor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology, said the biometrics check against the Automated Biometric Identication System allows the Coast Guard to quickly identify migrants for such things as previous deportation orders or criminal war rants. is partnership at sea serves as a valuable deterrent to prevent those from risking their lives by taking a danger ous voyage to the U.S., Mocny said. We know biometrics is the wave of the future as far as identication and US-VISIT will continue to support the Coast Guard as they explore the use of other biometrics at sea such as face and iris. Since the Biometric at Sea System was implemented in 2006, the Coast Guard has collected more than 4,000 biomet rics, resulting in more than 850 prosecu tions. Additionally, illegal migration ow in e Mona Passage is down nearly 75 per cent. In 2011 alone, the system has helped facilitate the prosecution of more than 85 individuals for human smuggling, illegal entry or illegal re-entry into the U.S. With the success of the Biometrics at Sea System, the Coast Guards Oce of Law Enforcement looks forward to ex panding the use of biometrics to other sections of the maritime border which will help the service take another step in DHSs comprehensive strategy to secure the nations borders. Benfold helps stranded men e militarys logistics system has performed ex tremely well on the front end of supporting warf ighters these past 10 years, a senior Defense Depart ment ocial said Nov. 30. e departments logistics system is actually performing extremely well for what it is designed to do, which is supporting forces engaged in com bat, said Alan F. Estevez, assistant secretary of de fense for logistics and ma teriel readiness. Estevez praised the defense logistics system during the 2011 Defense Logistics Conference which featured corporate sponsors such as IBM, Northrop Gruman, Honeywell and Rockwell Col lins. If you look at what we have done in sustaining and redeploying our forc es in Iraq, [and] in surging and sustaining our forces in Afghanistan all that going on simultaneously weve done a magni cent job, he said. Estevez noted people tend to look at logistics as the behind-the-scenes tail in the department. We really cant look at logistics as tail from the per spective of the Depart ment of Defense, he said. That combat power thats on the ground today in Afghanistan, putting the hurt on the Taliban, is there because of a logis tics system that is capable of putting it into a land locked country. And [its capable of] sustaining it there and doing likewise in another war, Estevez continued. Plus, [it is] capable of do ing things like Haiti relief, tsunami relief, and earth quake relief across the globe. So Id submit to you that logistics is not tail. Its not a back-end function inside the Department of Defense. Estevez cited the e ciency of the defense lo gistic system in Iraq. In the next month well be out of Iraq, he said. Your logistics system has just done a phenomenal job in posturing the force. A year or so ago, Estevez noted, the U.S. had about 500 bases in Iraq. Today, there are six bases oper ating in Iraq, aside from sites that will be used for the Oce of Security Cooperation-Iraq, and the State Department. Estevez compared the amount of U.S. equipment and forces in Iraq prior to the drawdown with the countrys current gures. Over the last year, since September of 2010, as we embarked on Operation New Dawn, there were about 2.15 million pieces of equipment in Iraq, he said. Today, theres about 346,000 pieces in Iraq. Not all of that will be coming out,. Some of that will re main in Iraq. It is no lon ger usable for U.S. forces, and on the other hand, it is usable for Iraqi forces. Today, there are about 13,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, with nearly 800 departing each day, compared to 46,000 troops as recently as midsummer of this year, Estevez said. e assistant secretary noted as U.S. forces have drawn down, theyve helped build up Iraqi ca pabilities, with about $400 million worth of gear, so they are capable of sus taining themselves. On the backside of that, weve saved $700 million by not having to haul that stu out of Iraq and back home where we, the U.S. military, have no use for it, he said. DoD ocial salutes logistics



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THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Page 9 Fun breakfast Page 6Kings Bay turns out for blood drive Arrive, depart Pages 4, 5 More authorized stops commuting between work, home Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced expanded occasion for wear and updated policies for the Navy Working Uniform Type I, II and III in NAVADMIN 366/11, released Dec. 2. ere has been a lot of interest throughout the eet regarding expanding the locations that Sailors can wear the Navys working uniform. e NAVADMIN expands the authorized stops for which NWUs may be worn when commuting to and from home and work, and to allow wear of the NWU during selected events when authorized by regional commanders or commanding ocers. ese policies will take eect Jan. 1 for all continental United States, Hawaii and Guam commands. NWU wear is authorized for commuting and all normal tasks, such as stops at child care centers, gas stations, o-base shopping, banking, at the DMV, and dining before, during and after the workday. Since NWUs are not a liberty uniform, consumption of alcohol while obase in the NWUs is not permitted. Area or regional commanders may further restrict this policy within their geographic limits. Additionally, the NWU Type I, II and III are authorized Jan. 1 for wear at all locations with the exception of several National Capitol Region locations. ese include inside the Pentagon building and the National Mall area bounded by Capitol Hill and surrounding senate and house sta oces, the White House and executive oce building, State Department and all monuments and memorials. Slides depicting NCR prohibited areas can be found at the Navy Uniform Matters Web site at www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/uni forms/Pages/default2.aspx. Additionally, the NWU Type I is authorized for wear by all Commander, Navy Recruiting Command recruiters in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam. NWUs are not authorized for wear on commercial travel such as airlines, railways, or buses in the continental United States. However, they may be worn on military and government-contracted ights between military aireld installations, as well as commuter transportation such as city and commuter buses, subways and ferries. e uniforms may also be worn at the Pentagon Metro and Pentagon commuter slug lines. Wear rules for Navy working uniform expandedLight Up Kings Bay No nukes for Iran a priorityDefense Secretary sees threat from Middle East countrye United States and its allies and partners in the international community must do everything possible to make sure Iran never obtains a nuclear weapon, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Dec. 2. Irans President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad insists his nations nuclear program is peaceful, but the International Atomic Energy Agency reported in November about evidence indicating that Iran is trying to build a nuclear bomb. Irans continued drive to develop nuclear capabilities, including troubling enrichment activities and past work on weaponization documented by the IAEA, and its continued support to groups like Hezbollah, Hamas and other terrorist organizations, make clear that the regime in Tehran is a very grave threat to all of us, Panetta said. e key, he said, is for the international community to work together to make sure Iran does not acquire a nuclear weapon. Armed Service program provides blood for troopse Armed Services Blood Program held a blood drive at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Dec. 5 and 6. e donated blood will arrive in combat zone theaters by Friday to support deployed troops. For Capt. John ONeill, commanding ocer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, this drive was the rst time he said he has ever donated blood to the ASBP and was the rst uniformed donor of the drive. e blood donated today makes a great, immediate impact for our forces overseas, ONeill said. I encourage everyone who can to donate to this positive, long-standing program. is is the rst time ASBP has held a blood drive in Kings Bay, said Erin Hawkins, an ASBP Blood Donor Recruiter from Fort Gordon, Ga. December is typically the toughest month to get blood donations, Hawkins said. With people preparing for the holidays, travelling around the

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA NSB Vet Clinic Christmas Dec. 15Join the Kings Bay Veterinary Clinic 4 to 7 p.m., ursday, Dec. 15 for its second annual open house. Patrons will have the opportunity to meet the doctors, have complimentary pet pictures with Santa, enjoy childrens activities, refreshments, giveaways, and, if patrons bring in an item to do nate the humane shelter, in exchange the sta will perform a free toe nail trim. For more information, call the clinic 573-0755 or stop by 921 USS George Bancroft Ave., Building 1003. Items that will be happily accepted for the shelter are dog food, cat food, cat litter, chew toys, laundry soap, bleach, cat toys, postage, collars, leashes, paper towels, vine gar and Pine Sol.MOAA Christmas dinner Dec. 20Kings Bay Chapter of Military Ocers Association of America will hold its dinner meeting starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday Dec. 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Rd. Guest speaker will be Cheri Richter with the St. Marys-War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee. Dress is seasonal festive. Former and active duty ocers of the Armed Services as well Public Health Service and NOAA are welcome. RSVP by Dec. 10 to Capt. Orren Crouch, (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Commissary posts holiday hourse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commis sary will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Monday be fore Christmas, Dec. 19. e commissary will be closed ursday, anksgiving, and Friday, Nov. 24 and 25,; Dec. 25 for Christmas and Dec. 26; and Jan. 1 for New Years Day and Jan. 2.St. Marys holiday home tour soone St. Marys Christmas Tour of Homes is a fes tive tradition that helps kick o the holiday season. is years tour will be 5:30 to 9 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10 and will feature six beautifully decorated private homes, three bed and breakfasts, and ve churches. ere will be a free, 6:30 to 9 p.m. special perfor mance in the St. Marys Waterfront Park, provided by a local Christian band, Ignite. Tour tickets are priced at $12 in advance or $15 on the day of the event and will be available at e Cottage Shop, Market on the Square, the St. Marys Welcome Center and Sheilas Hallmark. For information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at 912-882-4000 or info@st maryswelcome.com.Exchange explains return policyis holiday season, the Navy Exchange wants to make returning gifts as easy as possible. Since gifts may be purchased well before they are given during the holidays, all NEXs will accept returns through Jan. 29, 2012. is includes items typically covered by the 14-day return policy, such as computers, computer equipment, software, digital cameras and the 45-day return policy for all other merchandise. is extended return policy applies to original purchases made Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 either in a NEX or through the NEX Web store, www.myNavyExchange.com. Customers are asked to include any packaging material along with the receipt when making a return. Any returns without a receipt will be placed on a NEX Gift Card. Now hear this! NSB Kings Bay ChapelSunday 8:30 a.m. Confessions 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) 10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protestant) Monday 6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults (RCIA) Monday through Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass Wednesday 6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study Saturday 4:30 p.m.Confessions 5 p.m. Catholic Mass 6 p.m. Life Teens Southeast names 2011 Sailor of Year e holiday season is upon us, and its a time when many people nd themselves celebrating at parties where alcoholic beverages are being served. erefore, it is important that everyone know what they are dealing with when it comes to consuming alcohol. e National Highway Transportation Safety Administration reports that in 2009, there were 1.4 million driving-under-the-inuence arrests and drunk drivers claimed the lives of 10,839 people. Binge drinking and drinking and driving are more likely to occur during the holiday season when people are o work and celebrating the season. Binge drinking is drinking to get drunk, and is dened as ve or more drinks for a man and four or more drinks for a woman in a two-hour period. What is a drink? One drink is 1.5 ounces of distilled liquor, 5 ounces of wine or 12 ounces of beer. Binge drinking is linked to legal problems such as DUIs, public intoxication, drunk and disorderly, domestic violence and assaults. Prolonged or heavy use can lead to liver damage and heart disease. One unfortunate consequence of the holiday season is a sharp increase in alcohol-related accidents and deaths. Many partygoers dont drink often, leaving them with low tolerance and more vulnerability to the alcohols eects, ocials said. If you are hosting a party and serving alcohol, here are some steps to ensure that all guests are comfortable and that alcohol does not become a problem: Never pressure anyone to have a drink; Offer a selection of non-alcoholic beverages as well as plenty of food; Stop serving alcohol at least one hour before the party ends; Dont serve alcohol to an intoxicated guest; Dont let anyone who is drunk or had more than the recommended drinking drive home; and Promote having a plan and a designated driver prior to attending the party. Because individuals are so different, it is dicult to give specic advice about drinking. But certain facts are clear theres no way to speed up the brains recovery from alcohol and no way to make good decisions when you are drinking too much, too fast. So this holiday season, do not underestimate the eects of alcohol. If you drink have a plan: Set limits no more than three drinks for the evening. Keep count; Pace yourself. Have drink spacers make every other drink a nonalcoholic one; Call a taxi/friend/family member/supervisor; and Have a designated driver. Lastly, consider the consequences of an arrest or a potentially fatal crash, and make plans to get home safely and remember that a designated driver is someone who hasnt had any alcohol, not simply the person in your group who drank the least. Have a safe holiday season!Holiday drinking and driving a threat Safety Hey Dollar Bill! I recently read in the local news that many Camden County residents have had their credit card numbers stolen and cash has disappeared from their bank accounts. How can I protect myself from this happening to me? Consumer Dear Consumer, You are correct. Information provided in the news by Camden County Sheris Oce indicated that credit card numbers and cash have been stolen from Camden County residents. CCSO reported that hundreds of thousands of dollars have been stolen in a matter of months. ere were 60 to 75 cases this past summer. With the holidays in full swing, now more than ever, it is critical to safeguard your identity. ere are several things you can start doing to protect yourself and your credit. Keep your personal information to yourself. Banks will not call or send an e-mail asking for nancial information. Shred mail, old receipts, documents and account information. Memorize your Personal Identication Number(s) (PIN) and passwords. If you must write them down, keep them separate from your account information. Always review your monthly statements. With online banking available, you should review your accounts several times during the week for any suspicious activity. Report any unauthorized transactions to your bank or credit card agency. Pay attention to your credit or debit card every time you make a purchase. Make sure the cashier or anyone nearby isnt recording your information. If your credit card leaves your sight, make sure the card you get back is yours. Check your credit report at least yearly through www.annualcreditreport.com. is Web site provides a free credit report from all three credit bureaus annually. Beware of Phishing/Vishing. Phishing is when someone is trying to get usernames, passwords and credit card details electronically. Vishing is the same as Phishing but using the telephone. Shop trusted Web sites from reputable companies. When you order online, make sure the Web site address begins with https://, which indicates a secure Web site. Use your credit card to shop on line, because you can dispute the charges if something goes wrong. Beware of meeting people online or on social Web sites who suddenly need help with money. ey may claim to be a relative, for example grandson, nephew or niece, or someone you knew from years ago. Watch out for these tricks and e-mails saying you stand to inherit lots of money from a relative or announcements that youve won a prize or lottery you never entered. If you think that you have been the victim of identity theft, I recommend that you contact your local law enforcement ocials and le a report. You will also need to le a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov and contact each of the Credit Bureaus to place a fraud alert on your le. As a Certied Credit Report Reviewer for the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, I can review your credit le and assist with ling complaints of identity theft. I can possibly provide you a free copy of your credit score. Please contact me at the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-9783 or 573-4513 for more information or to schedule an appointment. I look forward to working with you to understand your credit report and credit scores and in helping you get any possible errors corrected. Very respectfully, Dollar Bill Ask Dollar Bill! By William Dollar Bill Snook Kings Bay FFSC country in addition to deployments and regular operations, it tends to slip peoples minds. But the need never slips. e process to get blood from the donor to the desert is very ecient and maintains an extremely fast tempo. From the time the blood leaves the donors arm to the time its being stored in theater takes 72 hours, Hawkins said. e donors are interviewed on their medical history, given a quick but thorough check-up to ensure the member is healthy to donate before all of the paperwork is reviewed by the companys sta sergeant to issue a blood bag. Our process attempts to eliminate error as much as possible, said SSgt. Eric Longacre, Bravo Co., Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Ga. is makes it as safe as possible for the donor and the potential serviceman or woman who may need it. At that point, the donor will have their blood drawn and be given time to recover with high-sugar treats like juice and cookies. Its one of the few times a doctor will order a patient to consume more sugar. Once its bagged, the blood is mixed with an anticoagulant to ensure the blood doesnt clot in transport or storage. e tube is then segmented for testing and packed away for transport, all usually within an hour. e blood is tested and screened at the Armed Services Whole Blood Processing Laboratory at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey before being own into theater for those in need or stored on Navy ships. Its really a tri-service eort to take care of our Soldiers down range, Hawkins said. ere are other people out there who need [my blood] more than me, said Lt. Eric Goying, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Gold). For Erica Gilliand of Lewiston, Idaho, the blood drive had a dierent meaning. Its our anniversary today, Gilliand said about her and her husband, Coast Guard Gunners Mate 2nd Class Jon Gilliand of Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay. e couple began to celebrate their fth anniversary with their donation. We decided not to give each other gifts for our anniversary because its so close to Christmas, Erica Gilliand said. So, were oering a gift to those who are serving overseas. I want to help out my fellow Marines over there [in combat], said Cleveland native Pfc. John Schon of Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay. I joined the Corps to go to over there, but the Marines need me here instead. is is the best way for me to help them right now. For more information on the Armed Services Blood Program, visit the Web site at www.militaryblood. dod.mil or visit the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/militaryblood.Blood

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Award winner Military kids visit White House In a gesture of gratitude for their service and sacrice, First Lady Michelle Obama Nov. 30 invited military families, including families of the military fallen, to be among the rst to see the White House decked out for this years holiday season. I know for some of you this holiday season will be tough, Obama said. But hopefully its times like this that make you know that you live in a grateful nation, and that we are just so inspired by your sacrice. is holiday season, she said, the White House is oering a special tribute to those who serve. Among the White Houses 37 Christmas trees scattered along the visitor tour route are two special Christmas trees intended to honor service members and their families. e ocial White House Christmas tree, which is a towering 18foot balsam r in the Blue Room, is a salute to service members of all branches. e tree is decorated with holiday cards created by military children around the world; service medals, badges and patches; and military images adorned with pine cone frames and ribbons. Some of those cards are inspiring, Obama said, sharing one of the written messages. Five children in Medical Lake, Wash., wrote, No matter how many Christmases our dad misses, he makes every Christmas special and we love him. In another card is a more matterof-fact message, the rst lady noted. Hey Dad, its cool youre in Italy. So when are you coming back, because I already know what I want for Christmas. A Gold Star Christmas tree, bright with gold star ornaments and framed Purple Heart medals, graces the visitors entrance on the East Wing landing. e tree was decorated by families of military fallen and features photos of fallen heroes and messages from their loved ones. A mom from Anchorage, Alaska, wrote this note to her son, Obama said: I love and miss you, son. ank you for all of the great memories we shared. e tree is surrounded with photos and stories from more than 800 Gold Star families, the rst lady noted. Fight to Save Lives. A CFC participant provided as a public service.St. Jude Children s Research Hospital800-822-6344 www.stjude.org A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) sits at its homeport of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 23. Tennessee returned to Kings Bay following a three-month deployment. Machinists Mate 3rd Class Anthony Coberley of Kerrville, Texas, and shipmates stand by at the ready. 1300 23 Nov 11 Arriving USS TennesseeBoatswains Mate 1st Class Travis White of West Palm Beach, Fla., waves to crew members of the USS Tennessee, returning to Kings Bay following a three-month deployment. Linehandlers start to tie off Tennessee. Tennessees off crew, the blue crew, assisted in linehandling efforts. Linehandlers pull in the boomer. Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 5 Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Antonio Archuleta of Pittsburgh takes a Thanksgiving dinner order from a shipmate aboard USS Tennessee as crewmembers spent Thanksgiving with their families. 1500 23 Nov 11 DeParting USS MarylandOhio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) begins to pull out of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 23. Linehandlers from USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Blue) wait for the submarine to return to its homeport. Maryland is the 13th of the 18 ballistic missile subma rines in the Navy fleet. Tugs makes preparations to move the boat. 24 Nov 11

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Breakfast with Santa is Sat urday, Dec. 10, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets, on sale at ITT, CDC, Youth Center and the Conference Center, are $5 per person, $3 per child 12 years old and under, and chil dren 2 and under free with a pay ing adult. Breakfast will be 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa there 9 to 10:30 a.m. for photo ops. Bring your camera. ere will be games, prizes, candy and a holiday mov ie. Come join in the fun and a delicious breakfast. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4559. Last Class of 2011 at the Fitness Complex Its 6 to 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 14 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Enjoy 90 minutes of Spin or Zumba Class, Free hor doeurvres, and a photo slideshow of 2011 Year in Review after classes. There will be a Holiday Ugly Sweater or out fit contest so wear your worst. Come out and enjoy our last class of the year with friends and family. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Kings Bay Drive-In Movie Night Showtime is 5:45 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Football/Track Field Parking Lot, with our holiday feature Polar Express. Space is limit ed, so it will be first come, first serve. Sound is through your car radio. Pack up the family car, get the goodies and dont forget the kids. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Punch Card Blowout This offer is back through Dec. 31 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Check out the Early Bird Specials and great rates on green fees. You can save even more when you buy your cart. For more information, call (912) 573-8475. Holiday Happenings at the Big EZ & Oscars Check out the December calendar for a list of fun events, trips and holiday fun. For more information, call (912) 573-4548. Holiday Cheer at K.B. Finnegans Its 3:30 to 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 15. All hands are invited for a holiday social including hors doeuvres, drink specials, door prizes and holiday music. Enjoy some laughter with friends and co-workers. Drawings for prizes will be every 15 minutes, but you must be present to win. For more information call 912-573-9492/4564. New Years Eve Bash Its at Rack-N-Roll Entertainment Center, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 31. Cost is $25 per person or $150 for a lane and up to 6 people. There will be pizza, finger foods, champagne toast at midnight and more. There will be a prize for the Worst Holiday Sweater. Drink specials, door prizes and a bal loon drop. Make your reservations today at (912) 573-9492. Guided Quail Hunts Theyre at the Dorchester Shooting Preserve, Midway, through March 31. Outdoor Adventure Center is offering trips for hunting par ties of four hunters. Cost is $200 per hunter. Half day hunts can be scheduled for a.m. or p.m. No license required, but must have Hunter Safety Card and be 14 years and older. Trips include transpor tation, lunch and hunt. Sign up at to the Outdoor Adventure Center. For more information call (912) 573-8103. Sunday NFL Ticket Doors open at noon at KB Finnegans. Over nine screens to watch all the games including two outdoor screens. A $5 buffet includes a hamburger or two dogs, chips and a draft beer or soda. Bar Bingo, Jello Shots, drink specials, prizes and more. Check out the calendar for more specials. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9429. Are you ready for some football? Information, Tickets and Travel now has Jacksonville Jaguar single game and season tickets on sale. Get your favorite game before they are gone. For more information, call ITT at (912) 573-2289. Tuesday Trivia Night Trivia returns to KB Finnegans from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday nights with prizes for first, second and third place. For more information call (912) 573-9429/9492. Karaoke Returns Thursday Nights to KB Finnegans, featuring The Big Show. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Disney, Wet & Wild Discount tickets and specials are available at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. For more information, call (912) 573-2289. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call A lacrosse clinic will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Youth Ball Fields. Registration is through Dec. 8 at the Youth Center, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays,, except holidays. Openings are limited. Its $5 per child pre-registered or $10 per child day of clinic. is is for ages 8 to 16. For more information call (912) 573-8202. Winter Break 2011 Its at the Youth Center for ages kindergarten to 12, Dec. 19 to Jan. 6, but closed on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Cost is based on total family income. Lunch, morning and afternoon snacks will be provided. For more information, contact the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Open Recreation at the Teen Center Its 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays for preteens ages 10 to 12; 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays for preteens and teens ages 10 to 18 and still in school; and 4 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays for teens ages 13 to 18, still in school. This is free to all. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Youth Center Open Recreation Its open now for the school semester, for youths kindergarten age through 12, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays. This is free to all youths. For more information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Free Movie Weekends Movies start at 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All youths under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Officials are needed for the Youth Sports season If you are 14 years or older, have knowledge of sports, call Youth Sports today at (912) 573-8202 for more informa tion.Lacrosse clinic coming Just for kids Breakfast with Santa Dec. 10 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysMeet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 12 and 19. Enrollment is ongoing. Attendees must complete six weeks to receive a certificate. Registration required at 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopThis workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 15. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.What About The Kids workshop upcomingThis workshop is designed for parents whose children have been or may currently be exposed to domestic vio lence. Pre-registration is required. The workshop is 1 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 21. For more information call 573-4512.safeTalk suicide prevention Dec. 12safeTALK helps to create suicide-safer communities. This class is offered 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 12. Registration, by calling 573-4512, is required.Transition Assistance Program seminar soonThe Transition Assistance Program, or TAP, is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 12 to 15 for separation. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more information call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetThe New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 20. To register, call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop set for Dec. 13Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 13. For more information, call 573-4513.Gambling awareness class set for Dec. 16Participants in this class will complete a gambling self-assessment. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment Dec. 15This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a comprehensive to-do list. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 15. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops My Military Family While he works to protect the country,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital works to save his daughter from a deadly disease.800-822-6344 www.stjude.orgA CFC Participant provided as a public service.Matt Pasco, Chief Warrant Ofcer 2, and his daughter Delilah THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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Christmas in the air In our Unscientific American favorite holiday movie poll, Jean Shepherds A Christmas Story wins for the second straight year. Hey, why not? Who doesnt love little Ralphie (my brother Dave) and Scut Farkus (me). I sure do. But, just to be contrary, Ill throw out Die Hard 2. Whats better during the holidays than watching Bruce Willis (my old chief) almost singlehandedly save his wife and the entire country by blow ing up a plane full of turncoat terrorists? Yippie-kai-yay!Look for our roving reporter around Kings Bay and tell them what you think about our question of the week.Jennifer Eastridge Family member Houston Miracle on 34th Street, but it bounces between that and White Christmas. Roy Ceci Retired Navy Mt. Clemens, Mich. Its a Wonderful Life. Averi Stover Family member Ridgeland, Miss. A Christmas Story. Its big with my family. Cpl. Timothy McKinney Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Elizabeth, N.J. How the Grinch Stole Christmas. EM2 George Stevenson USS Georgia Gold Fort Myers, Fla. National Lampoons Christmas Vacation. Cpl. Nicholas Tapp Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Phoenix A Christmas Story. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 9

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Navy College Educational Information 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 11

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Work begins on new Arlington columbarium Arlington National Cemetery began its rst major construction project in nearly eight years Nov. 30 with a ground-breaking ceremony for a 20,000-niche columbarium that will extend the life of the cemeterys inurnment space to 2024. A columbarium is a structure that holds urns containing cremated remains. Construction on the cemeterys ninth columbarium begins in January, with completion expected in June 2013, said Army Col. Victoria Bruzese, the cemeterys chief engineer. e new structure will dwarf the previous eight columbariums, she added, the largest of which contains 8,000 niches and the smallest 3,000. is will be 540 feet long, 116 feet wide, and at its highest elevation about 11 feet tall, Bruzese said following the groundbreaking. Well have more than 20,000 niches, which gives us the ability to have three to four inurnments within each niche -service member, spouse, children -so were looking at more than 60,000 inurnments, so thats signicant. e new columbarium will be almost the length of two football elds. Kathryn Condon, executive director of the Army National Cemeteries Program, told the audience of mostly cemetery grounds-keepers and sta workers that construction of the new columbarium would extend the life of our inurnment space out to 2024. Ocials also plan to expand the cemeterys grounds on two sides by another 70 acres. at will further extend the cemeterys ability to handle inurnments, burials and possibly mausoleums out to the 2050s, Bruzese said. She noted the biggest challenge to overcome will be the lack of attention paid to the infrastructure over the years. ere are two expansion opportunities here on the horizon -our Millennium Project, which is a 30-acre combination of land we acquired from Fort Myer and the National Park Service, and already existing [cemetery] land that will increase our in-ground and niche burial capability, Bruzese said. e second expansion includes a 40-acre plot thats now occupied by the Navy Annex on the cemeterys south side. Bruzese said she requested the chief engineer position at the cemetery following a deployment to Afghanistan. One reason she cited was that her father and her grandfather are inurned there. But when I heard about the challenges going on here, I wanted to be part of the solution, she said. I think thats what youll nd with anybody whos on the sta here. ey want to be part of the solution in returning the dignity and honor not only to the cemetery, but [also] to the veterans who lie here.ThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Minestrone Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Paprika Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cub Sandwich Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered CarrotsFridayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line New England Clam Chowder Barbecue Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Mac and Cheese Green Bean Almadine Simmered Succotash Speed Line Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger Hot Dogs French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg RollsSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Mixed Vegetables Oven Fried Bacon Waffles Omelets to Order Eggs to Order Dinner Minestrone Soup Pizza Wings French Fries Baked BeansSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Dinner Asparagus Cheese Soup Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Corn on the CobMondayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Corn Chowder Country fried steak Cream gravy Baked Fish Mashed Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Speed Line Pizza Chicken Wings Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes Turkey Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas Southern Style GreensTuesdayBreakfast Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Waffles Grilled Bacon Buttermilk Biscuits Sausage Gravy Cottage fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Twice Baked Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rich Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliflower Speed Line Chicken Tacos Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refired Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat Sauce Marinara Sauce Alfredo Sauce Sauteed clams Pasta Steamed Broccoli Callico CornWednesdayBreakfast Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order Pancakes Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Gumbo Fishwich Grilled Chicken Breast Steamed Rice Mashed Potatoes Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Speed Line Corn Dogs Grilled Cheeseburger Grilled Hamburger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Hot and Spicy Chicken Beef Stew Steamed Rice Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green BeansThursdayBreakfast Rolled Oats Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast Grilled bacon Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Lunch Regular Line Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Speed Line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Fried Catfish Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed BroccoliGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast hours 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served! Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. All breakfasts and brunches include cereal, instant oatmeal or grits, juice bar, pastry bar, yogurt. All meals served for lunch and dinner also feature the Healthy Choice Salad Bar and various dessert items. Menu items are subject to change. Pirates Cove menus More than 70 top-performing Sailors from the enlisted ranks were selected to pursue a commission through the Navys Seaman to Admiral-21 program, ocials said recently. STA-21 is a commissioning program that provides a path for qualied Sailors to receive a college education and earn a commission as a naval ocer. Selectees are authorized a maximum 36 months of full-time, year-round study to complete a baccalaureate degree. Participants in STA-21 remain on active duty while attending college and benet from an education voucher valued at up to $10,000 per year to cover tuition, fees and book costs. STA-21 participants must become members of and drill with a local Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps unit while attending school. Upon graduation, STA-21 participants will be commissioned as ensigns and return to active duty in the eet.Sailors aim to become ocers 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 8, 2011 13 Guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) assisted four stranded mariners in the waters o San Clemente Island Nov. 28 while conducting routine training operations in the Pacic Ocean. e United States Navy always stands ready to provide assistance, said Cmdr. David Oden, Benfolds commanding ofcer. It was our privilege to help these seamen. Benfold initially detected the small shing craft using the ships state-of-theart optical sight sys tem. e ship deployed a rigid-hull inatable boat with engineers and medical personnel aboard to assess the condition of the vessel and crew, as well as render assistance. A helicopter assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 provided aerial support during the assistance operation. After determining that the small boat was no longer seaworthy, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Sea Otter quickly responded in order to take the mariners aboard and their vessel in tow. I couldnt be more proud of my crew for going above and beyond, Oden said. Particular credit was given to Fire Controlman 3rd Class Lisa Stamp for rst sighting the craft. Its exceptional Sailors like FC3 Stamp that make this the best ship in the Navy and the best Navy in the world. Benfold is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer homeported in San Diego. Middies spread holiday spirit e Naval Academy Brigade of Midshipmen, faculty and sta gathered with representatives from the City of Annapolis and the Salvation Army in Bancroft Hall Nov. 29 for the 21st annual Giving Tree lighting ceremony. Coordinated by the Midshipmen of 6th Company, the Giving Tree is set up in the rotunda of Bancroft Hall each year and decorated with paper angels, each with the name of an underprivileged child in the local community. Midshipmen, faculty and sta have the opportunity to spread holiday cheer to hundreds of children by selecting an angel on the tree and purchasing gifts for the children represented by the angel ornaments. Last year, the Academy provided 600 gifts for children. is year, the number of paper ornaments on the tree increased to nearly 1,000. Each angel includes the age, gender and wish list of the child, giving the purchaser a good idea of what to buy. In 21 years of doing the Giving Tree program at the Academy, this is the 14th year that 6th company has been working in conjunction with the Salvation Army, said Midshipman 1st Class Kristen Tellar, event coordinator. e Midshipmen love to participate and look forward to this event every year. Im just so honored to be able to work with 6th Company for such a great cause. After choosing a paper angel, the donor purchases a gift for that child and places it unwrapped under the tree. All of the donations will be picked up by the Salvation Army Dec. 12. e gifts are wrapped and distributed to the children Dec. 22, just in time for Christmas. It is certainly a great project because it allows us to give back to the community, Tellar said. ere are children in Annapolis who, if it werent for projects like the Giving Tree, wouldnt have a Christmas. e happiness and joy we bring to the children represent the true holiday spirit of the season. Midshipman 2nd Class Ricky Rodriguez said the event is important to the Midshipmen and the community. e city of Annapolis gives so much to the brigade, he said. ey support us in many ways, and to be able to do this and bring smiles to the children of the community its an honor for us to be a part of. Guardians use biometrics e U.S. Coast Guard is the rst-line protector of our nations 95,000 miles of coastline. In its law enforcement mission, verify ing the identity of foreign nationals de tained aboard a Coast Guard vessel following an interdiction or boarding at sea is especially important. Helping boarding team members to rapidly identify suspect ed migrants or smugglers at sea is one key piece of technology biometrics. As a relative newcomer to the technology,Nov. 19 marks the ve-year anniversary of the rst ever biometric taken at sea by the Coast Guard. Led by the Coast Guards Operations Directorate and Research and Development Center,the Coast Guard established a pilot project aboard its cutters operating in e Mona Passage, west of Puerto Rico, in November 2006. Increasing demands on law enforcement, homeland security and defense missions highlighted the need for expanded use and more advanced technologies to collect and transfer biometric data. Today, the Biometrics at Sea System is being used aboard 20 Coast Guard cutters operating in e Mona Passage and southern Florida. Coast Guard Patrol Forces in Southwest Asia,, supporting Operation New Dawn, are also in the process of implementing mobile biometric capabilities. A biometric prole consists of biographic data, nger prints and a facial portrait. e biometric le is then sent through the Department of Homeland Security biometric database, where it is searched against their stored les. e results of the search are then sent back to the Coast Guard for proper law enforcement action to be taken. Lt j.g. Ken Franklin, commanding of cer of Coast Guard cutter Dolphin, cur rently uses the Biometrics at Sea System aboard his 87-foot patrol boat. Biometrics at Sea has increased our situational awareness aboard the cutter, said Franklin. e quicker we can collect and transmit biometrics data, the quicker we know amplifying information regarding migrants and suspected smugglers. We use this information to adjust our security posture and ultimately attain disposition. While the system has been used for the past ve years, the Coast Guard is looking to improve its capability in the near future. Testing is underway for the service to upgrade to the 10-print system, which is fast becoming the international standard for law enforcement. e 10-print system, consisting of all 10 ngers, would be a dramatic improvement from the current two-print system that the Coast Guard uses now. e Coast Guard also is researching the possible implementation of adding facial and iris recognition to the 10-print system. Robert Mocny, director of U.S. Vistor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology, said the biometrics check against the Automated Biometric Identication System allows the Coast Guard to quickly identify migrants for such things as previous deportation orders or criminal warrants. is partnership at sea serves as a valuable deterrent to prevent those from risking their lives by taking a dangerous voyage to the U.S., Mocny said. We know biometrics is the wave of the future as far as identication and US-VISIT will continue to support the Coast Guard as they explore the use of other biometrics at sea such as face and iris. Since the Biometric at Sea System was implemented in 2006, the Coast Guard has collected more than 4,000 biometrics, resulting in more than 850 prosecutions. Additionally, illegal migration ow in e Mona Passage is down nearly 75 percent. In 2011 alone, the system has helped facilitate the prosecution of more than 85 individuals for human smuggling, illegal entry or illegal re-entry into the U.S. With the success of the Biometrics at Sea System, the Coast Guards Oce of Law Enforcement looks forward to expanding the use of biometrics to other sections of the maritime border which will help the service take another step in DHSs comprehensive strategy to secure the nations borders. Benfold helps stranded men e militarys logistics system has performed extremely well on the front end of supporting warfighters these past 10 years, a senior Defense Department ocial said Nov. 30. e departments logistics system is actually performing extremely well for what it is designed to do, which is supporting forces engaged in combat, said Alan F. Estevez, assistant secretary of defense for logistics and materiel readiness. Estevez praised the defense logistics system during the 2011 Defense Logistics Conference which featured corporate sponsors such as IBM, Northrop Gruman, Honeywell and Rockwell Collins. If you look at what we have done in sustaining and redeploying our forces in Iraq, [and] in surging and sustaining our forces in Afghanistan all that going on simultaneously weve done a magnicent job, he said. Estevez noted people tend to look at logistics as the behind-the-scenes tail in the department. We really cant look at logistics as tail from the per spective of the Depart ment of Defense, he said. That combat power thats on the ground today in Afghanistan, putting the hurt on the Taliban, is there because of a logistics system that is capable of putting it into a landlocked country. And [its capable of] sustaining it there and doing likewise in another war, Estevez continued. Plus, [it is] capable of doing things like Haiti relief, tsunami relief, and earthquake relief across the globe. So Id submit to you that logistics is not tail. Its not a back-end function inside the Department of Defense. Estevez cited the eciency of the defense logistic system in Iraq. In the next month well be out of Iraq, he said. Your logistics system has just done a phenomenal job in posturing the force. A year or so ago, Estevez noted, the U.S. had about 500 bases in Iraq. Today, there are six bases operating in Iraq, aside from sites that will be used for the Oce of Security Cooperation-Iraq, and the State Department. Estevez compared the amount of U.S. equipment and forces in Iraq prior to the drawdown with the countrys current gures. Over the last year, since September of 2010, as we embarked on Operation New Dawn, there were about 2.15 million pieces of equipment in Iraq, he said. Today, theres about 346,000 pieces in Iraq. Not all of that will be coming out,. Some of that will remain in Iraq. It is no longer usable for U.S. forces, and on the other hand, it is usable for Iraqi forces. Today, there are about 13,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, with nearly 800 departing each day, compared to 46,000 troops as recently as midsummer of this year, Estevez said. e assistant secretary noted as U.S. forces have drawn down, theyve helped build up Iraqi capabilities, with about $400 million worth of gear, so they are capable of sustaining themselves. On the backside of that, weve saved $700 million by not having to haul that stu out of Iraq and back home where we, the U.S. military, have no use for it, he said. DoD ocial salutes logistics