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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098617/00117
 Material Information
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher: Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay -- Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
Coordinates: 30.791 x -81.537 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body: Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note: Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note: Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
System ID: UF00098617:00195

Full Text



Medal of Honor
Army Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta
earns nation's highest honor
Page 4


Up Periscope
On Thanksgiving Day, we ask
'What are you thankful for?'
Page 13


Veterans Day
A parade and unveiling of the new
Veterans Memorial Park in Kingsland
Pages 8,9


2009 CHINFO Award Winner


Tf E


Vol. 45 Issue 46


K IN G %www.cnic /ki y

www.cnic.navy.mil/kingsbay


www.kingsbayperiscope.com Thursday, November 25, 2010


USS Rhode Island on course for smoking ban


Cessation programs
well underway for
Dec. 31 deadline

By MC1 Erica Gardner
Submarine Group 10 Public Affairs

Sailors on board the Kings Bay,
Ga.-based ballistic-missile subma-
rine, USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740)
(Blue), have been participating in
a smoking cessation program since
June 2010.
The impetus came in April 2010
when Commander, Submarine


Forces mandated that no smoking
below decks on all submarines would
become policy Dec. 31.
"We have about 60 tobacco users
currently on board," said Hospital
Corpsman 1st Class (Fleet Marine
Force) Shawn A. Fisher, independent
duty corpsman for Rhode Island.
"Since we started the smoking ces-
sation program, we have drastical-
ly reduced the number of tobacco
users."
Fisher has 10 submariners partici-
pating in the smoking cessation pro-
gram, which has a success of 90 per-
cent. Fisher added that the average
person takes seven attempts to quit.


In honor of the American Cancer work with because tobacco usage


Society celebrating the 35th Great
American
Smokeout
Nov. 18, "We have tw
m o r e
tobacco nicotine supl
users are CO users. We
encour- patches or n
aged to use
the date as H
a starting
point to
plan to quit
smoking or quit smoking on that day.
"I think the Great American
Smokeout is a good tool for us to


concerns are the same


vo methods of
port for tobac-
Soffer nicotine
nicotine gum."
IMl Shawn Fisher
Fleet Marine Forced


as those out-
lined in the
smoking
cessation
plan devel-
oped by
the Navy,"
said Fisher.
Th e
Great
American
Smokeout
gives cur-


rent tobacco users who want to quit
or former smokers concerned about
relapses an opportunity to have a


healthier life without a greater risk
of being diagnosed with cancer. It
is important for tobacco users to
understand that quitting smoking is
not easy but can be done.
Fisher works with two smoking ces-
sation counselors assigned to Rhode
Island and health promotion coordi-
nators assigned to the medical clinic
on base. The counselors interact with
tobacco users to help them under-
stand why they use tobacco products
and the best course of action to quit.
"We coordinate with the indepen-
dent duty corpsman from each of

See Smoking, Page 11


USS Dunham joins fleet


Navy honors Corps
hero, commissions
newest DDG

By MC3 Desiree Green
USS Jason Dunham Public Affairs

The Navy commissioned
its newest Arleigh Burke class
destroyer USS Jason Dunham
(DDG-109) during a ceremony
in Port Everglades, Fla. Nov.
13.
The ship's commission-
ing ceremony paid homage
to its namesake, Cpl. Jason
Dunham, who selflessly sac-
rificed his life at age 22 in Iraq,
April 14, 2004.
Dunham was born in Scio,
N.Y., Nov. 10, 1981, sharing
the same birthday as the U.S.
Marine Corps.
On April 14, 2004, Dunham's
squad was conducting a
reconnaissance mission in
Karabilah, Iraq, when his
battalion commander's con-
voy was ambushed. When
Dunham's squad approached


Photo courtesy of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works
The Pre-Commissioning Unit Jason Dunham (DDG 109) con-
ducts sea trials in the Atlantic Ocean.


to provide fire support, an
Iraqi insurgent leapt out of a
vehicle and attacked Dunham.
As Dunham wrestled the
insurgent to the ground, he
noticed that the enemy fighter
had a grenade in his hand and
immediately alerted his fel-
low Marines. When the enemy
dropped the live grenade,
Dunham took off his Kevlar


helmet, covered the grenade,
and threw himself on top to
smother the blast.
In an ultimate selfless act
of courage, in which he was
mortally wounded, he saved
the lives of two fellow Marines.
The Marine Corps Security
Force Battalion's barracks at
Naval Submarine Base Kings
Bay is named for Dunham.


Navy photo by MC1 Martin Cuaron
Gen. James F. Amos, 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps, delivers remarks during commis-
sioning of the Navy's newest Arleigh Burk-class destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109).


"I am delighted to attend
my first commissioning as
Commandant of the U.S.
Marine Corps, for a ship
named after a true hero," said
Gen. James F. Amos.
Former President George W.
Bush posthumously awarded


Cpl. Dunham the Medal of
Honor. Dunham is the first
Marine to be awarded the
medal for Operation Iraqi
Freedom, and the first Marine
to receive the Medal of Honor
since the Vietnam War.
"The timing of this event


could not have been better,"
Amos said. "I think it's fit-
ting that we commission this
ship, named after a Marine
just three days after Nov. 10, a
birthday shared by both Jason

See Dunham, Page 6


Internal threats examined


Navy photo by MC3 Cory Rose
Chapel donates to CFC
The Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel presented, Combined Federal Campaign
Loaned Executive Kelly Wirfel, with a check for $2,000 in support of the CFC. From left are
Father John Kaul, RP2 Michael Brewer, RP2 Erin Hernandez, Wirfel, RPC Andre Haynes,
and Lt. Cmdr. Dedra Bell.


Studies prompted
by Fort Hood
shooting incident

By Lisa Daniel
American Forces Press Service

The Army, Navy, Air Force
and Marine Corps will update
their policies and proce-
dures to better assess inter-
nal security threats, according
to reports the services filed
recently in response to last
year's shooting rampage at
Fort Hood, Texas.
In reports service leaders
wrote of the need for better
coordination and information
sharing among the services,
the Defense Department and
outside law enforcement
agencies, as well as mental
health professionals, to pre-


vent another possible attack.
Maj. Nidal Hasan, an Army
psychiatrist, is charged in the
Nov. 5, 2009, shooting at Fort
Hood that left 13 dead and
43 wounded.
A Defense
Department "Whei
report in the
"Protecting
the Force:
Lessons from nevet
Fort Hood," G .
issued to Gen Ge
Defense A
Secretary
Robert M.
Gates on Jan. 15, found that
force-protection measures
focused solely on external
threats are no longer sufficient
and alerted the department
to the need for monitoring
threats from "self-radicalized"
military personnel.


5

r

rf


The department's report
recommended that each ser-
vice conduct its own in-depth
review of whether processes
and policies are in place to
detect
such
you are internal
security threats
a n d
, you are respond
done." to pos-
ge Casey Jr. a ks.ib e
ny Chief of Staff Lessons
learned
from the
Fort Hood rampage already
have made the Army better
prepared, Army Secretary
John M. McHugh said during
a Nov. 5 remembrance cer-
emony at Fort Hood.

See Threat, Page 10


Threat of cyber attack presents 'huge' threat, Gates says


Defense secretary notes
effective protection for
'.mil' in place

By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

Leaders are taking steps to bring
defense industrial and domestic
partners under an umbrella of pro-
tection from cyber attacks, Defense
Secretary Robert M. Gates Nov. 17.
"There is a huge future threat and
there is a considerable current threat
[from cyber attacks]," Gates said dur-
ing a question-and-answer session at


the Wall Street Journal's CEO Council
in Washington, D.C. "That's just a
reality we all face!.
The DOD already has implement-
ed effective protections for ".mil," he
said, and is working with its partners
in the defense industrial base to offer
them similar protections.
Leaders also would like to extend
this protection to the government's
domestic side, Gates said, noting the
importance of the National Security
Agency to the nation's defense
against cyber threats and attacks.
"The only defense the United States
has ... against nation states and other
potential threats in the cyber world


is the
National "There is a h
Security
Agency," future threat
he said. and there is
"You can- considerable
not repli-
cate the current threat
National Robert
Security Secretary of
Agency
f o r
domestic
affairs. There isn't enough money,
there isn't enough time, and there
isn't enough human talent."
The challenge, however, is offer-


U
a



G

D


ing the
tge govern-
ment's
t domes-
a tic side
e access
to NSA
"".. while
3ates also tak-
efense ing into
account
concerns
for priva-
cy and civil liberties, Gates said.
With this issue in mind, President
Barack Obama recently approved
a memorandum of understand-


ing based on recommendations
from Gates and Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano.
The MOU creates a Homeland
Security Department cell within NSA,
Gates said, with the authority to task
NSA, but using its own attorneys to
ensure privacy and civil liberties are
kept at the forefront. The cell offers a
domestic security agency an oppor-
tunity to reach into NSA in a "real-
time way" for protection, Gates said.
"My hope is over time that this will
lead to better protections for both
.gov and .com," he said.

See Cyber, Page 10




2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


LOCAL NEWS & VIEWS


Sunday
8:30 a.m. Confessions
9 a.m. Catholic Mass
10:10 a.m. Confraternity of Christian Doctrine
(CCD)
10:30 a.m. Grace Christian Worship (Protes-
tant)
Monday
6:30 p.m. Rite of Christian Initiation Adults
(RCIA)
Monday through Wednesday
and Friday
11:15 a.m. Catholic Mass
Wednesday
6 p.m. Grace Christian Bible Study
Saturday
4:30 p.m.- Confessions
5 p.m. Catholic Mass
6 p.m. Life Teens



THE --. 1 -



K I N G S E A 1 D E l R D I A

NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. John S. O'Neill
NSB Kings Bay Executive Officer
Cmdr. Jeff Pafford
NSB Kings Bay Command Master Chief
CMCMC Jimmy Schubert
NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer
Scott Bassett
NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Office staff
Kelly Wirfel, MCC (SW/AW) Ty Swartz,
MC3 Cory Rose
Editor
Bill Wesselhoff- 573-4719
periscopekb@comcast.net


The question:


Now hear this!


Commissary sets November hours
The following are hours for the Naval Submarine Base
Kings Bay Commissary in November: Closed, Saturday,
Nov. 6; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Veterans Day, Thursday, Nov. 11;
9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday, Nov. 22; Closed, Thanksgiving,
Thursday, Nov. 25; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, Nov. 26. These
hours are subject to change.

Dietician's Commissary Tour Dec. 8
A Commissary Shopping Tour will be sponsored by
Naval Branch Health Clinic Wellness Department to
provide education for healthy eating during the Holiday
Season. The base dietician will provide the tour at 10
a.m., Wednesday Dec. 8. The tour will last approximately
one hour and will focus on understanding labels and
planning healthy meals for your holiday gatherings by
choosing products low in fat and sodium. For more infor-
mation, contact Health Promotion at 573-4237/8626.

Local FRA Branch has essay contest
The Fleet Reserve Association is having it's annual
Americanism Essay Contest, with national grand prizes.
The contest is for students in grades seventh through
12th. Complete rules are at www.fra.org/essay. The dead-
line for entrees is Dec. 1. Anyone with questions can con-
tact or turn in entrees to FRA Branch 248 President Tom
Brown, at (912) 673-6829, at carlowtown@aol.com or
write to him at 202 Norwood Dr., Kingsland, Ga., 31548.
Students also may contact Branch 248 secretary Russ
Borchart at (912) 283-9847 or at 2952 Jonny Minchew Rd.,
Waycross, Ga., 31503.

Local Red Cross offers scholarships
The local American Red Cross has a limited number of
Service to Armed Forces First Aid and CPR scholarships
available to service members, retirees, veterans and their
families for classes. Call the Camden Charlton Kings Bay
Service Center (573-3939) for details and class listings.

Kingsland VFW has karaoke Nov. 19
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 8385 hosts karaoke
nights, starting at 7 p.m., Nov. 19, Dec. 10 and Dec. 17.
Until 11 p.m. The VFW Post is at 150 Camden Woods
Parkway in Kingsland. For more information, call 729-
7933.

Base lost and found has found items
There is lost and abandoned property, such as watch-
es, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base
Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information
reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer,
Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail,
Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.

Tobacco cessation program Tuesdays
If you are a tobacco user, quitting is the most important
thing you can do for your health. Classes are open to all
active duty, family members, civilians and contractors.
Bring your lunch from 11 a.m. to noon every Tuesday to
the base Fitness Complex classroom in Building 1034.
Space is limited, so call and reserve your spot at 573-
8626/4237. After the class, free nicotine patches, gum and
lozenges are offered to eligible beneficiaries.

Suggestions for The Periscope?
Do you see an event on base you think deserves cover-
age in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill
Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.
net.


'To stuff or not to stuff'


Thanksgiving and the
holidays are upon me.
I am hosting
Thanksgiving, and I am so
excited. I love the house full
of life and activity. I love the
smells of baking, candles and
the warmth of friends and
family. Scott's family is com-
ing. Several single sailors will
join us as well as a few spous-
es of deployed Marines. With
Thanksgiving around the cor-
ner, I am busy cleaning, menu
planning and decorating.
Did I mention menu plan-
ning?
This year I have a dilemma.
Growing up, Thanksgiving
dinner was the traditional
baked, stuffed turkey, mashed
potatoes, fruit salad, sweet
potato casserole and of course
the traditional green bean
casserole. I fear this menu is
now out-of-vogue. As I glee-
fully planned this menu, con-
versations arose that led to
doubt. "Do you deep-fry your
turkey? You know that is the
juiciest turkey." You don't put
the stuffing in the turkey, do
you?"
One comment stopped me
cold ... "After photograph-
ing the 'pardoned turkey'


a-l








at Disneyland, how can you
have a turkey on the table?"
Ack! What is wrong with the
traditional menu?
What is wrong with turkey?
What is wrong with sweet
potatoes smothered in marsh-
mallows?
It's not like I serve that calo-
rie-rich meal every day. And,
don't forget sweet potatoes
are good for you.
I ate turkey with the stuff-
ing baked in it for over 30
years and I am fine. That was
before they said it was bad for
you. What's up with that? In
the past week I've polled my
friends on that most weighty


issue, "To stuff or not to stuff."
Why do we have to villain-
ize one of two legitimate days
to enjoy a calorie over-dose?
Can I just enjoy my stuffed
turkey, all the trimmings and
sugar-laden desserts in the
company of people I love
without a guilt-trip? Please?
I promise to use a meat
thermometer.
I promise to bake all good-
ies with Splenda to avoid cre-
ating diabetic comas.
I promise to work out twice.
Do the aerobic gyrations
of watching football on TV
count as a workout?
I promise to be good on
my diet the rest of the year ...
except for my birthday and
Christmas.
Oh heck, forget it! I don't
care.
Call me old-fashioned but
I will bake my turkey in the
oven with stuffing in the cavi-
ties.
I will smoother those yams
in marshmallows.
I will overfill my plate and
enjoy every bite.
I will not give in to the pres-
sure to fry or grill.
I will hold fast to my tradi-
tional Thanksgiving, and after


VA expands support for low-income vets


From the Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs announced an important pro-
gram designed to provide enhanced
services to low-income veterans and
their families who are at risk of being
homeless.
Under the Supportive Services for
Veteran Families Program, VA will pro-
vide grants to private non-profit orga-
nizations and consumer cooperatives
that will help break the cycle of home-
lessness among America's Veterans at
risk.
The program will deliver grants to
community agencies for vocational
and rehabilitation counseling, employ-
ment and training service, educational
assistance; and health care services.
Agencies will also provide direct
financial assistance for daily living,
transportation, child care, rent and
utilities and other expenses. Agencies
may also propose funding for addition-


Shinseki


al services in their supportive services
grant application based on the specific
needs of their communities and local
Veterans.
"Ending homelessness for Veterans
and their families will require all seg-
ments of our communities to work
together," said First Lady Michelle
Obama. "I am pleased this new pro-
gram will help more local organiza-
tions support them when they need it


most."
"This new program will provide valu-
able new tools in our campaign to end
homelessness among Veterans and
their families," said Veterans Affairs
Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. "Partnering
with homeless agencies across this
country, we will attack the problems
that underlie homelessness and, for the
first time, fund services for the spouses
and children of homeless Veterans."
By mid-December, VA officials will
provide local agencies with the instruc-
tions necessary to apply for grants
under the program.
Eligible Veteran families include
those who are residing in permanent
housing, are homeless and scheduled
to become residents of permanent
housing within a specified time period,
or who have left permanent housing
and are seeking other housing that is
responsive to such very low-income
Veteran family's needs and preferenc-
es.


Navy Exchange Gift Cards make fine gift


From Navy Exchange Public Affairs

Navy Exchange Gift Cards
make the perfect gift this holi-
day season.
NEX Gift Cards can be pur-
chased by either authorized
or non-authorized customers,
but can only be used by autho-
rized patrons. NEX Gift Cards
can be purchased online at
myNavyExchange.com or at
any NEX worldwide.
"NEX Gift Cards make the
perfect gift for military cus-
tomers," said Mike Powers,
director, Retail Operations at
the Navy Exchange Service
Command. "We know that
military families often live
away from their loved ones.
NEX Gift Cards are easy to
mail and allows the recipient
to choose their own perfect
gift. Plus, NEX Gift Cards can
be redeemed at any military
exchange around the world,
which adds to its conve-
nience."
NEX Gift Cards can include
a personalized greeting card


for just $4.25, plus U.S. post-
age. Customers have the
option to customize their NEX
Gift Card online with a mes-
sage and download a digital
photo that can be affixed to
the front of the card.
Customer can also choose
from a selection of over 1,000
greeting cards for all occasions.
A personalized standard letter
carrier is also now offered at
$1.75 plus postage. The NEX
Gift Card with greeting card/
letter carrier can be mailed to
APO/FPO addresses.
NEX Gift Cards can be used
just like cash for most mer-
chandise and service pur-
chases, make layaway pay-
ments or place special orders.
Customers have the ability to
get their NEX Gift Card bal-
ance online at myNavyEx-
change.com. NEX Gift Cards
have no fees or expiration
dates and can be purchased
for varying amounts begin-


ning at just $5.
The Navy Exchange also
is offering a special holiday
promotion just for its Military
Star" Card customers.
Through Dec. 24, customers
using their Military Star Card
for purchases totaling $399 or
more, excluding jewelry and
watches, will have no down
payment, no interest and no
payments for 360 days.
The Military Star Card offers
many benefits, including 10
percent off first-day purchas-
es, up to the customer's credit
limit, no annual fee, low inter-
est rates and 24-hour customer
service including online access.
Military Star Card applica-
tions are available at any NEX.
The application can be pro-
cessed the same day at the
NEX customer service desk.
Remember, customers
receive a 5 cent credit toward
their purchase for each eco-
friendly reusable bag used to
bag their purchase.
Also, this holiday season,
the NEX wants to make return-


ing gifts as easy as possible.
Since gifts maybe purchased
well before they are given dur-
ing the holidays, all NEXs will
accept returns through Jan. 30,
2011. This includes items typ-
ically covered by the 14-day
return policy, such as com-
puters, computer equipment,
software, digital cameras and
the 45-day return policy for all
other merchandise
This extended return policy
applies to original purchases
made Nov. 17 to Dec. 24 either
in a NEX or through the NEX
Web store.
Customers are asked to
include any packaging mate-
rial along with the receipt
when making a return. Any
returns without a receipt will
be placed on an NEX Gift Card.
"We want to take care of our
Navy family this holiday sea-
son," Powers said. "We know
that the holidays can be hec-
tic. We hope that by giving our
customers extra time to return
gifts are the holidays will help
ease some of their stress."


my gluttonous meal I will
collapse on the couch in full
tryptophan stupor.
Most of all, I will express
gratitude that I have a turkey
on the table, when many in
the world do not.
I will give thanks that I
am surrounded by a com-
munity, my military com-
munity, which literally lays
it on the line to protect the
nation whose roots began at
Plymouth Rock.
I will give thanks for friends
and family, those enjoying a
meal with me, those deployed
and those separated by miles.
I will give thanks for and
pray for this American experi-
ment and that we honor this
day as did the Pilgrims and
their Native American friends.
I will give thanks that even
the poorest among us is rich
in comparison to most of the
world's population.
I will give thanks that I am
alive, that I am healthy, that I
am loved.
Happy Thanksgiving!
Connect with Beth on T 11,, ,.
BethWilson), Facebook (facebook.
com/EnlistedSpouseCommunity)
or her new Web site www.
enlistedspousecommunity.com.


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publication.
The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-
4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official
views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of
Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy
of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,
gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert
Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Tom Castle, Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336 FAX (904) 366-6230


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Prices are in effect from receipt of ad through 11/29/10 and are subject to change. American Signature Furniture (ASF)is not responsible for typographical errors. Assortmentsvary by location. See store for details regarding oil warranties. *ur "Compare at" and"Save" prices reflectthe current selling price of merchandise
of like grade and quality sold by others in the ASF trade area, which is a national trade area that includes online retailers. As a result, advertised "Compare at" and "Save" prices may or may not necessarily be the prices at which such merchandise is sold by traditional retail outlets in the local area. +Advertised higher
price is not a retail price comparison or a representation that any sales of this product at this price have taken place in the local area. Tis price is merely a representation of what similar competing products have been priced at in the recent past under similar retail market conditions. The consumer should check competing
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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Courtesy photo
Now-Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta with his now-wife, Jennifer, as he prepared to deploy for a sec-
ond time in summer 2007 to Afghanistan's dangerous Korengal Valley, where he would rescue
a wounded friend from two enemy fighters.


Army photo by Leroy Council
President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Staff Sergeant Salvatore Giunta dur-
ing a ceremony at the White House, Nov. 16. Giunta earned the first non-posthumous Medal
of Honor since Vietnam.


Army's Salvatore Giunta earns Medal of Honor


By Karen Parrish
American Forces Press Service

President Barack Obama
presented the Medal of Honor
Nov. 16 to the first living ser-
vicemember to receive the dis-
tinction for service in the Iraq
and Afghanistan wars.
During a White House cer-
emony, the commander in
chief of what he called "the
finest military that the world
has ever known" awarded
the medal to Army Staff Sgt.
Salvatore A. Giunta for hero-
ic action in Afghanistan's
Korengal Valley on Oct. 25,
2007.
"Since the end of the
Vietnam War, the Medal of
Honor has been awarded nine
times for conspicuous gal-
lantry in an ongoing or recent
conflict. Sadly, our nation has
been unable to present this
decoration to the recipients
themselves, because each
gave his life, his last full mea-
sure of devotion, for his coun-
try," Obama said.
"Today, therefore, marks the
first time in nearly 40 years
that the recipient of the Medal
of Honor for an ongoing con-
flict has been able to come to
the White House and accept
this recognition in person," the
president said.
The Medal of Honor is the
highest military award a ser-
vicemember can receive for
valor in action against a com-
batant force. Giunta's Medal
of Honor is the eighth award-
ed to troops serving in Iraq
or Afghanistan. The previous
seven awards all have been
posthumous.
"It is my privilege to present
our nation's highest military
decoration ... to a soldier as
humble as he is heroic'" the
president said. "I'm going to


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go off script here for a second
and just say, 'I really like this
guy."
Cheers and applause fol-
lowed.
"When you meet Sal and
you meet his family," Obama
continued, "you are just abso-
lutely convinced that this is
what America is all about. So
this is a joyous occasion for
me."
During Giunta's first of two
tours in Afghanistan, his team
leader gave him a piece of
advice, Obama said: "You've
just got to try to do everything
you can when it's your time to
do it."
The president then
described the events that led
to today's medal presentation.
"He was a specialist then,
just 22 years old. Sal and his
platoon were several days
into a mission in the Korengal
Valley, the most dangerous val-
ley in northeast Afghanistan,'
Obama said. Giunta was serv-
ing as a rifle team leader with
the 173rd Airborne Brigade
Combat Team's Company B,
2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry
Regiment. That October eve-
ning, his squad ran into an
insurgent ambush.
The platoon's soldiers had
spent the day in an overwatch
position and were head-
ing back to their base camp.
Giunta's squad moved out first
and came under enemy fire.
"It was an ambush so
close that the cracks of the
guns and the whiz of the bul-
lets were simultaneous'" the
president said. "The Apache
gunships overhead saw it all,
but couldn't engage with the
enemy so close to our sol-
diers." When the ambush
split Giunta's squad into two
groups, he exposed him-
self to enemy fire to pull a


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squad mate back to cover.
Later, while returning fire and
attempting to link up with the
rest of his squad, Giunta saw
two insurgents carrying away
a wounded fellow soldier, Sgt.
Joshua C. Brennan.
"Sal never broke stride,"
Obama said. "He leapt forward,
he took aim, he killed one of the
insurgents and wounded the
other, who ran off. Sal found his
friend alive, but badly wound-
ed. He had saved him from the
enemy. Now he had to try to
save his life."
Giunta provided medical aid
to his wounded comrade while
the rest of his squad caught
up and provided security.
Brennan, 22, from McFarland,
Wis., died the next day during
surgery. A medic, Spc. Hugo
V. Mendoza, 29, of Glendale,
Ariz., also died.
"It had been as intense and
violent a firefight as any sol-
dier will experience," the pres-
ident said. "By the time it was
finished, every member of first
platoon had shrapnel or a bul-
let hole in their gear. Five were
wounded, and two gave their
lives."
Obama said Giunta is a


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"low-key guy" who doesn't
seek the limelight.
"Your actions disrupted a
devastating ambush before it
could claim more lives," the
president said to Giunta. "Your
courage prevented the capture
of an American soldier and
brought that soldier back to
his family. You may believe
you don't deserve this honor,
but it was your fellow soldiers
who recommended you for
it." Obama asked members of
Giunta's team from that day
who were present at the cer-
emony to stand and be recog-
nized.
"Gentlemen, thank you for
your service'" Obama said.
"We're all in your debt, and
I'm proud to be your com-
mander in chief."
America's highly trained
and battle-hardened service-
members all have one thing
in common, Obama said: they
volunteer.
"In an era when it's never
been more tempting to chase
personal ambition or narrow
self-interest, they chose the
opposite," he said. "For the
better part of a decade, they
have endured tour after tour


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in distant and difficult places.
They have protected us from
danger. They have given oth-
ers the opportunity to earn a
better and more secure life."
Obama quoted something
Giunta said shortly after he
learned he would receive the
Medal of Honor.
'"If I'm a hero,' Sal has said,
'Then every man who stands
around me, every woman in
the military, every person who
defends this country is.' And
he's right'" the president said.
"This medal today is a testa-
ment to his uncommon valor,
but also to the parents and the
community that raised him,
the military that trained him,
and all the men and women
who served by his side."
Today's servicemembers
represent a small fraction
of the nation's population,
Obama said.
"But they and the families
who await their safe return
carry far more than their fair
share of our burden. They do
it in hopes that our children
and grandchildren won't have
to," he said. "They are the very
best part of us.... They are why
our banner still waves, our


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founding principles still shine.
They are why our country, the
United States of America, still
stands as a force for good all
over the world."
The president stood beside
the staff sergeant as the Medal
of Honor citation was read,
and then fastened the distinc-
tive blue ribbon suspending
the medal around Giunta's
neck.
Giunta stood at attention
as the crowd applauded and
cheered. Finally, when the
clapping continued with-
out abating, the young man
smiled.
Giunta was born Jan. 21,
1985, in Clinton, Iowa, and
grew up in Cedar Rapids and
Hiawatha, Iowa. His parents,
Steven and Rosemary Giunta,
live in Hiawatha. He has a
younger brother, Mario, and a
younger sister, Katie.
Giunta enlisted in the
Army in November 2003, and
completed basic and infan-
try training at Fort Benning,
Ga. He married Jennifer Lynn
Mueller, a native of Dubuque,
Iowa, in October 2009.


See Giunta, Page 5


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DOD photo by Fred W. Baker
Steve and Rose Giunta talk outside of their home in Hiawatha, Iowa, Sept. 22.


Giunta

From Page 4
Giunta completed two com-
bat tours in Afghanistan with
the 173rd, from March 2005
to March 2006 and from May
2007 to August 2008. He cur-
rently is stationed at the unit's
home base near Vicenza, Italy,
while the brigade is once more
deployed to Afghanistan.
Giunta's wife, parents and
siblings accompanied him to
the White House for today's
medal presentation.
Also attending today's cere-
monywere First Lady Michelle
Obama, Defense Secretary
Robert M. Gates, members
of Congress, Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm.
Mike Mullen, Army Secretary
John M. McHugh and Army
Chief of Staff Gen. George W.
Casey Jr.
Here is the text of Giunta's
Medal of Honor citation:
The President of the United
States of America, autho-
rized by Act of Congress,
March 3, 1863, has awarded,
in the name of Congress, the
Medal of Honor to Specialist
Salvatore A. Giunta, United
States Army. For conspicuous
gallantry and intrepidity at
the risk of his life above and
beyond the call of duty:
Specialist Salvatore A.


Giunta distinguished himself
conspicuously by gallantry
and intrepidity at the risk of
his life above and beyond the
call of duty in action with an
armed enemy in the Korengal
Valley, Afghanistan, on
October 25, 2007.
While conducting a patrol as
team leader with Company B,
2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d
Infantry Regiment, Specialist
Giunta and his team were nav-
igating through harsh terrain
when they were ambushed
by a well-armed and well-
coordinated insurgent force.
While under heavy enemy fire,
Specialist Giunta immediately
sprinted towards cover and
engaged the enemy. Seeing
that his squad leader had
fallen and believing that he
had been injured, Specialist
Giunta exposed himself to
withering enemy fire and
raced towards his squad lead-
er, helped him to cover, and
administered medical aid.
While administering first aid,
enemy fire struck Specialist
Giunta's body armor and his
secondary weapon.
Without regard to the ongo-
ing fire, Specialist Giunta
engaged the enemy before
prepping and throwing gre-
nades, using the explosions
for cover in order to conceal
his position. Attempting to
reach additional wounded
fellow soldiers who were


separated from the squad,
Specialist Giunta and his team
encountered a barrage of
enemy fire that forced them to
the ground. The team contin-
ued forward and upon reach-
ing the wounded soldiers,
Specialist Giunta realized that
another soldier was still sepa-
rated from the element.
Specialist Giunta then
advanced forward on his own
initiative. As he crested the
top of a hill, he observed two
insurgents carrying away an
American soldier. He imme-
diately engaged the enemy,
killing one and wounding
the other. Upon reaching the
wounded soldier, he began
to provide medical aid, as his
squad caught up and provided
security.
Specialist Giunta's unwav-
ering courage, selflessness,
and decisive leadership while
under extreme enemy fire
were integral to his platoon's
ability to defeat an enemy
ambush and recover a fellow
American soldier from the
enemy. Specialist Salvatore A.
Giunta's extraordinary hero-
ism and selflessness above
and beyond the call of duty
are in keeping with the high-
est traditions of military ser-
vice and reflect great credit
upon himself, Company B, 2d
Battalion (Airborne), 503rd
Infantry Regiment, and the
United States Army.


THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 5


DoD takes aim at bullying


By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

It can begin with a single,
seemingly harmless act: a
taunt at recess, a snub in the
lunch room or a juicy piece of
gossip posted to Facebook or
Twitter.
But each act, multiplied
over time, can equate to some
devastating consequences,
including shattered self-
esteem, depression, fear and,
in the worst cases, suicide.
Bullying has dominated the
headlines in recent months
with the highest-profile cases
splashed across front pages,
bringing national attention
to an issue once relegated to
school halls and locker rooms.
Several teens reportedly took
their own lives rather than
face ongoing torment from
their persecutors.
What once was an issue
that most chalked up to an
inevitable rite of passage is
now being re-examined for
its true impact, from Defense
Department schools all the
way up to the highest echelons
of the nation's leadership.
Last year, the departments
of Education and Health
and Human Services joined
with four other depart-
ments, including the Defense
Department, to create a fed-
eral task force on bullying.
And in August, the task force
held its first National Bullying
Summit to bring light to the
issue and to find a path to stop
it for good.
"It's gotten the attention of
the country just how invasive
any type of bullying is to the
well-being of a victim'" said
Barbara Thompson, director
of the Pentagon's office of fam-
ily policy, children and youth.
Although they're extremely
adaptable, military children
may be particularly suscep-
tible to bullying in public
schools, where they tend to
be the "new kid on the block,"
Thompson said, especially
when moving to an area where
their classmates have been liv-
ing since kindergarten.
According to national sta-
tistics, about 32 percent of
students ages 12 to 18 report


being bullied in school. They
most commonly said they
were made fun of, were the
subject of rumors or were
pushed shoved, tripped or
spit on. However, only about
a third of the victims notified a
teacher or another adult about
it.
"It's important for all par-
ents to be vigilant and to ask
their children how things are
going in school," Thompson
said. "Create an open forum
where a child feels comfort-
able to say, 'I'm scared' or 'I
don't like the way I'm being
treated:"
Bullying happens to some
extent in all schools, but that
doesn't make it acceptable,
said Patricia Cassiday, direc-
tor of pupil personnel services
for the Department of Defense
Education Activity. DoDEA
oversees all of the depart-
ment's schools, both overseas
and stateside.
"For those of us who work
with kids in schools, we don't
want children to be humiliat-
ed and embarrassed and have
to 'put up with it,'" she said.
"It's against the law, and it's
not OK."
The education activity has
built bullying prevention les-
sons into the curriculum for
students in kindergarten up to
12th grade. Instead of focusing
on punishment and repercus-
sions from the top down, the
curriculum underscores the
importance of preventing the
problem from the ground up.
"We stress the importance
of students supporting each
other and saying, 'Not in our
school,' Cassiday said.
Schools also push the
bystander role to the fore-
front rather than putting the
onus solely on the victim to
get help. Students are encour-
aged to intervene, whether it's
to come to the defense of a
victim in a nonviolent way or
to distract a bully, who may
also be a friend, from picking
on others.
A student at Wiesbaden High
School in Germany recently
produced a short video that
echoes this message. He urges
students to stand "shoulder to
shoulder," and to take action


if they see a student who is
being isolated or seems dis-
heartened. The video is now
posted on DoDEA's Web site.
Despite the best-intended
prevention efforts, bullying
will still occur, Cassiday noted.
If it does, DoDEA's school offi-
cials encourage a step-by-step
process, starting with urging
the victim to speak up, but in a
way that won't exacerbate the
situation.
"Be assertive," Cassiday
advised. "Right away, be clear
you want them to stop. Say, 'I
don't like it when you ...' then
get out of the situation.
If it continues, victims
should let the bully know
they are going to ask for help.
Students are taught this isn't
a case of "tattling," but of self-
preservation, she said.
The next step is to encour-
age the victim to sit down with
the bully and a counselor to
discuss the issue, Cassiday
said. Or, if the victim isn't
comfortable being there, the
counselor will meet with the
bully alone to call for an end
to the destructive behavior. By
doing so, "we're keeping the
bully from having all of the
power," she said.
If the bullying happens a
third time, disciplinary action
will be taken by the school,
Cassiday said.
"Now there's a whole history
of behavior," she said. "We try
to make this a learning experi-
ence for both parties. Not just,
'The bully is a bad kid; but
'The bully made a bad choice:"
All bets are off, however,
when physical violence is
involved, Cassiday said. In
those cases, immediate disci-
plinary action will be taken.
Along the way, students
are encouraged to talk about
the incidents to a parent or
trusted adult. In turn, the par-
ent should immediately let the
teacher or school adminis-
tration know what's going on
if they're not already aware.
What parents shouldn't do,
Cassiday said, is tell their chil-
dren what they might have
been told in their own youth:
to hit back.

See Bully, Page 6


HERO


APPRECIATION DAYS


Wednesday, December 1st Thursday, December 2nd


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Discoun

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ATTENTION ALL:


* Active Military Members
and their immediate family


* Full-time Active Guardsmen
and their immediate families


* Activated Guardsmen or Reservists
and their immediate families


The above individuals or a representative from their immediate family are cordially invited
to shop any area Dillard's store on either or both days. These guests are asked to SAVE their sales receipts.
Upon completing their shopping each day, guests are asked to take receipts to a Dillard's Customer Service area and show
a valid active or full-time military ID. Immediate family members shopping on behalf of full-time or activated members of
the military not present will be asked to present ID that notes they are family of such military personnel. Dillard's will gladly
deduct the discount from participants' total purchases in the same form of payment they used for purchases.
Discount must be redeemed the day of the purchase in Customer Service.

Call 1-800-345-5273 to find o Dillard's store near you.


951966




6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Jacksonville parade one of Veterans Day'


By Kaylee LaRocque
Naval Air Station Jacksonville Public
Affairs

Approximately 20,000 spec-
tators lined the streets to pay
tribute to service men and
women during the Veterans
Day Parade in downtown
Jacksonville, Fla., at 11:01 a.m.
Nov. 11.
The parade featured more
than 3,500 participants,
including local military com-
mands, veterans' organiza-
tions, high school bands and
Reserve Officer Training Corps
units.
"We're here today to say
thank you to veterans and
those who are in uniform
today. Thanks for their service
and sacrifices. This parade
is a visible symbol of that
gratitude'" said Bob Buehn,
director of military affairs
for Jacksonville. "This is the
biggest parade in the state of
Florida and one of the biggest
in the country. Jacksonville is a
very patriotic city:'
Veterans from all branches
of the military proudly wore
their uniforms, many remi-
niscing with strangers about
their service to the country.
"It was both inspiring and
humbling to see how the city
of Jacksonville, as well as peo-



Bully

From Page 5

"If you hit back, then both
parties are going to be dis-
ciplined," Cassiday explained.
"It's tough for schools to know
who is to blame if both are
involved"'
Parents also can choose
to go to the parents of the
bully, but not on the attack.
Cassiday advises they make it
a learning situation, and use
the approach of, "I'm not sure
you're aware of this, but ..."
Above all, she added, it's just
as important for parents to
speak up as it is for their chil-
dren.
"To remain silent, you're
condoning the behavior," she
said. "Your child doesn't have
to ever put up with bullying."
Complicating the mat-
ter, bullying no longer is rel-
egated to cafeterias and locker
rooms. Bullies now can take
their taunts worldwide via the
Internet. The stories are ram-
pant: bullies posting slander
to Facebook and Twitter or
circulating a compromising
photo through text messages.
In a survey on WiredSafety.
org, nearly half of the partici-
pants reported they'd been
"cyberbullied" before, and
more than 50 percent had a
friend who had been bullied
online.
Cyberbullying can have an
impact that extends far beyond
the school's walls, Cassiday
noted. To prevent online bul-
lying, Defense Department
schools are using a variety
of computer training tools to
emphasize the importance of
online safety and responsibil-
ity to students, she added.
Outside of school, parents
should monitor computer
use and let children know
they're doing so, she advised.
However, there's a fine line
between protecting children's
online privacy and a parental
responsibility to protect them
against a possibly unsafe envi-
ronment, Thompson noted.
"Children really do need
to have parental and adult
involvement regarding how
they receive information and
post it," she said. The Defense
Department is working with
children and youth services
managers to highlight online
dangers and to teach them
how to respond if a child



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Continenta[Conseation:
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Navy photo by MC2 Gary Granger Jr.
Navy ROTC cadets from Jacksonville University march in the Jacksonville Veteran's Day Parade.


pie from all across Northeast
Florida, came out to say thank
you today. They've expressed
a heartfelt thank you not only
to those veterans partici-
pating in the parade, but to
every Sailor, Marine, Soldier,
Airman and Coast Guardsmen
who has ever worn the uni-
form," said Naval Air Station
Jacksonville Commanding


approaches them with a con-
cern, she added.
Additionally, the Defense
Department's Military
OneSource site at www.mili-
taryonesource.com offers free
online resources and printed
materials that are aimed at
helping parents and children
deal with bullying, whether
the traditional or digital kind.
The information also is direct-
ed at helping bullies change
their behavior. Bullies, stud-
ies indicate, often were bullied
themselves.
The Defense Department
will continue its efforts to
shed light on the pervasive
problem, not just for military
children, but for all children,
Thompson said.


Officer Capt. Jeffrey Maclay.
"I'm am extremely grate-
ful for the support NAS Jax
receives from the First Coast
Community, not only dur-
ing this military appreciation
week, but throughout the
year."
Cmdr. Richard Sams of
Naval Hospital Jacksonville
and his wife, Teri, brought



Dunham

From Page 1

Dunham and the Marine
Corps, and just two days after
Veteran's Day when we honor
all military members both
present and past."
The pier welcomed more
than 5,000 guests and support-
ers including family members
of the crew and the Dunhams.
"I have military family, and
I have a personal family," said
Cpl. Dunham's mother, Deb
Dunham. "The kindness, the
generosity, and the strength
that they have given Dan and
I and the children has kept us


their children to the parade.
"This is such a wonder-
ful event to show support to
our veterans and those serv-
ing today. We look forward to
coming to the parade every
year,' Teri said.
Navy retirees were out in
force with a display of sup-
port. "We're out here today to
honor the veterans because


going. The process has been
a journey that I hadn't antici-
pated, but it's a ride I wouldn't
miss. I have words for Jason
later. I don't quite know what
I'm going to say, but I have
words."
Maj. Trent Gibson,
Dunham's officer in charge,
expressed his feelings about
a ship being named in
Dunham's honor.
"I think it's an indescrib-
able honor," said Gibson,
"The fact that his name is on
a ship is going to perpetuate
and inspire future generations
of American sons and daugh-
ters of that impact. His name
is already legendary in the
Marine Corps, but to extend
it to the Navy is truly special:'


it's been an absolutely won-
derful lifetime in a free nation
and it's because of all the vet-
erans who gave us and are
still giving up those freedoms.
So we are here to celebrate
that today," retired Capt. John
Furness said.
Veterans Day is a federal
holiday, celebrated through-
out the country. It began with
the original celebration of
Armistice Day at the end of
World War I Nov. 11, 1918.
On every continent, formal
events commemorated this
historic moment, and so it was
no surprise that Armistice Day
would evolve into a national
holiday that continued to be
celebrated year after year. In
November 1919, President
Woodrow Wilson issued his
Armistice Day proclamation.
"To us in America, the
reflections of Armistice Day
will be filled with solemn
pride in the heroism of those
who died in the country's ser-
vice and with gratitude for the
victory. Both because of the
thing from which it has freed
us and because of the oppor-
tunity it has given America to
show her sympathywith peace
and justice in the councils of
the nation...;' Wilson said.
For 16 years, the United
States formally observed


Since arriving in Port
Everglades Nov. 5, the crew
has volunteered for various
community service projects
throughout the week includ-
ing visits to Joe DiMaggio
Children's Hospital, perform-
ing work on a Habitat for
Humanity project, preparing
meals for Feeding Florida and
visiting local schools.
"I am deeply proud and
honored to stand here today
to represent my Sailors; by far
the greatest and most special
group of men and woman
that I have worked with in
my entire 19-year career,"
said Cmdr. Scott Sciretta, USS
Jason Dunham commanding
officer.
Sciretta thanked everyone


largest


Armistice Daywith impressive
ceremonies at the Tomb of
the Unknown Soldiers, where
the president would place a
wreath.
In many other communi-
ties, the American Legion was
in charge of the observance,
which included parades and
religious services.
Slowly, the holiday that was
to commemorate the end of
World War I, evolved into a
general celebration of all vet-
erans.
Leaders of veterans groups
began to celebrate the origi-
nal date of Nov. 11 to honor
all who had fought in various
American wars, not just World
War I.
The first unofficial Veterans
Day celebration was held Nov.
11, 1953, in Emporia, Kansas.
An act of Congress changed
the name to Veterans Day May
25, 1954.
In October 1954, President
Dwight D. Eisenhower called
on all citizens to observe the
day by remembering the sac-
rifices of all those who fought
for our country during all of
its wars.
Thus the celebration of
Armistice Day was officially
replaced with Veterans Day
and American veterans of all
wars were to be honored.


involved in planning the com-
missioning ceremony, the
city of Fort Lauderdale for its
hospitality and also Bath Iron
Works who built the ship.
"Our ship and crew has
much to be grateful for today,"
said Sciretta. "We are grateful
to our commissioning com-
mittee, local Navy League
councils and our Broward
Navy team partners for orga-
nizing this week's events for
our crew. Our heartfelt thanks
to your city for making us feel
like family'.
He also offered thanks to
Gibson who he deemed a
"true brother" He then turned
to Deb and Dan Dunham to
express his love and apprecia-
tion for them.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 7


Frozen


Chosin


battles


recalled

By Walter T. Ham IV
Eighth Army Public Affairs
More than 250 veterans gath-
ered in Seoul Nov. 10 to mark
the 60th anniversary of the piv-
otal Jangjin "Chosin" Reservoir
battles where U.S. Soldiers and
Marines defeated a much larger
enemy force during a strategic
retreat through bitterly cold and
fiercely contested mountainous
terrain
During a ceremony at the War
Memorial of Korea, U.S. Army
Gen. Walter L. Sharp, the top
American commander in South
Korea, praised the veterans who
took on communist Chinese
troops at the Jangjin "Chosin"
Reservoir in late 1950.
Along with Republic of Korea
Minister of National Defense
Kim Tae-young, Sharp was one
of the featured speakers at the
ceremony. The ceremony also
featured performances by the
U.S. Marine Corps Silent Drill
Team, a Korean dance group and
the ROK Ministry of National
Defense Honor Guard who dem-
onstrated traditional sword and
spear techniques dating back to
the Joseon Dynasty.
"I am truly honored to wel-
come the Korean War veter-
ans'" said Sharp, commander of
the United Nations Command,
Combined Forces Command
and U.S. Forces Korea. "Whether
you fought outnumbered in the
bitter cold with X Corps or under
the United Nations flag during
any other part of the war, you are
our honored guest here today.
As your successors in maintain-
ing peace and stability on the
Korean Peninsula, we owe you a
debt of gratitude that can never
be repaid."


hi.
4.


Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Frank C. Kerr
Marines of the 5th and 7th Regiments, who fought back a surprise attack by 3 Chinese communist
divisions, receive the order to withdraw. In five days and nights of sub-zero winds and icy roads, they
fought back 15 miles through Chinese troops to Hagaru-ri on the southern tip of Chosin Reservoir.


Sharp thanked all of the assem-
bled veterans who "fought side-
by-side to hurl back the human
wave attacks and to protect the
newly-established Republic of
Korea."
"United Nations Command
Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and
Marines fought not only the
enemy but also the elements,"
said Sharp, the son of a Korean
War veteran.
ROK Minister of National
Defense Kim thanked the veter-
ans for defending the Republic
of Korea.
"Today, we have the great
honor to be in the presence of
the heroes of this battle'" said
Kim. "The Republic of Korea will
always remember you."
Called the "Chosin" Reservoir
by United Nations Forces using
outdated Japanese maps, the
Korean name of the reservoir
is Jangjin. It was the site where
United Nations forces defeated
eight communist Chinese divi-
sions during the battle that last-
ed from Nov. 27 to Dec. 13, 1950.
More than 100,000 Chinese
soldiers encircled 30,000 United


Nations troops at the reservoir
during one of the coldest winters
in the history of the region. The
communist Chinese came to the
aid of the North Korean forc-
es after UN forces had pushed
them all the way to the Chinese
border, following Eighth Army's
successful defense of the Pusan
Perimeter and the 1st Marine
Division and X Corps' amphibi-
ous assault at Inchon in 1950.
Heavily outnumbered and
completely surrounded, Soldiers
and Marines under the com-
mand of the U.S. Army's X Corps
outmaneuvered and outfought
the communist Chinese People's
Volunteers in the teeth-cracking
cold, where frigid winds and 40
below temperatures routinely
caused weapons to malfunction.
During more than two weeks
of tough fighting, communist
Chinese forces attacked at night
and fled during the day when
U.S. air support was overhead.
The U.S. Navy and U.S. Air
Force also played a critical role
in the battle, conducting fire
support, resupply and medical
evacuation missions.


"Korean, American and British
units fought with a valor rarely
seen in the history of war," Sharp
said. "Our air forces parachuted
supplies, ranging from ammu-
nition to temporary bridges, to
our hard-pressed Soldiers and
Marines, while our naval forces
provided fire support and logis-
tics. All of the services worked
together to fight one of the most
successful rearguard actions in
the history of combat."
Prevailing in intense ground
combat and overcoming numer-
ous man-made and natural
obstacles, American Soldiers
and Marines hobbled the much
larger Chinese force, broke
through their encirclement and
made it to the North Korean port
of Hamhung where they helped
to evacuate more than 100,000
North Korean refugees to the
south.
The 78-mile journey was the
longest withdrawal in U.S. mili-
tary history.
During the battle, 14 Marines,
two Soldiers and a naval aviator
earned the Medal of Honor, the
nation's highest military honor.


'a -
I-


From Naval Supply Systems
Command Office of Corporate
Communications

Naval Supply Systems
Command Commander
Rear Adm. Mike Lyden
released his FY11
Commander's Guidance
Nov. 9.
The Guidance remains
aligned to the Chief of
Naval Operations' priori-
ties to Build the Future
Force; Maintain Our
Warfighter Readiness;
and Develop and
Support Our Sailors,
Navy Civilians, and their
Families.
"In FY11 we must
maintain our laser focus
on cost effective support
to Sailors around the
world," Lyden said. "We
must also continue to be
leaders on the business
side of the Navy and play
a key role in the daily
execution of the Navy
enterprise and support
infrastructure."
The Commander's
Guidance includes five
focus areas: Efficiency
and Affordability;
Global Network; Navy
Enterprise Resource
Planning & Logistics
Systems; Quality of Life;
and Our People, which
are driven by 31 strate-
gies.
The strategies are
designed to change the
way NAVSUP does busi-
ness.
"To underscore how
the strategies will impact
our basic business, we
have mapped each strat-
egy into one of three
primary business lines:
Weapon System Support;
Global Logistics Support;
and Sailor and Family
Support," Lyden said.
"The strategies will drive
specific changes to how
we operate that business


line with specific out-
comes and deliverables
clearly defined.
"Our success depends
on the dedication, pro-
fessionalism, and skills
of our entire workforce.
Every day, the members
of the NAVSUP enter-
prise provide vital sup-
port to our customers
around the world. The
products and services we
provide our basic busi-
ness play a key role in
maintaining warfighter
readiness and improving
the quality of life for our
Sailors and their fami-
lies. My Commander's
Guidance conveys the
strategic initiatives that
will help us improve the
way we accomplish our
basic business in the
future'.
The NAVSUP FY11
Commander's Guidance
can be found online
at www.navsup.navy.
mil/commandersguid-
ance2011.pdf.
NAVSUP's primary
mission is to provide U.S.
naval forces with qual-
ity supplies and services
worldwide.
With headquarters in
Mechanicsburg, Pa., and
employing a diverse,
worldwide workforce of
more than 22,500 mili-
tary and civilian per-
sonnel, NAVSUP over-
sees logistics programs
in the areas of supply
operations, conventional
ordnance, contracting,
resale, fuel, transporta-
tion, and security assis-
tance.
In addition, NAVSUP is
responsible for quality of
life issues for our naval
forces, including food
service, postal services,
Navy Exchanges, and
movement of household
goods.


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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Cub Scouts
Pack 218 of
St. Marys
marches in
the Kingsland
Memorial Day
Parade.


Participants
bow their
heads in
prayer during
invocation at
the Veterans
Memorial
celebration.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 9


The U.S. Navy Memorial Stone along with Army, Marine, Air Force and Coast
Guard are unveiled at the newly named Veterans Memorial Park.


Capt. John S. O'Neill, commanding officer Naval Submarine
Base Kings Bay, was guest speaker at the unveiling of the
Veterans Memorial Park.


Kingsland Mayor Kenneth E. Smith Sr. and Camden
County High School JROTC members salute the flag
during the Veterans Memorial Celebration at Veterans
Memorial Park.


Above, Sub Vets parade the colors.

Right, veterans, active-duty service
members, retired military, family
and friends rally around the flag in
the Veterans Memorial Park.

Below, veterans belonging to
motorcycle clubs participated in
the parade.


3 all,




10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Little lady once a Devil Dog


By lan Graham
Emerging Media, Defense Media
Activity

Marie Peckham is a small
woman. While it wouldn't
be technically inaccurate to
assume she wears military-
themed pins and jewelry
because her husband served
in the military he did it
would be an underestimation
of Peckham's strength.
Even though she stands only
somewhere between four and
five feet tall, she was a Marine
Corps staff sergeant, follow-
ing in her father and brothers'
footsteps.
"It was only natural I
became a Marine, and thank
God I did," she said.
Through her service and
involvement in the U.S. Marine
Corps League, Peckham met
her husband, a fellow Marine
who survived five major cam-
paigns in the Pacific and went
into Nagasaki mere weeks
after it had been bombed.
Peckham, who grew up with
dual U.S.-Canadian citizen-
ship, ultimately embraced
America when she took the
oath of enlistment and joined
the Corps in 1943. After basic
training, she served with the
Marine air wing at Congaree
Field, S.C., as a link trainer.
She also taught plane and ship
recognition to fighter pilots.
"We taught pilots to fly by
their instruments'" she said.
"When they were 'undercov-
er, as we called it, and they
couldn't see very well, they
had to learn to fly by instru-
ments. So I sat at a desk and
watched what they did in the
trainer and made sure they
were doing it right.'
Peckham's service changed
her outlook on people, she
said. A lot of cultural norms


DoD photo by MC2 William Selby
Marie Peckham, a former Marine Corps staff sergeant and
World War II veteran, discusses her service during an inter-
view at the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., July
21. Peckham served in the Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946.


were changing at the time, she
added, and being in an inte-
grated force helped her adjust.
"My service taught me
camaraderie, it taught me
to not be prejudiced, and it
taught me to appreciate all of
the blessings of this country,"
she said.
That appreciation, she
said, is something that isn't
as prevalent today because
a gap between civilians and
servicemembers needs to be
remedied.
"I'm a bit prejudiced,"
Peckham said of the nation's
current conflicts when asked if
she has any advice for today's
servicemembers. "We want all
of it to be over as soon as pos-
sible, but while it's going on,
do your part."
Civilians don't need to feel
pressured to serve in uniform,
she said, but they need to do
everything they can to support
those who do don the uniform.
Members of the all-volunteer
force are putting themselves at
great risk, she added, and the


y that dovetails into his initiative
S er to slash $100 billion from the
r DOD's overhead.
"Too often competition
From Page 1 in Washington is, everyone
wins," he said. "That's not my
Gates also touched on the idea of competition. My idea
need for "real" competition in of competition in the acquisi-
regard to acquisition, a topic tion arena is winner takes all.


least people can do at home
is to create an environment of
support and caring.
"Read more about veter-
ans issues. Read about their
problems, what they need and
what they deserve," she said.
"And always, always support
them. Always.
'All you veterans out there,
especially you Vietnam guys, if
you want to be loved, accepted
and belong to a group where
we're brothers and sisters,
come and join a veterans orga-
nization," Peckham said, not-
ing that she is a member of
the U.S. Marine Corps League,
the Veterans of Foreign Wars
Auxiliary and the American
Legion.
Veterans' Reflections is a
collection of stories of men
and women who served their
country in World War II, the
Korean War, the Vietnam War,
operations Desert Shield and
Desert Storm, and the pres-
ent-day conflicts. They will be
posted throughout November
in honor of Veterans Day.


"I think the more we can
do this, and the more we can
cause industry, particularly
on relatively low-technology-
risk programs, to share the risk
with the government in terms
of timeliness and costs, the
better off the taxpayers will
be."


Navy photo by MC1 Curtis K. Biasi
U.S. Naval Academy slot back Aaron Santiago carries the ball during the first half of the game
between Navy and Wake Forest on Oct. 9. The Midshipmen beat the Demon Deacons, 28-27.


Navy earns 8th straight bowl


From Naval Academy Athletics
Association Public Affairs

The Naval Academy has
qualified to play in the San
Diego County Credit Union
Poinsettia Bowl Dec. 23 as a
result of its Nov. 6 victory over
East Carolina.
Qualifying for the Poinsettia
Bowl is a landmark achieve-
ment for the football program,
marking the first time that
Navy has gone to eight-straight
bowl games.
Naval Academy Director
of Athletics Chet Gladchuk


Threat

From Page 1

"In my judgment, there is no
question today that we are a
stronger Army," McHugh said.
"We have learned from the
things that unfolded that day,
and we are a safer Army."
In the Navy review, officials
cited the importance of lead-
ership "the obligation to act


said the game will be played
at Qualcomm Stadium in San
Diego against a projected
opponent from the Mountain
West Conference.
"We strongly encour-
age Navy fans to buy their
bowl tickets directly from
the Naval Academy Athletic
Association," said Gladchuk.
"Our goal is to bring a large
contingent of the Brigade of
Midshipmen, and we expect
more than 20,000 Navy fans in
the stands. It is very important
for this game and for future
Navy bowl considerations for

and the discretion available
to a commander" and the
need to consider the impact of
proposed policies on civilian
personnel. The Navy's follow-
up actions include:
* Extensive reviews during
exercises to identify and man-
age internal threats and better
share information; and
* Updates to Shipboard
Force Protection Condition
measures.
The Marine Corps reported
developing a violence preven-


our fans to purchase tickets
through the NAAA.
"If you can't make it to the
game, we ask that Navy fans
buy tickets for our midship-
men and enlisted personnel,
which will allow us to create
the usual pageantry of Navy
football. San Diego is a Navy
town, and it would be great if
we could send any interested
enlisted personnel and their
family to the game.
The game will be televised
nationally by ESPN, and the
game time is set for 5 p.m. PST,
8 p.m. locally.

tion and response program,
revising its law enforcement
manual to include best civil-
ian practices in targeted areas,
and providing better informa-
tion sharing.
The Marine Corps report
also recommends fielding
an emergency calling system
at all of its installations that
integrates military and civil-
ian computer-aided dispatch,
as well as other technical
upgrades to better manage
and share information.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 11


Navy led to life of service


Navy photo by MC3 Nicholas Hall
Hosts of the ESPN2 television show, ESPN First Take, Derrick Brooks, left, Jon Richie, Jay
Crawford and Dana Jacobson conduct a question-and-answer session with Sailors on the flight
deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).


Carrier plays host to ESPN


By MC3 Sandi Grimnes
USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77)
Media Department

USS George H.W. Bush
(CVN 77) hosted a live broad-
cast of ESPN2's First Take on
the ship's flight deck, Nov. 8.
ESPN First Take broadcasted
from the Navy's newest air-
craft carrier as part of their
week-long Salute to America's
Heroes, said Dana Jacobson,
ESPN First Take host.
"The one thing that really
steps out, for all of us, is the
discipline that all of these men
and women have and how
focused they are, and every
person on this ship has such a
specific job," said Jay Crawford,
ESPN First Take host.
The two-hour broadcast was
the culmination of weeks of
work by the entire crew.
The ship's Supply
Department coordinated


Smoking

From Page 1

the boats to provide them with
submariners that may have
started their treatment with
us," said Joanne Rex, health
promotion coordinator, NSB
Kings Bay. "This gives the per-
son an opportunity to contin-


the crane onload of ESPN's
equipment, with Air and
Engineering Departments
running the ship's air-
craft elevators and Aircraft
Intermediate Maintenance
Department running forklifts
to move the gear around the
ship's hangar bay and flight
deck.
Combat Systems
Department provided com-
munications support for the
broadcast, and the Operations
Department provided secu-
rity.
During the event, hundreds
of Sailors had the opportu-
nity to participate in the live
broadcast.
In a live interview with the
carrier's island in the back-
ground, Commanding Officer
Capt. Chip Miller gave all the
credit to his crew.
"The most impressive thing
about the ship and team is

ue their treatment"'
Smoking cessation counsel-
ors are trained coaches that
asses each individual's stage of
the smoking cessation process
and recommend appropriate
treatment and resources to
quit smoking or remain smoke
free. The counselors also have
been tobacco free for at least
six months. Formal classroom
training provided by a multi-
disciplinary medical training


these guys right behind me,'
Miller said.
Several Sailors had the
chance help First Take ana-
lysts Derrick Brooks and Jon
Richie demonstrate how the
Steelers and Bengals might
play in their game during a
Monday Night Football demo
on a mock-gridiron setup on
the flight deck.
"I enjoyed being a part of
this history of this ship'" said
Yeoman 3rd Class Thomas
Moffit. "It was an amazing
time and I am very grateful for
being allowed to participate"'
In preparation for the
broadcast, a production team
from ESPN flew out to the ship
during a recent underway to
get footage of the carrier and
crew in action.
In addition, ESPN filmed
duty section personnel watch-
ing Sunday night football on
the ship.

team help the counselors han-
dle situations tobacco users
may encounter with the addic-
tion.
"We are trained to look for
addiction and drug depen-
dence and behavior change,'
said Rex.
Danita Johnson, health
promotion technician, Naval
Submarine Base Kings Bay,
Ga., stated that through coun-
seling and helping skills, they


By MC2 William Selby
Emerging Media, Defense Media
Activity
If all you knew about Bill
Sumner was that he joined the
military during World War II a
day after graduating from high
school, that would say plenty
about his character and dedi-
cation to his country.
But it marked only the
beginning of a life of service.
When he left for boot camp
in 1942, the United States
was involved in World War II,
Sumner said, and he had to do
his part.
'A few months later I was
transferred to Pearl Harbor
and was stationed aboard the
USS Mahan," he said.
On Dec. 7, 1944, the USS
Mahan was patrolling between
Leyte and Ponson Island when
a squadron of Japanese air-
craft found it.
"They were heading home
after bombing an inva-
sion force, and I guess the
American P-38 started to hit
them," Sumner said. "So they
decided [that] rather than go
home, they would just destroy
us.'
During the ensuing battle,
Sumner said, the nine twin-
engine Bettys were diving into
the ship one at a time, but only
three of the aircraft actually hit
the Mahan.
"The first one hit mid-
ship, and the second one hit
us between two stacks," he
added. "The third one missed
us and then came back around
and hit us."
The ship was exploding from
all the munitions and weap-
ons onboard, and there was
nothing to extinguish the fires,

are able to reach tobacco
users that want to quit but are
unsure of themselves because
of the addiction.
Providing education tobac-
co health effects, benefits of
quitting, managing distress
and moods, quitting process-
es, eating and weight issues
and co-morbidity are the
major aspects counselors deal
with.
"We have two methods of


DoD photo by Navy MC2 William
Selby
During an Oct. 13 interview
at the World War II Memorial
in Washington, D.C., retired
Air Force Lt. Col. Bill Sumner
discussed his military experi-
ences.
because one of the planes
knocked out the power to the
ship, Sumner recalled. With
no power and no water to fight
the fires, the Mahan's skipper
decided it would be best for
the crew to jump overboard.
But, Sumner said, there was
one thing he couldn't leave the
ship without.
"I had a dog onboard" he
said. "His name was Butch. He
was a cocker spaniel, and he
was our ship's mascot. I went
down below to get him, and
then we all jumped off the ship
into the water."
The Mahan's crew floated
in the water for roughly two
hours while waiting to be
picked up, and eventually was
sighted and picked up by the
crew members USS Walke, a
flat-bottomed landing ship.

nicotine support for the tobac-
co users," said Fisher. "We offer
nicotine patches or nicotine
gum."
Smoking can cause cardio-
vascular and pulmonary dis-
ease and cancer. It can also
increase the chances for hos-
pitalizations, missed work-
days, failed fitness evaluations
and impaired night vision.
Johnson and Rex have a
mobile unit of information


Sumner said when Walke
was ready to start taking sail-
ors on board, none of the crew
would go until Butch was safe-
ly aboard a fairly funny addi-
tion to an otherwise less-than-
comical story. After the sailors
from the Mahan had boarded
the Walke, the decision was
made to sink the listing ship.
The surviving sailors did
not get to come home imme-
diately, and Sumner stayed
aboard the Walke. While leav-
ing the Philippines, Sumner's
ship was challenged, he said,
only this time it wasn't the
Japanese.
"We were on the way back
from the Philippines, and
we hit the edge of Halsey's
Typhoon," he said. "And
believe me, that was [scarier]
by far than being sunk'.
Sumner returned to the
United States after traveling
aboard five different vessels
over three months, and he was
assigned to the USS Steinaker
on the East Coast. Soon after
that, Sumner received an
honorable discharge from the
Navy.
Years passed, and after he
earned a degree from the
University of Nevada, Sumner
decided to seek a commis-
sion as an Air Force officer.
He served in the Air Force for
22 years, including time spent
as a bombardier navigator fly-
ing combat missions in the
Korean and Vietnam wars. All
told, Sumner spent 27 years
serving in the armed forces.
He fought in three major wars
and retired as a lieutenant
colonel.
He said serving his country
was the most important thing
he ever did.

that is used to educate Kings
Bay. The table of knowledge
has literature, facts and prod-
ucts that a person wanting to
quit using tobacco products
can take away with them dur-
ing the visit.
"This information is free to
anyone on base that is eligi-
ble," said Rex. "We offer class-
es, one on one counseling or
walk-ins. We are here to help
and support'.


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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 13




SS
. *

withBillWesslhof
erisco


It's Thanksgiving, what are you thankful for?


Look for our roving
reporter around Kings
Bay and tell him what
you think about our
question of the week.


W ll, it's Thanksgiving. We're all supposed to have
something we're thankful for. Right? I guess I'd start
with my brother. You know, the one who I told you last


week will be cooking the turkey. He also has a big-screen, hi-
def TV. Then there's my daughter, son-in-law and granddaugh-
ter. After that, there's my two dogs, Peachy Fearless Bowden


and Tuffy JoeBen Crede. And, my human friends. Finally, of
course, there's being American, working here and getting to get
out and talk to all of you great young people once a week.


MM1 James Hinton
Trident Training Facility
Hayes, Kan.
"My family, and I just got shore
duty. I've been out to sea a lot.
Being home is pretty nice."


Lt. Cmdr. James Quintin
Squadron 16
Elderg, Pa.
"The weather."


MMFA Brenden Wilkinson
USS Maryland Blue
Corpus Christi, Texas
"Being alive'


MM1 Tim Dunlap
Port Operations
New Albany, Miss.
"I'm thankful for a new
family, an old home and the
stability we have.


Lance Cpl. Christopher
Kolakowski
Marine Corps
Security Force Battalion
Mooresville, N.C.
"Liberty."


MM2 Alex Korponay
USS West Virginia Blue
Grayson, Ga.
"I'm thankful for being on
submarines and for being able
to make it this far."


Marine Corps seeks correct balance for 21st century


By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service


The Marine Corps needs to be
like a middleweight boxer agile,
quick and deadly, the commander of
Marine Corps Combat Development
Command said in Washington, D.C.,
Nov. 16.
Speaking to the Defense Writers'
Group, Lt. Gen. George J. Flynn noted
that the Marine Corps has the mis-
sion to be America's expeditionary
force in readiness.
"A middleweight fighter has to
have a knockout punch'" the general
said. "But I also don't think a middle-
weight should go 15 rounds with a
heavyweight."
Finding the right balance to define
what the Corps should look like and
what capabilities it should contain
is Flynn's mission. "It means that we


are going to be truly expeditionary -
that we can go wherever we need to
go today, not tomorrow, and that we
put a premium on readiness," he said.
"A crisis response force does all the
things you see the Marine Corps do
right now," he told the group, from
fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan to
providing aid to Pakistan, to helping
countries in Africa, South America
and Asia. The Marine Corps is taking
the lessons of 10 years of war to heart,
he added.
"One of the top lessons is that we're
doing things at a much lower level
than we ever did in the past," Flynn
said.
Marine Corps companies are doing
what battalions did in the past, he
explained. The strategy calls for
pushing intelligence and operations
planning to company level.
"We're asking a lot of the young


leaders to do this'" he said. "Tactical
actions have strategic implications,
and that really is a key factor in push-
ing those things down there and ask-
ing them to coordinate these in a very
complex battle space.
Strategists talk about a three-block
war, and the Marines have embraced
that notion, Flynn said. "It is not
uncommon to have a unit doing pret-
ty heavy combat, at the same time
they train their replacements, be it
police or army support, and the other
part is enabling governance to take
place'" Flynn said.
Another lesson is integrating new
technology into battle plans and
integrating lessons on the fly. Pre-
deployment training is an area of
concentration for Marines, Flynn
said. The training, he said, enables
Marines at all levels to understand
the mission ahead.


"We use the pre-deployment train-
ing to integrate the new things that
are on the battlefield, not just equip-
ment, but the tactics, techniques and
procedures as well'" Flynn said.
For example, he said, the Marine
Corps just opened the expanded
immersive infantry trainer at Camp
Pendleton, Calif., and is building
similar facilities at Camp Lejeune,
N.C., and in Hawaii. The trainer gives
ground Marines the same leg up that
pilots receive, Flynn said.
"For those who fly airplanes, you
would never think of giving a pilot
the keys to a commercial airliner or a
fighter aircraft without some simula-
tor time," he said. "Why would we
give a young squad leader the keys to
a rifle squad without going through
a simulator? The simulator gives you
the pre-combat check ride to make
sure you can deal with what you're


going to have to deal with."
The Marines have been criticized
as functioning simply as a second
land army, but Flynn said he doesn't
agree.
"I would argue that since 9/11,
we've been at sea quite a bit as well',
he said. A Marine expeditionary unit
based on ships responded to the
earthquake in Haiti in January, he
noted. Another responded from the
sea to the flooding in Pakistan. Still
another responded to Haiti as a hur-
ricane struck the island nation earlier
this month, Flynn said.
Integrating new equipment into
the Corps also is part of Flynn's mis-
sion, and he is looking at new ground
combat vehicles, the F-35 joint strike
fighter and many other pieces of
equipment, he said. He acknowl-
edged, however, that such programs
can present fiscal pitfalls.




14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


'People make the difference'


By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service


Though he never expected
he'd have a military career, the
nation's highest-ranking mili-
tary officer said the people he
has served with are the reason
he stayed in the service.
Navy Adm. Mike Mullen,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, told ROTC cadets
and midshipmen at UCLA on
Nov. 10 that a career wasn't
on his mind when he reported
to the U.S. Naval Academy in
Annapolis, Md., in 1964.
"The reason I stayed was
it became very quickly about
the tremendous, tremendous
people I met from the first day
I showed up at Annapolis,'
Mullen said to the officer can-
didates. "You're joining a mili-
tary of great young men and
women that is the best we've
ever had in our history, and I
would argue it is the best force
in the world, ever."
The chairman has served


46 years since arriving at
Annapolis. He credits the peo-
ple he has served with and the
hankering to see the world -
"even though my first assign-
ment was in Vietnam" with
keeping him in the Navy.
The men and women who
aspire to become officers in
the U.S. military must focus on
leadership, the chairman said.
He told the ROTC students to
study leaders, to examine their
styles and take what works for
them. The military is involved
in two wars and maintains
guard around the world, he
noted, and the only constant
theywill see upon entering the
force is change.
"Leadership is what getting
commissioned is all about,"
he said. "You are coming into
the military at an unbelievably
complex time in our country
and our world. The military is
not immune. We've changed
dramatically in this past
decade, and we will continue
to evolve."


The future officers will face
tough decisions, and they
must have good leadership
ability to see them through,
Mullen said.
"Good leaders step forward
and solve tough problems at
the right time'" he added.
Mullen urged the cadets
and midshipmen to keep
their options open, and not
burn any bridges. "You never
know that 10 years down the
road you won't have a differ-
ent view of what that bridge
would have looked like had it
still been there'" he said.
"Ask a thousand questions;'
he continued. "When you are
making big decisions, go to
people you respect and get
their view. In the end, make
them your decisions. Don't
make them anyone else's,
because you are the one who
is going to have to live with
them every day."
The military values respon-

See People, Page 21


DoD Photo by MC1 Chad J. McNeeley
Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff speaks to audience members
question after speaking at the Bernard Brodie Distinguished Lecture Series at UCLA.


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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Marine


has big


heart


By Cpl. M. Foster
2nd Marine Logistics Group


Navy photo by UT2 Vuong Ta
Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 18 build a Southwest Asian Hut at
Kandahar Air Field.



Afghan provinces evolve


By Terri Moon Cronk
American Forces Press Service

Three provinces in east-
ern Afghanistan are "prime
for transition" in the near
future for self-governance, a
task force commander in the
region said Nov. 10.
"The Afghan govern-
ment has made tremendous
progress in [its] ability to
both protect and govern the
Afghan people," said Army
Col. William Roy, command-
er of Task Force Wolverine
and the Vermont National
Guard's 86th Infantry Brigade
Combat Team, speaking from
Afghanistan with Pentagon
reporters by video teleconfer-
ence.
Roy and his soldiers are
developing security forces
and district governments
in Afghanistan's Parwan,
Panjshir and Bamyan prov-
inces.
A recent combined opera-
tion in western Parwan, he
said, resulted in five Taliban
operatives being detained
when they were caught trying
to plant bombs along a major
road network.
"We see this as a tremen-
dous example of the progress
they're making," he said.
The Afghan National Police
are "right on the heels" of
the Afghan army in gaining
respect from the Afghan peo-
ple, Roy said. Afghan police
candidates in the region are
well-educated, he added, with
a 90 percent literacy rate in
Bamyan.
"When you have a [police]
training class with seats for 30
individuals and you have 50
show up, the desire to learn
and to grow in their capability
is tremendous," Roy said.


Now on his fourth deploy-
ment to Afghanistan, Roy said
he has seen significant change
in Afghanistan's army since he
arrived in 2002 for his first tour
of duty there.
"So coming back here
in 2010, you see the Afghan
National Army and it has
grown by leaps and bounds,"
he said, noting the profession-
alism of today's officer corps
and the building of a "very
strong" corps of noncommis-
sioned officers.
Roy said he sees Afghan sol-
diers during his current tour
whom he first met in the war's
early years. "When you work
alongside them in this type of
a mission, you become very
close friends', he said. Many
have gone from being com-
pany commanders to battal-
ion commanders, from battal-
ion commanders to brigade
commanders, from battalion
command sergeants major to
brigade command sergeants
major since he's known them,
he said.
"I had a great conversation
with one of the former com-
pany commanders in English,"
he said. "He went through
the training center to study
English, and we had a tre-
mendous conversation when
I came back"'
Progress in security has
allowed for development in
the three provinces for recon-
struction, embedded training
and agribusiness develop-
ment, the colonel said, and
economic development in
eastern Afghanistan is becom-
ing evident.
"In Panjshir, they just
opened up a marble mine
factory that is really provid-
ing a lot of revenue as well as
jobs for the locals," Roy said.


Tourism signs are beginning to
pop up in Bamyan, he added.
The future of Afghanistan lies
in small business, Roy said.
"When I was here in 2002,
when you went from Kabul
to Bagram, there was virtu-
ally nothing on the road'" he
told reporters. "Now, in about
an hour-long drive, you get
the development all the way
along businesses growing
up, gas stations on the side of
the road."
Afghanistan's ability to self-
govern is moving slowly, but
steadily, Roy said, noting that
Bamyan has Afghanistan's
only female governor, repre-
senting the Hazara popula-
tion. Panjshir's ministry of
agriculture put together a
budget, sent it to the central
government and received the
budget back to put in place in
the province, he added.
The U.S. military offers
Afghans the opportunity to
workthrough such programs as
the Commanders Emergency
Response Program, which
provides funding for immedi-
ate-impact projects. If a bridge
needs rebuilding, the Afghan
people will build it with
cement supplied by the U.S.
military. By mandate, contrac-
tors must hire local workers
for such programs.
The relationship between
the provincial governments
and Afghanistan's central
government is strong, Roy
said. "The governors that we
have in all three of our prov-
inces understand what the
requirements are to oversee
the needs of the people," Roy
said.
"It's the Afghans who are
leading the way," he added.
"And it's been that way for
quite some time.'


Amidst the tall, broad and
burly Marines, whose biceps
won't fit in the largest of
sleeves, is a distinctly smaller
Marine, with a distinctly big-
ger muscle: her heart.
If you ever come across
Lance Cpl. Emma Stanfield,
perhaps in 2nd Marine
Logistics Group's Food Service
Company Field Mess, you
might walk right past her
without realizing it, but only
because she's quiet. If you take
the time to notice her, you'll
soon realize she's a friend
worth having.
"She's the kind of per-
son that you know immedi-
ately you can trust her," said
Staff Sgt. James Horak, Food
Service Co.
Growing up in the small
Illinois town of Palestine,
which boasts a population
of less than three-thousand,


Marine Corps photo by Cpl. M. Foster
Lance Cpl. Emma Stanfield is a warehouse Marine with Food
Service Company Field Mess, 2nd Marine Logistics Group.


Stanfield graduated high
school in a class of only 25
students.
The youngest of three, she
and her siblings were raised
by their actively involved and
loving parents.
"They're very caring," she
said. "They always seemed
to set the example with my
brother and sister. They always
worked hard and showed all of
us right from wrong from the
beginning. I was very disci-
plined as a child."
For Stanfield, family is most
important.
"No matter what, they'll
always have your back," she
said in a definitive tone.


And the way she was raised
is the same way she treats her
fellow Marines.
"She is very humble," Horak
said. "She is considerate of
her peers and always puts the
other Marines and the mission
first, even before herself... just
like you would with family."
Even though she is not as
close to her Marine brothers
and sisters as she is with her
siblings, she still gives them
her all, the way her family
does for her.
"My parents always moti-
vated me to do my best," she
added. "And now I'm trying
to do the same for my fellow
Marines."


Gates orders probe into leak


American Forces Press Service

Defense Secretary Robert
M. Gates has condemned
the unauthorized release of
draft findings of a working
group studying the impact of
a potential repeal of the ban
on gays and lesbians serving
openly in the military, and
he has ordered an investiga-
tion into the source, Pentagon
Press Secretary Geoff Morrell
said Nov. 12.
Gates is "very concerned
and extremely disappoint-
ed" that unnamed sources
selectively revealed aspects
of Comprehensive Review
Working Group's draft find-
ings, Morrell said in a state-
ment, "presumably to shape
perceptions of the report prior
to its release.'
The report is due to Gates
Dec. 1.
The secretary launched the


review in
March to
objectively
ascerta in
the impact
of repeal-
ing the
so-called
"Don't Ask, Morrell
Don't Tell"
law on mili-
tary readiness, effectiveness,
recruiting, retention, unit
cohesion and families, Morrell
noted.
"[Gates] made it clear then
and throughout this process
that it was 'critical that this
effort be carried out in a pro-
fessional, thorough and dis-
passionate manner,' Morrell
said. "He has also stated
clearly that 'given the politi-
cal dimension of this issue, it
is equally critical that ... every
effort be made to shield our
men and women in uniform


and their families from those
aspects of this debate."
Morrell noted that the work-
ing group has operated for
nearly nine months in strict
accordance to Gates' mandate.
"Anonymous sources now risk
undermining the integrity of
this process," he said.
"The secretary strongly
condemns the unauthorized
release of information related
to this report and has directed
an investigation to establish
who communicated with the
Washington Post or any other
news organization without
authorization and in violation
of Department policy and his
specific instruction, Morrell
said.
The report is due to Gates
Dec. 1, and the full report will
be made public early next
month. "Until then, no one at
the Pentagon will comment on
its contents," he said.


Littoral fleet will expand sooner


By Lt. Courtney Hillson
Navy News Service

Effective competition
between industry bidders to
build the littoral combat ship
led the Navy Nov. 3 to discuss
with key Defense Committee
members and their staff, as
well as industry, the possibil-
ity of gaining congressional
authorization to award each
bidder a 10-ship block buy.


Consideration of this option
is separate from the ongoing
LCS down select process, and
if congressional approval for a
dual block buy is not received,
the Navy will proceed to down
select in accordance with the
terms of the current solicita-
tion.
Either a down select or a
dual ship block buy approach
will ensure the Navy procures
affordably priced ships.


"This option is good for the
taxpayers because it enables
us to buy more ships for the
same money and allows us to
lock in a lower price for all 20
ships," said Secretary of the
Navy Ray Mabus. "It's good
for the Navy because it gets us
more ships faster and increas-
es our flexibility, and it's good
for industry because it main-

See Littoral, Page 19


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 17
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$ FRINOV 26TH & SAT, NOV 27TH; MON, NOV 29TH SAT, DEC 4TH
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18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Army basic changes to boost combat readiness


By David Vergun
Army News Service

Blind obedience-oriented
basic combat training is out.
Confidence-building and
thinking-oriented training is
now in.
That's the bottom line of
how Comprehensive Soldier
Fitness is shaping changes
in Army boot camp, chang-
es leaders say are improving
Soldiers' preparedness for
combat once they reach their
units, said Command Sgt.
Maj. John R. Calpena, Initial
Military Training Center of
Excellence, at an Assocition of
United States Army meeting of
senior Army enlisted.
"When we went through
basic, total control and fear of
authority was taught" Calpena
said. "You could see the fear
with that stupid look on their
faces. Instead of creating obe-
dient machines to do what
they're told to do when they're
told to do it, we're teaching
our young Soldiers how to
think, how to understand the
circumstances and make deci-
sions in stressful conditions
because that's what's going on
downrange. Young Soldiers
receiving fire in a marketplace
need to make an on-the-spot
decision whether to shoot or
not under stress,
"We had to radically change
the way drill sergeants teach
to do this as well. They're no
longer strictly disciplinarians,
they've got to train Soldiers on
tasks that are relevant to com-
bat so when Soldiers gradu-
ate, they're ready to go into
the fight, in a relatively short
amount of time. Soldiers need
to understand how the task is
performed and how am I going
to use this task in the fight.
They really want to know. You
don't have to force obedience
into them. They want to be like
us, they want to serve. They
have heart. "Some will perceive
this as a lack of discipline. It's
not. It's confidence.'
Other CSF changes to basic
training are improved physi-
cal readiness, proper nutrition


YI

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Joel


Army photo by David Vergun
Soldiers demonstrate combative training at the Association of the United States Army meeting in Washington, D.C.


and injury prevention, said
Staff Sgt. Timothy E. Sarvis,
assigned to Fort Leonard
Wood, Mo.
He was selected as the
active-duty Army 2010 Drill
Sergeant of the Year.
"Soldiers need to prepare for
combat the way athletes train
for competition;' Sarvis said.
"This includes eating healthier
foods and reducing injuries'"
He said the new Army
Physical Readiness Training
manual, TC3-22.20, replaced
FM 2120 as of Aug. 20.
"The new manual stresses
agility, flexibility, stability,
speed, power, balance, coordi-
nation and posture. Complex
tasks and movements prepare
Soldiers for the operational
forces'" he said.
Several Soldiers demon-
strated physical movements
trainees are now required to


perform. Most of these move-
ments are actually done on
the battlefield, such as mov-
ing into and out of cover and
concealment, crouch running,
moving around and under
obstacles, sprinting, jumping,
explosive power and landing,
according to one of the train-
ers.
Teaching culture, beliefs,
values and behaviors are also
part of basic training now that
CSF is being used.
"We used to train the seven
core Army values loyalty,
duty, respect, selfless service,
honor, integrity and personal
courage using PowerPoint
slides'" Sarvis said. "This didn't
hold their attention very well.
Now we use interactive-sce-
nario-based training, which
allows Soldiers to interact with
the videos, making decisions
along the way and reinforced


by the drill sergeants."
Resiliency training is an
important aspect of basic.
"It's a huge deal," said Sarvis,
explaining Soldiers now need
to bounce back from stress.
He said trainees are given the
Global Assessment Tool with-
in the first 10 days of training
and the Army then tracks how
they improve or decline over
their careers.
GAT is a self-appraisal
designed to boost personal
growth, strengthen relation-
ships and give Soldiers better
coping skills for dealing with
potentially traumatic events.
GAT can also be used to indi-
cate when Soldiers need to
seek professional help.
A sampling of the rough-
ly 200 questions on the
GAT: "Quick, yes or no: "I
believe my life has a higher
purpose? "I believe in our


mission? "I can call people
I know in an emergency? "I
trust the team I work with? "I
feel comfortable with my fam-
ily support net?"
"Twenty-five percent of all
drill sergeants are master resil-
iency trained. They can help
show how trainees can effec-
tively deal with stress," Sarvis
said.
Marksmanship training is
fundamental to all Soldiers
and here too, CSF has changed
the way it is taught in basic.
"No longer is an alibi given
for a malfunction on the firing
range," said Staff Sgt. Melissa
C. Solomon, assigned to the
108th Training Division, and
selected as the Army Reserve
Drill Sergeant of the Year.
"Trainees are required to per-
form remedial action them-
selves."
Other changes include


holding the rifle the same way
they do in combat instead of
a traditional raised hold, she
said. A five-round shot group
replaces a three-round shot
group to better align weapon
sights. Also, hitting a bulls-
eye on the target is no longer
enough. Sometimes two or
three well-placed rounds on
target are required for score.
"We all know that one shot
at the enemy might not be
enough. It sometimes requires
multiple hits for a kill,"
Solomon said. "Soldiers learn
to shoot like they would in
combat.
For example, firing around
barriers." Solomon also pro-
vided details about changes
in first aid, which reflect cur-
rent medical best practices.
An example she cited was
stopping the bleeding before
administering an IV.
Sarvis said Soldiers are
using smart phones and appli-
cations or apps to download
Army manuals and videos,
which "reinforces training, not
taking anything away from the
drill sergeant."
A question-and-answer ses-
sion followed. A Soldier in the
audience asked if the physical
fitness test would change to
reflect CSF.
Lt. Gen. Mark P. Hertling,
another attendee, said chang-
es could come by December
of this year from a working
group and that the new test
would better measure combat
readiness.
Another Soldier in atten-
dance, a sergeant major, ques-
tioned the "more thinking,
less discipline" approach to
basic training resulting from
CSF, agreeing with parts of
the new approach but citing
the need to continue to instill
obedience. He said he could
see two approaches in his two
sons, one a specialist and the
other a sergeant first class.
The younger specialist trained
under the new CSF approach
and the older son under the
more traditional approach. He
cautioned for a more balanced
approach.


S
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YELLOW BLUFF


Be Home for the Holidays



Christmas Event & Toy Drive


I Saturday,_De embr____ ____ 3 : O~ -


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 19


Department of Veterans
Affairs visits base
The Department of Veterans
Affairs representative for
Kings Bay is in the office 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Thursdays.
Appointments are required.
Service members wishing
to participate in the Benefits
Delivery at Discharge program
should be within 60 to 180 days
of discharge or retirement and
available for an exam by the
Veterans Administration. For
more information, call Veterans
Affairs representative Katherine
Fernandez at 573-4506.

FFSC offers
classes on site
The Fleet and Family
Support Center will take most
of its regular workshops on
the road if a unit can furnish a
conference room or classroom
and guarantee a minimum of
five participants. Additionally,
personnel will tailor pre-
sentations to cover any unit's
General Military Training
requirements when those
requirements deal with
human resources and social
issues. FFSC counselors can
create a presentation for a
unit's area of special concerns.
Personnel are available to par-
ticipate in areas of expertise
in the indoctrination of newly
assigned personnel and family
members of active duty per-
sonnel.

Kings Bay FFSC
on Facebook, Twitter
Fleet and Family Support
Center is on Facebook (FFSC
Kings Bay) and Twitter
(FFSCKB) Become a fan/
friend for information and
printable calendars or fol-
low us for information and
reminders about classes.

ASIST Training
workshop starts Nov. 30
Applied Suicide
Intervention Skills Training is
a suicide intervention work-
shop focused on helping indi-
viduals become ready, willing
and able to intervene with a
person at risk of suicide. It's
geared towards all popula-
tions, including military at all
levels, civilians and contrac-
tors. Registration is required.
The workshop is scheduled for
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Nov. 30 and
Dec. 1 at the base chapel. For
more information, call 573-
4512.

Stress management
covered at workshop
Events, schedules, daily
pressure and many other
items can cause undo stress
in your life. Stress may or may
not be good for your health
depending on how you man-
age that stress. This workshop
is slated for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 16.
Pre-registration is required.
Call 573-4512 for details.

Parenting classes
offered on Mondays
Are you frustrated with your
children? Would you like sug-
gestions on how to stop tem-
per tantrums or how to get
your teen to complete chores



Littoral

From Page 19

tains and even expands jobs at
two shipyards."
Unlike the current solici-
tation, this option would


We, imviW-t


without asking them 14 times?
We believe parents are the
experts on their children. But,
children don't come with a
manual! So, sometimes you
need help to figure out what to
do with them. Meet with the
parenting class from 9 to 11
a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 29, and
Dec. 6, 13 and 20. Enrollment
in this six-week class is ongo-
ing. Attendees must complete
all sixweeks in order to receive
a certificate. A minimum of
six participants is needed in
order for a new class to start.
Registration required at 573-
4512.

What About The Kids
workshop upcoming
This workshop is designed
for parents whose children
have been or may currently be
exposed to domestic violence.
All children are affected when
exposed to domestic violence.
Discussing domestic violence
with your children will help
to reduce any psychological
damage caused by a child's
exposure to abusive behavior.
Pre-registration is required.
The workshop is scheduled for
1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 15. For more
information call 573-4512.

Ombudsman Basic
Training coming
Therewillb e an Ombudsman
Basic Training course for pro-
spective Ombudsman, new
Ombudsman and Command
Support Spouses at Fleet and
Family Support Center Bldg.
1051. This class will be 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 29 to
Dec. 3. For more information
and to register, call 573-4513.


Spouse 101 helps new
Navy wives adjust
Spouse 101 provides infor-
mation to new Navy spous-
es to support, enhance and
ease their transition into the
military lifestyle. This interac-
tive workshop addresses the
military culture and terminol-
ogy, and gives tools to access
installation and local com-
munity resources. The work-
shop is 9 a.m. to noon, Dec. 9.
Registration is required. Call
573-4513.

Transition Assistance
Program seminar coming
TAP is a seminar for those
separating, retiring or con-
templating leaving the mili-
tary that provides informa-
tion on benefits, job search
skills, employment resources,
resume writing, interviewing
and other related transition
skills. Spouses are encour-
aged to attend. The seminars
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 6 to
9 for separation. You must be
registered by your Command
Career Counselor. For more
information call 573-4513.

New Moms and Dads
Support Group to meet
A New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group will meet every
other Tuesday at the Fleet
and Family Support Center
throughout the month. This
workshop is scheduled for 9
to 11 a.m. Dec. 7 and 21. This
workshop is an opportunity to


require Congressional action
to authorize two block buys by
mid-December 2010.
"The Navy's LCS acquisition
strategy to down select to a sin-
gle design resulted in a highly
effective competition and an
industry response that signals
a significant potential savings
in the LCS program," said Sean


share experiences, meet and
gain support from others, and
exchange new ideas. To regis-
ter, call 573-4512.

Career One Stop
covers civilian life
You're busy and that end
of service date may be fast
approaching. Take advantage
of the new Career One Stop
class to find your next career
target, market yourself effec-
tively and shine in the inter-
view, all in one three-hour ses-
sion offered every month. This
month's class is 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Dec. 16. Call 573-
4513 for more information and
to register for the class.

Anger management
seminar Dec. 1
Anger is not an effective
method for getting what you
want and is often a smoke
screen for other emotions.
This workshop is slated for
8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 1. It
can help you focus on identi-
fying the feelings anger hides
and explore behaviors help-
ful in resolving primary issues.
Pre-registration is required.
Call 573-4512 for details.

Pre-marital workshop
offered Dec. 1
The Fleet & Family Support
Center is offering a workshop
for pre-marital counseling for
couples that are contemplat-
ing marriage. The workshop
is designed to address couples
interested in enriching their
future through improved com-
munication, problem-solving
skills, financial planning and
realistic expectations of mar-
riage. The class is designed
to meet all clinical counsel-
ing requirements. The work-
shop is scheduled for 1 to 4
p.m. Dec. 1. Registration is
required, and childcare is not
available. For more informa-
tion call 573-4512.


Stackley, assistant secretary of
the Navy for research, devel-
opment and acquisition.
The Navy remains commit-
ted to the LCS program and
the requirement for 55 of these
ships to provide combatant
commanders with the capa-
bility to defeat anti-access
threats in the littorals.


safeTalk suicide
prevention Dec. 13
safeTALK helps to create
suicide-safer communities.
A training lasting about three
hours, safeTALK is for every-
one in the community and is
designed to ensure that per-
sons with thoughts of suicide
are connected to helpers who
are prepared to provide first
aid interventions. This class
is offered 1 to 4 p.m.,Dec. 13.
Registration, by calling 573-
4512, is required.

Couple's Communication
workshop Dec. 2
The characteristics which
attract us to one another often
become a focus of conflict
in marriage. This Couple's
Communication workshop
focuses on learning to lis-
ten to one another in a new
way so differences can be
understood and appreciated.
Registration is required for the
classes scheduled for 1 to 4:30
p.m. Dec. 2. Call 573-4512 for
details.

Individual Augmentee
return workshop offered
This workshop prepares
family members for reunion
so that problems will be mini-
mized and the positive aspects
of reunion can be maximized.
It is tailored to the uniqueness
of the IA deployment. Topics
include expectations, cycles of
deployment, returning to chil-


*HARRY POTTER & THE
DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG13)
11:45 12:30 3:00 3:45
6:45 7:00 9:30 10:15
*THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG13)
1:00 4:00 7:15 10:05
*UNSTOPPABLE (PG13)
12:15 2:30 4:45 7:25 9:40
*SKYLINE (P013)
12:20 2:45 5:00 7:30 9:50
*MORNING GLORY (PG13)
1:30 4:20 7:20 9:45
DUE DATE (R)
7:35 9:55
*MEGAMIND 3D (PG)
12:00 2:15 4:30 6:45 9:15
MEGAMIND 2D (PG)
12:00 2:15 4:30
FOR COLORED GIRLS (R)
1:15 4:15 7:10 10:00
*Pass Restricted
.H. **llil~li *O~i


As w0 Eoliei of o, ctistyOev O fdr oot oKilsho itr

S ho Iective I o%0 off s.evic ees fa- 4he- itovtkk o- Nove*49be5-4


(Expires Dec 1, Active Duty Only, Must show ID)
950864


dren and being aware of the
signs of operational stress and
Traumatic Brain Injury. The
first class is 9 to 11 a.m. Dec.
15. For more information or to
register, call 573-4513.

Strong Navy Couples
helps your marriage
This class addresses the
impact of deployment on rela-
tionships, discusses greatest
challenges and victories, and
gives tools to reconnect as a
couple after a deployment.
This class is for couples, up
to 180 days after deployment.
This new class is 11 a.m. to 1
p.m., Dec. 1. To register, call
573-4513.

Expectant Family
Workshop coming
Expectant Families can
receive training on second
Wednesday of every other
month to ease the adjust-
ment to a newborn baby.
Information will be provid-
ed about WIC, Navy Marine
Corps Relief Society and vari-
ous other benefits and ser-
vices available to expectant
parents, along with answers
to your questions. Frequent
breaks offered for the comfort
of expectant moms. The next
class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Dec. 9.

Individual Augmentee
pre-deployment help
Information enables one
stop shopping for IA's and
their families. Representatives
from PSD, medical and Fleet
and Family will be available
to answer questions and dis-
tribute resources. This one-
stop shop is 6 to 8 p.m., Dec.
1. Childcare is by registration
only. Call 573-4513 for more
information.

Gambling awareness
class set for Dec. 16
Participants in this class
will complete a gambling
self-assessment. Using mini-
scenarios, the participant will
identify the warning signs of
problem gambling and iden-
tify appropriate referrals from
a list of resources. This train-
ing is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m.
Dec. 16. Registration is recom-
mended. For more informa-


tion call 573-4513.

Smooth Move Workshop
scheduled for Dec. 7
Smooth Move Workshops
are designed to help person-
nel with military relocations
and transfers. Areas covered
include transportation, travel
pay, allowances, and impor-
tant forms and documents,
housing referral office and
relocation services. All service
members and their spouses
are encouraged to attend six
months before their transfer
date. Due to limited seating,
please do not bring children.
The workshop will be 2 to 4
p.m., Dec. 7. For more infor-
mation, call 573-4513.

Command Return and
Reunion training sched-
uled
The target audience for this
class is Command Training
Coordinators and provides a
tool kit for trainers to use while
on deployment to address the
issues associated with return
and reunion after deployment.
This class will be 1 to 3 p.m.,
Dec. 2. Registration recom-
mended, call 573-4513.

Basics of Retirement
Planning Dec. 9
This two-hour session is
an interactive program that
introduces the basic concepts
of financial retirement plan-
ning, including the military
retirement system and the
new Thrift Savings Plan. This
is a must if you are leaving
the military. This training is
scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. Dec.
9. Registration is recommend-
ed. For more information call
573-9783.

Ten Steps to a Federal
job examined
Gain information on the fed-
eral employment process, sal-
aries and benefits. Learn how
to interpret job announce-
ments and determine wheth-
er you are eligible to apply.
Attendees will be provided
guidelines, information, sam-
ples and tips on completing
the electronic Federal resume.
This class is 12:30 to 4 p.m.,
Dec. 14. Registration required
by calling 573-4513.


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912-729-2821


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Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Open Everyday*
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itpy


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'I '4C;





NAVSEA

earns

honor

From Naval Sea Systems Command
Public Affairs
As part of November's
Warrior Care Month, the assis-
tant secretary of the Navy
Manpower and Reserve Affairs
and the chief of naval opera-
tions presented Naval Sea
Systems Command with the
Wounded Warrior Hiring and
Support Award at a ceremony
in the Pentagon Nov. 15.
Juan Garcia and CNO Adm.
Gary Roughead presented
the award, which recognizes
NAVSEA's commitment and
achievement in support of
Wounded Warrior hiring and
reintegration practices for fis-
cal year 2010.
"[During] my last visit to the
NAVSEA headquarters, I had
the opportunity to meet some
of the Wounded Warriors who
have been hired," Roughead
said. "And the passion that
they have, the sense of belong-
ing that exists and the sense
that they are a vital contribut-
ing key member of the team
are just overwhelming. That
to me is indicative of not just
a headquarters or command
initiative, but of the entire
organization seeing the value
of having these great young
men and women coming


People

From Page 14
sibility and accountability, the
chairman said. "From a career
advice standpoint, focus on
the here and now. Focus on
where you are and whatever
your assignment is, and it will
work out just fine'" he said.
"Be curious about your next
assignment, but don't dwell
on it."
The military can guarantee
its future if it takes care of its
people, Mullen said.


BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 21
UMMM


..


Navy photo by MCC Tiffini Jones Vanderwyst
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead, left, and Juan
M. Garcia III, assistant secretary of the Navy for Manpower
and Reserve Affairs, right, present the Wounded Warrior
Hiring and Support award to Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy, com-
mander, of Naval Sea Systems Command.


aboard and being part of a
truly great enterprise."
In addition to setting
Wounded Warrior hiring goals
for each of its major sites,
NAVSEA partnered with fed-
eral agencies and private orga-
nizations to develop programs
to help post-service veterans
find employment at NAVSEA.
Through a partnership with
state and philanthropic enti-
ties, NAVSEA's Learning and
Employment Centers are the
recognized model in public/
private support of Wounded
Warrior hiring.
The collaboration of state
and philanthropic funding
with NAVSEA employment
opportunities provides com-
prehensive assistance to vet-
erans, from career counseling


"No matter what our mis-
sions are, or where we go, or
the stuff that we have, ... in the
end it's the people who make
the difference," the chairman
said. "We're the most combat-
hardened force we've been
in our history, and we need
to take advantage of that and
leverage that for a very bright
future.'
A student asked about a
"values disconnect" between
the military and American
society as a whole.
Mullen replied that the mili-
tary recruits from all across the
United States.
"I'm not overly concerned


to job placement.
NAVSEA's joint enterprise
with Defense Acquisition
University and Veterans
Individual Assistance Training
Link launched a contracting
career pipeline for Wounded
Warriors.
With VITAL coaches serv-
ing as the liaison between
Wounded Warriors in mili-
tary treatment facilities and
NAVSEA, Wounded Warriors
follow a customized program
of education and/or training
while recuperating to gain
certification in the acquisition
field, and later job placement
as a civilian employee.
Through these joint efforts,
NAVSEA surpassed its goal of
134 Wounded Warrior hires in
FY10 by 210 percent.


about the values disconnect',
he said, but he added that he is
concerned that the American
people are not connected in
other ways. The military is less
than 1 percent of the American
population, he pointed out,
and since the end of the Cold
War, bases have been closed
and avenues for a connection
have dried up.
So the military has to do
what it has always done, he
said: take in 18 to 24 year olds
"and change lives and present
opportunity."
"We as a country bene-
fit from that if you stay in or
don't," he added.


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22 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Big EZ offers PJ's & Parades for Thanksgiving


PJ's & Parades begins at
9 a.m., Thanksgiving Day,
Thursday, Nov. 25 inside the
Big EZ. Come join in the holi-
day fun with breakfast served
at 9 a.m. Watch the Macy's Day
Parade on the big screen. For
more info call (912) 573-4548.
* Pilgrims Pride Thanks-
giving on the Mayflower
- From noon to 3 p.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 25, enjoy a tra-
ditional Thanksgiving feast at
the Conference Center. Roast
turkey will be served with all
the trimmings. Dessert will be
served on "The MayFlower."
Then at Oscar's, enjoy
Thanksgiving Trivia all day,
with Liberty prizes and Movie
Tickets. Cards, board games,
Playstations, Xbox and more.
For more information, call
(912) 573-8328.
* Light Up Kings Bay -
Saturday, December 4 From
4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
4, this event is free for all at
the Fitness Complex Tennis
Courts. A huge ice skating rink
will be set up. Tree lighting is
at 6 p.m. and St. Nick arrives
on a fire truck. Enjoy pony
rides, a train, hot cocoa, cook-
ies, festive music, plus arts and
crafts. Chicken nuggets or
corn dog bites, plus chips and
a drink are $1. Bring your cam-
era for a photo op with Santa.
Proud sponsors of this event
are USAA, Bennett Suzuki and
Bennett Chevrolet. Come out
and start your holiday with
us. For more information call
(912) 573-4564/4556.
* Kings Bay Veterinary
Treatment Facility An
Open House is set for 2 to 6
p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 7. Come
out and meet the staff, includ-
ing Dr. Tanya Seckman. Bring
your leashed pet for a photo-
op with Santa. Refreshments
will be served. Representatives
of our most popular products
also will be in attendance.
There will be lots of give-
aways. For more info call (912)
573-0755.
* The Countdown to
Christmas Cardio Challenge
- This event runs through
Dec. 17 at the Fitness Complex.
Point system with prizes for
reaching levels of fitness. Log
sheets keep track. Call (912)
573-3990 for more informa-
tion.
* Double Shotgun Golf
Tournaments hosted byMWR
- It's winner take all every
first and third Wednesday. The
next tourneys are Dec. 1 and
15. Captain's Choice. Times
are 8:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Cost
$23 which includes green fees,
cart, food and prizes. Register
at Trident Lakes Pro Shop. For
more information call Trident
Lakes Golf Club at (912) 573-
8475.
* Movie Under the Stars -
At 6:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec.
18, MWR invites all family &
friends to a relaxing night out
under the stars for the free
movie showing, Disney's A
Christmas Carol at the Youth
Center ball fields. Concessions
open at 6 p.m. offering hot dog
baskets for $1, which includes
chips and a drink. Bring your
own blanket or lawn chairs


Youth Day Lock-In


scheduled Dec. 11


The Big EZ is home to PJ's and Parades today beginning at 9 a.m.


for a great event on the big
screen. For more information,
call (912) 573-4564.
* NFL Football Every
Sunday doors open at noon
in the Sports Zone for a great
afternoon and evening of
football entertainment. Plates
of food are only $5. Morale,
Welfare and Recreation/Kings
Bay Fantasy Football will be
tracked and prizes given each
week to top points partici-
pants.
* Rape Aggression Defense
System course R.A.D. is a
basic, physical, self-defense
program which will provide its
students the physical abilities
to defend themselves against
physical abduction. The goal
is to provide training opportu-
nities that encourage, educate,
nurture and grow self-con-
fidence within the students.
Every female has the right to
defend herself. RAD will give
her the ability. There is no cost
for the four sessions, however,
you must attend all four ses-
sions. Each session is from 6
to 8:30 p.m. and will be Dec.
7, 9, 14 and 16 at the Fitness
Complex. For more infor-
mation, contact the Fitness
Complex at (912) 573-3990.
* Bite into bowling with the
Bowler Bargain Card It's
available at Rack-N-Roll Lanes
for $25 each. This is a sav-
ings of more than $10. Get 13
games of bowling, one free
shoe rental and 10 percent off
pro shop merchandise. The
card is good for 30 days from
date of purchase. For more
information, call (912) 573-
9492.
* Are you ready for some
football? Information,
Tickets and Tours is sell-
ing Jacksonville Jaguar home
game tickets for the 2010 sea-
son. Tickets are $55 each. No
tickets will be held and no
phone orders. So if you want
to enjoy a game this season,
don't miss out. For more infor-
mation, call ITT at 573-2289.


B I IJE LI IlIT'

Thanksgiving Thursday
6am-9pm
Black Friday 5am-11 pm
kmart S
Military Discount Program
10 20% OFF EVERY DAY*
Active/Reserve/Retired/Dependants/VA


S -Moon Dough Magic g
FufrRea Barnyad Zooble GRit Pack
10% OFF 20% OFF APPAREL
Computer & Electronic TV Cameras Protege' Route 66 Wrangler
Games Music Toys Groceries Jaclyn Smith Bongo
Baby Bed and Bath Automotive Selena Gomez LO Joe Boxer
Jewelry Craftsman Tools Workforce Thornm McAnn
4645 Blnding Blvd, Jax* 1601 Hwy 40 Kiigsland, GA
500 Atnmic Blv4, Neptune Beach 380 Blandmg Blvd, Orange Park 9600 San Jose Blvd. Jax
Mot Proram: MIIhbry Dln ts~ Avlle ONIY @ tie 5 Isled Partclpitg dUste. Cas, cec, det or Sers Brded a cr ds muset be nled fr p nt clies-
Advtedi medrchtde3,Toec,,Alol,Lottery 11cket5,prencrpflfps,GfBeDJi state, IocJ IIcnsgs, ve ndg and e nt mnachieandxte ndedw n .


* Legends Grill At the
Trident Golf Course, The
Legends Grill is not just for
golfers, but for everyone. Stop
by and enjoy the delicious
food. The Grille opens at 11
a.m. Monday through Friday.
The menu offers a sandwich-
es, appetizers and salads for
health conscience individuals.
The Grille offers take out and
on the weekends it is open for
breakfast starting at 9 a.m. The
number for Legends Grille is
(912) 573-0008.
* Dollar Bowling Deals -
starting at 5 p.m. Tuesday
and from 1 p.m. until close
Sunday, you can bowl for
only $1.25 per game and $1.25
for shoes. Thursday is all you
can bowl for $8, with shoes
$2. Friday and Saturday deals
are three hours of bowling for
$10 or four person special of
two games per person, four
pairs of shoes, one 14-inch,
one-topping pizza and foun-
tain drinks for $40.
* Taking it to the Internet
- MWR is taking you to the
Internet age with a Facebook
page that will keep you know-
ing all. Become a fan at www.
facebook.com/mwrkingsbay
or look into the MWR Sports
page for all the Kings Bay
sports updates. Additionally,
MWR has electronic comment
cards. For being heard, go to
www.surveymk.com/mwrkb
and fill out a compliment,
concern or complaint!


Periscope file photo


Karaoke Night Karaoke
is Thursday nights from 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. in the alcove at
KB Finnegan's with host
Doug Shankel, from Big Show
Entertainment. Call (912) 573-
9492 for more information.
Rocky Colletti's Specials
of the Month Take a bite
out of high prices with a
sandwich special at Rocky
Colletti's. During November,
a different choice with fries
and a drink will be offered
each day of the week for $5.50:
turkey club Monday, French
dip Tuesday, brat with fried
onions Wednesday, two grilled
ham and cheeses Thursday
and fried fish Friday. This
special is good during normal
hours. Call ahead for an easy
lunch pick-up at 573-4029.
The pizza special of the month



VIWKb


Youth Day Lock-In lets
you get some shopping
done during the holidays
and relax without the kids.
The Youth Center is hold-
ing a Lock-In from 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m., Sat., Dec. 11. Cost
for the first child is $30 and
$20 for each additional
child. Food and snacks will
be provided. Registration is
underway and runs through
Wednesday, Dec. 1. The is
for children in kindergarten
to 12 years old. A minimum
of 30 youth are needed to
hold this event with a maxi-
mum reached at 90. Call the
Youth Center for more infor-
mation at (912) 573-2380
Teen Mall Trip It's
noon to 6 p.m., Saturday,
Dec. 11. Registration begins
Nov. 29 at the Youth Center


for November is one 14-inch
chicken, bacon, ranch pizza
with a large order of bread
sticks for $14. That is a savings
of more than $3. Stop by or call
for carry out at (912) 573-4029.
* November Calendar for
KB Finnegan's Start your
week on Mondays with $2
nachos and cheese 7 to 10
p.m. Tuesday is Trivia Night
from 6 to 8 p.m. with priz-
es. Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. a
Shepard's Pie Plate is $6.50.
Happy Hours 4 to 6 p.m.
Thursday include discounts
on all beverages, 10 percent
pub food and hot dogs for 50
cents. Also from 6 to 9 p.m.


Iii:H DETIS


and is from 8 a.m. to 5:30
p.m., Monday through
Friday. the last day to reg-
ister is Dec. 9. The trip is for
teens ages 13 to 18 who are
still in school. It's free for
members and $5 for guests.
Meet at the Youth Center by
11:45 a.m. Participants need
to bring their own spending
money for lunch and gifts.
For more information call
(912) 573-2380 or 8236.
* Officials are needed for
the upcoming Youth Sports
season If you are 14 years
or older, have knowledge of
fall sports, call Youth Sports
today at (912) 573-8202 for
more information.


Thursday, enjoy Karaoke with
host Doug Shankel from the
Big Show Entertainment.
Enjoy $1.50 Margarita Night 4
to 6 p.m. Friday.
Platter at Finnegan's -
Friends and co-workers can
enjoy a Friday afternoon of
socializing and camaraderie
with a free platter valued at
more than $30 for stopping
by with at least eight of your
friends and/or co-workers.
Call ahead 24 hours and let
them know you are coming
and that's all it takes. Call the
Pub at (912) 573-9429 or Rack
-N-Roll Lanes at (912) 573-
9492.


James J. Lassiter, DMD University of Georgia Graduate 1998
Medical College of Georgia Graduate 2003

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Teeth Whitening
Digital X-Ray TV & Movies for Kids & Adults

? CHILDREN WELCOME!
Most Insurance Accepted, Including Tricare

u1891 Hwy. 40 East, Suite 1105
Located across from Ray Carter Kia at
2- i REGENCY PROFESSIONAL PLAZA

Mw 912-576-4011

Call for an appointment!


THE


LOCATION
A RAZORS EDGE
ACE HARDWARE
ACE HARDWARE
AFFORDABLE INSURANCE
AIRWAVES
AMOCOGAS
ARMY SURPLUS STORE
BENNETT CHEVEROLET
BENNETT CHRYSLER JEEP
BIG DADDY'S BBQ
BP GAS
CAMDEN COUNTY LIBRARY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHARLTON COUNTY
CHEVRON
CITY HALL
COLERAIN OAKS
COMFORT SHOWCASE BY LANE
CUMBERLAND INN & SUITES
DICKS WINGS
DIVERS DEN
DOLLAR GENERAL STORE
DRY CLEANERS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
HALL'S BEACH STORE
HARDEE'S RES.
HESS FOODS
HILLIARD PHARMACY
KING FOOD STORE
KMART
LIL CHAMP FOOD STORE
MAIL AND MORE
MAIL OR MORE
MAIL PLUS
MARKET ON THE SQUARE
MOM AND POP #1
MOM AND POP #2
MOM AND POP #3
MOM AND POP #5
MOM AND POP #7
MOM AND POP #8
MOM AND POP #9
NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


F-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
ADDRESS
4515 HWY 40 E SUITE C
SR 40
1282 SR 40
2803-K OSBORNE RD
1000 E KING AVE UNIT 2
US HWY 301
HWY 17
HWY40
HWY40
SR 200 & CR 107
US HWY 17 &A1A
1410SR40E
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
JOEY OR HAMP WILL DELIVER
1330 E BOONE AVE
OSBORNE RD
2716 OSBORNE RD
HWY40
HWY40
139 CITY SMITTY DR
MARINER'S VILLAGE
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD &A1A.
A1A @ PKWY
S. 8TH ST & SADLER RD.
ATLANTIC AVE. & S FLETCHER AVE.
SADLER RD.& WILL HARDEE RD.
195 & SR 200
SADLER RD & S. FLETCHER AVE.
S. KINGS RD.
A1A @ PKWY
N. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD..
1601 SR 40 E
ATLANTIC AVE. & S. 10TH ST.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #8
994 E KINGS BAY RD
K-BAY CROSSING
100 OSBORNE RD
3380 SR 40 (BROWNTOWN)
946 POINT PETER RD
915 DILWORTH
1875 SPUR 40 (CROOKED RIVER)
100 ALEX DR (SHADOWLAWN)
2800 COLERAIN (SUGARMILL)
1371 SR 40 E(THE LAKES)
569 SPUR 40


CITY
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
WOODBINE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
YULEE
YULEE
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
CHARLTON
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
KINGSLAND
FERNANDINA BEACH
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S


LOCATION
PATRICIA ANN'S RES.
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
QUALITY AUTOS
QUALITY AUTOS
RAMADA INN
RAMADA INN
SALVATION ARMY
SALVATION ARMY
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHELL
SHELL
SHELL GAS
SMILE GAS
SONNY'S BBQ
SONNY'S BBQ
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SPRINT STORE
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
STEAMBOAT LILLY'S
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUPER TEST GAS
SUPER TEST GAS
THE PIG BBQ
TNT LANES
TNT LANES
UPS STORE
UPS STORE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WATSON REALTY
WATSON REALTY
WAYFARA RES
WHISTLE STOP
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE #168
WINN DIXIE #168
WOODBINE LIBRARY
WOODBINE LIBRARY
Updated: FEBRUARY 1, 2007


ADDRESS
S. KINGS RD.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
9 QUALITY RD
9 QUALITY RD
1215SR40 E
1215 SR40 E
1901 OSBORNE RD
1901 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
N. KINGS RD. A1A & N KINGS RD.
SADLER RD.
1380 E BOONE AVE
1380 E BOONE AVE
KENNETH GAY DR
KENNETH GAY DR
JONAS RD. LEM TURNER RD.
101 HERB BAUER DR
101 HERB BAUER DR
S. KINGS RD.
102 ST MARY'S ST W
102 ST MARY'S ST W
N KINGS RD.
S.8TH ST.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
2210 OSBORNE
2210 OSBORNE
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
SR 40 E
SR 40 E
6588 SR 40
6588 SR 40
2015 OSBORNE RD
2015 OSBORNE RD
195 & SR 200
N. KINGS RD.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
S. 8TH ST.IN WALMART PLAZA
SR 200 --A1A
CAMDEN CORNERS
CAMDEN CORNERS
311 CAMDEN AVENUE
311 CAMDEN AVENUE


CITY
HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
YULEE
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
WOODBINE
WOODBINE


I ICKU OUEI SCPEATAN F HEE OATIIONS 123




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010 23


Special Thanksgiving menus

Thursday at Pirates Cove


Special brunch and
Thanksgiving dinner menus
will be served on Thursday,
Nov. 25, at Pirates Cove
Galley.
The holiday menu
includes corn chow-
der, peel & eat shrimp, the
Pirate's Salad Bar, roast
Tom turkey, honey-baked
ham, turkey gravy, snowflake
potatoes, savory bread dress-
ing, candied sweet potatoes,


Thursday
Special brunch and Thanks-
giving menus. See above.

Friday
Brea kfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Waffles
Grilled Bacon
Sausage Gravy
Biscuits
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
New England Clam Chowder
Barbecue Chicken
Tempura Battered Fish
French Fries
Baked Mac and Cheese
Green Bean Almadine
Simmered Succotash
* Speed Line
Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger
Hot Dogs
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
Asian Stir Fry Soup
Sweet and Sour Pork
Oriental Pepper Steak


green bean casserole, corn on
the cob, cloverleaf rolls, cran-
berry sauce, assorted des-
serts, nuts and hard candy.
The 2 to 5 p.m. Thanksgiving
dinner menu is $7 per per-
son, military or civilian.
The 8 to 10 a.m. brunch
menu is $4.85 each person,
military or civilian.
Prices for El to E4 depen-
dants only brunch is $4.20
and dinner is $5.95.


Fried Rice
Steamed Rice
Chinese Mixed Vegetables
Egg Rolls


LAUFM


ACROSS
1 For what
reason?
4 Run after
9 Source of
dietary fiber
13 Schlep
15 Reigns
16 Uncle Ben's
product
17 Norway's
largest city
18 Map within a
map
19 Shade trees
20 Grave marker
22 Pub orders
23 Enemies
24 Sup
26 Evaluate
29 Rod with
engine wheels
attached
34 Filthy _; ill-
gotten gain
35 Monikers
36 Scottish denial
37 Uproars
38 Penalized
monetarily
39 Not taped
40 Gent
41 Poultry shop
purchase
42 Buffalo
43 town; small
community
45 Meningitis
symptoms
46 to Billy Joe"
47 Refer to
48 Short note
51 Femininity
56 Zealous
57 Steer clear of
58 Surrounded by
60 Irritate
61 One with an
unending term
62 Casino game
63 Downhill glider
64 Very high
65 Just purchased


DOWN
Which person?
Chopped meat
concoction


3 log; holiday
fireplace blaze
4 Urgent
situations
5 Searches
6 Additionally
7 "Who has
the wind?..."
8 Respected
9 Out of _;
panting
10 Small brook
11 High point
12 Crime fighter
Eliot _
14 Comfy shoes
21 Prescribed
amount
25 Donkey
26 Hertz rival
27 African nation
28 Popular tea-
time nosh
29 Long boat
30 "So be it!"
31 Licorice-like
flavoring
32 In of; for
33 High schoolers


Wings
French Fries
Baked Beans


Sunday
Brunch
Chicken Noodle Soup
Cannonball Sandwich
Grilled Polish Sausage
French Fries
Grilled Peppers and Onions
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Sausage Patties
Dinner
Asparagus Cheese Soup
Roast Prime Rib
Fried Shrimp
Rosemary Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Simmered Carrots
Corn on the Cob


Saturday
Brunch
Logging Soup
Fried Chicken Tenders
Corn Dogs
Potatoes O'Brien
Mixed Vegetables
Oven Fried Bacon
Waffles
Omelets to Order
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Minestrone Soup
Pizza


Monday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled Bacon
Fresh Fruit Salad
Breakfast Burritos
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Corn Chowder
Country fried steak
Cream gravy
Baked Fish
Mashed Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Simmered Peas and Carrots
Louisiana Squash


THIS WEEKS ANSWERS
M N A 1 0 A -iS





S1 S1 AON
N 0S I 1 Old NI SN I V_


AI 0 V S N AS S S S C

IV 3 AS V -

IJ I 8SaIAH

N VI H I 3 1S V HO0 A HMAA


(c) 2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.


35 Sips of liquor
38 Good-bye
39 Evergreen tree
41 Food fish
42 Girl in "Little
Women"
44 Like a parka
45 Dressy clothes
47 USNA student


11/25/10


48 Red planet
49 Wicked
50 5280 feet
52 Hodgepodge
53 Ear warmer
54 Foretelling sign
55 Have a feast
59 Jones
Average


* Speed Line
Pizza
Chicken Wings
Potato Bar
Dinner
Vegetable Soup
Baked Ham with Honey Glaze
Roast Turkey
Mashed Potatoes
Turkey Gravy
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas
Southern Style Greens

Tuesday
Breakfast
Cream of Wheat
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Waffles
Grilled Bacon
Buttermilk Biscuits
Sausage Gravy
Cottage fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Twice Baked Potato Soup
Pot Roast
Chicken Cordon Blue
Brown Gravy
Wild Rich
Au Gratin Potatoes
Mixed Vegetables


Simmered Cauliflower
* Speed Line
Chicken Tacos
Beef Enchiladas
Spanish Rice
Refired Beans
Taco Bar
Dinner
Minestrone Soup
Baked Italian Sausage
Meat Sauce
Marinara Sauce
Alfredo Sauce
Sauteed clams
Pasta
Steamed Broccoli
Callico Corn


Wednesday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Pancakes
Grilled Bacon
Corned Beef Hash
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Gumbo
Fishwich
Grilled Chicken Breast
Steamed Rice
Mashed Potatoes
Chicken Gravy
Pinto Beans
Mixed Vegetables
* Speed Line
Corn Dogs
Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
Beef Rice Soup
Hot and Spicy Chicken
Beef Stew
Steamed Rice
Simmered Egg Noodles
Yellow Squash
Steamed Green Beans

Thursday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats


Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled bacon
Sausage Patties
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Noodle Soup
Fried Shrimp
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Simmered Carrots
Steamed Peas
* Speed Line
Chicken Pattie Sandwich
Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich
Grilled Pepper and Onions
Baked Beans
Chili
Cheese Sauce
Sandwich Bar
Cold Cut Sandwich
Dinner
Cheddar Cheese Soup
Beef Stroganoff
Fried Catfish
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy
Buttered Egg Noodles
Seasoned Corn
Herbed Broccoli


;r


Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15 a.m.
to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No Breakfast Served!
Brunch 10:45 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m.
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All breakfasts and brunches
include cereal, instant oatmeal
or grits, juice bar, pastry bar,
yogurt.
All meals served for lunch and
dinner also feature the Healthy
Choice Salad Bar and various
dessert items.
Menu items are subject to
change.


Balfour Beatty


Communities




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Now renting to Active Duty Single Sailors,


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No security deposit* or pet deposit, Active Duty Military Only


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visit nsbkingsbayhomes.com





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THE Daily Commuter Puzzle by Jacqueline E. Mathews




24 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 25, 2010


Marine cited for action during car crash in Pensacola


By Lance Cpl. Claudio A.
Martinez
Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni
Station members held a for-
mation at the parade deck in
front of Building 1 here Oct. 28
to recognize and award a local
Marine for his bravery.
Sgt. Travis Goodwin, sta-
tion runway supervisor, was
awarded the Navy and Marine
Corps Medal for heroism dis-
played while saving the lives
of two people during his tour
of duty in Pensacola, Fla.
"It's not every day we get
the opportunity to recognize a
Marine'" said Lt. Col. Michael
Coletta, Headquarters &
Headquarters Squadron com-
manding officer. "It's a very
special award."
The Navy and Marine Corps
Medal is the second highest
noncombat award given for
heroism to Navy and Marine
Corps service members.
The medal is awarded to
service members who display
heroism by saving the life of
another while risking their
own life during a non-com-
bative situation.
Coletta said he believes
every Marine who was pres-
ent at the formation would do
what Goodwin did. Goodwin
saved the lives of two women
during a head on collision
nearly a year ago.
"I take no credit for it,"
Goodwin said. "I give it to the
Marine Corps. The Marine
Corps taught me, and I'm able
to perform because of the
Marine Corps."
During the traffic accident,
Goodwin placed his own life
in danger to pull the women
out of their vehicles, which
were on fire and in danger of
exploding.
"I thinkhe's reallybrave, and
I'm proud of him," said Keely
Goodwin, Travis Goodwin's
wife of five years. "I don't
know if I would have been able
to think and react as quickly
(as he did)."
It was 7 a.m. with clear
blue skies and a cool breeze
on March 19, 2009, when
Goodwin decided to go into
work earlier than he usually


FIREARr


HOW UNL


MILITIA


THE LOW PRI


IF WE DOH


GET IT AT


did.
Goodwin was an instructor
at an expeditionary airfield
school in Pensacola, Fla. A
class had just graduated and
he expected it to be a slow
workday as he drove on Blue
Angel Parkway.
Goodwin was driving his
pickup truck when he saw the
vehicle in front of him swerve.
He swerved a little to the
opposite side when he saw a
car coming head on toward
him.
Quickly reacting, Goodwin
jerked his wheel and forced
his truck into a sideways slid-
ing motion down the road.
As his vehicle slid down the
road, Goodwin saw a head on
collision between a Cadillac
CTS and a Nissan Sentra.
Both vehicles were traveling
at approximately 55 to 65 mph
toward each other. The impact
caused the vehicles to lift up in
midair and land horizontally
on the road, stopping traffic.
A Dodge Neon was unable to
stop and T-boned the Cadillac,
causing an explosion and a
fire.
After Goodwin's truck finally
came to a stop nearly 150 feet
from the accident, he rushed
out to help.
"Everyone else was so wor-
ried about getting to work that
nobody was doing anything,"
said Goodwin. "Theywere just
going around the vehicles."
Goodwin quickly analyzed
the situation and saw three
vehicles and four people
involved in the accident. He
saw the Cadillac was on fire
and a woman, bloody and
with several compound leg
fractures, trapped inside.
Goodwin rushed over to pull
her out first before the vehicle
could explode.
Bystanders screamed out,
"The car is on fire, the car is
on fire'" as Goodwin pulled
her out through the passenger
side.
After carrying her to safety
and leaving someone to look
after her, he returned to the
collision.
Goodwin ran to the Dodge
Neon and saw an unconscious
woman in the driver's seat


r.. .-,' r & A -V .
Marine Corps photo by Cpl Andrea M. Olguin
Lt. Col. Michael C. Taylor, Marine Wing Support Squadron 171 commanding officer, pins Sgt.
Travis Goodwin, station runway supervisor, with the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.


and her uninjured, conscious
daughter in the passenger
side.
After checking her pulse and
breathing, he struggled to pull
the woman out.
"The (Cadillac) engine, was,
no joke, right behind me on
fire," Goodwin said. "It was
hot, really hot. As soon as I got
(her) out, somebody finally
stopped by with a fire extin-
guisher and was able to put
the fire out."
After pulling the woman
out and leaving her daughter
with her, Goodwin ran to the
Nissan Sentra to see what he
could do.
"I couldn't do anything for
her," Goodwin said. "It was
the worst feeling I ever had,
because I was like, 'Man what
do I do for this lady. "
He saw a woman in the
driver's seat severely injured,
bleeding from her head, but
alive with the car engine in
her lap.
After leaving someone
behind to keep the woman
in the Nissan Sentra calm,
Goodwin returned to the
unconscious women he pulled
out from the Dodge Neon.
He attempted to calm the


ns SUPER Sill


TIL CHRISTMAS


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LAYAWAY



ICES WORTH THE DRIVE


I'T HAUE IT UE CAH


BLOWOUT PRICES i


woman's 20-year-old daughter
as he began to resuscitate the
unconscious woman.
Goodwin fell back on the
training he received as a
Marine recruit to help the
unconscious woman.
"I'm not an (emergency
medical technician); I'm not
a paramedic. I'm a Marine,'
Goodwin said. "In boot camp
we learn the basic stuff -
how to apply pressure, how
to check for certain things. I'd
been in the Marine Corps for
six years and I hadn't used this
stuff in six years."
Goodwin stayed with the


woman, attempting to help
her with his training until the
paramedics arrived. All four
women survived the collision,
two of them because of what
Goodwin did.
Throughout the whole two-
minute ordeal, Goodwin had
no thought in mind but to
help. It wasn't until he was
giving his statement to the
state troopers that Goodwin
thought about what he did.
"It was then that I realized
'Holy crap, what did you just
do, what just happened?' "
Goodwin said. "Instincts, it
just happened. When I had


to write my statement out, I
started shaking and started
(thinking) 'Oh my God, how
did this just happen?"'
After the scene was cleared
and the women were taken
away, Goodwin headed
straight to work.
Word of what Goodwin had
done began to spread at his
work section, even though he
downplayed his involvement
in the whole thing.
Warrant Officer Scott
Nickson, expeditionary air
field recovery officer-incharge
here, was serving with
Goodwin in Pensacola at the
time.
"At first, he didn't say much
about it and then we heard
secondhand about what he
had actually done," Nickson
said. "He was pretty modest
about it, actually."
Several of the state troopers
who arrived at the scene of
the collision wrote letters to
Goodwin's command inform-
ing them of what he did.
"What he did was inspir-
ing and, bottomline, heroic',
Nickson said. "He could have
injured himself. The situation
could have been much worse."
Time passed after the col-
lision and Goodwin slowly
began to lose touch with the
women whose lives he had
saved.
Though still modest about
what he did, giving credit to
the Marine Corps for train-
ing him, Goodwin stood at
the parade deck to receive an
award that speaks volumes
about his bravery.


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t The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


mm
Q CONDO 2/2 Like
Happy Ads I new, pond view,
Lost and Found d l1118sqo appis stay,
downstairs unit, furn.
Clubs and Organizations included w acceptable Business Opportunities
o f f e r $74,900.
Rides/Travel 904-509-0534 Distributionships/
Notices STNICRENTALCM Franchises
Personals O 2BR from $495 Ficticious Names
Entertainmentwest GA Money to Lend/Borrow
Southwest GA *
1,281/ac @ $2,250/ac Mortgages Bought/Sold
SI Big deer, quail, duck ponds
SNice deer stand & food
pots. Mature long leaf ARLINGTON UPDATED!
pines& hardwoods 6541 Greenfern Lane
Irrigated farmand 4/2 newly remodeled Single
Other Properties Family home, 2000SF,
Open Houses Motivated Seler. De, Fireplace, Screened
Call 478-477-1000 Porch $985 +1 month dep
Argyle 8 Credit history and ref.
Arlington recild Pets + $250. Non
Avondale/Ortega refundable. Avail 11/5. Private Instruction
BeachesM nfcue Call 904-707-0664 Schools
Beaches
Downtown ORA GE P /1 Specialty Training/
Fernandina/Amelia Island carport,extra clean, fen Events
Intracoastal West 3BR/2BA rear yd, 125 Lester Dr.,
Keystone Heights/Melrose $31.00 for the 1st s675mo-dep 805-402-1761
Mandarin month 904-783-2460
Middleburg_ -SOUTHSIDE- 3BR/2BA
Middleburg Eat in kitchen, all
North Jacksonville appliances, $950mo +
Orange Park/Clay County dep. Call 904-891-8201
Riverside
San MarcoPSC- Historic Avon- DRIVER TRAINEES
San MarcoIClassic 3/1 in NEEDED!
Southside .great neighborhood. Werner is Hirin
Springfield Walk to restau- No CDL, No Problem
Springfield rants, shops, parks, and
Westside Nearly New 2005 Fleetwood schools. Less than 10 Training available
Waterfront 4/2 on Iandscaped minsto NAS. Hardwood with Roadmaster!
Condominiums 1/4 acre lot Marietta floors, W/D, detached Call Now! 866-467-0060
Manufactued Homes area zero down as low garage, sunroom, and
Manufactured Homes as $595mo 904-589-9585 deck. Corner ot on quiet
Lots dead end street.
ar Acreg$1100/month includes
Farm Acreage yard maintenance.
Investment Property Contact (904)891-1059 or
Retirement Communit WOW $27500. m.ba eu.nav.m. Start Here,
Baker Couentyo t Affordable Starter Home. Get Ahead
Baker County Beautiful 3br/2ba, MH Get Ahead!
Georgia Real Estate Irg living rm, den w/frpl, -
Nassua County dining area, hardwood Everest
Countyfloors. Garden tub w/
Putnam County Jacuzzi in master bath. University -
St. Johns Open Houses MANY EXTAS! Must MARIETTA AREA- Jacksonville
St. Johns Homes move off lot. St. Marys, Nearly New 2005 Fleet- an help you train
St. Johnsga. Ca l 912-674-2393 wood 4/2 on landscaped
St. Johns Waterfront 1/4 acre lot. 1st & last. for a career in
St. Johns Oceanfront $595mo. 904-589-9585 Health Care
St. Johns Intracoastal i Call today!
St. Johns Marshfront 1-888-249-8129
St. Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses SC-Arlington Nice Or aply online at
St. Johns Manufactured home w/pool & priv www.SeeEverest.com
St. Johns Manufactured fncd bkyd. Reason-
Homes able rate incl's until. r
L end For Sale
St. Johns Lots/Acreage Call 542-3623 NS/DFv
Coin. 57 AC, 1500ft on St Mary's
Co1. River- 3/2 1800sq.ft. UNIVERSITY
St. Johns Investment house. Owner financing U IV I
Income Property Call Mike 904-759-0121 fr Rent
Miscellaneous ARLINGTON /W'side
Out of Area/Town/State N'side -Furn, ph, TV w/d,
Real Estate Wanted ch&a $100-$130wk 838-4587
GM e ia3 Orange Park Priv bedrm
-R- -- Es aLana For Smale w/shared bth, hse privi-

close to 1-16, REDUCED
Price $1195 per ac, Call
AALTAMAHA RI VER Bill Breiner 478-457-7005
Applying County Geo rgia
lOOft on, wter, 4.78 acres I s
with 25%down 92-367-7473 ra ri pe n
Apartments Furnished For Sale
Apartments Unfurnished Commercial /Industrial our com
mutondoms tFor Rent
RRetirement Communities F
e Homes Furnished Businesses For Sale
A n Homes Unfurnished e ac Fo donated 6
Manufactured Homes Office Space For Sale
t rMoble Home Lots Office Space For Rent h s
(6CTIO3- Roomst Reintr hou rs of
FORECLOSED HOME Roommates Rti Sa
AUCTION Rooms to Rent Retail For Sale 3 6 o
1 Auction 12/11 Beach/Vacation/Resor ts
2Open House Stm rge/Min Lkert St. Johns C mercial/ service
RE1D1C /ile 1F24 2L5sgs. Management/Rental Services Industrial For Sale
REDC /View Fuii ListingsI
www.Auotion.cem Wanted to Rent
Re Estate Dsp n StJohn Apartments Furnshed St. Johns Commercial/ and
Cor oration RE Brkr No. St Johns Apartments Unfur Industrial For Rent
CQ~031187 Auctioneer nished
Mark Buleziuk AU3448 eSt Johns Condominiums St. Johns Businesses Geo rgia laS


PRBA ERRO NG St. Johns Houses Furnished St. Johns Office Space ti e was
Clay County Courthouse Unfurnished For Rent
Property address Unfurnished
St J490 Eax, ns Mobile Home/Lot St. Johns Retail For Sale c mrr
490 Edgewood Ave., Jax, Fi Rental
Commercial zoning St Johns Lots St. Johns Retail For Rent
Right ffoff io warehouse St Johns Roommates
lot is fenced in 150ftxt5Ofto St 0 arOrganization
Building loadingdock St. JohnsaOceanfront/Waterfront r
height. For info: Cristina St. Johns Vacation Rental
(630)335-2735 M-St0e. Johns Storge/F
St. Johns Wanted to Rent Northside 12602 Saw Pit Rd
Jacksonville, 32226.
Rel Ec n D ... j30 acres c eared and ...
W at fon A S partments irrigated (currently plant scouting
nursery) office bldg on
i d site, zoned AGR. Lease
I. . .. ....... ...1aii or part, Call 635-0021


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M...._ New
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Internal Medicine Jacksonville, FL to Alert Security Services open A
Job Fairs design, implement & 20 positions to fill Discount F
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Marine/Trade ment project. Bachelor's A Harold and Associates, LLC I
Nurses/Nurses Aides in CS, engineering or
Office/Clerical/ related field (willing to The Hanania Group is hiring SALES seeking experienced SH-60B/\
Administration accept foreign edu MANAGERS and SALES PROFESSIONALS. seeking experienced SH-6B
Part-Time e q u i v ) & 5 y rs One of the nation's top volume dealerships is maintenance professionals. AHR
Pat-Java/J2EE develop experiencing massive traffic and we are looking
Personal Services/Beauty ment exp or, alterna- to add New and Used Sales Managers and Sales accepting resumes and applica
Real Estate/Property tively, MS & 3 yrs exp Professionals to our staff. multiple potential position
Management as noted above. Also
Recreation/Sports/Fitness requires exp w/: Spring Paid Training. Flexible Schedule. Great pay, from Nov 4th to Dec 15t
Restaurant/Bar/Club/ or EJB; JSF or Struts; benefits and growth opportunities. Benefits
Food/Beverages XML; obiect-oriented include medical, 401K. and more. Please visit: www.aha-llc.com/
Fevergesmethodologies & UML;
Retail Hibernate. Send resume Apply in Person at and click on "Pending Positiol
Sales to Idea Integration Corp, Hyundai of Orange Park 7600 Blanding Blvd.
Science/Research J. Ghizzoni, 1 Indepen- or Call Danny Hines at 904-449-6583 more information, specific positi
Social Services/Counseling dent Dr, Jacksonville, or email dhines@hyundaioforangepark.com application tools and proceed
Technical Support FL 32202. Job Code/SC1
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted -


Syou!

testing our

military

stationed in

unities

50,620

volunteer

Northeast

Southeast

t year. Their

given to

unity

is, church

h activities,

nd more.


_II


U ou 01o a luu



The military community makes up 20 percent of the tot

population for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia

That means that 20 out of every 100 people you meet 2

somehow connected with the military.


Get your message to them by advertising in one or all (

the publications distributed at the local bases in the are



For advertising information,

call 904-359-4336,

Fax 904-366-6230.



j-j-iirTNews M i FLRIA. Periscol
RE!9-..I.,r r o r A.... ... R.....


CHEAP RENT
Southside 1BR/1BA, full
kitchen, new paint, ceiling
fans, close to bus line and C la f
9A. $250 Dep. $350 Rent. lass
Ready for move in 693-6092


HOME LOANS Ads
for credit scores under 600 THE FLEET


Call 772-8031. MARKET
ADVERTISING
RULES
a 7 Please fill out
S5 this form in
_______AAAA______black or blue ink.
1 Ill912-882-4444
Close to Kings Bay Naval Base (1/2 mi.) DEADLINES
Move in 2010
RENT FREE for Jan. 2011. TH E

IRates PERISCOPE

SNoon
Mnnrilv


_ _ I __ I _ I _ _


Rank/Grade:
Name (please print):


Work Phone #


1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Naval
Submarine Base, Kings Bay.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such as
sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED
FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL
BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED
INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY
REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATE-
MENTS IN THE BODY OFTHE AD OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be written
independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market,The Peliscope,
Public Affairs Office, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, GA 31547, or to The Periscope,
One Riverside Avenue. Jacksonville. FL 32202


Date Submitted:


Organization:
Signature:


6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the above
requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or all ads.
7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by call
366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed on
original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: I wk [ 2 wks 1 3 wks O 4 wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Periscope.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more tl
one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per family, per
week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.

Category:


Periscope
C "|O. .r


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


S90 4 -3 6 6 -6 3 (

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online
no additional charge.


I I


Comerial.RealtEstate Pets/AnimalsfT^


A R L 1,NGTON/S A
I~~~ N, R


IMI




Project Developer in
Jacksonville, Florida
with The Stellar Group.
Duties: Development of
(1) turbine inlet cooling
projects, (2) various
projects involving
Biogas waste to energy
systems and carbon
capture systems, and
(3) CHP and Cogenera-
tion projects, from
initial concept through
engineering design to
project execution
and installation;
Development of products
such as modular chiller
plants, bulk air coolers,
Biogas and gas
conditioning modules
and CHP packages,
requiring review,
customer interface,
conceptual design,
estimating, quoting,
selling, negotiating,
and project transfer to
Project Management
and Engineering teams.
M-F 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. Requires U.S.
equivalent of Bachelor's
degree in Mechanical
Engineering and 5 years
of experience in energy
delivery technologies.
Fax resume to Amy
Haag at 904-899-9439


V & Silver PRE-65
Coins! CASH PAID
Get Christmas money
now! 904-316-8513
, WANeTED! War
Souvenirs. CASH
PAID. Private col-
lector seeking
WWI/I I US German,
Japenese Daggers,
Helmets, Swords, Med-
al s, Uniforms .
904-316-8513


REFRIGERATOR
Maytag 21cu. ft.,
to op freezer, ice
mkr, slide out
shelves. $150.268-2482





s.


Approx. 200ft chain
5 f n1 0 C a l l


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade



OAK FIREWOOD 1/2 Cord
& full cord. You pick or
we deliver. 904-653-1442


912-576-1476


WANTED TO BUY- War
souvenirs, medals,
patches etc., Old USMC
uniforms 477-6412



r BED.AAAAAA
ABSOLUTE BARGAIN
L New Queen Pillowtop N
$70 365-0957

Bed A Bargain
QN. PILLOWTOP $65
904-644-0498
BEDROOM SET
Beautiful Cherry $300
904-644-0498
, DIN TBL w/6chrs
cherry wd, 2
inserts, $400obo. (2)
18th Century Lrg
China Chrs $450ea. Call
904-553-0319
KING PILLOWTOP
Mattress Set still in
plastic $180. 904-644-0498
4 Rockers Recliners 2
like new, leather,
dark brown, $225
each $400 for both.
Can transport. 282-6466
4L Rust colored Sofa,
lyr old. Bought a
Badcock for $600 -
will sell for $300.
Too large for condo.
Tiffany ceiling lamp
bought at Home Depot
for $179 will sell for
$50. 904-278-3064


U.,inner aress, wniTe,
35x31 pants. $70.
215-0252 for all.
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
NEEDED. I BUY
sealed, unexpired boxes.
Call Mike (904)712-9015


S P IANO-Mahog.
matching bench,
good cond., $600.
904-502-3633



4 2-20" Bikes Boy's 2
pegs. Girls pink
purple Golf Bags-2.
$25-$35 Clubs. Your
choice. $5-$10-T Head
c .. II k k .f 1 ll 1|1o


., 2 us,-
. ... .



I NEED TICKETS to the
SEC championship
Football game at Geor-
gia Dome in Atlanta on
Dec. 4 Call 404-216-1665


4 2007 5x10 Pace
Cargo Sport encd.
trailer. Great
shape. Battery box
on tongue. Swing drs.
$1300. Jeff 912-882-8532
STow Dolly, DEMCO
Kar-Kaddy
whdrauic brakes,
spare tire, tool box
& tongue iack. $1500obo.
693-2759



$Cash$ for ljunk cars
200+. Free towing,
must have title. 781-3813
, WANTED: Float-
ing Dock for Wave
Runner, 2 singles or
1 double. Ca ll
241-6170 or 629-2074



Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted



BOSTON TERRIERS,
* Mini Schnauzers, *
Shih-tzu, ToyAussie
www.wal kerkennel.com
Call 912 422 3982.
Quality Puppies since 1966


20 out of a 100

The military community makes up 20 percent of the total
population for Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia.
That means that 20 out of every 100 people you meet are
somehow connected with the military.

Get your message to them by advertising in one or all of
the publications distributed at the local bases in the area.


For advertising Information,
call 904-3M-4331,
Fax 904-366-6230.


0axjirNews Mirror Peris.cope
-M i ror ...........*


American ullaog Hups.
Shots and wormed.
Huge. 912-552-5984
English Bulldog Pups AKC
Champion lines, all colors
avi now. $1400 904-614-9868
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS
READY NOW!
WWW.ICNDF.COM
Olde English Bulldogge
Puppies 5 males and 3
females. 757-362-2854.
PEKINGESE Pups regis-
tered, $525 912-614-2360
elizabeth@rosewoodkennels.org
Pug Pups AKC Champ
Bldlines Home Raised
M/F $550. 904-651-0610
Yorkie Puppies TINY.
$400. Please call
912-375-0029, 912-278-1554.





% bi


Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


4 2004 17' 2 Seafox CC
S90 Merc-. Poling
Platform on trailer.
Nice boat runs
good. $8500obo. Call
904-307-6216 or 242-8293
SEADOO '04- Bom-
bardier 6115 RXP,
l120hrs, exc cond.,
paid new $13,900,
selling price $7,500
w/trailer. Rich 644-8016



t 1984 31ft Holiday
Rambler TT, incl
membership in
RV-Prk nr Orlando.
$3995. 904-388-3145
,, 2001 VIKING 2460
Legend Pop-Up. 24ft
Great shape,
loaded, toilet/shwr,
AC, heat, fridge, awning
$3400. Jeff 912-882-8532


4 Motorcycle is
extremely fast,
gar-kept, grt cond.
SNever stunted ,
dropped, played down,
wrecked or any other
behaviors that would
damage the bike. 7k
mi's, less than 200 mi's
on tires. Full Yoshi
Tri-oval series header &
exh. upgrade, Pwr
Commander II USB &
frame sliders installed
by authorized dealer. No
modifications have been
made that would intef-
ere with the handling of
the bike (swingarm,
height, etc) Comaes with
2 helmets & 2 jackets
(M/F). Transfering to
Japan (904) 610-9555
, Vespa LX50- 2008-
Like new! Only
550mi's. Windscrn
& cover incl.
$2500obo-No motorcycle
lic. needed, Driver's Lic.
only-904-285-9466
4j KAWASAKI VUL-
CAN 1500A '92-
19Kmi, $2400. Boss
Bags, Cobra pipes,
Mustang Sheild. Call
George 778-8837 Iv msg


1996 Virago 750
Yamaha 40kmi, not
wrecked, loan value
$22K. Asking $1800.
Needs Ing. Mod. Lv Msg
Kevin 904-613-1069.
O.B.O Nice.



SNewer Security
sys. for car. $20.
Kim 850-559-5741

-7


1971 Corvette Coupe
steel cities gray,
blk int., 350/270hp,
4spd, A/C, P/B, P/S,






1978 Toyota Landcruiser FJ40
Red, 55k mi, removable
hardtop, good cond,
$7400 Call 229-630-8554

, 1966 Mustang Con-
vertible. Red w/blk
pony int. 289 V8,
AT, 58K orig. mi's.
Looks, runs, & drives
grt. Power top. Always
gar'd; no accidents;
non-smoker; incl's Ton-
neau cover. Pict's avi.
on request. Loc'd in
Pearson, GA.691-379-3627



BMW 325i Convertible '95
Low mi, gar kept, exc
cond, new top, Ithr,
$6500 obo 904-616-1819
Chevy El Camino SS
Muscle Car 1980- Com-
pletely Restored, Candy
Apple Red, Black inte-
rior, $13,500 Must See!
904-502-2496 or 904-356-6929
Chevy Impala LTZ '06
White, 18k mi, sunroof,
$16,000 obo. 904-641-0258
Mercedes Benz E320 '97
silver, 61k mi, like new
cond owner 904-389-3980
& 1996 NISSAN
MAXIMA GLE
sedan 4dr, beige,
AT, good cond. Call
904-221-0710. $2500.
'96 Honda Accord
At/A runs gd, little
paint needed. $2000
Firm. 904-502-3633
41997 Toyota Corolla,
new tires, 2nd
owner, 141,300mi,
well cared for $2000.
904-287-1905
05 Honda CRV EX,
BLK, 77K miles:
Excellent Condition.
Asking $13,200 OBO.
Jonathan @ (904)226-0316
4t 2000 Mustang
89kmi, loaded, good
to fair cond. $3700.
945-3358
TOYOTA COROLLA 1996
AT, AC, PS, 164k miles,
clean, dependable,
$2950., 904-945-9916




Land Rover Range
Rover HSE 2003, MINT.
TXT ME (904) 351-8361
morsedebra@aim.com
Toyota Rav4 2010-6,000
miles, 4 cylinder, swd 2
liters, Price $18,880.
Exc. Cond., 904-415-6217


$Cash$ for lunk cars
200+. Free towing
must have title. 781-3813


aeaier arectior


KEY BUCK
4660 Souhside Blvd. 642-6060







CADILLAC-SAAB OF
ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700
www.cadillafoangepark.com

CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Souhside Blvd. 642-5111
www.claudenolan.com


NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com

JERRY HAMM CHEV
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036
www.jerryhamm.com






ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
www.atlanticeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 493-000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com
ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com









ATLANTIC DODGE
ww.atlanticeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421

JACKSONA O WCHRVSLER
JEEPDODGE
9A & Baymeadows 493-0000


ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com

RICKKEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, FemrnBch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com





PAUL MWUFOFD4AURY
1-95N. Exit 129(Yulee)
225-3673
MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325
MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060
MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673





NIMNICHTPONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 8544826


DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900


LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300







KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060


ATLANTIC INFINITI
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200


ATLANTIC JEEP
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US 1 South 354-4421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A&BAYMEADOWS. 4930000
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com

ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com








KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078





LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd.
721-5000

LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com


LINCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd.
642-4100

MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673





BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080
MERCEDES-BENZ
alo ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 777-5900


MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810CassatAve. 389-3621






SAAB OF ORANGE PARK
7999 Blanding Blvd. 302-5373
www.saaboforangepark.com





SUBARU OF ORANGE PARK
6999 Blanding Blvd. 777-1800
www.sojax.com






KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Cirde.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 Cassat Ave. 389-4561


OSTEEN VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODAY!
904-322-5100


TOM BUSH VOLKSWAGEN
:3 9850 Atlantic Boulevard
725-0911


O'STEEN VOLVO
www.osteenvolvo.com
396-5486



OT LEASING
Ce ercial Leashg Since 19U5
2810 St. Augusine Rd.
398-5000
www.gtleasing.com


0 ST 0 I P, PE S"CLL9


BMW 2011
128i Convertible
328i Sedan


bmwusa com800 334 4BMW







No Money Required






You Own It


The All New


2011 BMW 128i Covertible



iT^'
.-g^y -- ._.


The All New


2011 BMW 328i Sed;


Per Month*


MSRP 539,550

At 2.9%/O

Automatic, Premium & Value Package, BMW Assist
w/Bluetooth, Cruise Control and Much More


-.. Upto





wi $2,500e




Holiday Finance Credit*


Automatic, Power Locks, Power Windoi
Cruise Control, Tilt


$0 Maintenance Cost 4 Years/50,00 Miles


777-2500


6914 Blanding Blvi

SOrange Park www.opbmw.cor

Sales: 9am-8pm Mon.-Fri. e Sat. 9am-7pm e Closi
"YOU Have a Friend in The Business" Service/Parts: 7am-7pm Mon.-Fri. Closed Sat.


*Holiday Finance Credit is being made by BMW of North America, LLC and only applies to specific new 2011 BMW Models leased or financed through BMW Finance Services through November 30, 2010 W.A.C. 2011 BMW 128i Convertible monthly purchase payment $399 at 2.S


AUTO I
A Family
Busini
autolinepreo0
2126 Mayport Rd.,
904-242.


AUT(
BEACH I
AUTONM
Family Owned
beachblvdauto
6833 Beac
724-&


DARCARS t
PRE-OWNED S
1672 Cass
904-384
www.westsidf


O'STEEN VWi
PRE-OWNEE
VISIT OSTEI
TODM
904-322.

WORLD IN
CERTII
PRE-OWNE
CENT
www.woddimpf
11650 BEAC
9984-9



READ [
EVE
SATURI
TH
TIMES-1
OF

PICK UP
THE MA(
OF
GO'
DRII
JACKSOI
COMIC
GREAT
VALIJ


The BMW Joy Sales Event


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Driving M


n


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