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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-26-2011 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00215

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00215

Full Text


Rhode Island
SSBN 740 Sailors welcomed
by homecoming at pier
Page 8


THE


Up Periscope
Remember America's battles
this Memorial Day
Page 15


USS Boise
Battenburg Cup goes to
submarine for third time
Page 12


Vol. 46 Is sue 21 www.subasekb.navy.mil www.kingsbayperiscope.com Thursday, May 26,2011




U.S. supports reforms in Middle East


Uprisings in six
countries challenge
oppressive leaders
By Cheryl Pellerin
American Forces Press Service

Amid extraordinary changes
taking place in the Middle East
and North Africa, the United
States is responding in ways
that advance the nation's val-
ues and strengthen its security,
President Barack Obama said
in a speech in Washington D.C.,
May 19.
Obama described how people


across the region have risen up
against oppressive governments
during the past six months, town
by town, in Tunisia, Egypt, Ye-
men, Libya, Syria and Bahrain.
"The question before us is:
What role America will play as
this story unfolds?" Obama said.
"For decades, the United
States has pursued a set of core
interests in the region coun-
tering terrorism and stopping
the spread of nuclear weapons,
securing the free flow of com-
merce and safe-guarding the se-
curity of the region, standing up
for Israel's security and pursu-
ing Arab-Israeli peace," he said.


"If you take risks that
reform entails, you will
have the full support of
the United States."
Barak Obama
President


The United States will contin-
ue these efforts, keeping com-
mitments to friends and part-
ners, the president said.
After years of war in Iraq,
100,000 troops have moved out
of the country, he said.


"The Iraqis have rejected the
perils of political violence in
favor of a democratic process,
even as they've taken full re-
sponsibility for their own secu-
rity," the president said.
Sectarian divides need not


S.. . '. .. .. .::. .. ... .. -

Navy photo by MC3 Cory Rose
Kings Bay area Trinity Praise Dancers perform a praise dance at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Diversity Fair, May 19, near
the Fitness Complex tennis courts. More photos on page 5. See story on Page 18.



Diversity celebrated at Kings Bay


Fair combines many
ethnic heritage days

By Stacey Byington
NSB Kings Bay Trident Refit Facility
Public Affairs Officer

Naval Submarine Base Kings
Bay and other tenant com-
mands hosted a diversity fair
for military and government
workers from May 19 at the
MWR Recreational Complex
near the tennis courts.
Throughout the year, the
U.S. Navy commemorates
nine different diversity-related
groups. These include Black
History Month in February,
Asian-Pacific American Heri-
tage in May, Hispanic Heritage
Month in September/October
and National American Indian
Heritage Month in November.
In today's world of limited
budgets and even more lim-
ited manpower, the Kings Bay
Diversity Fair is combining
several of these commemora-
tive events into one.
"Diversity is all the different
characteristics and attributes
of our individual Sailors and
government employees who


enhance the mission readi-
ness of the Navy," said Capt.
Jim Jones, executive officer of
Trident Refit Facility, in the
welcoming address. "The Navy
reflects diversity at all levels
and employs top-performing
people whose diverse back-
grounds, experiences and
skills help us meet today's
challenges.
"Today's Navy has the most
highly qualified, highly moti-
vated and highly trained forces
of men and women in our his-
tory. We are stronger today be-
cause we are more fully repre-
sentative of all Americans."
The event was organized by
the Diversity Fair Committee,
co-chaired by Ro Kinson and
Erika Dargan of Trident Refit
Facility, with military and ci-
vilian members from almost
every tenant command at
Kings Bay. It meshed the best
food and entertainment of the
many different cultures which
influence the area.
Six area restaurants provid-
ed samples of their culinary
specialties. They were Mangos
Caf6 with Hispanic special-
ties, Little Saigon with Asian


Photo by Stacey Byington
Kings Bay employees sample the culinary treats provided by six
local restaurants specializing in traditional and ethnic favorites.


treats, El Potro with Mexican
offerings, Wasabi Sushi with a
variety of sushi samples, Aunt
B's Restaurant with traditional
southern favorites and Millie
Stanfenberg with Asian-Pa-
cific fare and various Filipino


deserts.
The Kings Bay Navy College
Office invited representatives
from more than 24 universities
and colleges that offer off-duty
See Diversity, Page 5


lead to conflict, he added, not-
ing that Iraq is poised to play a
key role in the region if its prog-
ress continues.
'As they do," he said, "we will
be proud to stand with them as
a steadfast partner."
In Afghanistan, the United
States and its coalition partners
have broken the Taliban's mo-
mentum, Obama said. Starting
in July, U.S. troops will begin
returning home and the job
of security in Afghanistan will
transition to that nation's own
military.

See Reform, Page 10



'Force of


Families'


praised


First Lady lauds
homefront during
West Point speech

By Terri Moon Cronk
American Forces Press Service

The nation's military is built
and sustained on the strength
of families, First Lady Michelle
Obama told the U.S. Military
Academy's Class of 2011 and
their families at a banquet May
20 in West
Point, N.Y.,
on the eve
of Sunday's
graduation
ceremonies.
No mat-
ter where
their careers
take them, Obama
Obama told
the graduating cadets, their
families will be right alongside
them, "because our force is a
force of families!.
The first lady reminded the
cadets that regardless of their
backgrounds, they've all had
someone who taught them the
values and lessons that will sus-
tain them when times get tough
or they're unsure of what's
ahead.
"I want you to know that these
people will always be there for
you," she said. "As I've seen in
my own life and heard from
troops all across this world, your
family will be your rock, wheth-
er they're right next to you or
across an ocean'
Family, Obama told the audi-
ence, has a special meaning for
the cadets as emerging leaders
for the Army and the nation. She
singled out Cadet Russ Burgin,
noting he was inspired by his fa-
ther, who continued to work to
support his family while under-

See Force, Page 6


Electrical repairs big project


NSB Kings Bay
Public Works
Utilities and
Base Operating
Services
Contractor
civilian per-
sonnel repair
underground
electrical splic-
es to ensure
electrical utility
reliability in
support of the
Navy's strategic
deterrence
mission.

Courtesy photo


1,405 splices in 131
manholes over year

From Naval Facilities Engineering
Command
The Kings Bay Naval Subma-
rine base electrical distribution
system was designed in the late
1970s and subsequently built in
the 1980s. More than 95 percent
of the electrical distribution
system is underground.
The underground 12.5 KV ca-
bles are configured as loops and


are installed in underground
ducts that are inter-connected
by 650 underground vaults,
which provide access to mul-
tiple interconnection points for
the system.
Many of these vaults con-
tain electrical splices. Due to
the high water table at Kings
Bay, the majority of the vaults
remain full of water and the
electrical distribution system is
continually submerged.
Beginning in 2009, Kings Bay
began experiencing numerous
electrical failures in the 12.5 KV


cabling system. Repair efforts
and subsequent investigation
into the cause of the unsched-
uled electrical power outages
by the Kings Bay Public Works
Department personnel deter-
mined that the failures were the
result of a defective connector
plug in the bolted splices. This
plug was found to be hydro-
scopic and over time absorbed
sufficient water to cause an
electrical fault resulting in an
unscheduled electrical power

See Repairs, Page 5




2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011



Local news and views


Now hear this!


Sign up for Vacation Bible School
The Command Religious Program of the
King's Bay Chapel's Vacation Bible School is
9 a.m. to noon, June 20 to June 24 for children
who have completed kindergarten through fifth
grade. Registration runs through Friday, June 3.
Volunteers are needed to help and may fill out a
volunteer form. For more program information,
call the chapel 573-4501 or to stop by the cha-
pel office located across the parking lot from the
Kings Bay Navy Exchange.

Golf tournament fights Alzheimer's
Bill Brown's Charity Golf Tournament, to
raise money to fight Alzheimer's disease, will
be at Fleming Island Golf Course, Friday, May
27. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with a noon
shotgun start. Lunch, prizes and dinner are in-
cluded, at $65 for active-duty and retired mili-
tary. Walkups are permitted, but reservations
are encouraged. For more information, call Bill
Brown at (904) 291-8987.

Camden Partnership tours June 9
The Kings Bay Camden Community Forum/
Tour will be visiting Naval Submarine Base
Kings Bay's Explosive Ordinance Disposal
Range, Trident Training Facility's Indoor
Simulated Marksmanship Trainer, the Marine
Corps Security Force Battalion for a brief and
static display and see a working dog demon-
stration, on its next tour, 8 to 11:30 a.m., June 9.
For more information, contact Marty Klumpp,
forums and tours chair, at (912) 227-2148.

Library hosting drive for USO
The Camden County Public Library is partici-
pating in the Camden County Government USO
Drive for our Local Troops Home & Abroad,
accepting donations of healthy snacks and fem-
inine hygiene products. Items can be dropped
off in the designated box inside the library. The
deadline is Tuesday, May 31.

Navy Exchange offers special deals
The Navy Exchange is having a jewelry and
watch special event through May 27. Customers
who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $199
or more and pay with a Military Star Card can
take advantage of no interest, no down payment
with no payments for six months. For more
information, visit the Navy Exchange or www.
mynavyexchange.com.

Welcome Center needs volunteers
You're invited to become an ambassador of
tourism by volunteering at the new St. Marys
Welcome Center. There is an immediate need
for additional volunteers to keep the Welcome
Center running at capacity. Volunteers are need-
ed to act as driver and tour guide for the histori-
cal tram tours given daily by the Welcome Center
and also to serve as greeters on-premises at the
center. To be considered for volunteer opportu-
nities, call the Welcome Center at (912) 882-4000.



















Sunday
8:30 a.m. Confessions
9 a.m. Catholic Mass
10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian
Doctrine (CCD)
10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship
(Protestant)
Monday
6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation
Adults (RCIA)
Monday through Wednesday
and Friday
11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass
Wednesday
6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study
Saturday
4:30 p.m.- Confessions
5 p.m. Catholic Mass
6 p.m. Life Teens



THE


K I N G 5 B A 1 G E l R G I 4

NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. John S. O'Neill


NSB Kings Bay Executive Officer
Cmdr. Jeff Pafford
NSB Kings Bay Command Master Chief
CMDCM Jimmy Schubert
NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer
Scott Bassett
NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Office staff
Kelly Wirfel, MCC (SW/AW) Ty Swartz,
MC3 Cory Rose
Editor
Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719
periscopekb@comcast.net


Examining the nature of friendship


Tears tumbled down her
cheeks as Annie relayed the
details of a conflict with fel-
low military spouse Jill. Jill and
Annie met at a military spouse
event and hit it off immediately.
Over the few months they have
known each other they have spent
a great deal of time together. One
even moved into an apartment in
the same complex as the other so
they could be closer.
Then it happened. The details are
not vital but suffice it to say they
had a misunderstanding, a conflict.
The conflict led to more misunder-
standing and the next thing you
know they were not speaking and
even un-followed each other on
Twitter and un-friended each other
on Facebook. My heart broke for
both of them.
Military spouse friendships are
interesting. We move frequently
and often before a deployment.
We are in a pressure cooker and a
new location leaves a vacuum for
friendships and relationships. It
is natural for us to look for friends
and we tend to go deep in our new
friendships very quickly. As a mili-
tary spouse, I have done this and
watched many of us do the same
thing.
God created us as social crea-
tures. We need each other. We
enjoy each other. Relationships and
friendships enhance our lives. Now,
consider with me the uniqueness
of our world. We live our lives in


-By Beth


roughly
three-
year in-
crements.
We arrive
at a new
instal-
lation
knowing
we may
only be
there for
one tour.
From the


moment we
arrive, the clock is ticking. Whether
consciously or unconsciously, we
begin the search for friendships. Of-
ten, we look to connect with other
military spouses.
Healthy friendships share char-
acteristics that we'll explore in the
coming weeks. Friendships take
time to develop. There are stages to
friendship and there are different
types of friendships. Understanding
these can help us develop healthy
relationships that are fulfilling and
enjoyed by all parties. There are also
skills and practices we can develop
which promote healthy, strong, ful-
filling relationships. We are going to
explore those in the coming weeks.
Annie and Jill's situation is a great
place to start our exploration into
building healthy friendships. Anne
was convinced that their friendship
was over. From the outside looking
in, I thought these two ladies, while
very different, had the potential to


f04^^^^
L Homefront


Options aplenty for military moving


From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
COMPASS

The moves military families make
are often full of boxes, long car rides
and unfortunate hotel rooms.
One aspect of the move that takes
precedence is where the family will
live for the duration of the service
members' time at this duty station.
COMPASS, a three-day, 12-hour
course offering guidance to military
spouses, offers some of the most
important details to know as well as
whom to contact for more informa-
tion.
Military families are given two op-
tions for housing: living on base or
living in town. The benefits of each
are personal to each family.
Military base housing offers an
immediate community for families
to be a part of. In addition, expens-
es such as electricity, water, trash
removal and sometimes cable are
covered when you live in base hous-
ing. When living on base, a service
member's entire Basic Allowance
for Housing is used and sent directly
to the community to pay for these
amenities.
If families decide to live on base,
the expectation is there will be await
list for new and incoming families.
This wait can be one month to six
months. Families can find out if the
duty station has a wait list by calling
the base Housing Office.
Living in town also has its own
benefits. Families can choose where
to live in town. This is especially


advantageous when families have
spent time in the town they will be
stationed and know the area they
would like to live.
For families in the situation of
wanting to buy a house, there are
many options regarding location
and adding a personal touch on
the home you live in. When living
in town, a service member receives
their entire BAH to cover various ex-
penses that renters or homeowners
incur.
Knowing the BAH is only intended
to cover 90 percent of the costs of liv-
ing will help families plan where to
live. The Housing Office offers a full
list of properties available to military
families.
Before signing a contract to rent
or buy a house in town, families are
encouraged to have the contracts re-
viewed by either the Housing Office
or the Base Legal Assistance Office.
Both of these offices are prepared to
ensure families are not being taken
advantage of, as well as making
them aware that contracts should
include a Military Clause.
Established as a part of the Sol-
diers and Sailors Civil Relief Act, this
clause states that a service member
can break their contract early due to
a deployment or other unexpected
stationing.
For more information, visit the
Base Legal Assistance Office.
The Kings Bay COMPASS course


is open to all military spouses as a
guidance course for all aspects of
military life. All materials and baby-
sitting are provided free of charge. It
is taught in three four-hour sessions
held on Kings Bay Naval Base and
covers lessons such as Navy mis-
sion, history, organization, customs
and traditions, rights and benefits
and more. Topics give spouses a bet-
ter understanding of where to find
answers in Navy life.
Guest speakers often include the
base chaplain, Navy Federal Credit
Union representatives and Naval
Criminal Investigative Service staff.
Through these topics spouses learn
the importance of checking into all
resources available and how to bet-
ter deal with challenges of every day
life.
For more information or to reg-
ister for a class, visit the COMPASS
Web siteat www.gocompass.org.
COMPASS, then SUBS, was estab-
lished 1998 as a program to benefit
submarine families of the Subma-
rine Force Pacific in Pearl Harbor,
Hawaii, by Rosemary Ellis. Within
a year, the program was opened to
spouses of all Navy communities at
Pearl Harbor.
The name COMPASS was given to
the program and the first team was
established in Kings Bay, Ga. Since
implementation, the program is
now available to military spouses in
13 cites.
For more information about
COMPASS, visit the Web site at
www.gocompass.org.


Kids art contest promotes sun safety


From Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public
Affairs

May, when the weather takes a
turn toward summer, marks Ultra-
violet Awareness Month and Skin
Cancer Prevention Month.
Naval Hospital Jacksonville, its
hospital and five branch health clin-
ics, and the Oakleaf Club of Jackson-
ville are sponsoring a children's art
contest with a sun safety theme.
NH Jax offers a robust preventive
health program, and the beginning
of summer is a perfect time to get
children involved in preventing sun-


associated vision and skin problems
in later life.
The art contest is open to military
and Department of Defense depen-
dent children age four to 12. Entries
must be the child's original slogan
and artwork, expressing the theme
of sun safety vision and skin pro-
tection on 8 1/2-inch by 11-inch
paper or posterboard.
Entries, with an entry form at-
tached, must be dropped off at the
hospital or Kings Bay Branch Health


Clinic Administration Department
by noon on May 31, or postmarked
by May 31 and mailed to: Public
Affairs, Sun Safety Contest, Naval
Hospital Jacksonville, 2080 Child St.,
Jacksonville Fla. 32214.
By entering, participants agree to
the publication and display of the
child's name, photo and artwork.
All entries become the property of
NH Jax and will not be returned.
Winners will receive a pair of sun-
glasses and the hospital will display
the winning art.

See Contest, Page 10


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publica-
tion. The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714
or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the of-
ficial views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department
of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The FloridaTimes-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for ac-
curacy of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,
gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or
patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The FloridaTimes-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher
1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Tom Castle, Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336 FAX (904) 366-6230


be great friends.
Most friendships share con-
nection points, and the deepest
friendships share many connection
points. These connection points
give the friendships strength, like
the threads of a spider's web. Annie
and Jill started their friendship with
one connection point military
spousedom. This connection point
defined their friendship and other
connection points were not discov-
ered or developed.
When a conflict arose, they didn't
have enough connection points
to facilitate working through the
conflict. And, conflict resolution is a
skill we need. But, if you're like me,
many of us prefer to avoid conflict
rather than work through it.
Annie and Jill have worked
through their conflict. They are
following each other and friended
each other again. Their relationship
has taken on a new facet as a result.
They are building a broader and
deeper friendship.
Many of us as military spouses
have experienced the pain of
conflict, betrayal or rejection from
a new friend or a fellow military
spouse. I am sorry that happened.
Join me over the next few weeks as
we look at the nature of and how to
build healthy friendships.

Enlisted Spouse Radio, Beth's Internet talk
show for spouses, launches a new format and
new time in June 2011. Stay tuned for details.
Follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.
com/EnlistedSpouseCommunity.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 3








Greater Jacksonville Area USO
Invites You To Our
Military Appreciation Event
@ Ashley Furniture HomeStore in North JAX


We look forward to seeing you on Saturday, June 4th, at
Ashley Furniture HomeStore @ River City Marketplace (Exit 363 @ 1-95), North Jacksonville, FL 32218 (904) 268-2347
visit the #1 Name In Furniture at www.AshleyFurnitureHomeStore.com for directions


I r




4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


Navy photo by Trice Denny
Chief Master-at-Arms James Blagg, from New Port Richey, Fla., and Boatswain's
Mate 1st Class Richard Grier, from Afton, N.Y., command drug and alcohol preven-
tion advisors at Naval Air Station Key West, hang a banner next to a vehicle that
crashed near Key West while the driver was under the influence of alcohol.


Summer Safety sets sail


FI4N IN THE SUN

EXPL~~FE OUR VARIETY OF
SICA^L.CHARMS


By April Phillips
Naval Safety Center Public
Affairs

The Naval Safety Cen-
ter's annual summer
safety campaign officially
begins Memorial Day
weekend, and materials
are available now to help
Sailors and Marines pre-
pare for their upcoming
off-duty and recreational
activities.
The last few years have
shown that it's possible to
have fun while managing
risk.
"Last summer, Sail-
ors and Marines set the
bar high and statistically
achieved the safest sum-
mer on record," said Rear
Adm. Arthur J. Johnson,
commander, Naval Safety
Center. "I firmly believe
we have all the compo-
nents in place to continue
that positive trend and do
even better this year."
While last summer was
a successful one for most,
14 Sailors and 14 Marines
lost their lives in motor ve-
hicle and recreation mis-
haps. That was a tragedy


for their families, for their
units, and for the fleet as a
whole.
Sailors and Marines do
a great job of managing
risk on duty, and that's a
mindset NAVSAFECEN's
command master chief
said must carry over out-
side the gates of the instal-
lation.
"Just like in an opera-
tional environment, we
are faced with obstacles
that, unless we plan
ahead, could result in
negative consequences,'
said CMDCM Dominick
Torchia. "Off duty recre-
ation is really no differ-
ent. It requires planning,
from something as seem-
ingly minor as wearing
sun block, to ensuring ve-
hicles are running prop-
erly and your trip is well
planned out. These details
could mean the difference
between mitigating risk
and suffering the conse-
quences.'
To help manage risk,
NAVSAFECEN's summer
campaign known as Live
to Play, Play to Live, re-
inforces positive things


Sailors, Marines, and their
families can do to have fun
this summer.
While most activities
carry a certain amount of
risk, that danger is usually
easy to plan for and man-
age.
"Managing risk not only
reduces mishaps, but it al-
lows us to thoroughly en-
joy the activities we par-
ticipate in;' Johnson said.
"A little advance planning
goes a long way."
NAVSAFECEN has pre-
sentations, booklets, vid-
eos, and other materials
to help service members
and their families plan
for summer fun. These
tools can be downloaded
at www.public.navy.mil/
navsafecen.
Johnson said he hopes
everyone will take advan-
tage of these materials so
the fleet can build on the
positive trends of the past
several years and have a
great summer at the same
time.
"Don't let a preventable
mishap constrain your
summer fun and enjoy-
ment," he said.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 5


Afghan


security


improves


By Army Sgt. 1 st Class
ichaelJ. "Carden
American Forces Press Service

Now is time for insur-
gents in Afghanistan to lay
their weapons down and
rejoin their communities,
a top NATO military offi-
cial said.
Speaking to Pentagon
reporters here via vid-
eoconference from his
headquarters in Kabul,
Afghanistan, British army
Maj. Gen. Phil Jones cred-
ited recent security gains
throughout the country
for setting the stage for a
growing reintegration pro-
gram.
"Security gains have two
effects. It gives the com-
munity a confidence to
support [reintegration]. It
also creates an environ-
ment for groups to come
back and reintegrate'" said
Jones, who heads the In-
ternational Security As-
sistance Force's force inte-
gration cell.
The Afghan program
provides support to in-
surgents and groups who
want to formally reinte-
grate into their communi-
ties. The program started
in July 2010, shortly after
the surge of 30,000 U.S.
troops began arriving in
Afghanistan to beef up se-
curity.
"The peace process sup-
ports fighters and their
communities to rejoin Af-
ghanistan with honor and
dignity, providing they
renounce violence, sever
ties with terrorist groups
and live under the con-
stitution," Jones said. "As
we start to see the secu-
rity gains made over the
autumn period solidified,
people get a sense that
they are irreversible."
Jones pointed to recent
reintegration progress in
northwestern Badghis




Diversity

From Page 1

educational opportuni-
ties. These schools include
King Bay's eight on-base
partners as well as several
off-base schools from the
local area and many oth-
ers from around the coun-
try.
The schools offer a wide
range of distance learning
opportunities.
Representatives of the
Fleet and Family Support
Center offered two ses-
sions of two seminars at
the Chapel Fellowship
Hall.
The topics were 10 Steps
to a Federal Job and Career
One-Stop.
The Buffalo Soldiers Mo-
torcycle Club, Jacksonville
Chapter, helped showcase
the role that Buffalo Sol-
diers played in the history
of the United States.
These fighting men were
the first Black professional
soldiers in the peacetime
Army following the Civil
War.
The nickname Buffalo
Soldiers was bestowed
by Cheyenne warriors in


Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rashaun X. James
Sgt. Ricardo Pereyra-Garcia directs vehicles across an improved ribbon bridge,
outside of Combat Outpost Payne in Afghanistan.


province as an example of
the type of successes they
have seen. The security
situation there has com-
pletely turned around for
the good, he said.
He described Badghis as
a poor province with vast
health and education de-
ficiencies that contributed
greatly to a growing insur-
gency there. The govern-
ment had little control or
influence. But after step-
ping up security opera-
tions and removing some
key insurgents, the gov-
ernment was afforded a
new platform for change,
he said.
"On the back of those
security gains and on the
back of some really excel-
lent political outreach, we
now have something like
400 armed men who have
reintegrated over the past
four months," Jones said.
"And, frankly, the security
situation in Badghis has
changed out of all recog-
nition."
Jones said that coalition
forces and Badghis gov-
ernment leaders recently
sat down with about 40
ex-insurgents and dis-
cussed ways forward for
peace. Also, he noted sim-
ilar meetings in Laghman
province with about 83



1867, reflecting the re-
spect the Indians had for
the soldiers' fierce fighting
ability.
Overtime, Buffalo Sol-
diers became a generic
term for all African-Amer-
ican soldiers.
The Navy Band South-
east combo Pride per-
formed throughout the af-
ternoon with a mix of pop,
rhythm and blues, classic
rock, modern rock, dance,
Motown, soul, hip-hop,
swing, country and disco
music.
Other entertainment in-
cluded
* The Hoku-Loa danc-
ers performing authen-
tic Polynesian dances
from Hawaii and Tahiti,
led by Malia Williams of
Jacksonville;
* Cherokee of Georgia
dancers from the Cherokee
of Georgia Tribal Council,
led by Francis McGahee,
also known as Red Hawk;
* And the Trinity
Dancers from Kingsland.
Joan Jones of Mt. Pleas-
ant, S.C., a basket weaver
for more than 35 years,
showed off her craft. Pro-
ducing products with
sweet grass has been a part
of the Mt. Pleasant com-
munity for many years.


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recently reintegrated Tal-
iban fighters.
Of the 25,000 insurgents
ISAF estimates bear arms
against NATO forces and
the Afghan government,
about 1,740 have formally
reintegrated back into so-
ciety, Jones said. Although
that is only a small percent-
age, a much larger progress
is looming, he said.
"Problems still remain
- absolutely no doubt, but
there've been some re-
ally big steps forward," he
said. "This is, at its heart,
all about fighters leaving
the fight and beginning to
build community cohe-
sion and stability from the
grass roots up."
Reintegration meetings
are now occurring in 15
provinces, and are likely
to start in at least five oth-
ers, he said. The recent
killing of al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden also has
had some effect, he noted,
adding that a several low-
level insurgent groups
have since shown interest
in the program.
In addition, Jones ex-
pects that as many as
2,000 fighters will bypass
the formal reintegration
process and simply lay
down their weapons and
return home.


Still, some elders and
armed fighters are hesi-
tant to participate.
"As any of the elders
will tell you, after 20 years
of war and 10 years of in-
surgency, Afghans will be
cautious about commit-
ting with their futures'" the
general said. "These are
life-changing decisions
that people are making,
and it is all built on trust
and confidence and will
only move at the speed of
trust and confidence."
Jones stressed the im-
portance of remaining
optimistic and having pa-
tience with the reintegra-
tion efforts.
"The deficit of trust and
the lack of confidence
after 30 years of fight-
ing here in Afghanistan
is quite profound," Jones
said. "The decisions peo-
ple are making are not
taken lightly, nor are they
taken necessarily quickly.
Their lives depend upon
the decisions they make.
"We've got to be careful
not to be unrealistically
optimistic, but we in ISAF
are seeing a lot of poten-
tial for this process to ex-
pand and accelerate as it
begins to have impact on
many communities across
Afghanistan," he said.


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Repairs

From Page 1

outage.
The corrective action
was to replace this defec-
tive component with a
non-hydroscopic molded
rubber connector plug.
There are several thousand
splices and gaining access
to them is difficult. To re-
place an electrical splice
in a vault, all sources of
electrical power entering
the vault must be secured
and grounded, followed
by pumping all water
from the vault, gas free-
ing the vault and adhering
to other safety measures
to ensure the safety of the
electricians performing
the work in the vault.
Because there are multi-
ple high voltage circuits in
each vault, work has been
very difficult to coordinate
and accomplish while
meeting mission require-
ments. Extensive planning
and complex coordination
has been necessary to ob-
tain approved outages to
accomplish this work.
In many cases, multiple
tenant commands are
affected by each repair
action. Due to mission
requirements and the un-
certainty in scheduling
this work, the Base Oper-
ating Services Contractor
was the logical choice to
perform these repairs.
Task orders for electri-
cal repairs were issued









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to the BOS, whom has
worked in close coordina-
tion with the PWD staff to
schedule and perform this
work on weekends, nights,
and holidays to get the job
done right with minimal
effect to Kings Bay's daily
operations.
The partnership and
flexibility of the Base Op-
erating Services Contrac-
tor to work with the Public
Works Department has re-
sulted in more than 1,405
defective connector plugs
being replaced in 131 un-
derground vaults to date.
Barry Lawson, electri-
cal engineering techni-
cian, has spearheaded this
work for the PWD. Lawson
has worked closely with
the BOS staff, tenant com-
mands and other affected
parties to make this repair
work proceed smoothly,
safely and with minimal
disruption.
Lawson credits the
BOS Utility Department's
knowledge, skill and can-
do attitude for the suc-
cessful completion of this
effort. Completing this
work will eliminate a very
high percentage of the un-
scheduled outages on the
electrical distribution sys-
tem and allow the system
to operate with minimal
repair for the life of the
cable system.


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b




6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


Force

From Page 1

going chemotherapy and
radiation treatments.
"Today, his dad is can-
cer-free, and Cadet Burgin
is here at West Point, the
best place he could imag-
ine to live out the values
that his father demon-
strated every day," the first
lady said.
She also recognized Ca-
det Woo Do, a first-gener-
ation American. "Growing
up," Obama said, "he'd ac-
company his grandfather
on doctor visits as a trans-
lator, and that's how he
developed his passion for
medicine a passion that
will take him to Harvard
Medical School next year."
Many of the graduating
cadets came from mili-
tary backgrounds, Obama
said, including Cadets
Christina Veney and Me-
gan Snook, who each have
multiple family members
who have graduated from
the U.S. Military Academy.
"And [Cadet] Erin An-
thony," she added, can
trace her family's military
history to the 1600s."
All of the cadets, the first
lady said, succeeded at the
academy in part because
of the support they re-
ceived from their families.
"Without your families,
you never would have
had the strength to tackle
Beast Barracks while your
peers were enjoying a fi-
nal, carefree summer be-
fore college," Obama said.
"They've been there for
you for every moment of
triumph and every mo-
ment of challenge. Their
unending love and sup-
port provide the very
foundation that allows
you to stand strong today"'
The values the cadets
brought to West Point are
reflected in their success,
Obama noted.
"It is very clear to me that
you all reflect everything
we hope to see in ourselves
and our country firmness
of character and strength


Photo by Tommy Gilligan
First Lady Michelle Obama spoke on the importance of family at the commence-
ment of the West Point Class of 2011, prior to graduation on the following day.


of heart, a strong body and
a ferocious mind, a devo-
tion to country and to fam-
ily," she said.
The cadets knew what
they were facing as they
made their way toward
graduation, the first lady
said, praising them for
pressing on.
"You have seen cadets
from the classes ahead
of you pack their bags for
Afghanistan or Iraq. ...
You hear updates not only
from headlines and news-
feeds, but from e-mails
and cell phone calls from
friends," she said. "You've
visited wounded friends,
you've heard the bugle's
call each time a graduate
of this academy has fallen
in our wars. Yet you stayed
anyway."
Speaking to the parents
at the family banquet,
Obama said she could
only imagine their feeling
of pride.
"But as a parent, I can
also imagine what else
might be on your mind
tonight," she added. "All of
you read the news. All of
you understand what your
children have signed up
for. You know what their
next assignment is, and
in the back of your mind,
you're wondering where


the assignments after that
might take them"
Their concerns are
natural, she said, and are
a testament to parental
strength, patriotism and
unconditional love.
As the graduating cadets
move on to their military
careers, Obama said, they
will find that family will
continue to be an impor-
tant part of their lives and
culture.
Today's military families
have husbands and wives
both pursuing careers
and raising children, often
still finding time for night
school, she said, and their
children move from town
to town, always adjusting
to new schools and mak-
ing new friends.
Parents of service mem-
bers wake up every morn-
ing and pray their child
comes home safely, she
continued, and Gold Star
families honor the memo-
ry of their loved ones while
channeling their strength
into serving others.
"Graduates, here's why
your role is so important,"
Obama said. "You'll serve
not just for yourselves,
and not just for your own
families, but for these
families, too. You'll help
your troops deal with the


fifth or sixth time in a de-
cade.'
She assured cadets and
their families that while
most people don't know
what it's like to serve, or
how to help, they do want
to help.
The chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, Navy
Adm. Mike Mullen, calls
that support "the Sea of
Goodwill," the first lady
said, adding that she and
Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice


President Joe Biden, have
channeled that willing-
ness to help into the na-
tional "Joining Forces"
campaign, calling on
Americans to recognize,
honor and support mili-
tary families not only
with just words, but also
with deeds.
The first lady urged the
graduating cadets to go
forward with confidence
in their education and in
the nation.


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joy of a newborn and the
disappointment of not be-
ing in the delivery room.
You'll help a soldier cope
with a family emergency
halfway around the world.
You'll see again and again
that those family relation-
ships are just as important
to a soldier's success as
anything that you can pro-
vide them in the field."
The leadership and sup-
port the troops need also
is something their families
need, the first lady said,
because they sacrifice and
serve the nation alongside
anyone who wears the U.S.
uniform. While Americans
see troops in uniform at a
grocery store or airport
and can thank them, she
noted, family members
just blend in.
And because only 1 per-
cent of the U.S. population
serves in the military, said
the first lady added, many
Americans don't know
many military families.
"They aren't familiar
with the resilience it takes
to get through a long de-
ployment," she said. "They
don't know the courage it
takes simply to turn on the
evening news. They don't
fully realize the strength
you need to move your
family for the fourth or


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 7


EI yolwcavUm i ne.ID


itF- I F-35C


rn IP uI sir juCenter,


Parenting classes
offered on Mondays
Are you frustrated with your
children? Would you like sug-
gestions on how to stop tem-
per tantrums or how to get
your teen to complete chores
without asking them 14
times? We believe parents are
the experts on their children.
But, children don't come with
a manual! So, sometimes you
need help to figure out what
to do with them. Meet with
the parenting class from 9 to
11 a.m. on Mondays, June 7,
13, 20 and 27. Enrollment in
this six-week class is ongoing.
Attendees must complete all
six weeks in order to receive
a certificate. A minimum of
six participants is needed in
order for a new class to start.
Registration required at 573-
4512.

Pre-marital workshop
offered June 1
The Fleet & Family Support
Center is offering a workshop
for pre-marital counseling for
couples that are contemplat-
ing marriage. The workshop
is designed to address cou-
ples interested in enriching
their future through improved
communication, problem-
solving skills, financial plan-
ning and realistic expecta-
tions of marriage. The class is
designed to meet all clinical
counseling requirements. The
workshop is scheduled for 1 to
4 p.m. June 1. Registration is
required, and childcare is not
available. For more informa-
tion call 573-4512.

Couple's Communication
workshop June 2
The characteristics which
attract us to one another often
become a focus of conflict
in marriage. This Couple's
Communication workshop
focuses on learning to lis-
ten to one another in a new
way so differences can be
understood and appreciated.
Registration is required for
the classes scheduled for 1 to


4:30 p.m. June 2. Call 573-4512
for details.

Job search workshop
scheduled for June 2
A job search workshop will
be held 10 to noon, June 2.
The Family Employment
Readiness Program gives
assistance, information and
referrals on employment and
education resource oppor-
tunities. Services are avail-
able to family members of
military personnel, retiring
and separating military, and
family members of relocat-
ing civil service personnel.
Appointments are required.
Call 573-4513 to register.

New Moms and Dads
Support Group to meet
A New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group will meet
every other Tuesday at the
Fleet and Family Support
Center throughout the month.
This workshop is scheduled
for 9 to 11 a.m. June 7. This
workshop is an opportunity to
share experiences, meet and
gain support from others, and
exchange new ideas. To regis-
ter, call 573-4512.

Transition Assistance
Program seminar coming
TAP is a seminar for those
separating, retiring or con-
templating leaving the mili-
tary that provides informa-
tion on benefits, job search
skills, employment resources,
resume writing, interviewing
and other related transition
skills. Spouses are encouraged


to attend. The seminars are
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 6 to
9 for separation. You must be
registered by your Command
Career Counselor. For more
information call 573-4513.

Fleet and Family offers
classes at your site
The Fleet and Family
Support Center will take most
of its regular workshops on
the road if a unit can furnish
a conference room or class-
room and guarantee a mini-
mum of five participants.
Personnel will tailor presenta-
tions to cover a unit's General
Military Training require-
ments when they deal with
human resources and social
issues. Counselors can create
a presentation in response to
a unit's area of special con-
cerns. Personnel are available
to participate within areas of
expertise in the indoctrina-
tion of newly assigned per-
sonnel and family members
of active duty personnel.

Kings Bay FFSC
on Facebook, Twitter
Fleet and Family Support
Center is on Facebook (FFSC
Kings Bay) and Twitter
(FFSCKB) Become a fan/
friend for information and
printable calendars or fol-
low us for information and
reminders about classes.


Department of Veterans
Affairs visits base
The Department of Veterans
Affairs representative for
Kings Bay is in the office 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Thursdays.
Appointments are required.
Service members wishing
to participate in the Benefits
Delivery at Discharge program
should be within 60 to 180 days
of discharge or retirement and
available for an exam by the
Veterans Administration. For
more information, callVeterans
Affairs representative Katherine
Fernandez at 573-4506.


in air


show

From Naval Air Systems
Command Public Affairs

The F-35C Joint
Strike Fighter made
its first public appear-
ance at an air show
May21.
Piloted by Lt. Cmdr.
Eric "Magic" Buus, the
F-35C made a single
pass down the show
line at the Joint Service
Open House at An-
drews Air Force Base,
Md.
The flight com-


Lockheed Martin
The Navy version of the F-35C in a test flight.


memorated 100 years
of naval aviation by
highlighting the future
of tactical air power for
the U.S. Navy.
The F-35C variant of
the joint strike fighter
is distinct from the
F-35A and F-35B ver-
sions with its larger
wing surfaces and re-
inforced landing gear
for greater control in
the demanding at-sea
carrier take-off and


landing environment.
The flyover origi-
nated from the F-35C's
primary test site at Na-
val Air Station Patux-
ent River, Md. and was
executed in the same
manner as any con-
trolled test sortie.
The aircraft, CF-2,
flew within its ap-
proved flight envelope
and was accompanied
by an F-18 Hornet fly-
ing chase.


OPERATION PREPARE
BE INFORMED > HAVE PLAN > MAKE A KIT



Emergency Preparedness

Town Hall Meeting

Presentations will be provided by:
*Fleet and Family Support Center
*Naval Submarine Base Emergency Management
*Navy Marine Corps Relief Society
*American Red Cross
*Camden County Emergency Management Agency
*Training and a demonstration will be provided on t
Navy Family Accountability Assessment System
(NFAAS)
*Balfour Beatty
*Base Security
*Fire Department
FREE CHILD CARE WILL BE PROVIDED FOR ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY
Please register with the Child Development Center by 26 Iay 2011
573-9918
Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
Auditorium, Building 1031
1st& 2nd June 2011
6PM 8PM
For more information, contact The Fleet and Family Support Center
573-4513
Or Email
Felipe.Gonzalez@ )iavy.,mil


he


IL


F


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Ff aeok


II


I - -


I




8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


Hbimecoming



HM MI





hsI m idI Family membe


fi+ e-.-_-:_. - . i g-- -----. i,
liftIfti it fii t


Linehandlers wait to pull the submarine into port.


rs and friends wait on the pier as tugs push the sub closer.


Family and friends welcome USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740 ) during its May 16 homecoming at NSB Kings Bay.


Above, linehandlers begin to secure the boat.
Left, USS Rhode Island moored at NSB Kings Bay.


It ".IA ." 'P
ITX4
1(.


STS2 Adam Coleman kisses his 3-month-old daughter, Emma,
while his wife, Kelly, looks on.


MT3 Billy Corring is greeted and welcomed home on
the pier by his wife, Amber.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 9

SLeft, Joan Jones,
4 -a basket weaver
.' < ifor more than 35
years and mother
of a Trident Refit
r~Id ___ *'Facility employ-
-.- _.-. ; ee, talks about
" T..- her baskets. N


S'Right, MU3 Sean
Meyer, a vocal-
ist with the Navy
Band Southeast
combo Pride,
,, -. 'entertains. -__


Left, Capt.
Jim Jones,
executive
officer of
Trident Refit
Facility Kings
Bay, talks
to mem-
bers of the
Jacksonville,
Fla., chap-
ter of the
Buffalo
Soldiers
Motorcycle
Club.


Area colleges
show what
they have to
offer.


- q-
5,- ~ j- -'21 I
-i I I


Cherokee of Georgia flute maker James
Nemeth plays music on a hand-crafted flute.


Above, Raices de Colombia performs a native dance.

Left, Fair goers sample some of the many ethnic foods.




10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


Photo courtesy of General Dynamics-NASSCO
The Military Sealift Command Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo and ammunition
ship USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) is seen in an aerial view. USNS Cesar Chavez
will be fourteenth of the class.



Cesar Chavez new ship


From Department of Defense
Public Affairs

Secretary of the Navy
Ray Mabus announced
May 18 the selection of the
USNS Cesar Chavez as the
14th Lewis and Clark-class
of dry cargo/ammunition
ships.
Continuing the Lewis
and Clark-class tradition
of honoring legendary pi-
oneers and explorers, the
Navy's newest underway
replenishment ship hon-
ors the memory of Mexi-
can-American civil rights
activist Cesar Chavez.
Chavez served in the
Navy from 1944 to 1946,
after which he became a
leader in the American
Labor Movement and a
civil rights activist who
co-founded the National
Farm Workers Associa-
tion, which later became
the United Farm Workers.
"Cesar Chavez inspired
young Americans to do
what is right and what is
necessary to protect our
freedoms and our coun-
try," Mabus said. "The
Cesar Chavez will sail
hundreds of thousands
of miles and will bring
support and assistance


to thousands upon thou-
sands of people. His ex-
ample will live on in this
great ship."
Designated T-AKE 14,
Cesar Chavez is being
built by General Dynam-
ics NASSCO shipyard in
San Diego.
Eleven of the T-AKEs are
slated to serve as combat
logistics force ships, and
three are slated to be part
of the maritime preposi-
tioning force.
Cesar Chavez will serve
the CLF missions, help-
ing the Navy maintain a
worldwide forward pres-
ence by delivering am-
munition, food, fuel and
other dry cargo to U.S. and
allied ships at sea.
"This proud ship will
honor one American. But
the story of my father's
family is a lot like the story
of so many other immi-
grants, especially Latinos,"
said Paul F. Chavez, son of
the ship's namesake and
president of Cesar Chavez
Foundation. "They came
to America seeking a bet-
ter life. In so doing, they
brought to their new land
a fervent patriotism that
has been demonstrat-
ed over and over again


throughout the storied
history of our nation.
"My dad was like many
Latinos and African Amer-
icans from his generation
who returned home in
the years following World
War II determined to see
that the country for which
they sacrificed lived up to
its promise as a beacon to
the nations of equality and
freedom.'
Cesar Chavez will be
designated as a United
States Naval Ship, and
operated by the Navy's
Military Sealift Command
with a crew of civil ser-
vice mariners (129 in CLF
mode, 75 in MPF mode).
For CLF missions, the
T-AKEs' crews include a
small detachment of sail-
ors.
Like her sister dry cargo/
ammunition ships, T-AKE
14 is designed to operate
independently for extend-
ed periods at sea and can
carry two helicopters and
their crews.
The ship is 689 feet in
length, has a waterline
beam of 105 feet, displac-
es approximately 41,000
tons, and is capable of
reaching a speed of 20
knots.


Reform

From Page 1

"And after years of war
against al-Qaida and its
affiliates," Obama said,
"we have dealt al-Qaida
a huge blow by killing its
leader, Osama bin Laden'.
Bin Laden was no mar-
tyr, the president said.
"He was a mass murder-
er who offered a message
of hate, an insistence that
Muslims had to take up
arms against the West, and
that violence against men,
women and children was
the only path to change,"
Obama said.
Bin Laden rejected de-
mocracy and individual
rights for Muslims in favor
of violent extremism, win-
ning some followers but
alienating others with his
"slaughter of innocents,"
he said.
"By the time we found
bin Laden," the president
said, "al-Qaida's agenda
had come to be seen by
the vast majority of the
region as a dead end, and
the people of the Middle



Contest

From Page 2

Judges will include rep-
resentatives from NH Jax
and the Oakleaf Club of
Jacksonville. Posters are
judged based on origi-
nality, artistic merit and
expression of the theme.
Judging categories are by
age four to six years, 7
to 10 years, 11 to 12 years
- as well as a separate
category for computer-
generated art for ages four
to 12.
Entry forms are avail-
able by e-mailing jaxpub-
licaffairs@med.navy.mil
and by downloading from
the NH Jax Web site at
www.med.navy.mil/sites/
nhjax. Contact BHC Kings
Bay Public Affairs at (912)
573-0034 with questions.


wr


East and North Africa had
taken their future into
their own hands."
In too many coun-
tries in the region, "calls
for change have been
answered by violence."
Obama said.
The most extreme ex-
ample is Libya, he said,
where Moammar Gadhafi
launched a war against his
own people, "promising to
hunt them down like rats"'
Today, "the opposition
has organized a legiti-
mate and credible interim
council. And when Gad-
hafi inevitably leaves or
is forced from power, de-
cades of provocation will
come to an end and the
transition to a democratic
Libya can proceed," he
said.
In the months ahead,
Obama said America must
use its influence to encour-
age all countries in the re-
gion to embrace reform.
"Our message is simple,"
he said. "If you take the
risks that reform entails,
you will have the full sup-
port of the United States."
Middle Eastern and
North African nations won


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their independence long
ago, he said, but in too
many places their people
did not.
The choice that must
be made in these nations
is the same that must be
made across the region, he
said the choice between
hate and hope.
"It's a choice that must
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For the American peo-
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upheaval in the region may
be unsettling but the forces
driving it are familiar.
Our own nation was
founded through a rebel-
lion against an empire,
Obama said. Our people
fought a painful civil war
that extended freedom
and dignity to those who
were enslaved, he said.
"I would not be stand-
ing here today unless past
generations turned to the
moral force of nonvio-
lence as a way to perfect
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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


USS Boise captures 2010 Battenberg Cup


By Kevin Copeland
For Commander, Submarine
Force Atlantic Public Affairs

The Los Angeles-class
attack submarine USS
Boise (SSN 764) has won
the 2010 Battenberg Cup
Award as the best all-
around ship in the U.S. At-
lantic Fleet.
The announcement was
made by Adm. John C.
Harvey, Jr., Commander,
U.S. Fleet Forces Com-
mand via a Navy message,
May9.
Boise is homeported at
Naval Station Norfolk in
Norfolk, Va., and is only
the third submarine to win
the Battenberg Cup. The
other winners were the
Los Angeles-class attack
submarine USS Memphis
(SSN 691) in 2005 and the
Los Angeles-class attack
submarine USS Miami
(SSN 755) in 1999.
"The outstanding
achievements by the
crews of each ship nomi-
nated for the Battenberg
Cup made the selection
process extremely diffi-
cult," Harvey said. 'All of
the finalists distinguished
themselves through ex-
ceptional performance
and should be proud of
their accomplishments.
"For the crew of USS
Boise, you have shown
yourselves to be among
the best Sailors we have,
and you made Boise the
best ship in the Atlantic
Fleet. I'm very proud to
serve alongside you and
congratulate you for your
achievement. Bravo Zulu.'
The other ships in the
Battenberg Cup competi-
tion were the aircraft car-
rier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) representing
Commander, Naval Air
Force Atlantic and the am-
phibious warfare ship USS
Nassau (LHA 4) represent-
ing Commander, Naval
Surface Force Atlantic.


manders.
During the 2010 calen-
dar year, Boise was recog-
nized for effective leader-
ship and commitment to
establish and maintain a
foundation of personal,
professional, and opera-
tional excellence by earn-
ing the 2010 Commander,


Submarine Squadron
Eight Battle Efficiency "E"
award. In addition, the
ship was awarded the En-
gineering "E,"
Navigation "N," Com-
munications "C," Sup-
ply "E," and Medical "M"
awards for departmental
excellence.


Navy photo by MC2 Danna M. Morris
The Los Angeles-class submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) returns to homeport at
Naval Station Norfolk after a scheduled six-month deployment.


"Boise was outstanding
this past year. They ap-
proached every challenge
in a dedicated and very
thorough way," said Vice
Adm. John M. Richard-
son, Commander, Sub-
marine Force Atlantic.
"Every member on the
Boise team knows their
job and knows they are
valued by their command
and the Navy as national
treasures. Boise's integrity
and humble sense of pur-
pose really set them apart
as an example for others
to follow. I'm super happy
about them receiving this
prestigious award"'
The Battenberg Cup,
also known as the Brit-
ish Challenge Cup, was
initiated by Rear Admiral
Prince Louis of Batten-
berg. Under his command
in 1905 four armored
cruisers from the British
Second Cruiser Squadron
made a goodwill cruise to
Annapolis, Md., Washing-
ton, D.C., and New York.
The visit was hosted by
Rear Adm. Robley D. Ev-
ans, Commander in Chief
of the Atlantic Fleet.
After returning to Great
Britain, he created the cup
to recognize the "good fel-


lowship and wonderful
entertainments" he and
his men experienced in
their visit to the United
States. The large silver
trophy he made stood an
impressive three-feet high
and 11 inches in diameter
at the top.
Battenberg mailed the
cup to Evans, with an ac-
companying letter stating
the cup was intended for
the enlisted men under
Evans' command The let-
ter also requested the cup
to become a challenge
cup. In accordance with
Battenberg's wishes, Ev-
ans subsequently set up
racing rules so that Brit-
ish Sailors would compete
with American Sailors in
using U.S. Navy standard
racing cutters.
From 1906 until 1940,
competitions were held
until the war years dis-
rupted them and they
never resumed until 1978.
That year Adm. Isaac C.
Kidd, Jr, Commander-in-
Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet
reinstated the Battenberg
Cup Award, not for racing
cutters, but as a symbol
of operational excellence
within the Atlantic Fleet.
"Boise had a great


2010, which included a
very successful European
Command deployment,"
said Cmdr. Brian L. Sit-
tlow, commanding officer.
"Many crew evaluations
and inspections produced
high marks. There were
also numerous individual
accomplishments that
collectively supported our
teamwork philosophy."
Throughout 2010, the
submarine and its crew
performed exceptionally
across a myriad of chal-
lenging operations and
initiative, both in port and
at-sea. Boise successfully
completed an accelerated
Deployment Preparation
Period after completing
a demanding Docking
Selected Restricted Avail-
ability.
While deployed to two
different theaters of op-
erations, Boise achieved
all operational objectives,
maintained an operation-
al tempo of 84 percent,
steamed 34,800 nautical
miles and had zero missed
mission days. The subma-
rine flawlessly executed
three missions vital to na-
tional security which key
decision making intelli-
gence to Combatant Com-


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 15


n0

Recalling Biclnemorf
i wric e i1


Recalling Americas battles on Memorial Day


Memorial Day is when we remember those who
have given their lives in battle to make the
United States what it is today. Few really want
to fight in battle, but, luckily, we have those who will. So


MM1 Scott Myers
Trident Refit Facility
Sarasota, Fla.
"The Battle of Midway. It
changed the way we look
at naval warfare."


my question is, if you fought one battle in U.S. history,
which battle would it be? As a military history buff, I
would prefer to have been at Valcour Island, Cowpens,
Sarasota, Vicksburg, Midway or any battle since 1990,

, - -.~2S fI


Gunnery Sgt. Palace CW4 Damian Ashcraft
Harris Security Force Battalion
Security Force Battalion St. Petersburg, Fla.
Albany, Ga. "The Pacific Island
"Belleau Wood. That's Hopping Campaign. It was
where the Marines earned a tremendous undertaking
the name Devil Dogs." and team effort."


MU3 Sean Meyer
Navy Band Southeast
Bridgeton, N.J.
"Gettysburg. They were
fighting for the rights of
all human beings."


and I say the latter because Americans really seem to
appreciate the military these days. I wouldn't want to
have been at Fredricksburg, Peleliu, Chosin, the A Shau
Valley or with Custer. Here's what others said.


MU3 Raymond Laffoon
Navy Band Southeast
Roanoke, Va.
"I can't pick just one
because Americans always
fight for good or the better-
ment of mankind."


~A .d,. ~I


Wesley "Money" Scruggs
Treasurer, Buffalo
Soldiers of Jacksonville
Richmond, Va.
"Desert Shield/Desert
Storm. I participated in
them, so it's sort of fitting."


Small girl,
giant
donation
Mary Lee Clark
Elementary School
fifth-grader Gabby
Albansese formed
a club called The
Shining Stars and
collected donations
to be sent to Sailors
serving on Individual
Augmentations over-
seas. Her father is
assigned to Strategic
Weapons Facility
Atlantic and the
family will soon
transfer to Hawaii.
She is pictured with
Master Chief Jimmy
Schubert, NSB Kings
Bay Command
Master Chief.
Photo by Kelly Wirfel


Navy photo by MC3 Cory Rose
Navy League tours
Kings Bay Navy League received a base orientation tour May 17. Participants toured Trident Training Facility,
received a brief and demonstration about the Navy's Marine Mammal Program, had lunch at the galley and
received a brief about the history and mission of Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic. The group is pictured
in front of the SWFLANT missile display.


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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


JLI~avy College U Edu~caion []a Informationu [0]I


Honoring past,


celebrating new


By Gregg White
Director, NSB Kings Bay Navy
College

Memorial Day is right
around the corner, and
while it's very appropri-
ate to remember all who
have or still fight for our
freedoms, I thought it is a
good time to take a min-
ute to recognize the newly
joined Sailor, officer and
enlisted.
Without this wide-eyed
individual, we would not
have someone to continue
the fight and serve to keep
our country great, and
we'd have no one to re-
place us when we advance
or retire. We also need to
remember that there is no
"chief enlistment" sold by
recruiters that allows you
to sign up and then report
in 10 years to the nearest
Navy base to pin on chief.
We were all "new joins" at
one time.
One of the best ways to
recognize and take care
of our new join is to intro-
duce them to the positive
things at a unit and on the
base. They'll find the neg-
ative things soon enough
and without our help. One
of Kings Bay positives is
the opportunity and avail-
ability for off-duty educa-
tion, and there are several


reasons to bring them by
the Navy College Office
asap when they check in.
First, mission is job
one and the Navy College
Counselors promote that
and push each Sailor, Ma-
rine, and Coast Guards-
man to take a year or two
and learn their job.
Second, the NCO coun-
selors teach each person
how to shop for a degree,
evaluate schools, use
available funding and
how off-duty education is
an earned privilege not a
right. This is what they can
do during their first year...
they plan.
Third, the NCO helps
the spouses and college-
age children with fund-
ing, school selection, etc.
Knowing their family is
taken care of allows the
war fighter to focus more
on his or her mission.
Join me this coming
Memorial Day in honor-
ing those who have fought
for us by taking care of the
new joins as we were once
taken care of. By doing
this, we continue a tradi-
tion, rather a conviction to
ensure that future genera-
tions will continue to have
more and better opportu-
nities than our forefathers
had, just as they wanted
for us.


CLEPoftheweek
PRE-CALCULUS
Section 1:25 questions, 50 minutes.
The use of an online graphing calculator (non-CAS) is
allowed for this section.
Section 2:23 questions, 40 minutes.
No calculator is allowed for this section.

20% Algebraic Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities
15% Functions: Concept, Properties, and Operations
30% Representations of Functions: Symbolic, Graphical,
and Tabular
10% Analytical Geometry
15% Trigonometry and its Applications
10% Functions as Model.

On Base Education Providers
Office Hours


Navy College Office


Main office: Mon Fri 0730-1600
Off Crew bid: Wed 0800-1600


American Military Unlv Qtrly call for appt (229) 539-6042


Brenau Univ


Mon-Th 0900-1800 / Fri 0900-1530


Coastline Comm College Tues & Wed 0900-1400
Empire State College Qtrly call for appt (518) 859-3858


Excelsior College


Wed 0900-1400


Thomas Edison St. Coll Mon & Thur 0900-1400
Univ of Md, Univ College Tues & Wed 0900-1400


Valdosta State Univ


Mon Fri 0830 1700


Ongoing and Upcoming Events
Event Date Time Location
Main NCO Office Every Day 0730-1600 Navy College Ed Center
Individual Assistance Valk-in or make appt. (nco.kingsbay@navy.mil)
Info: Get counseling, advice, guidance, training, answers, education action plans, etc.
Satellite NCO Office 0800-1600 Off Crew building
I...... Every Wed.....day
individuals or groups Walk-in or make appt Loading deck hallway
Info: Get counseling, advice, guidance, training, answers, education action plans, etc. (but closer to the crew)
Annual TA Training 7 days a week 24 hours a day On-line
Info: Complete this trng online then bring certificate to NCO.
https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/docsrrA-ONLINE-BRIEF-MAR2011_v2.ppt
Troops to Teachers 23 May. 13 Jun, 2 Jul. 29 Aug 0900-1000 Navy College Ed Center
Troops to Teachers 12Sep3 Oct,28 Nov 12 Dec -1(Next to NEX)
Info: This is information to help fund your pursuit of teaching K-12. This class Is for active duty and veterans.
Spouse Education Everyday alk-in or cll for Avy College Ed Center
Opportunities (kids welcome...)
Info:
We willteach you how to find, fund, schedule time for and start college. We understand the needs of today's
spouses and will listentfocus on your specific needs. Not just theory, but an actual plan to get started today.


a R

Ceil Pines
Adult Living Community
a front porch community

6008 Lake Cove Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
www.cecilpines.org


Located on the Previous Cecil Field Naval Air Station.


People come to Cecil Pines to experience independent living

in an inspiring natural setting.

We are a retirement community unique from others in that all of our

residences are spacious, one-story homes, each with its own carport, patio

and yard. But just because you live in your own home doesn't mean you

have to shoulder all the responsibilities that come with it. Cecil Pines is

a low maintenance community we take care of the maintenance in the

home, outside the home and in the yard so that you can focus on what's

truly important to you. Our emergency response system and gated-entry

campus also give you the peace of mind to pursue your life's pleasures.


For many, retirement is a time to downsize and simplify, and to make

time for friends, leisure activities, hobbies and travel. This describes the

exciting lifestyle enjoyed by residents of Cecil Pines.


Cecil Pines is located on 53 wooded acres with the amenities you need to

live life your way. In this natural setting you can focus on exploring the

beauty of the surrounding area, or join your neighbors in the many social

events that take place every day right on campus.


Located close by:

Indoor Olympic-sized heated pool & aerobics pool

Workout facility

Golf course

Shopping at the new Oakleaf Town Center


Independent low maintenance living in a peaceful setting...

that's the Cecil Pines difference.



CECIL PINES IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY HOUSING PROVIDER


1aUUUUU
l^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^^- a 0 0^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ uaua
0 S 0 0 ^^^^[EIT^ J^^^H


What are CLEPIDSST Exams?
CLEPIDSST examinations cover material taught in coursesthat most students take as requirements in the
first two years of college. A college usually grants the same amount of credtto students eating satisfactory
scores on the CLEPIDSST examination as it grantsto students successfully completing that course.
Many examinations are designed to correspond to one-semester courses; some however correspond to full-
year or two-year courses. Unless stated otherwise in its description, an examination is intended to cover
material in a one-semester course.

Most exams are 90 minutes long, and, except for English Composition with Essay, is made up primarily of
multiple-choice questions; however, some exams do have fill-ins.

More information about CLEP and DSST exams and practice tests are available at:
httpilwww.getcollegecredt.coml
httpilwww.collegeboard.comnstudentftestingfdeplexams.html
httplhwww.petersons.com/dodl


DSST oftheweek
ASTRONOMY
History of Astronomy 9%
Celestial Mechanics 5%
Celestial Systems 13%
Astronomical Instruments 12%
The Solar System 19%
The Sun and Stars 17%
Our Galaxy 7%
The Universe 10%
Determining Distances 5 %
Life in the Universe 3%


CLEP / DSST Testing Information
On-Base NationalTest Center

Money Savings
Military $FREE* vs. $500 $1,000 (extra TA)
Family $92-$100 vs. $500 $1,000
Time Savings:
Class = 45 hours (5hrs/night x 9wk)
CLEP = Study 2-3hr/wk for approx 2 months
Where: Navy College Ed Center, Rm 130
When: Thursdays 0845 & 1045
Cost: *Military: 1st attempt is free for each test.
Spouses: CLEP-$92 DSST-$100
Dependant: Same. Same.
Sign up at Navy College Education Center
VSU office or call 882-6573.


Navy College Office Testing Schedule
Conducted at the education center (Bid 1030)
Test Date / Time Fees
SAT Jun7.Oct4, Dec6 1-t: Free
(active duly and reserves only) 0730- 1330 2nd : SAT=$47
ACT Mayy3, Jul 5, Aug2, Sep6. NovI1 1t-: Free
(active duty and reserves only) 0730- 1300 2"d: ACT=S33
GED
GED Available locally Test $95
(Spouse & Dependants) Call 510-331 Training- Free
* Testing vill stsat promptly at 0730. AlU late hows will be rersdeduled foer following test petod.
* Resr-vationas are requlled on all testfin.
*If you have taken SA.T or ACT n last 3 yr., ake money order to "SAT" or "ACT" eacordingly.
* To plepare, use VVWWW.Petersons.coIe/DANTES Free academic skllHs course.
* GeCi testing calt be done in multiple sittings. The date d tes ses wil be scheduled based an what is
best for the member, and the availlbllityofNCO Test ERiaes-cs.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 17


Run for the Fallen June 14 at NSB Kings Bay


The Run for the Fallen
starts at 7 a.m., Tuesday,
June 14. The run is free.
Sign up at the Fitness
Complex. For more in-
formation, call (912) 573-
3990.
* Pre-Lifeguard Train-
ing and Lifeguard
Classes Registration
is at the Fitness Center.
Costs are $50 for Pre-Life
Guard Training and $175
for Lifeguard classes.
Participants must be 15
years old by May 27. For
more information, call the
Fitness Center at (912)
573-3990.
* Coke Zero 400 at
Daytona It's Saturday,
July 2. Tickets avail-
able now available at
Information, Tickets and
Travel. Weatherly Box
$70, Keech Tower $65,
Weatherly Tower $80,
FanZone $25. Kids 12 and
under, $10 for all seating.
For more information, call
I.T.T at (912) 573-2289.
* Rack-N-Roll Lanes
is offering an Economic
Break All games, all the
time are always $1.50. No
more this price or this day.
Great deals also are offered
at Rocky Colletti's with
50-cent hot dogs and $1.50
refillable fountain drinks.
* Disney, Wet & Wild -
Discount tickets and spe-
cials are available at Kings
Bay Information, Tickets
and Travel. For more
information, call (912)
573-2289.
* Legends Grill Special
- Have lunch at Legends
Grille at Trident Lake Golf
Course in May and get $1
off your lunch entr6e when
you present your receipt
from that day's play. Call
for more information at
(912) 573-8475 The Grille
opens at 11 a.m. Monday
through Friday. The menu


/7 A








Saturday, May

12 4 p.m.

Fitnea Pool Complex

Kee Entry to Pool


April, a different choice
with fries and a drink will
be offered each day of
the week for $5.50: turkey
club Monday, French dip
Tuesday, brat with fried
onions Wednesday, two
grilled ham and cheeses
Thursday and fried fish
Friday. Call ahead for an
easy lunch pick-up at 573-
4029. The pizza special of
the month for May is one
bacon-cheddar cheese-
burger 14-inch pizza and


a large order of break-
sticks for $14. That is a
savings of more than $3.
Stop by or call for carry
out at (912) 573-4029.
*Platter at Finnegan's
- Enjoy a Friday after-
noon of socializing and
camaraderie! Have a
platter on Finnegan's for
stopping by with at least
eight of your friends and/
or co-workers. It's valued
at more than $30, compli-
mentary for you and your


Open Rec for teens

nights start June 3


28


First 300 people get free souvenir wrist bands!

DI


Morale. Welfar.



NAVY
FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION

Prowd Sponaor of thi event
The Navy nor any other pa of the federal government offiaally
endorses any company, sponsor or their products or services


offers a sandwiches, appe-
tizers and salads for health
conscience individuals.
The Grille offers take out
and on the weekends it is
open for breakfast starting
at 9 a.m.
* Rocky Colletti's
Specials of the Month -
Take a bite out of high pric-
es with a sandwich special
at Rocky Colletti's. During


Open Recreation at
the Teen Center, start-
ing June 3 is 4 to 9 p.m.,
Friday for ages 13 to 18
and 4 to 8 p.m. Wednes-
days for ages 10 to 12.
It's free to all teens.
Special guests will be
announced. For more
information, call, (912)
573-2380.
Junior Golf Camp
For ages 10 to 17
at Trident Lakes Golf
Course. Cost $125 per
person which includes
golf instruction with golf
pro, golfing on course,
lunch, hat and prizes.
Out for Summer Camp
begins June 6 and runs
through June 10. Back
to School Camp begins
July 25 through July 29.
Lessons are8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. This is a great
start for the new golfer
in your family. For more
information call (912)
573-8475.
School Age Care -
Registration at the Youth
Center begins Friday,
July 1 for the before and
after school programs.
Register 8 a.m. to 5:30
p.m., Mondays through
Friday. For more infor-
mation, call (912) 573-
2380
Adventure Landing

party. Call ahead and let
them know you are com-
ing 24-hour advance
notice is required. Call the
Pub at (912) 573-9429 or
Rack -N-Roll Lanes at 912-
573-9492


Trip It's 11:30 a.m., to
5 p.m., Saturday, June
18. Registration is May
23 through June 10 at
the Youth Center, 8 a.m.
to noon and 1 to 5:30
p.m. This is for ages 11
to 18, and the cost is
$20 per person. Youths
will need to bring their
own spending money
for lunch and games.
A swimsuit, sunscreen
and towels are required.
For more information
call, (912) 573-2380.
First Tee Golf Camp
at the Youth Ball
Fields Two ses-
sion are Tuesdays and
Thursday, June 21 to
30 and July 12 to 21.
Registration is May 20 to
June 17 for the first ses-
sion and May 20 to July 5
for the second. Register
at the Youth Center,
8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
Cost is $40 for military,
$45 for DoD and con-
tractors and $50 for
civilian, per session per
child. Last day of camp
will be at Trident Lakes
Golf Course with a com-

See Kids, Page 19

Morale, Welfare and
Recreation is going
"Green" and paperless
With your help, MWR
can achieve this planet-

See MWR, Page 19


L8J


N


El


STO ORDER


Get upgraded solid surface

countertops and tile floors

when you buy a Built to OrderT' KB home at Timber Creek
by May 31and finance with KBA Mortgage, LLC.*

Discover all the amazing choices at KB Home Studio.
But hurry! This special offer will not last long.


* *


Timber Creek in Nassau From the $110s
* 1,224-3,418 sq. ft. community amenities for a low HOA and no CDD fees
* 3-6 bedrooms minutes from shopping and dining on Amelia Island
* zoned for highly rated schools just 18 miles from the Kings Bay Naval Base
From 1-95, exit A1A and head west approx. 1 mi. to community on left. (904) 225-2581


888-KB-HOMES kbhome.com
02011 KB Home (KBH). Studio options package (ARV $4,883) includes level 2 Corian kitchen countertops, including undermount sink, (ARV $3,008) and level 1 tile in wet areas (ARV $1,875). To receive Studio options
offer, buyer must sign purchase agreement on a new Built to OrderTM KB home at Timber Creek between 5/1/11 and 5/31/11; close escrow in time required under the contract; and finance via KBA Mortgage, LLC, an
operating subsidiary of Bank of America, N.A. Buyer may finance via any other lender but will not be eligible for offer. No substitutions; not transferable, redeemable or exchangeable for cash; cannot be combined with
any other offers or a Broker Co-op; and supersedes previous offers. Buyer must sign an owner-occupancy agreement at time of purchase. Offer will be credited at closing. KBH employees and their family members are
not eligible for this offer. KBH reserves the right to extend, modify or discontinue promotion/offer at any time without prior notice. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. See Built to Order options and upgrades
offered at KB Home Studio. All options/upgrades require additional charges, may require ordering at predetermined stages of construction and are subject to change/discontinuation anytime by KB Home. KB Home is not
a custom homebuilder and Built to Order only applies to appliances/options available at KB Home Studio. Plans, pricing, financing, terms, availability and specifications subject to change/prior sale without notice and may
vary by neighborhood, lot location and home series. Additional charges apply for lot premiums, options/upgrades. Buyer responsible for all taxes, insurance and other fees. Sq. footage is approximate. HOA applies. Exterior
ro..... ...i photos show upgraded landscaping/options and may not represent community's lowest-priced homes. Interior photo shows upgrades/options that may be purchased at _
___o __, predetermined stages of construction for an additional cost and decorator items/furnishings not available for purchase from KBH. See sales counselor for details. CBC1257079 E R
..... JAX-94436 ig,.,:- :*
*Studio options offer is only available on properties advertised above and will be credited at the time of closing. Buyer may finance via any lender but will not be eligible for this offer. Buyer must finance with KBA Mortgage,
LLC. to be eligible for this offer. Offer expires after 5/31/11.
Equal Housing Lender. KBA Mortgage, LLC is an operating subsidiary of Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. 02011 Bank of America Corporation. All trademarks are the property of Bank of America Corporation or KB
Home, respectively. Some products may not be available in all states where KBA Mortgage, LLC operates. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend.
Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. KBA Mortgage and KB Home are independently responsible for the products, services and incentives each company offers. (05/11) ARF3F6M6.


L


^ *41C


Pool G ame
Pocket Scavenger Hunt
Board Walk

Pop ictle
Pritze & More

Food available for purchase!

912-573-4564


I

Fr


..T~a




18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011


Ericsson


rescues


sailors

By Edward Baxter
Military Sealift Command Far
East

Civil service mariners
aboard Military Sealift
Command fleet replenish-
ment oiler USNS John Er-
icsson (T-AO 194) rescued
five people lost at sea in a
small boat near the Solo-
mon Islands May 18.
While conducting rou-
tine operations in the Sol-
omon Sea May 17, Erics-
son received notification
from the Maritime Rescue
Coordination Centers in
Australia and Papua New
Guinea at about 11 p.m.,
to be on the lookout for a
missing commercial ves-
sel.
At approximately 8 a.m.
local time the following
morning, Ordinary Sea-
man Tyrone Mouzon spot-
ted a small commercial
vessel with five individu-
als aboard waving franti-
cally. Mouzon notified the
watch officer, Third Mate
Timothy Gervais, who
alerted Ericsson's civil ser-
vice master Capt. Richard
Kirk, who immediately
ordered the ship to head
toward the small craft and
render assistance.
"Visibility at the time
was very limited by rain
squalls, so it was very for-
tunate that the mate on
watch spotted these com-
mercial sailors," Kirk said.
Ericsson carefully
inched close to the boat
and the ship's crew se-
cured lines to the small
craft. Safely secured along-
side, Ericsson brought the
commercial sailors on
board where they received
medical examinations as
well as food and water.
"The sailors were tired
and dehydrated but they
appeared to be in good
condition;' Kirk said.
Kirk said the five Solo-
mon natives said they
were transiting between
the Solomons' Nissian and
Bougainville islands when
they became disoriented
by bad weather and heavy
seas, spending two nights
and three days lost more
than 35 miles out to sea.
"They had no food and
water remaining," he said.
Ericsson's crew also was
able to salvage the small
boat by placing a large net
underneath the vessel,
lifting it out of the water
using the ship's crane and
securing the boat to the
side of the ship for trans-
port.
Ericsson then made
the short transit to near-
by Bougainville Island
where the five commercial
sailors, along with their
vessel, were repatriated
ashore.
Ericsson is one of MSC's
15 fleet replenishment
oilers that deliver avia-
tion and diesel fuel to U.S.
Navy ships at sea. Ericsson
was in the region support-
ing U.S. Navy ships.


Navy photo by MC2 Adrian White
Rainbow sideboys render honors to Rear Adm. Anatolio Cruz, deputy commander
of U.S. 4th Fleet, on the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS
Carl Vinson (CVN 70).


Navy's diversity saluted


From Chief of Naval Personnel
Diversity Directorate Public
Affairs

Commands through-
out the Navy are celebrat-
ing Asian-Pacific Islander
Heritage Month during
May, and two Navy offi-
cers are serving as prime
examples of the diversity
found within the Navy's
ranks.
Capt. Raquel C. Bono
was nominated in April
for promotion to rear ad-
miral, and Rear Adm. Ana-
tolio B. Cruz III, a Navy re-
servist who was promoted
last year, will be the only
siblings of Filipino de-
scent to hold flag-officer
ranks simultaneously.
"Service to others; ser-
vice to country," Bono
said. "It was ingrained in
us by our father and moth-
er in gratitude to their ad-
opted country, the United
States.'
Bono and Cruz's grand-
father, an obstetrician in
the Philippines, was com-
missioned as a U.S. Army
colonel and supported his
countrymen in their fight
against the Japanese dur-
ing World War II. Some
20 years later, their father
and mother left Manila for
Minnesota, where their fa-
ther completed his surgi-
cal residency.
The family ultimately
settled in San Antonio,
Texas. Their father went
on to serve in the Navy Re-
serve, eventually retiring
as a captain.
Bono, the oldest child,
enrolled at the University
of Texas and considered
becoming a nurse. Her fa-
ther asked, "Why not be a
doctor?" she recalled.
In the question, she


said she heard a lesson:
if she believed in herself,
she could accomplish
lofty goals and serve oth-
ers, too. So, through the
Navy's Health Professions
Scholarship program, she
earned her medical de-
gree at Texas Tech and
began her military career
with a general surgery res-
idency at Naval Hospital
Portsmouth, Va. She was
the first woman to gradu-
ate from the program.
"I had tremendous sup-
port from the department
... from the staff that ran
the program," she said.
"What I enjoyed about be-
ing in the Navy was that I
always felt confident that
my ability to be advanced
was going to be based on
my capabilities and my
performance. I felt that I
had an equitable opportu-
nity to succeed."
Cruz, one year younger
than his sister, graduated
from the Naval Academy in
1980, and in the following
year reported to USS Gray
(FF 1054), in which he was
the only minority officer.
In 1982, he earned the
Pacific Fleet Shiphandler
of the Year Award. In
1984, Cruz returned to An-
napolis as an admissions
and congressional liaison
officer. He transferred
to the Navy Reserve two
years later, but remained
closely involved in acad-
emy admissions for the
next 22 years, with a par-
ticular interest in promot-
ing diversity.
"I've seen first hand the
strides we've made over
the years," he said.
Cruz spent most of his
career in special opera-
tions assignments and
completed six command


tours. Units he command-
ed earned the Leo Bilger
Award for mission effec-
tiveness and the Meritori-
ous Unit Commendation
for exceptional perfor-
mance.
Regardless of those ac-
complishments, he said
he has always been in awe
of his sister.
"She was the smart one
and very disciplined at
everything she did," Cruz
said. "Dad set the bar and
she raised that bar. Quite
frankly, she deserved to
make flag before I did."
After three years as com-
manding officer of Naval
Hospital Jacksonville, Fla.,
Bono became chief of staff
of the TRICARE Manage-
ment Activity in Septem-
ber 2008.
In 2010, she became the
deputy director of medi-
cal resources, plans and
policy for the chief of na-
val operations. Cruz has
been U.S. Naval Forces
Southern Command's
and U.S. 4th Fleet's deputy
commander since Febru-
ary 2010.
They talk frequently, of-
ten about military topics,
and while Asian-Pacific
Islander Heritage Month
comes around just once a
year, they find support for
their Filipino-American
heritage every day, Bono
said.
"The Navy has been a
great place to pursue a ca-
reer and still maintain the
essence of who you are as
an individual and a mem-
ber of a particular ethnic
group," she said. "It's an
environment that values
the different, representa-
tive groups to enhance
and promote the people
who are serving:'


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Keel set for USS Minnesota


By Submarine Group Two Public Affairs Office

Newport News Shipbuilding, a division
of Huntington Ingalls Industries, hosted
a keel laying ceremony May 20, for the
new submarine USS Minnesota (SSN
783), the third U.S. Navy ship named for
the North Star state.
Ellen Roughead, wife of Chief of Naval
Operations Adm. Gary Roughead, served


as the ship's sponsor and keel authenti-
cator for the ceremony.
Roughead authenticated the keel by
chalking her initials onto a metal plate.
Her initials are then welded onto the
plate, which will be permanently affixed
to the ship.
Minnesota will be the 10th of a pro-
See Sub, Page 21


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 19


Marine leaders train at Gettysburg battlefield


By Cpl. Brian Adam Jones
Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point

As darkness fell over Gettys-
burg, Pa., April 27, a cool, spring
wind swirled around the rough-
ly 70 Marines from Marine Wing
Support Squadron 271. The
wind brought the threat of rain,
but also the warm, comforting
scent of charcoal from a camp-
fire and airy, musical notes from
the absentminded strumming of
a guitar in the distance.
The Marines from MWSS-271,
staff noncommissioned officers
and noncommissioned officers,
came from Marine Corps Air
Station Cherry Point, N.C. to the
site of the historic Civil War bat-
tle with one expressed purpose
- to see how they could grow
and learn together as enlisted
leaders.
The Marines set up camp in
the yard next to the home of
Seamus Garrahy, a man who
departed the Marine Corps as a
corporal in 1968. Though Gar-
rahy left the Corps, the Corps
never left him. Now 70 years
old, Garrahy has spent the last
30 years showing a small stature
can conceal a big heart, opening
his home to any and all Marines
who wish to visit and camp out.
His home has adopted an affec-
tionate title Marine Barracks
Gettysburg.
The first night, thunder and
rain came with fury and pur-
pose, rattling the Marines in
their tents.
But the next day, as the Ma-
rines toured the storied battle-
grounds, the dark, foreboding
clouds surrendered the fight to
clear, blue skies.
Sgt. Maj. Brett C. Scheuer, the
sergeant major for MWSS-271,
led the exploration of the bat-
tleground. A history enthusiast
whose great-great-grandfather
fought in the Battle of Gettys-
burg with the 102nd New York
Infantry Regiment, Scheuer said
he hoped his Marines departed
the experience with an under-
standing of their history.
"It's important to carry on our
traditions and our history as our
junior Marines become senior
leaders," Scheuer said.
Scheuer said ultimately, the
main goal was team building,
to heighten camaraderie and
esprit de corps. Sgt. Manuel D.
Ayala seemed to embrace the
sergeant major's message and
the purpose of the trip.
"It's amazing to be in a loca-
tion like this," said Ayala, a field


Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Brian Adam Jones
Gunnery Sgt. Hugo R. Duran, the company first sergeant for MWSS-271's Engineer Co., speaks
with the Marines about the lessons one could derive from the Battle of Gettysburg during a visit to
Gettysburg, Pa., April 28.


wireman with MWSS-271's
Headquarters and Service Com-
pany. "I've read some books on
the battle, but it's nothing like
being here and walking the ter-
rain."
Ayala said he believed there
were tremendous similarities
between the human experience
in warfare during the Battle of
Gettysburg and what Marines go
through today.
"Everyone here fought for
what they believed in," Ayala
said of the Civil War troops.
"They fought for the men to their
left and right, and they fought to
protect their families. That's also
the case for everyone I've ever
served with."
The Marines made several
stops on their tour, visiting the
site of Pickett's Charge, Big
Round Top and Devil's Den,
among others.
It was touching for many to
connect southern Pennsylva-
nia's lush, rolling countryside,
with green grass speckled with
yellow wildflowers, to the vio-
lent clash that made the region
famous.
"Gettysburg was a turning
point in the fight against slavery
and the preservation of our na-
tion," said Gunnery Sgt. Hugo
R. Duran, the company first ser-
geant for MWSS-271's Engineer


Co. "This trip has renewed my
sense of patriotism."
Duran also expressed high
hopes for the leadership lessons
that could be learned from the
experience.
"Everyone has a leadership
style, I can't say mine is better
or more effective than anyone
else's," Duran said. "We have so
many different leadership styles
here among the 70 staff NCOs
and NCOs here today, so there's
a lot that can be learned."
Staff Sgt. Joshua D. Hanson,
the H&S Co. gunnery sergeant,
said that engaged leadership
holds up the institution and sets
standards to follow.
"By getting the senior staff
NCOs and the NCOs together,
this trip provided the chance
to for the NCOs to engage their
senior leaders on a different
level and allowed the Marines
the chance to build a stronger
bond," Hanson said. "I think
the sergeants and corporals will
come back with a lot more mo-
tivation. I had several conver-
sations with NCOs who asked
me about my style of leader-
ship; I explained that my style
of leadership evolves with ev-
ery Marine I meet, and I adopt
something from their style. A lot
of sergeants and corporals will
come back and implement that


with their junior Marines, and
that will build a more cohesive
group, not just at a unit level but
at the squadron level."
After touring the battle-
ground, the Marines returned
to Marine Barracks Gettysburg
where Garrahy and several local
Marine veterans had been busy
cooking steaks and chilling beer
for the Marines to feast on.
"Steaks and beers" night is a
part of the institution of Marine
Barracks Gettysburg, an oppor-
tunity for the visiting Marines
to share stories of the past and
present with Garrahy and his
crew ofvets.
"There is nothing better than
hanging around Marines," Gar-
rahy said. "This place wouldn't
be home without them."
"What we do here is just a lit-
tle bit of what we can do to give
back and show these guys and
gals how much we appreciate
what they do," said Stan Clark,
who left the Marines as a staff
sergeant in 1976 and now helps
Garrahy support the Corps in
anyway he can.
Clark manned the grill ear-
nestly, producing juicy steaks
nearly as thick as they were
wide. The steaks were coated in
Gung-ho Sauce, Garrahy's own
special recipe.
As the Marines dined and


shared stories, they were given
but one rule they were not
under any circumstances al-
lowed to feed Recon Marine,
Garrahy's golden, shaggy-haired
dog with a penchant for hanging
around the picnic tables.
It was the second time the Ma-
rines from MWSS-271 had visit-
ed Marine Barracks Gettysburg,
and Scheuer presented Garrahy
with a plaque thanking him for
his hospitality.
As the sun dipped below Big
Round Top, the boulder-strewn
hill that served as the left flank
of the Union defense more than
a century ago, Garrahy's wife,
Linda Bell, played "Taps" on the
bugle, in chilling remembrance
of the more than 50,000 lives lost
near where the Marines now
stood.
Scheuer said educational trips
like the one to Gettysburg ben-
efit every Marine in the squad-
ron. He said after last year's trip,
the squadron didn't have a non-
judicial punishment for 90 days
and didn't have a court martial
for nine months.
"It certainly renews the sense
of leadership and perspective
for the NCOs who go on the trip,
but it also shows the younger
guys, the lance corporals and
the privates first class, that rank
has its privileges," Scheuer said.
Cpl. Robert W. Hartnett, a
food service specialist with the
squadron, said he was a lance
corporal the year before and
was unable to attend the trip,
but when he saw the more se-
nior Marines come back, it was
inspiring.
"When they got back last year
theywouldn't stop talking about
it, so it made me envious, made
me want to get promoted so I
could be like them," Hartnett
said. "Now, being here, seeing
guys like Seamus, those guys are
influential and impactful. It's
our job to uphold the traditions
and standards they set and con-
tinue to uphold. They have a big
heart for the Marine Corps."
"What I learned here was not
about the Battle of Gettysburg.
I looked to the sergeant major
and the steaks and beer crew
and I took away a message of
selflessness," Hanson said. "It's
not about me. It's about taking
care of the Marines around me.
We're a family, it's what we were
taught when we first enlisted;
it's what many of us enlisted for.
Trips like this solidify the base of
engagement and cohesion that
are so important"


Kids

From Page 17

plimentary lunch. All par-
ticipants will receive a golf
T-shirt. For more informa-
tion call (912) 573-8202.
* Lacrosse Clinic It's
9 a.m. to noon, Saturday,
June 18. Registration,
through June 1 at the


Youth Center, is $5 per
pre-registered child and
$10 per child on the day
of the clinic. Register 8
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. For more
information call (912)
573-8202.
* Jacksonville Univer-
sity Soccer Camp June
6 to 10 at the Youth Soccer
Fields. Registration runs
through June 2 at the


Youth Center. For more
information call: (912)
573-8202.
* Swim lessons Learn
basic skills at the Fitness
Center. Parents are taught
to safely work with child
in the water, children are
introduced to basic skills
that lay a foundation to
help them learn to swim.
Classes will be for ages 6
months and up. Group


sessions are $40 and
private lessons are $75.
Check with the Fitness
center for days and times
for each class or call (912)
573-3990 or (912) 573-
3001.
* Youth Basketball
Camp June 13 to 17 for
5-to-8 year olds and June
20 to 29 for ages 9 to 17,
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Cost is $20 for June 13 to


17 and $25 for the June 20
to 29 camp. Registration
runs to June 8 for first
camp and June 15 for sec-
ond camp. Late registra-
tion will be accepted if
there are openings avail-
able. Sign up at the Youth
Center 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
For more information call
the Youth Center at (912)
573-8202.


Juvenile Diabetes
strikes 40 children
every day.
Ihank you for making life-saving
research possible.
Call 800.533.CURE
orvisitwww.jdrforg


Foundation
JD R F International
dediLcated to finding a cure
A CFC participant
Prowded as a public service


MWR

From Page 17

saving goal. MWR is post-
ing events in The Kings
Bay Periscope and on
Facebook. There is a tex-
ting program so you can
receive instant messages.
Call (912) 573-4556 for
more information on this
new process and become
part of the change or
visit www.facebook.com/
mwrkingsbay or www.


cnic.navy.mil/kingsbay.
* Taking it to the
Internet MWR is tak-
ing you to the Internet age
with a Facebook page that
will keep you knowing all.
Become a fan at www.
facebook.com/mwrkings-
bay or look into the MWR
Sports page for all the
Kings Bay sports updates.
Additionally, MWR has
electronic comment
cards. For being heard, go
to www.surveymk.com/
mwrkb and fill out a com-
pliment, concern or com-
plaint!


SHave "Dip For Your Trip"
E-Cigarettes

Discount Cigarettes

Tobacco Products
A Of ThsAvailable At Our Con renient DRI F T HRL
Fax In Orders Phone Cards
* Notary ' Copies/Fax
SSpecial tobacco Request
Even Get Keys Made Here!







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GIYT CAR


SED




20 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011



A




New furniture is arriving daily at

Bassett Avenues Thomasvile
Home Furnishings
to make this Sell Out
BIGGER & BETTER than ever!


Additional markdowns are in effect on the entire & complete stock
of quality Furniture, Accessories & More at Three Great Stores.
Over Three Million Dollars of famous name brand home
furnishings for bedrooms, living rooms, leather,
home office, sectionals, sofas & recliners
will be sold at drastically
reduced prices. o


GH


All Inventory In The Stores &
Warehouses Must Be Sold Quickly!
Nothing will be held back.
Prices will be plainly marked on sale tags
for immediate liquidation.


Bassetf
ninuiniL.i


Avenues Thomasvie
Home Furnishings thomasville.com


9357 Philips Highway 9365 Philips Highway I 1035 Philips Highway
One Mile North ofAvenues Mall I mile north ofAvenues Mall next to Bassett. One mile south ofAvenues Mall
(904) 363-3550 (904) 363-8267 (904) 292-0212
Mon,Thu, Fri 10-8 *Tue,Wed, Sat 10-6 Sun 12-6 Mon,Thu, Fri 10-8 *Tue,Wed, Sat 10-6 Sun 12-6 Mon,Thu, Fri 10-8 *Tue,Wed, Sat 10-6 Sun 12-6
*Discounts taken off MSRP. **With approved credit. No interest until January 2013. 1/3 deposit, minimum monthly payments & minimum purchase of $1999 required. Must be paid in full in
specified time or interest will accrue from the date of sale at the rate of 24.99%. Shipping & delivery extra. Offer not valid on previous purchases or pending sales. See store for details.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 21


Thursday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled Bacon
Sausage Patties
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Black Bean Soup
Fried Pork Chops
Lemon Pepper Fish
Noodles Jefferson
Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Italian Style Kidney Beans
Steamed Wax beans
* Speed Line
Chicken Pattie Sandwich
Philly Cheese steak Sand-
wich
Grilled Peppers and Onions
Baked Beans
Chili
Cheese Sauce
Sandwich Bar
Cold Cut Sandwich
Dinner
Minestrone Soup
Meat Lasagna
Grilled Italian Sausage
Marinara Sauce
Tossed Green Rice
Mixed Vegetables
Herbed Cauliflower
Friday


Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs To Order
Omelets to Order
Pancakes with Syrup
Grilled Bacon
Sausage Egg & Cheese
Muffin
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line


Beef Vegetable Soup
Southern Fried Chicken
Stuffed Fish
Wild Rice
Mashed Potatoes
Chicken Gravy
Black-eyed Peas
Southern Style Green
Beans
* Speed Line
Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger
Hot Dogs
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
French Onion Soup
Grilled T-bone Steak
Grilled Crab Cakes
Baked Potatoes
Honey Glazed Carrots
Steamed Asparagus
Arftf


Saturday
Brunch
Chicken Noodle Soup
Philly Cheese Steak Sand-
wich
Chicken Philly Sandwiches
French Fries
Grilled Hoagies
Steamed Broccoli
Cereal
Oven Fried Bacon
Omelets to Order
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Pizza
Buffalo Chicken Strips
French Fries
Green Beans
Sunday
Brunch
Knickerbocker Soup
Barbecue Pork Sandwich
Fishwich Sandwich
Tater Tots
Mixed Vegetables
Cole Slaw
Cereal
Oven fried Bacon
Grilled Sausage Patties
Dinner
New England Clam Chow-
der
Prime Rib au Jus
Garlic Butter Shrimp
Twice-Baked Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Sauteed Mushrooms &
Onions
Broccoli Parmesan
Corn on the Cob

Monday
Breakfast
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order


Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled Bacon
Fresh Fruit Salad
Breakfast Burrito
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Gumbo
Blackened Chicken
Roast Beef
Rissole Potatoes
Red Beans & Rice
Calico Corn
Collard Greens
* Speed Line
Chicken Wings
Pizza
Potato Bar
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Seafood Newberg
Teriyaki Beef Strips
Rice Pilaf
Noodles Jefferson
Club Spinach
Italian Style Baked Beans
Tuesday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Waffles
Grilled Bacon
Grilled Sausage Links
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Spanish Soup
Salisbury Steak
Confetti Chicken
Brown Gravy
Mashed Potatoes
Mac and Cheese
Simmered Carrots
Fried Cabbage with Bacon
* Speed Line
Chicken Tacos
Beef Enchiladas
Spanish Rice
Refried Beans
Taco Bar
Dinner
Chili
Barbecue Beef Cubes
Chicken Pot Pie
Parsley Buttered Potatoes
Steamed Rice
Simmered Green Beans
Steamed Cauliflower

Wednesday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Blueberry Pancakes
Grilled Bacon
Corned Beef Hash


Get started today and you could be
working in as few as 9 months.*
More educational benefits are available now than ever before for military personnel and their spouses.
Plan for your future-call Concorde today to get more information on how our training can
benefit you, your spouse and your family.


We offer healthcare training for:
NEW! Physical Therapist Assistant- (AS) I Insurance Coding & Billing Specialist I Respimtory Therapy- (AS)
Surgical Technologist I Dental Assistant I Medical Assistant I Patient Care Technician I Practical Nursing | Nursing- (AS)

7960 Arlington Expressway I Jacksonville, FL 32211 ( ONCORDE
Financial Aid ovilable to those who qualify. Acredited Member, ACCSC. High school diploma or 6ED required. *Program lengths vry.l s n Hah ',1, ,in


Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Doubly Good Chicken Soup
Braised Beef Tips
Stuffed Flounder
Buttered Egg Noodles
Rice Pilaf
Brown Gravy
Simmered Lima Beans
Mixed Vegetables
* Speed Line
Corn Dogs
Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
Chicken Egg Drop Soup
Roast Pork
Teriyaki chicken
Filipino Rice
Fried Lumpia
Stir Fried Vegetables
Steamed Asparagus


Thursday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled bacon
Sausage Patties
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Minestrone Soup
Chicken Parmesan
Meat Sauce
Boiled Spaghetti
Paprika Potatoes
Steamed Broccoli
Italian Kidney Beans


* Speed Line
Chicken Pattie Sandwich
Philly Cheese Steak Sand-
wich
Grilled Pepper and Onions
Baked beans
Chili
Cheese Sauce
Sandwich Bar
Cold Cub Sandwich
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Fried Catfish
Braised Pork Chops
Mashed Potatoes
Chicken Gravy
Tossed Green Rice
Fried Okra
Simmered Carrots


Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15 a.m.
to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No Breakfast Served.
Brunch 10:45 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
All breakfasts and brunch-
es include cereal, instant
oatmeal or grits, juice bar,
pastry bar, yogurt.
All meals served for lunch
and dinner also feature the
Healthy Choice Salad Bar
and various dessert items.
Menu items are subject
to change.


Sub

From Page 18

jected 30 Virginia-class
submarines.
Construction began
in February 2008 and its
name was announced July
15, 2008. The name Min-
nesota was selected to
honor the state's residents
and their continued sup-
port of the U.S. military.
The state is the home of
46 Medal of Honor recipi-
ents spanning the Civil
War through the Vietnam
War.
HII designs, builds and
maintains nuclear and
non-nuclear ships for the
U.S. Navy and Coast Guard
and provides after-market
services for military ships
around the globe.
Minnesota is being built
under a teaming arrange-
ment between HII and
General Dynamics Elec-
tric Boat.
Upon completion, the
submarine will be 7,800-
tons and 377-feet long,
which is slightly longer
than a football field.
Minnesota has a 34-foot
beam. The submarine will
be able to dive to depths
greater than 800 feet and
will be able to operate
at speeds in excess of 25
knots while submerged.
Minnesota is designed
with a nuclear reactor
plant that will not re-
quire refueling during the
planned life of the ship,.


VIDEO


WHEREHOUSE


_IS BACK
With more selections and better prices. Not just a machine
in front of the grocery store. We have 1,000's of DVDs & cassettes.
COMPETITIVE PRICING AS LOW AS 500 PER NIGHT
WE TAKE RESERVATIONS. NO CHARGES FOR RESERVATIONS NOT SECURED.




I FREE "
I I

Movie I

S Rental J
I Bring in ad. Exp. June 9, 2011 1


(912) 729-8448
840 E. King Avenue, Ste. A Kingsland, GA


"WE BRING THE MILITARY


MARKET To You!
~I


AI, IR N D CIP




Military Publications reach

P I I ~81% of the military community


eInternetd veI rI siII




Military Community

Includes 92,103 Active-

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Working On Base -

CalAvriig y50,6J31


Acive-Duty, Reserves, Civilians, Cotractors



| iiiiu i .axAirNews '

Published by

0he1iforida itmes-~nion 103045




22 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, I Ii... ,1,, May 26, 2011


SSi


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE
Mon. Thurs.
Fri. 7:30 a.m.
TOLL FREE
BY FAX


366-6300
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-5:30 p.m.
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IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines

Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction
and billing adjustments.
Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about
payments or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all
advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of
publication. Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal,
State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.
Standard abbreviations are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


It The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


CLASSIFIED INDEX

Annunemnt Intuio


Auctions


Employment


Real Estate for Rent


Financial


IMerchandise


ITransportation


S IlS DISC VER 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears
online at no additional charge.


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel


Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment


Notices

I was involved in a motor-
cycle accident at Franklin
gate on Wednesday 11 May
2011 at 0720 and the person
that caused the accident fled the
scene. If anyone witnessed the
accident I could greatly use their
help if they are willing to make a
statement it would be most appre-
ciated. I know that several people
witnessed the accident because
they stopped and offered assis-
tance and made sure I was OK, to
all of them thank you. 912-573-6998






Open Houses
Argyle
Arlington
Avondale/Ortega
Beaches
Downtown
Fernandina/Amelia Island
Intracoastal West
Keystone Heights/Melrose
Mandarin
Middleburg
North Jacksonville
Orange Park/Clay County
Riverside
San Marco
Southside
Springfield
Westside
Waterfront
Condominiums
Manufactured Homes
Lots
Farm Acreage
Investment Property
Retirement Community
Baker County
Georgia Real Estate
Nassua County
Putnam County
St. Johns Open Houses
St. Johns Homes
St. Johns Waterfront
St. Johns Oceanfront
St. Johns Intracoastal
St. Johns Marshfront
St. Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses
St. Johns Manufactured
Homes
St. Johns Lots/Acreage
St. Johns Active Adult
Com.
St. Johns Investment
Income Property
Miscellaneous
Out of Area/Town/State
Real Estate Wanted


1 Georgia
Real Estate

FOR SALE BY OWNER
LAKE JORDAN WEST
100 Windermere Dr.
Kingsland, Ga.
Very nice well maintained, close
to schools and shopping. Great
neighborhood 3br/2ba w/screened
porch, pool & nicely landscaped.
$1000's below appraised value.
Seller will pay closing costs.
$158,000. Call 912-673-8558


LAND FOR SALE 82.3 ACRES
Pierce County. Large pond with
high drivable dame. Approx 50
acres of Long Leaf Pines. Electric
power on site, LOTS OF DEER &
TURKEY. Will sell 10ac tracks or
larger. Owner will finance. Call cell
904-753-1846 or home 904-261-0339


St. Simons Island
Beach Club Condo
2br/2ba balcony with ocean view.
Reduced to $345K. Must sell.
Call 912-617-3002



V Orange Park
/ Clay County

SHome for sale 3/1 1/2, conve-
nient to NAS, New kitchen,
paint, and carpet, screened in
patio $65,000 OBO. Call
904-269-5721 "Officially Reassigned"



Waterfront


HOME ON BASS LAKE
Private subdivision. Pool, tennis,
dock, fabulous views of lake and
intracoastal, across from Amelia
Island, 15 minutes from Beach.
Contact: WOODJP@comcast.net


Support
your military
newpapr.

The best bargain
in town.
For Classified Advertising,
call 904-366-6300,
or 1-800-258-4637.

i ,ir ElNews


W Manufactured
Homes
Orange Park 2011 Jacobsen modular.
Landscaped Fenced lot. Owner
financing $695mo. 904-589-9585

SOUTHSIDE 2BR/2BA Very
clean, walk to Memorial
Hospital, fenced yard. Rent
to own. $650mo. 904-733-2155


Frms &
Acreage
29.7 Acres w/2 wells, pond, fenced,
cross fenced, barn, will subdivide,
Pomona Park (Putnam County)30
min fr. St. Aug., 2 hrs from Disney,
10 min. from St Johns River, 5 min
from Crescent lake, 1 mi. from
Lake Broward (Spring-Fed) $375k,
(904) 614-7511.


Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St. Johns Apartments Furnished
St. Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St. Johns Condominiums
St. Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St. Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St. Johns Houses Furnished
St. Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St. Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St. Johns Lots
St. Johns Roommates
St. Johns Rooms to Rent
St. Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St. Johns Vacation Rental
St. Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St. Johns Wanted to Rent


Condominiums

2 bedroom 1 bath DUPLEX,
fenced yard, off street parking, 800
square feet, bonus room. Tile
floors, bedrooms carpeted. Indoor
laundry facilities, no washer &
dryer. $650 per month.
Available June 1st. 904-415-9946


V Houses
Unfurnished
FLEMING ISLAND 3/2.5 TH 2-story,
A-rated schools, 2 pools, tennis
$1000/mo +dep avl immed 451-5572




Oceanfront Neptune Beach House
3800sf, 5/3.5 amazing views. $5,500
per month. 904-509-5296
SNice 3 bedroom 2 bath home
for rent in Argyle convenient
to Oakleaf Shopping and
Orange Park Mall. $1050 a
month. Call 282-0502. "OR"


7 Houses
Unfurnished

WESTSIDE- 3br/1.5ba,
Den, upgraded 4 years ago,
$850mo + $800dep.
call 904-786-3928 after 4pm


W Manufactured
Homes
MARIETTA Area 28x80 Fleetwood
2005 4/3, on landscaped 1/2 acre lot,
close to schools. Owner fin, low to
no dwn, $495.00/mo. 904-589-9585
Middleburg 2005 32x80 on 1/2 acre
landscaped on paved road Lv
room/Den and Fireplace 4/3 a must
see at $525.00 a month 904-589-9585
SPCS ORDERS-2001 MOBILE
HOME FOR RENT $550
Monthly. 900 SQ.FT, 2 Bed-
room/2 Bath. Very Good Con-
dition. Located 2 miles from NS
Mayport, in a very clean and safe
Park. Includes: All appliances,
Heat/Air Conditioning, Trash Col-
lection, Sewer & Water. Perfect
for a young family or GEO Bach-
elor(s). For more information con-
tact Joyce at (904) 242-9404.


Roommates

SWESTSIDE Close to NAS JAX
Seeking responsible & reliable
person to share home,
separate bath, furn'd room,
clean, no pets, no drugs, share
utilities & cable Interent access.
Home security. Preferably female.
PCS orders. 904-307-2890



-II


Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent






Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold


COASTAL MORTGAGECOMPYTHE

A Division of Fowler Maxwell Financial Services

Specializing in Coastal Georgia

VA Purchasing & Refinancing L K NES BAY, BEEDRGIA


912-729-5626

24 Andrews Way Kingsland, GA
www.CoastalMortgageCompany.com
11111111111 111 __________1 ~ 1111IN76426L
aj;iMIII j:Iiiir :Iiir M; 7Wjjj~i


Navy

Classified

Ads


THE FLEET

MARKET

ADVERTISING
RULES

Please fill out this
form in black or
blue ink.


DEADLINES


THE

MIRROR


Noon

Friday


Rank/Grade: Work Phone# Organization: Date Submitted:


Name(please print):

1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to the Mayport
Naval Station.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to
help qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads
such as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ANIMAL
OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE
PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATEADS WILL BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT
OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF
STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN
ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD- OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be
written independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, The
Periscope, Public Affairs Office, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, GA 31547, or
to The Periscope, One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the
above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any
or all ads.


Signature:

7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
calling 1-800-2584637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-3666230, however, they must be completed
on an original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 0 1 wk 0 2 wks Q 3 wks 0 4 wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Mirror.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not tom) along the outside border. (2) No
more than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free
ads per family, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the
Classified Index.



Category:



-Periscope
One Rversde Avenue Jacksnvlle FL 32202
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


eJ iE FR oFREFREeF EoFEoFEoI FEEaJREiFREB


I


I I I I I


I RalEsat fr al Srvce


I Commercial Real Estate Pets/Ani




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 26, 2011 23


Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events


Schools


The University of Florida
is now offering a unique
Career Training Program:
PHARMACY TECHNICIAN

Online Video Course: $2,795
(Uses same curriculum as Live Class)


Online ourse ilan ea~sj
Ianate ~ d a cla -and

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Loan application assistance and
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CALL US NOW!
TUF College of Pharmacy
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA
Call today to find out more and enroll
888-415-5833
For additional program details isilwww.UFpharm.org




Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted

SUWANNEE Home Care Now Hiring
Marketing Rep, OTs, RN, MSW
for busy and growing agency!
Exp in home care pref but will
train. PIs Fax Resume to:
904-384-6068


cr Medical/
Health Care
IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR
FULLTIME CVT with peripheral
intervention preferred. secondly full-
time certified Cardiac Ultrasound
Tech. excellent pay and benefits for
the right candidates. Private cath
lab mon-fri with excellent work
enviornment. No weekends or call.
Office and mobile echo all within
Putnam County. Please call Ruth
386-326-4129 or fax 386-329-8436



Life
Care
Center
of Orange Park

Now Hiring:
RN FT
LPN PT/PRN
C.N.A. FT

Apply at:
2145 Kingsley Ave.
Orange Park, Fl 32073
Ph # 904-272-2424
Fax# 904-272-0013

Lifeguard Ambulance Services is the
911 service provider for Columbia
County, Florida. Lifeguard offers a
team culture, progressive proto-
cols, focus on continuing education
and training, opportunities for
advancement, competitive wages,
and a variety of employee benefits.
Lifeguard currently has openings
for Full-Time Paramedics and
EMT Basics, Administration/ Bill-
ing, and Management personnel.
Lifeguard Human Resources will
be in Columbia County/ Lake City
on Tuesday May 24th (9am-9pm)
and Wednesday May 25th
(9am-2pm) accepting applications,
conducting interviews, and answer-
ing any questions. Individual meet-
ings can be scheduled for persons
not able to meet at the scheduled
t i m e s co n t a c t
Darnail.CWalters@lifeguardambu-
lance.com. Additional information
including location of the interviews
is available at www.lifeguardambu-
lance.com. To apply online, visit
our website at www.LifeguardAm-
bulance.com/company/careers. Or
download an employment applica-
tion and fax it to 850-365-0164


Medical Coders
Must have:Knowledge of ICD-9 &
CPT-4 Skills. Ability to extract
information from handwritten
records.Outpatient Emergency
Room Facility Coding experience
required. Please fax resume and
salary requirements to Martin Got-
tlieb & Associates, 904-596-2751 or
email: walkerc@gottlieb.com
No phone calls please



PONCE DE LEON
CARE CENTER
RE^CH NG NEW HORIZONS

Director of Admissions
& Marketing
Ponce Therapy Care Center, a
skilled nursing home facility, is
seeking a seasoned Director of
Admissions and Marketing. Must
establish positive relationship with
referral sources for census build-
ing while effectively implementing
an organized system for resident
admission, discharge and bed hold.
Will assure the residents' needs are
accurately assessed to identify the
appropriate level of care to be pro-
vided by the appropriate payer.
Excellent wages and benefits.
EOE. Please submit resume to
vmiller@poncecarecenter.com

RN, RRT, CRT
Lincare, a leading national respira-
tory company seeks Healthcare
Specialist. Responsibilities: Dis-
ease mgmt programs, clinical
evaluations, equipment set up &
education. Be the doctors eyes in
the home setting. RN, RRT, CRT
lic'd as applicable. Great personali-
ties with strong work ethic needed.
Competitive salaries, benefits and
career paths. Drug Free EOE. Fax
resume to 904-288-8115 or apply in
person at 9440 Phillips Hwy, Suite 13.



Delivery Driver

USA TODAY DISTRIBUTION
Profit potential of $11,500-14,000/yr as
carrier for USA TODAY. Routes
avail in selected Jax areas. M-F,
approx 3:30-7:30AM, no wknds or
holidays. Need reliable vehicle,
valid FDL & ins. Must have good
credit. To apply call 800/944-5543
option 2.


WMaintenance/
Janitorial Services
WHITEWAVE FOODS
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
If you have a desire to work for a
growing organization, please sub-
mit your application and resume:
maintenance department
Attn: Dora Carter
2198 W. Beaver Street
Jacksonville, FL 32209
We provide excellent affordable
benefits that include medical,
dental and 401k with a match.
We also provide a competitive wage
starting @ $18.93 an hour as well as
offer the opportunity for overtime.



Marketing

LPN'S & CNA'S are needed for PRN
work at Moosehaven, Orange
Park's oldest senior care campus.
Self-directed, energetic profession-
als capable of providing
customer-focused care are strongly
encouraged to apply. Fax resume
to 904-278-1285 or e-mail to
Jmarcum@moosehaven.org
EOE/DFWP



Sales


MARCH MOTORS NEEDS
SALES ASSOCIATES
For fast-paced dealership. Experi-
enced only. Bilingual a plus.
Valid license a must.
Patricia 652-9289



Peripscope
rGIIU. II


Transportation

Class-A CDL Driver Wanted -
Mobile Mini, Inc. Must have
Tilt-bed and Landoll Experience
and be customer-service oriented.
401k/Full Benefits are Available.
Call our office at 904-765-3544



DRIVER
PT position, schedule will vary. Must
have CDL license with "P" endorse-
ment, min. of 2 yrs recent exp. And
enjoy working with seniors.
Apply in person or fax resume
(904) 287-4615.
Westminster Woods
25 State Road 13
St. Johns, FL



The best bargain
in town.

Periscope





AC & Heating

We will beat any written estimate on
new systems & repairs by 10%. 904-
588-5222 padgettsair.com -CAC1814887



V Roofing /
Roof Cleaning
ROOF: Licensed/ins, 30/yrs exp. new
re-roofs, & repairs. Call 904-697-6518


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade


Appliances

SBroan 30" Stainless Steel
Range hood $45.
904-269-1478



Building Supplies

STEEL BUILDINGS 40x60 $16,800.


Clothes

Military Field Jacket. Black
w/hood & removable liner.
New, Irg $25. 352-586-7126



Electronics

STV/Monitor HD 15" Magnavox
w/converter & access. Works
great $35. 268-2482


V Furniture
Household
SBED. Iron frame, tubular
posts w/irg brass tops. Very
old, but in great cond. $425.
268-2482
Great Distinction brown all leather
large chair with ottoman. Sold new
for $2000. Will sell for $1,000.
Excellent condition. 573-9344 or
762-5998.
Love Seat- Beautiful Fairfield Traditional
Love Seat with decorative throw
pillows. Needle point floral design
on front in coral and beige. Excel-
lent condition. Ideal for profes-
sional office or home. $900.
573-9344 or 762-5998.


Garden/ Lawn

Craftsman 12amp, 19" Elec-
tric laawn mower $150.
559-772-2658


Misc.
Merchandise
S5 Person Hot Tub
I Like new $1000.


21 MPG


RER1!Hv II

NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA X-CAB



,AW t
MWQ~
_______ '


2005 HONDAACCORD EX...................$10,988 2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE...................$13,988 2008 FORD EXPEDITION ....................$19,988 2007 CHEVYAVALANCHE LT...............$23,988
BETTER HURRY. IMMACULATE VEHICLE! HAVE FUN IN THE SUN!! BEST BUY ON THE PLANET! SHOP & COMPARE THIS ONE

2004DODGERAMHEMI.....................$10,988 2007 MERCURYGRANDMARQUISLS....$15,988 2008JEEPLIBERTYLTD4X4...............$19,988 2008CHEVY1500XCAB4X4...............$24,888
GOESANYWHERE 21,000 MILES, LEATHER & LOADED! ROOF, NAVIGATION, CHROME WHEELS & MORE! 2 TO CHOOSE. GREAT MILES & CONDITION

2004TOYOTARAV4 ..........................$11,988 2006TOYOTATUNDRA ......................$15,088 2008GMCENVOY4X4 .......................$20,888 2007BMW330-I CONVERTIBLE ..........$26,988
SIPSTHEGAS SR-5ACCESS CAB, UPGRADEDWHEELS &TIRES. GOOD MILES ONLY34,000 MI. #211978 HARD TOP, SUPER CLEAN INSIDE & OUT!

2005CADILLACSRX .........................$13,988 2010HYUNDAISONATAGLS ..............$16,988 2007JEEPCOMMANDERLTD .............$21,888 2008GMCYUKONSLT .......................$30,988
3RD ROW, SPORT PACK & ROOF FUEL SAVING LUXURYSEDAN 3RD ROW, LEATHER & LOADED DON'T MISS THIS ONE

200 NISSAN QUEST.............................13,988 2006 FORD MUSTANG......................$16,888 2008 JEEP WRANGLER......................$22,988 2010 MERCEDES BENZC300...............$31,888
SPECIAL EDITION, TAKE THE WHOLE TEAM ONLY18,000 MILES. ABSOLUTELY LIKE NEW GOTTA SEE THIS ONE!! SUPER LOW MILES SAVETHOUSANDS!!

2007 FORD EDGE SE..........................$13,988 2007 HYUNDAIVERACRUZ ................$17,988 2009 MAZDACX-9.............................$22,988 2010 CHEVY1500 CREWCABZ71 ........$31,988
CARRYTHE FAMILY IN STYLE 13RD ROW SEAT, LEATHER & ALL THE TOYS ROOM FORTHE WHOLE FAMILY LIFT KIT & ONLY20,000 MILES

*All rebates assigned to dealer. Art for illustration only. With approved credit through Ally Financial. 39 month closed end lease, 12,000 miles per year, $3,500 down
nlus tax. tao & acquisition fee. Not to be combined with other offers. All rice Iu tlax tan title and $384.85 dealer fee.


ADDICTION TREATMENT FACILITY SEEKS THE FOLLOWING:

* PSYCH ARNP Psych exp req, CD expADON (RN) Nurse mgt/leadership exp req, CD exp a +
MASTER LEVEL THERAPISTS Primary, Family, Music, Art, FL lic
& CD exp a +, FT, PT weekends incl sign-on bonus
PT REGISTERED DIETICIAN CD expRECREATION THERAPIST CTRS req, CD exp a +
Email Resume to trice@lakeviewhealth.us or fax to 904-899-4538,
www.lakeviewhealth.com










650,620 HOURS



Besides protecting our country,


military personnel stationed in our


communities donated 650,620 hours


of volunteer service in Northeast


Florida and Southeast Georgia last


year. Their time was given to community


organizations, church groups, youth


activities, scouting and more.




Thank You!










THE N MAYPORT, FLORIDA




Mirror





TPeriscope
Lk KIN6S BAY. E EDRGIA




24 THE PERISCOPE, NSI

Misc.
Merchandise
Dairy Products Carrier. Hvy
wire frame, metal tag
Y stamped sealtest057. Old but
great cond. $20. 904-268-2482
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED
I BUY sealed, unexpired boxes.
Call Mike (904)712-9015
Free: Hot tub,
Softub $300. 904-710-5094
Large Stainless Steel Round Bird
Cage In good condition. $250.00.
573-9344 or 762-5998.
A MOVING SALE: Washer,
dryer, microwave, oriental
1Idresser, futon, bed, smail tbi,
fridge, ent. ctr, 882-3026
Never used 2010 Emotion
Kayak, Glide Anger $400 firm.
1244 Linkside, Atl Bch 249-9122
Jerome.
4 OLW 190CM SKIS, New
Salomon Bindings, poles, ZPR
L and lock $75 obo. Noraica
boots szl2 $15. 912-729-2090
RADIO, AM/FM, orig. equip.
From 2007 Ford Ranger incl
s 3.5"x8" speakers. Works great.
$70. 268-2482
. Cemetery Plots, Jacksonville
SMemorial Gardens, Orange Pk
pplot 164 and 165. $2000 each
take both for $3500. 386-8154
S R.C. Airplanes & access. Call
Sfor details $750. 559-772-2658
4 VGA 17" Monitor $65 with ATI
A-lI-W, fax modem cards, USB
keyboard, 30SW, PS, UPS Case
$85. 912-729-2090


Sporting Goods
EZ-GO Golf Cart '04-Elect,
champagne, white, Freedom
SE, new cond. weather enclo-
sure, lights, horn $3700.
246-6289 Charger.
SMinn Kota Foot Control Troll-
ing Motor 50# Thrust used
L/approx. 16hrs. $300obo. Gary
904-307-5645/904-291-9932
Surfboard NSP Funboard 7' 6"
great cond., used 3 times, $150.
904-536-3256
S Bowflex Blaze Home Gym,
like new, free local delivery
and set-up. $400. 629-6892
Edge Fitness 490 Program-
mable Recumbent Stationary
Exercise Bike, works great,
will help deliver locally $100.
629-6892


Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted

7 Pets &
Supplies
Bullmastiff crossed w/ Amer Bldg.
4 Lg female pups 912-552-5984
English Bulldog Pups 10wks, 3M, 1F
Reg. $1,500.00 386-698-1050

Support
your military
newspaper.

The best bargain
in town.
For Classified Advertising,
call 904-366-6300,
or 1-800-258-4637.
iax.Air News


B KINGS BAY, I .... I,, May2(

S Pets &
Supplies
MINIATURE CHORKIE PUPPIES
Must see! 352-235-1895. $500.00
Rotty Pups 9 w.o. German blood.
$350/obo 904-524-6456 / 352-598-5490
o FREE KITTENS TO GOOD
homes. 5 total. 4 boys & 1 girl.
from clean home. (1 gray, 2
v blk, 1 cream, 1 org/white
ready as of June 9th. 904-329-1830

*7.8 Billion
The economic impact of the
millltary In Northeast Florida
and Southaast Gorgla I
7.8 biUlinn.
Loot bIn benefit fom the mnli y and dvnllan pel nnl who
the military publkatlon dIlIbuted N he local ban In TM aa.

F- a



umas Mirror ?td5O,



Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


Boats

t 22' 2007 Tahoe Q8i ski boat,
appx. 34 hours on 5.0L inboard
Mercruiser. All Coast Gaurd
required safety equipment
included, spare tire for dual axle
trailer with electronic brake assist
plus many more extras. Asking
$28,000. Call 912-673-6647


RV's & Supplies

4 '06 Keystone Toy Hauler 23'6ft
Camper, A/C, heat, fresh
water tank, 50-gal tank, sips 8.
$16,900. Call 542-2326
2005 SOUTHWIND 37' 15K miles 3
slides, gas engine, auto awnings
excel cond. $71,900. 904-287-8872
S2008 Fleetwood Niagara Popup
SCamper A/C, 2 king beds,
L/lmicro/stove/oven/grill,
Shower/toilet, slideout, + more.
$12,000. Call 240-393-3443 Or
904-269-9994
Reese 5th Wheel Adapter
15,000 $300. Reese tow bar
Assy w/head $150. Leer L/B
Tonneau cover Dodge $250. Goose-
neck $150. 904-264-0610
SRV Winnebago View '08, 24J,
3000mi's, price nego., moving,
serious offers only. Asking
$5500. Call 9004-221-2030/704-3742


6, 2011

'W Motorcycles
/ Mini Bikes
'05 Buell XB9R Mint i200 miles
garaged, never seen rain,
t $6500. Trickle charger. Save
Gas. 246-6289 Fireboat
S'06 BAJA Dirt Bike 200cc,
,like new, low hrs, $900.
790-4693/210-7445
DUCATI 2007 1000cc, ST3,
FAST, ideal red w/bags.
$6150. Call 904-382-2239
01 H.D. '87 FXRS 1340cc, 33K
mi's, new tires, battery, carb.,
extras, gar. kept. $5800obo.
904-821-1550
'08 HONDA SHADOW 750CC 45
MPG, 3K MILES, GARAGED,
HELMET, SWITCHBLADE
WIND SHIELD. $5,500/OBO
CALL 912-322-8258.
S'03 H.D. Sportster Cust. Annv.
silver/blk. Lots of chrome.
Saddle bags, windshield incl.,
13k mi's, $3100. 904-435-4298


Automobiles

0 2004 Nissan Armada, 117k
miles, gold, leather seats, dvd
system, tow package, brand
new tires, Asking Price: $13,500
Call 972-369-9503/469-667-8613
CASH for your vehicle!!!
The Good, the Bad & the Ugly
912-673-6435
Chevy Malibu Super Sport/SS 2006
sedan, silver, black leather, duel
exhaust, allows, satellite, extra
sharp asking $10,800. obo. 731-4013
MERCEDES BENZ SL500 1997
85,000 miles, excellent shape,
$11,000. Call 904-254-0430
MERCEDES C300 2011
White w/black interior. Only has 500
mi, loaded, priv owner. 904-699-2938
S'06 Hyundai Sonata V6, great
deal only $5500. 127k runs &
looks outstanding 904-536-5386


Automobiles

S'97 Toyota Camry, 120,600 orig
mi's, exc cond, fully Ided, sun-
roof, new tires, cold A/C, 4cyl,
AT, $3000. 904-608-2530
S1992 Lincoln Towncar, white,
good cond., lust over 100kmi,
.driver's window needs motor,
good deal $1000. 904-882-5686
, '06 S-Type Jaguar, exc cond.,
30,060mi's, dual transm., Ithr,
wood inter. $17K.
-912-617-5883/912-673-979

7 Trucks /
Trailers / SUVs
4 '00 FORD RANGER Ext. cab,
76k orig. mi's, exc. working
cond. 3.0L, V-6, cold air,
$5900obo. 264-0969
S'02 ACURA MDX Touring Edt.
Running boards, $10,100.
790-4693/210-7445


7 Trucks /
Trailers / SUVs
4 '02 FORD F150, FX4 Lariat
Super Crew Cab, 5.4L, 156K,
great cond., $11k fully loaded.
904-923-4141

14 '97 Jeep Cherokee 6cyl, 4x4,
lift kit, runs good, needs int.
tlwork, body decent. $1400obo.
912-552-5857/912-882-4724
I '05 2WD Chevy Trailblazer LT
EXT: Lded w/CC, pwr every-
thing, fact. DVD sys. OnStar,
fact. Bose sound sys. w/ 6 CD
changer, sat. radio, 7 pass. seating,
luggage rack, & rear air cond. Just
under 83K mi. Blk w/grey Ithr
inter. $10,900 OBO. 912-573-1767

-... e v... e..


MEMORIAL





SALE EVENT


NEW 2011

JEEP WRANGLER


s289/mo .


On Sale Now

for $23,977



NEW 2011 DODGE DURANGO


SCompletely Redesigned
Hauls Like an SUV
Drives Like a Car

STARTING

AT


$29,900


NEW 2011 DODGE RAM 1500

UpTo

-09.f700
in savings

5.7 liter Hemi
Ram Box
5yr/00,000mi. Powertrain Warranty


NEW 2011 DODGE

GRAND CARAVAN

Now
% O


U" APR
UP TO 60 MONTHS


* 3.6 liter V6 "
* 25 MPG 'i.. ---
* 5yr/100,000mi. Powertrain Warranty


Buy a new vehicle and in NOW RECEIVE A NO-EXTRA CHARGE
OWNER CARE PLAN WHEN YOU

the first 2 years receive PURCHASE OR LEASE A VEHICLE'.

complimentary oil changes OLUN.EFR CRRE

-z., jeep (1
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
See dealer for details -B'. -wD-'S


-- '- Jeep NEW

.] FIVE STARED

.* ._, SUMMER


Jtf f HOURS


SWWW. ." KEFFER.COMk Sales Dept. is now open until 8pm
Alprices are plustax and fees.See dealerfor details foractualvehiclesshown. Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge are registered trade o for your convenience
Chrysler LLC, Aubum Hills, Ml, USA. Must qualify for all rebates. *Payments are plus tax, licenses, fees, 36 months @ 12,000 miles, WAC.


$7.8 Billion


The economic impact of the

military in Northeast Florida

and Southeast Georgia is

*7.8 billion.


Local businesses benefit from the military and civilian personnel who
buy and rent homes and who purchase goods and services. Let them
know what your business has to offer by advertising in one or all of
the military publications distributed at the local bases in the area.


For advertising
information,
please call 6420
904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366-6230. -"i


k1 t.i:.,,


a xrNews. Miiirror PeOriscope


7.1 -,v




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, I .. I May 26, 2011 25



Lm&EmlORIAL DAlYf


S UmmER STRTUPi




THERE'S NO BETTER

WAY TO GET YOUR

SUMMER GOING!

I ilIl lii


-: aq 1 i- el .. ..
C-
/b mj


I


p~4~


jiT II IgI -' .1
$101995 $161995 $191995lni~ll


I I


co S ta 14


7 i'


20 PoiaG 29IYk


L~I


r. ..,


SELLING AND SERVICING NISSANS SINCE 1970


NISSAN SALES
2715 MEMORIAL DRIVE* WAYCROSS, GA

912-283-7783
Your Hometown Nissan Dealer
E-Mail Address: crosbys9@accessatc.net
www.crosbynissan.com


*Prices do not include tax, title dealer or state fees. ** Dealer retains all rebates.
***72 Months @3.75% APR, $0 Down Plus Taxes, Title & Fees.


SHIFT the way you move


Check Out All of our New & Used Inventory at WWW.CROSBYNISSAN.COM


:; T4--1
-~-


_' \ i7 T\i


NN


* I J


204 hw Cload


el


2010 Nia Cb
29k Mi-les, Ga Saver!B


$1I9 $9 ,995':*...^^^I ^ ^____


P-7iL1


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Or_ a "- :_* -El
*"r <' "'


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_ca~ 1


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26 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, I ...I .,, May 26, 2011


Give Back


The Military is the largest employer

in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia!


* Regional Payroll (all 3 bases)
S2.04 Billion per year
* Retiree Payroll
S810 Million per year


* Goods a Services [all 3 bases]
S709 Million per year
* Tuition Assistance Authorized
5.137.440


iMiaarur ,axjlirNHews .i

Call Now To Advertise With Us!
904-359-4336


Cal


O ISeiTYUIiDALERSIP,

PLEAS CALL90445


0
BUICK
KEYBUICK-GMC
4660 Souhsde Blvd. 42-6060
NIMMICH BUICK-GMC
11503 PhillipsHwy 6858820


S'

CADILLACSAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-770
www.cadillacofrangeparl.comn
CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700SoutsideBlvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com





NIMNICIT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
904-647-4220
www.nimnichtchevy.com
JERRY HAMMCHEV
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036
www.jenyhamm.com


---400--

ATLANIC CHRYSLER
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US1 South 3544421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 493000
RICKKEFFER
1-95 Edt 373, Fem Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com
ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blnding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com


ATLANTIC DODGE
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421
JAICKNLLECIHIIR
JEEPDODGE
9A& Baymeadows493-0000
ORANGE PARK CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodgemm
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com


PULEA RK
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
2253673
MIKE SHAD FOD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325


KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southsde Blvd. 642-600




ATLANTIC INFINm
10980Atlantic Bvd. 642-0200






ATLAINIC JEEP
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US 1 South 354-4421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 49300
RCK EFFER
1-95 E)xt 373, Fer Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkefler.com


ORANGE PARK
MIKE DAVIDSON FO CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
AT REGENCY
9650Atnlic Blvd. 725-3060 7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com


MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673



N1 NICP T GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 685-8820


DUVAL HONDA
1325CassatAve. 899-1900
LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 PhillipsHwy. 370-1300


KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078



NORTH FLORIDA
UNCOLN
4620 Southside Blvd.
642-4100
MIKE SHAD FORD
LICOLN
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


The 3 Series doesn't just break the mold,


The 3 Series doesn't just break the mold,

it smashes it into a million pieces.



No Money Required


SAAB OF ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 302-5373
www.saabolorangepark.com


KEITH PERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Cirde.
771-9100
ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310CassatAve. 389-4561


O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODAY!
904-322-5100
TOM BUH VOLKSWAGEN
VISITTOMBUSHVW.COM
904-7250911


OSTEN VOLVO
www.osteenvolvo.com
396-5486


GT LEASING
ComnmdalLeasing Sha 1955
2810 St. Augustine Rd.
3985000
www.gtleasng.com


AUTO LINE
A Family owned
Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126 MayportRd., Atlic Beach
904-242-8000
BEACH BLVD.
AUTOMOTIVE
Family Owned Since 1967
beachblvdautomotve.cor
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511
DARCARS
WESTSIDE
PRE.OWNED
SUPERSTORE
1672 Cassat Ave.
904-384-6561
www.westsidedodge.net
O'STEENVW
CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED
CENTER
VISIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODArY
904322-5100
TOM BUSH
VW-MAZDA
PRE.OWNED
AUTO CENTER
www.tombush.com
9850 Atanic Blvd
904-725-0911
WORLD IMPORTS
CERTIFIED
PRE.OWNN
AUTO CENTER
www.woddimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992
READ DRIVE
EVERY
SATURDAY IN
THE
TIMES-UNION
OR
GO TO
DRIVE.
JACKSONVILLE.
COM FOR
GREAT
VEHICLE
VALUES! I


BMW 2011
328iSedan
bmwusa.com The Ultimate
1-800-334-4BMW Driving Machine


Lease It


Or


Own


The All New

2011 BMW 328i Sedan


$469


Sweeping contours, a revolutionary
valvetronic system for greater fuel
efficiency and BMW's xDrive intelligent
all-wheel-drive system ,


0.9% APR
Available on
select BMW Models*


Automatic, Premium Package, Leather, Cruise Control, Bluetooth, and More


$0 Maintenance Costs 4 Years/50,000 Miles


Orange Park

"You Have a Friend in The Business"


777-2500

6914 Blanding Blvd.

www.opbmw.com
Sales: 9am-8pm Mon.-Fri. e Sat. 9am-7pm Closed Sun.
Service/Parts: 7am-7pm Mon.-Fri. Closed Sat./Sun.


*Financing provided by BMW of North America, LLC and only applies to specific new 2011 BMW Models leased or financed through BMW Finance Services through May 31, 2011 W.A.C. 2011 BMW 328i Sedan monthly lease payment of $469 for
27 months based on MSRP $38,125. Purchase Option at lease end for $28,212.50. $469 first month payment. $0 Down Payment, $0 Security Deposit. $469 Cash due at signing. Vehicle may need to be ordered. Total lease payments are $12,663. Purchase
payment $469 at 2.9% for 60 months based on MSRP $38,125. Final Select Payment $13,343.75 due at end of term. 0.9% on Select BMW vehicles. Total amount financed excludes $725 Acquisition Fee, tax, license and registration fee. Program available
to qualified customers and not everyone will qualify. Subject to credit approval. See participating dealer for details. Dealer contribution may affect terms. Lessee must cover insurance and all items not covered under the BMW Maintenance Program. At Lease
end, lessee will be liable for disposition fee (350.00), any excess wear and use as set forth in the lease agreement and excess mileage charges of $.20 per mile for miles driven in excess of 10,000 miles per year. Lessee acquires no ownership interest unless
purchase option is exercised. See participating BMW centers for details and vehicle availability. For more information call 1-800-334-4269. Special lease rates and pricing may not be reflected throughout www.bmwusa.com. All figures presented are estimates
only. Actual selling price may vary. Please see your BMW center for details. Ultimate Service covers all factory recommended maintenance on all new vehicles as determined by the Service Level Indicator, for 4 years or 50,000 miles, whichever comes first.
Exclusions may apply. See the Service and Warranty information booklet for more details and specific terms, conditions and limitations. 2011 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks. Not Responsible
for typographical errors. Art for illustration purposes only. 3794895-01


er rec1r


It


Per
Mo.*


,


I I I I


.. ....... .




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, I I..... May 26, 2011 27


ST


FROM ANY CAR COMPANY

_ M -

MI.iTAR.Y ...

ISC 0 U(NT .1[ t
.*---- _


MILITARY


RETIREES


IN THE


ONTH OF


Get the best military discount from any
In recognition of Military Appreciation Month, we're offering military retirees the same GM Military Discountl as active duty
personnel and Reserves. May I through May 31,201 I, retirees can save big on most 201 I Chevrolet, 2 Buick and GMC vehicles.
Plus, USAA members can save an extra $750.3 To learn more about this special offer, go to gmmilitarydiscount.com.


= GM
M II. TARY
DISCO UNT
>"-"-


AY!


car company.
Special honor badge with Chevrolet.
As a tribute to your commitment, a special
Honor Badge (for display on your vehicle)
will be shipped to you at no cost when you
purchase or lease an eligible, new Chevrolet
during the month of May using the GM Military
Discount. Be sure to share this discount with
your military retiree friends.


gmmilitarydiscount.com.


201 GMC Sierra 1500
13 M C (discount example)
Sierra 1500 Reg. CabWT 2WD MSRP starting at


$ 22,230.00


MSRP of Sierra 1500 Crew Cab XFE
with optional equipment as shown' $ 35.970.00
Preferred Pricing" $ 33.987.00
Consumer Cash $ 4.505.00
USAA Private Offer' $ 750.00


Price You Pay
Your Discount


28.732.00
7,238.00


-J


201 Chevrolet Malibu
(discount example)


-- Malibu LS MSRP starting at $ 22,735.00
MSRP of Malibu I LT as shown4 $ 23,735.00
Preferred Pricing4 $ 22,998.17
Consumer Cashs $ 3,000.00
USAA Private Offer $ 750.00
PriceYou Pay $ 19,248.17
Your Discount $ 4,486.83

-, 201 Buick LaCrosse
i (discount example)
Buick LaCrosse CX MSRP starting at $ 27,745.00
MSRP of LaCrosse CXS as shown3 $ 36,605.00
Preferred Pricing3 $ 35,570.96
USAA Private Offer' $ 750.00


PriceYou Pay
Your Discount


34,820.96
1,784.04


I) Eligible military personnel includes active duty members and Reserves, including their spouses, of the U.S.Air Force,Ary, Navy, Marines, National Guard and Coast Guard. 2) Excludes ChevroletVolt 3) Offer expires 12/31/1 I. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Excludes Chevrolet Camaro
Convertible,Volt and all Cadillac models.GM discounts available only to persons eligible for membership in USAA Property and Casualty Insurance Group. P&C membership is generally available to current and former members of the U.S. Military and their former dependents.There is no obligation to purchase or continue
USAA products or services to obtain the offers.A USAA card with USAA number, USAA loan documents or a USAA insurance card must be presented at the time of purchase. 4)Tax,title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra. See dealer for details. 5) Not available with some other offers.Take retail delivery
by 5/3 111 I.See dealer for details.
USAA means United Services Automobile Association and its affiliates. USAA, the USAA logo and other USAA marks contained herein are registered trademarks of the United Services AutomobileAssociation.
The marks of General Motors, its divisions, slogans, emblems, vehicle model names, vehicle body designs and other marks appearing in this advertisement are the trademarks and/or service marks of General Motors, its subsidiaries, affiliates or licensors. 201 I General Motors. Buckle upAmerica!

Than youfo0yur0 eric t0oucunry


-.- AN AMERICAN

R=VOUTION


GMC
WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE.


THE SPIRIT OF AMERICAN STYLE


1W ^W W~ W IH j11f41B4154i.S tate Boa i2S jY
9WjVSW~f1W191112 21-B 1121 toT1 F.,. I8I8I
iF^^^^ ^r ^^ ^^^^^|^^^ -^^W^^W^^i^^^ t ^^^-*wormleJ ^MMHHiJ ^^^l^-^^


Three simple steps to get your discount.
I.Visit gmmilitarydiscount.com and register.
2. Follow the prompts to get your Go Code.
3. Print your Go Code, and bring it with your military
I.D. to a participating GM Dealer to get the discount.




28 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, ..I ,, May 26, 2011


ALL CASH SALE PRICES ARE AFTER ALL DISCOUNTS. ADD TAX AND TITLE. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. OFFER ENDS 5-31-11.
SFFORD FORD FORD FORD F150 FORD
CUS SE STANG RUS SHO I EDITION EL SUPERCAB ANGER


WB,970 i8,998 i2,957 n3,777 AVE WAVE
QUALITY FRESH PREOWNED SUPERSAVERS!


p* pg p
p.


(I'
DUANOST


10 C



I,,
I 4 ID r loodod.

** 6

1$A1,99
11 FR
FOUSSE


STACOMA 4 DOOR
PreRunner SR5 VE 47K Miles!

S4$21,991

RD ESCAPE XLT
s utomali Air #54533!
.416,991

ID FS0 CREWCAB
m 4X4 FX4 Patkage Mint!

S$21,991


p

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*I.


** 6
lrl Ii: *'
$19




SLQAD


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FCS SE




A *
Aut ir- Nce
$1399

ACCOD L




"08 OND


WE'LL BUY YOUR CAR EVEN IF YOU DON'T BUY OURS!


107I IJI:VF R'T AY Il1-11-1 f I I 'L9;1 jFI YIAI


'0 G SERIRA U

IIB- re ld


I .


Ill; ii
I '
"1A SEBIA
LIMITED
4 or- odd


I:



MA
.


:* S.
lodd-0 it


EXPEDITION 4X4
S_ Eddie Bauer loaded lire!

S12,991

WRANGLER 4 DOOR
Automatiie Air XRA Hike!
$15,991


S 1 91 I i' C A G


ppT -:AAE HOSApS
17,991S





"10 ORD110FOR

* S SS 6Tu n


ALL CASH SALE PRICES ARE AFTER ALL DISCOUNTS. ADD TAX AND TITLE. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. OFFER ENDS 5-31-11.

BMBM


2030 Hwy. 40 East Kingsland, GA


5103673
www.i95ford.com


II


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