Group Title: Kings Bay periscope
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098617/00101
 Material Information
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher: Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: January 8, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly[july 1988-]
biweekly[ former 1979-june 1988]
weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay -- Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
Coordinates: 30.791 x -81.537 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body: Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note: Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note: Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098617
Volume ID: VID00101
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881

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He's No. 1
Noah Rylan Jacobs gets his
first seabag at 9:16 a.m. Jan. 1

Page 3


Sailor of Year
Kings Bay's Leilei Walker honored
by Naval Hospital Jacksonville

Page 9


Holiday cheer
The holidays may be over,
but the memories linger on

Page4,5


P I G ,% %O -"""__


Vol. 44 Issue 1


www.subasekb.navy.mil


www.kingsbayperiscope.com


THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2009


Deaths decline


in Iraq conflict


Photo by MC3 Eric Tretter
From left, Animal Control Officer David Lloyd, NAVFAC Environmental Engineer Michael Anderson and Natural Resource
Manager Paul Schoenfeld prepare to release a Great Horned Owl near Port Services Dec. 19.


RehabbedRa

owl finds




Animal found dazed
and hurt, healed and

released at Kings Bay ...

By MC3 Eric Tretter
Periscope Staff


One of Naval Submarine
Base Kings Bay's native crea-
tures, a Great Horned Owl,
recently underwent rehabili-
tation after undergoing injury
and shock.
On Dec. 19, the owl took
flight near where it was found
injured more than a month
before by Animal Control
Officer David Lloyd.
"He seemed a little off bal-
ance," said Lloyd of his ini-
tial encounter with the then-
injured owl on Nov. 14. "He
was trying to take off and fly
but one of his wings was hang-
ing off to the side and his eyes
looked glazed over and dilat-
ed. He is definitely a lot better
today."


Photo by MC3 Eric Tretter
With a little help from his friends, a Great Horned Owl is able to fly away to freedom.


The owl showed no hesita-
tion as his small animal cage
carrier door opened to offer
freedom in a more comfort-
able perch, atop a tall, nearby
pine tree.
The bird's successful recov-
ery process began after con-
cerned Port Services employ-
ees initially spotted the dazed


creature, leading to Lloyd's
rescue.
After a check-up by Dr. Jan G.
Rossitier, managing veterinar-
ian of Island Animal Hospital
on St. Simon's Island, the owl
underwent full re-cooperation
at Sanctuary on the Sapelo
Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.
Nan Pate of SOS said the


owl was suffering from trauma
caused by a concussion.
"For a few weeks the owl has
been getting up to par, gain-
ing weight and strength, and
has been eating beef and deer
heart, rats, chicks and quail,"'
said Pate of the sanctuary's
part-time visitor. "We get them
in and we get them out!"


U.S. military
fatalities drop
sharply in 2008
from year before

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

The number of U.S. mili-
tary fatalities in Iraq in 2008
fell two-thirds compared to
the previous year, underscor-
ing an improvement in secu-
rity amid upcoming provincial
elections.
Last year's casualty figure,
314, marks a sharp reduction
from 2007 when 904 troops
died.
The 2008 tally comes on the
heels of a week in which the
number of daily attacks in Iraq
dropped nearly 95 percent
compared to the same time
last year.
"This is a dramatic improve-
ment of safety throughout
the country," Army Brig.
Gen. David G. Perkins, a
Multinational Force Iraq
spokesman, told reporters
in Baghdad last week, when
the average number of daily
attacks in Iraq was 10, com-
pared to 180 a year earlier.
He added that the country's
murder rates have dropped
below levels that existed before
the start of American opera-
tions in Iraq. In November,
the ratio was .9 per 100,000
people.
Military and Defense
Department officials have
attributed security gains over
the past year to a host of fac-
tors, including the now-com-
pleted surge of U.S. forces,
Sunni fighters aligning them-
selves with Iraqi and coalition
forces to help purge al-Qaida
and maintain security, and a
cease-fire pledge by promi-
nent Shiite cleric Moqtada al-
Sadr, who controlled several
militias.
Overall violence in Iraq has
fallen some 80 percent since
the surge of 33,000 U.S. forces
began in January 2007.
Speaking in October about
the reduced bloodshed in
Iraq, Navy Adm. Mike Mullen,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, emphasized the role


of reinvigorated counterinsur-
gency tactics.
Put simply, counterinsur-
gency is a form of warfare in
which a civilian population is
in the center of a tug-of-war
between an insurgency and
the forces attempting to stop
it. The Army and Marine Corps
in late 2006 published a coun-
terinsurgency strategy writ-
ten by a host of contributors,
including Army Gen. David H.
Petraeus, who implemented
its tenets while serving for 20
months as the top U.S. com-
mander in Iraq.
"In my view, what real-
ly turned it around was the
counterinsurgency tactics our
troops embraced and perfect-
ed," Mullen said Oct. 8 at the
annual Association of the U.S.
Army conference.
While the security gains
are significant, Army Gen.
Raymond T. Odierno,
Multinational Force Iraq com-
mander, warned in an inter-
viewwith reporters in Baghdad
last month against becom-
ing complacent amid Iraq's
improved security, a transfer
of authority to Iraqi forces and
an upcoming election.
"In military terms, transi-
tions are the most dangerous
times;'," the general said Dec.
23. "What we're trying to do is
make sure we don't have any
seams in our transition."
A piece of legislation ham-
mered out by Washington and
Baghdad, known as the Status
of Forces Agreement, went
into effect Jan. 1. The agree-
ment supersedes the United
Nations mandate for the coali-
tion presence in Iraq and
transfers military operational
authority to Iraqi forces with
U.S. forces assuming a support
or "overwatch," role.
The deal becomes effective
ahead of the scheduled Jan.
31 provincial elections in Iraq,
which Odierno characterized
as the next security test for
combined forces.
"Al-Qaida will try to exploit
the elections because they
don't want them to happen.
So I think they will attempt
to create some violence and
uncertainty in the population,"'
he said. "The next 60 days are
a critical period."


President-elect spends Christmas with visit to base


By Lance Cpl. Alesha R.
uard
Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Marines and Sailors at
Marine Corps Base Hawaii
were surprised with a special
visitor during their holiday
dinner at Anderson Mess Hall
Christmas evening.
As the troops enjoyed their
turkey and pie, President-elect
Barack Obama mingled with
the service members and fam-
ilies, wishing all a happy holi-
day season and thanking them
for their service.
"I was most impressed that
he met with the Marines and
sailors individually," said
Lt. Richard House, Chaplain,
MCBH. "It was a 'Wow'
moment. He could've been
with his family, but he was
with Marines and Sailors
today. I think that says a lot
about him."
To be personally thanked
with a smile and handshake
for their service meant the
world to the Marines and
Sailors, House said.
"I was ecstatic to meet the
newly elected president," said


Seaman Recruit Kywame
Summers, storekeeper, Patrol
Squadron 47.
Seaman Apprentice Jeff
Trenton, Aviation Machinist
Mate, VP-47, said the presi-
dent elect didn't simply make
an appearance but took his
time eating and speaking one-
on-one with the troops.
"He asked where I was from
and how I was doing," Trenton
said. "To me, it showed he is
truly interested in the people
who serve our country."'
With a big smile and endless
enthusiasm, Obama made his
way around the mess hall to
each table, talking and laugh-
ing with the Marines and
Sailors.
"It was very generous of him
to spend the holiday with ser-
vice members to show he
cares about the troops and
what we're doing," said Sgt.
Ashley Thompson, food ser-
vice specialist, Anderson Mess
Hall. "It increased my confi-
dence in him even more. He
showed he has the character-
istics of a leader, which is what
it's going to take to lead our
county."


Gunnery Sgt. Henry Pollard,
assistant manager, Anderson
Mess Hall, said Obama's visit
displayed his deep apprecia-
tion and concern for service
members.
"To come here ... showed
a level of selflessness and
showed the level of support we
have from him;'," said Pollard,
while enjoying his holiday
meal at Anderson Mess Hall
with his family.
After Obama's visit, Pollard
said he now feels military
members have support not
only from the president elect
but also from his family.
"His wife is behind him 100
percent, understanding his
role and him coming out here
to be with the troops," Pollard
said.
Obama is not "just talk,"
Pollard said, because he's still
putting in the work to support
the people who voted for him.
"He showed the level of
commitment he has is going
to continue, so that when he is
in office he's not going to for-
get about our military service
members," Pollard said.
Lieutenant Col. Thomas W.


Marine Photo by Lance Cpl. Alesha R. Guard
President-elect Barack Obama visits with Marines and Sailors during their holiday meal at the
Anderson Mess Hall, Dec. 25.


Ward, base inspector, Base
Inspector's Office, HQBN,
also enjoyed a greeting from
Obama while eating Christmas
dinner with his family at the
mess hall.
"His visit was so special,"'
said Delilah Ward, spouse.
"He was so personable, and


made the extra effort to ask
everyone their name."
Taking the time to greet
each service member and
family, displayed what a great
leader he is, said Lt. Gen.
Keith Stalder, Commanding
General, U.S. Marine Corps
Forces, Pacific.


"He was very gracious and
kind to come spend Christmas
with us," said Stalder, speaking
of the president-elect. "We are
so grateful he would do some-
thing like this he cares about
the American people because
he told them so today," Stalder
said.


TH-iE














2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


LOCAL NEWS & VIEWS


Briefly Speaking
Naval Branch Health Clinic upgrade to Jan. 5
To enhance the delivery of care available at Naval Branch
Health Clinic, Kings Bay, X-ray equipment is being upgraded
and will soon be 100-percent digital. To meet that require-
ment, space and equipment upgrades began Nov. 24. and will
last until approximately Jan. 5.
During that time, the Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay
will not have the capability to perform any X-ray services. The
necessary provisions have been made with the network to
ensure that all of beneficiaries have access to necessary X-ray
services. NBHC Kings Bay staff appreciates your understand-
ing during this period and anticipates complete X-ray services
will resuming Jan. 5. For questions or concerns, contact the
clinic at (912) 573-4204.

PSD begins holiday work schedule
Personnel Support Detachment Kings Bay begins holiday
work hours from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Dec. 19 until Jan. 5,
when 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. hours resume. It's recommended that
all business be conducted as early in the day as possible. PSD
will be open for ID card services only 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 20
and Jan. 3; 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 24 and Dec. 31; and closed
for ID card services Dec. 26 and 27. For planning purposes,
contact PSD Kings Bay supervisors for any items of interest
that need to be addressed. Call the PSD SDO at (912) 674-6824
for emergency support.
PSD Kings Bay's ID card section recently expanded service
hours. When holiday hours are not observed, the ID card sec-
tion willbe open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Personnel are
encouraged to utilize the new ID card appointment scheduling
Web site. Appointments are available Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday afternoons from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. To access the
ID card appointment scheduler, visit https://es.cac.navy.mil/
signup.pl. Be sure you use the PSD Kings Bay link, not the NSD
Kings Bay link.
Additionally, the dynatouch kiosk located in the Navy
Exchange may be used to schedule appointments. Personnel
without appointments will be assisted as scheduling permits
during these times. The ID card section is open 7:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Wednesday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

Personnel transaction timeliness is important
Department of Defense policy is to achieve a 99 percent
timeliness rate for associated pay transactions. While the local
Personnel Support Detachment has a major role and respon-
sibility in the timely submission of transactions, personnel
administrations, CPCs, the service member and his/her com-
mand is ultimately responsible for providing the required
documentation to PSD in a timely manner. It is imperative that
personnel who divorce, marry, have a child, occupy govern-
ment quarters or move out, come to PSD within five working
days to update their Page Two and to turn in all associated
documentation. This ensures all pay entitlements are stopped,
changed or started, ensuring no overpayments are posted to
the service members pay account.
It is imperative that your CPCs, Admin Office's and Chain
of Commands disseminate this information to your Sailors
to ensure they understand the importance of turning in their
paperwork to PSD as soon as it is available. Timeliness associ-
ated with personnel transactions (officer and enlisted), spe-
cifically: Gains/Losses/Reenlistments/Extensions/UAs/NJPs/
Crew Changes/Leave impact operational planning, personnel
accounting, and mission success. To be consistent with DOD
pay policy, Navy policy is to achieve a 99 percent timeliness
rate for all personnel transactions within four working days of
the effective date. Effective immediately, PSD Kings Bay will
closely monitor all paperwork received for submission and
will provide feedback on each commands timeliness via an
end of month message.

New photo requirement for officer records
All officers are now required to have a full-length color pho-
tograph in their military file. Officers who do not have a pho-
tograph on the electronic military personnel records system in
their grade must submit a photograph. The preferred uniform
will be service khaki without a cover. When service khaki is
unavailable, any regulation uniform is acceptable. The public
affairs center detachment at NS Mayport, Fla., is the tri-base
source for all official photographs. It is recommended officers
needing a full-length photo for selection board call (904)
270-7762 and set up an appointment. When facilities are not
available, officers are authorized to use commercial sources.
If commercial sources are unavailable, officer may submit any
color photograph that complies with the requirements out-
lined in MILPERSMAN 1070-180.

Military Sport Bike Class registration ongoing
In accordance with OPNAVINST 5100.12 (H) chg 1, all
military and DoD civilian sport biker riders are required to
complete the Military Sport Bike Class as soon as possible.
There are one-day classes at Naval Station Mayport which
will meet the required three-year refresher required by the
new OPNAVINST. Participates must have completed either
a BRC or ERC within the past 18 months and use their own
motorcycle. No borrowed or loaner bikes can be used. Class
starts at 7 a.m. at Building 1 (directions provided if needed).
All riders must carry their MSF completion card with them in
order to ride on NS Mayport. Additionally you must have base
decals on your bike or you will be required to trailer it to class.
No temporary passes will be issued. Currently active duty has
priority. To register, call Mayport Safety at (904) 270 5218 ext.
1524 then call Kings Bay Safety at either 2525 or 0414 to obtain
the necessary paperwork.


Living the life we want in the new year


Happy New Year! I
recently heard a news
item about resolu-
tions. The No. 1 New Year's
Resolution is to lose weight.
But another statistic indicated
most of us will forget our
resolution by March.
The new year provides
an opportunity to reflect on
where we've been and where
we are going; to shift direc-
tion to where we want to go.
Where would you like to be
in a year? In five years? In 10
years?
What do you want your life
to look like? Your marriage?
Your family? Your finances?
Your health?
My husband and I recently
attended the retirement cer-
emony of a family friend.
Over the past few months
our friend faced the end of a
career and future uncertainty
during an economic down-
turn. He told me he especially
regretted not setting goals and
making a plan for life after the
Navy. He did not participate
in the GI Bill and took his

New Year'
W ow. I can't believe
it's 2009. With the
husband deployed
over half of 2008, it went by
faster than it should. Which
is good during a deployment,
but when I looked at my chil-
dren today and realized how
big they are getting, it was a
bitter sweet feeling.
When we are missing our
spouses, we want the time to
go by as quickly as possible.
We'd be OK with blinking and
months passing by. I guess
it's a fine line of wanting to be
with our loved ones, but living
a full life. Sometimes we are in
such a rush that we forget that
we won't get this time back.
One day, I am going to
wake up and my kids will
be grown and gone. I have a
feeling that I will regret the
thoughts of wanting the days
to be shorter. It's hard. I want
my husband home, but at the
same time I don't want my life
to pass me by.
I guess the only way to deal
with both is to take it one day
at a time.
Don't look at it as weeks
or months. They will go by
without you counting them.
Just live each day to it's fullest.


Redux without a plan for the
funds. He thought he would
make more money as a civil-
ian, only to learn that his par-
ticular military skills did not
directly translate into a lucra-
tive civilian career.
Have you ever considered a
Personal Mission Statement?
Each branch of the military
has a mission statement. IBM,
Starbucks, Microsoft and UPS
all have mission statements.
A mission statement directs
not only what they do but
who they are. Mission state-
ments set the framework for

s resolutions
















Which is hard for a wife think-
ing, "The faster I go to bed,
the faster tomorrow comes."
Many of us are making New
Year's Resolutions. Most of us
won't keep them. I'm not going
to try to do anything spectacu-
lar, just enjoy my family.
My resolution is to make
memories and take as many
videos and photos as possible.
Because, when my husband
and I are sitting in our rock-
ing chairs some day, I want to
have those items to remind us
of all the amazing things we
have done. And, to go a little
deeper, I am going to be in
all the pictures I can. Strange
resolution, huh? Well, I hate
having my picture taken. I
mean really, really, hate it. I'm


goals and objectives. Franklin
Covey says, 'A 'Personal
Mission Statement' doesn't
have to change the world,
it just has to change 'your
world.' "
Let's face it, military
spousedom can present many
challenges. Let's look at how
to overcome challenges and
build the life we want.
We can easily identify chal-
lenges and hurdles, but can
you articulate what you want?
The exercise of creating a per-
sonal mission statement can
help us clarify who we are,
what is important to us, where
we want to go and develop
goals and plans to get there.
Does this sound weird to
you? Yeah, it felt weird to me,
too. But I'd like to invite you to
join me on a journey for 2009.
Would you join me in devel-
oping a Personal Mission
Statement which can lead to
goal setting that can enable us
to 'live the life we want?'
I can hear some already ...
"I'm just a military spouse.
What do I need a mission


statement for?" Because you
are full of promise and poten-
tial with a bright future. You
can build your most reward-
ing life when you know where
you want to be and how to get
there.
Where do we start? The
Internet provides many
options and tools for devel-
oping a personal mission
statement. I personally
like Franklin Covey (www.
franklincovey.com/tc/
resources/view/msb/) which
offers free a personal mission
statement builder and other
free tools and support for goal
setting.
Earl Nightingale says,
"People with goals succeed
because they know where
they are going. It's as simple as
that" Join me on this journey.
Next week we'll look at goal
setting, and a military spouse
who actually did took this
challenge in 2008. Till then
Happy New Year!
Questions or comments for Beth?
Email her at beth @homefrontinfocus.
com. Check out Navy Homefront Talk,
Beth's internet talk show for military
spouses at www.blogtalkradio.com/nht.


keep them simple


sure a therapist could link it to
some childhood trauma.
But, this year I had a
"moment" and realized I am
doing a terrible thing. My
husband and I are young,
just shy of 30. And this last
year we have watched friends
and acquaintances pass away
that were our age. It is tragic
and unfair. And when family
pulled out the pictures and
videos, I realized how much
those things meant. And even
if my husband and I live to be
110 years old, I want to have
those memories. I want my
children to have those memo-
ries. Who knew they were so
important?
This year will be a new
chapter for my family. We just
hit eight years in the Navy and
will be going to shore duty for
the first time. I am ecstatic.
My only concern is what do I
do with my husband when he
doesn't leave after a couple
months? It has been over
six years since we have lived
together longer than four
months straight. We tease that
he will drive me crazy and
that after three years of shore
duty, we'll be begging to go
back to sea.
I will get a ton of writing


material from this experience!
But, in reality, we can't wait to
coach youth sports together,
be able to plan vacations and
just have dinner every night
together. These are simple
things taken for granted by so
many civilian families. I guess
it really is the little things that
can make you happy.
My advice for the New Year
would be to keep the resolu-
tions simple. Don't make it
a job. Enjoy yourself, family
and friends. And remember
that you are not getting any
younger.
The advice I am giving
myself is to breathe more. I
want to be with my children
and husband and just take it
all in. I will take a deep breath
and save the memory.
And last, I am going to take
each day as it is. I'm not going
to rush it. In fact, I'm going
to hold on to it as long as I
can. Whatever is happening
in your life, whatever chapter
you are in, I hope you have a
great start to your New Year.
Questions, comments,
topics you'd like discussed?
E-mail Marie: marieangela@
mac.com and read more at
www.theycallmedependent.
wordpress.com.


Return of old friends prompts fond memories


ome old friends came
back home to us last
week.
They were eagerly antici-
pated and joined the panthe-
on of similar icons that grace
our home and her person.
Their countenance had been
missed, their history now
even more appreciated during
their absence.
Most of all, their return
marked a sort of official end
to debilitation, to illness and
suffering. And when they
took their rightful place on
her right hand, I was more
assured that, at least health-
wise, things were getting back
to normal for her and for me.
For all the tragedy and com-
edy that they had seen and
represented in our lives, these
faces were a welcome sight.
Did I mention that the faces
are on a special ring that my
spouse has worn every day of
her life since 1974? The faces


are quite non-traditional,
however: a hand-made, art-
ist-created set of comedy and
tragedy masks in silver. For
some readers, it might seem
odd for me to see a ring's
return to her hand as a senti-
mental and important event,
but that is all right with me.
Because you don't know the
story yet.
In the early 70s, as we strug-


gled with marriage, a child,
jobs and education, there was
a moment when we both got
what we wanted. I wanted a
new car an orange Chevy
Monza possessed of great
looks, too much engine, and a
bad suspension. The salesper-
son knew I wanted it and also
knew that my spouse had her
doubts.
In the process of bargain-
ing, she noticed a ring the guy
was wearing that featured a
distinctive set of faces known
to art and theater people
as the comedy and tragedy
masks. These faces are cre-
ated in myriad styles and out
of a wide variety of materials.
This set was obviously hand
cast in fine silver, with distinc-
tive markings on the faces and
dark grooves cut into the ring
band.
Their conversation led to a
deal. We would buy the car if
he would include a smaller,


duplicate version of the ring
that he had commissioned
and that his wife would
not wear. The next day, we
acquired both the orange,
fast car and the much-loved
jewelry piece.
The story is pretty predict-
able from there. The car was
eventually too small and too
hard to maintain and was
disposed of in a few years, not
too long after one light brush
with an interstate guard rail.
The ring, however, became
her constant companion and
signature piece of jewelry. It
was durable enough to wear
at school and while working
in the theater. It was unique
and distinctive enough to
wear to dinners or parties,
and especially to see plays at
the theater. Since 1974, I can-
not think of one day when I
did not see it on her hand,

See Fond memories, Page 3


NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. Ward Stevens

NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer
Ed Buczek

Editor
Bill Wesselhoff- 573-4719

Staff
MC1 (SW) Joe Sabo
MCSN Eric Tretter


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publication.
The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-
4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official
views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of
Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida limes-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy
of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gen-
der, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida limes-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida limes-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert
Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Russ Martin, Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336 FAX (904) 366-6230


I


s?I














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 3


Alexander to take command of Navy Southeast


By MC2(AW/SW) Marcel
A. Barbeau
Navy Region Southeast Public Affairs

Rear Adm. Townsend G.
"Tim" Alexander will relieve
Rear Adm. Michael C. Vitale
as Commander, Navy Region
Southeast, during a ceremo-
ny Friday aboard Naval Air
Station Jacksonville.
Alexander will take over
a command that leads shore
installation management
support and execution for
21 installations within the
Southeastern United States
and parts of the Caribbean
- specifically Naval Station
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
and Naval Activity Roosevelt
Roads, Puerto Rico with a
budget of more than $850 mil-
lion.


From Commander, Submarine Group
10 Public Affairs

Commander, Submarine
Squadron 16/20, Capt. Daniel
Mack, relieved Cmdr. Charles
Hill, commanding officer of
USS West Virginia (SSBN 736)
(Gold), Dec. 29, due to a loss
of confidence in his ability to
command.
Capt. Stephen Gillespie has
temporarily assumed com-
mand of West Virginia (Gold).
Gillespie, a former command-
ing officer of USS Rhode
Island, was most recently


By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service


Exactly three weeks before
Inauguration Day, the buzz of
activity at the Armed Forces
Inaugural Committee here is
a notable exception to the tra-
ditional holiday lull that set-
tles over the nation's capital
between Christmas and New
Year's Day.
More than 400 soldiers,
sailors, airmen, Marines and
Coast Guardsmen active
duty, reservists and National
Guardsmen are busy pre-
paring for President-elect
Barack Obama's inauguration
Jan. 20. Another 300 will report
for duty after
New Year's,
bringing Ever
AFIC to full has
strength h
with about Iocked
700 service-
members. perl
"We re
spinning Lt. Mil
up for the Navy
full dress
rehearsal
Jan. 11," Navy Lt. Mike Billips,
a reservist from Atlanta serv-
ing as an AFIC spokesman,
said. The rehearsal will kick
off in the dark at about 3
a.m., when participants go
through two full iterations of
the swearing-in ceremony at
the Capitol, then parade down
Pennsylvania Avenue toward
the White House.
"The curtain goes up on Jan.
20, and everything has to be
locked down perfect before
then," Billips said. "So it's a lot
of rehearsal, a lot of coordina-
tion and a lot of training for the
people who are coming in."
The incoming servicemem-


t


f
k
F


Vitale has commanded
Navy Region Southeast since
October 2007. He guided its
emergency management
efforts to unprecedented levels
of operational excellence dur-
ing hurricanes Gustav, Hanna,
and Ike, making CNRSE one
of the Navy's leaders in hur-
ricane preparedness and post-
disaster support.
The 1977 University of
Louisville graduate spear-
headed the formation of
the Commander, Navy
Installations Command
(CNIC) Air Operations Cross-
Functional Team to identify
major stakeholders and cre-
ate a single process owner for
shore-based air operations,
bringing organizational align-
ment between resource spon-
sors, CNIC, and all major avia-


assigned as deputy for train-
ing at Submarine Squadron
16/20.
Hill will be temporar-
ily assigned to Commander,
Submarine Squadron 20.
Each SSBN has two crews,
blue and gold crews, which
alternate taking the sub-
marines out on patrol. West
Virginia (Gold) is currently in
an off-crew status conduct-
ing training at its homeport in
Kings Bay, Ga.
For more news from Commander,
Submarine Group 10, visit www.navy.
mil/local/csgl1/.


bers will get intensive train-
ing for the ceremonial support
they'll provide at the inaugura-
tion ceremony and 10 official
inaugural balls, Billips said.
Some will be in the midst of
the fanfare, serving as honor
guards, marching bands,
musical units, salute batteries,
drivers, ushers and escorts for
distinguished visitors. Others
will work behind the scenes,
helping to ensure the events
go off seamlessly.
Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew
Finney, a telecommunica-
tions technician from Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio,
assigned to AFIC's information
technology directorate, called
being a
thi g part of the
thing inaugura-
-o be tion a rare
* be opportu-
-dow n nity. "I am
r f excited to
ect be a part of
our nation's
e Billips history," he
Reserve said.
"I am
honored to
be a part of a committee of
this caliber," Army Spc. Kevyn
Coleman agreed. "This is defi-
nitely an assignment to talk
about years from now. In my
personal opinion, I don't think
that I have ever had a better
assignment."
The 2009 inauguration
will be the 56th in which the
military has played a role in
welcoming the incoming
commander in chief. During
the first, in April 1789, U.S.
Army, local militia units and
Revolutionary War veterans
escorted George Washington
to his inaugural ceremony at
New York City's Federal Hall.


Fond memories ...


From Page 2
gleaming and gathering com-
ments.
Until 2008. That's when
breast cancer threatened her
life, requiring treatment and
life altering adjustments.
She lost some dignity, her
pretty hair, her durability and
mostly, her ability to wear
those tokens that tied her to
her work and family her
silver drama mask ring, her
30th-anniversary wedding
band, her 35th anniversary
re-engagement ring all had
to come off and stay off for
almost a year.
More horribly, they had
to be cut off, torn from her
hand by metal tools, partially
destroyed and left in plas-
tic bags on the dresser as a
reminder of the damage she
ooo


was suffering.
Through this difficulty,
though, she never was nega-
tive or filled with self-pity. Her
spirit always looked forward
to the day when she could
say the words "cancer-free"
and lift up her life as a mes-
sage and beacon on how to
conquer disease and to laugh
while dealing with tragedy.
That is why, when we gath-
ered her ring from Albert at
Albert's Jewelers, and placed
back on her hand, we knew
the healing was almost com-
plete; her "artistic" friends
were home. And when I took
her hand in mine, the feel-
ing was the same as it was
in 1974, when we both had
something new to celebrate.
If you have ideas or events you want
me to share with readers, send me a
note at pkraackl@tds.net.


tion stake-
holders.
Vitale
also exe-
cuted an
integrated
encroach-
ment plan
to serve as
the bench-
mark for Alexander
enterprise-
wide programs, including
installation liaison officers and
regional encroachment teams.
He secured Department of
Defense encroachment buff-
ering funds and established
strong partnerships with local
communities. Vitale brought
solutions to installation chal-
lenges and stood as the model
for innovative practices, which
realized significant savings,


promoted enhanced opera-
tional oversight, and support-
ed the fleet, fighter, and fam-
ily.
Rear Adm. Vitale has been
selected for promotion to vice
admiral and his next assign-
ment will be as Commander,
Navy Installations Command
in Washington D.C.
RearAdm.Alex-ander comes
to Navy Region Southeast
from his current position as
Commander, Navy Region
Hawaii, and Commander,
Naval Surface Group Middle
Pacific, positions he has held
since August 2006.
He graduated from the
University of Colorado in
1978, and was commissioned
an ensign after completion
of Aviation Officer Candidate
School in March 1981. His


operational assignments
included the Sea Snakes of
Helicopter Antisubmarine
Squadron (Light) (HSL) 33,
three tours with the HSL-
46 Grandmasters, and the
amphibious assault ship USS
Nassau (LHA 4).
Alexander served in a
variety of billets, including
detachment maintenance
officer and officer in charge,
squadron Naval aviation train-
ing and operating procedures
standardization officer, quality
assurance officer, operations
officer, maintenance officer,
executive officer and com-
manding officer. He served as
air boss aboard Nassau during
operations Noble Anvil and
Allied Force in 1999.
Shore assignments for
Alexander included the Air


Photos by HM1 (SW) Michael Morgan
Naval Hospital Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Jennifer Vedral Baron presents a certificate
to Melissa and CSCS Greg Jacobs congratulating them on their son, Noah, being the first baby
of the New Year born at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fla.


Naval Hospital Jacksonville


welcomes New Year's baby


4fMS


(i >; -i



..^ /


By Loren Barnes
NH Jax Public Affairs


Celebrating the New
Year's Day birth of their son,
Noah Rylan Jacobs, hospi-
tal Executive Officer Capt.
Jennifer Vedral-Baron pre-
sented Melissa and CSCS Greg
Jacobs a congratulatory cer-
tificate from Naval Hospital
Jacksonville on Jan. 2.
Noah was the first babyborn
at the hospital in 2009, arriving
at 9:16 a.m., New Years Day.
Chief Jacobs serves aboard
the USS Vicksburg, homeport-
ed at Naval Station Mayport,
Fla. He is from Boytown, Texas,
and Melissa is from Pensacola,
Fla.
Handsome and healthy at 8
pounds, 9.5 ounces and 20.5
inches, Noah is the third of
three boys for the Jacobs. He


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2008
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Naval Hosptial Jacksonville's
first baby of 2009, Noah
Rylan Jacobs.
has two brothers at home;
Christian, 6, and Braedan, 2.
Vedral-Baron also present-
ed the family Noah's "First


Seabag." The baby items in
the seabag, including a love-
ly crocheted baby blanket,
were donated by the NAS
Jacksonville Navy and Marine
Corps Relief Society. The base
Navy Exchange also gave a $50
gift card to the family.
The Jacobs said they re-
ceived great care at the Naval
Hospital. Mom was followed
throughout her pregnancy
by Cmdr. Ruth Duda and the
delivery was performed by Lt.
Cmdr Jason Bosco, assisted by
Lt. John Saenz. They received
around-the-clock attention
from the hospital's OB/Gyn
and Maternal Infant Unit
team.
Naval Hospital Jacksonville
delivers, on average, 80 to 100
babies a month, each one a
precious new member of our
military family.


Wolves of HSL-40, the Naval
War College, Chief of Naval
Operations staff, the Joint Staff,
and Naval Base Coronado.
During these tours, he served
as quality assurance officer
and instructor pilot, flag aide,
aviation programs analyst,
division chief, and command-
ing officer.
Alexander holds a Master
of Arts degree from the Naval
War College and he attended
the Armed Forces Staff College
in 1998. He was recognized
by the Naval Helicopter
Association as a member of
the 1993 Aircrew of the Year
(Embarked) and, in 1989, he
received the Rear Adm. Allan
G. Paulson award for inspi-
rational leadership from
Commander, Helicopter Sea
Control Wing 3.


Gitmo

detention

closing

studied

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

Defense Secretary Robert
M. Gates has requested a
proposal for shutting down
the U.S. detention center at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a
Pentagon official said Dec. 18.
Gates wants to be prepared
to provide a plan for closure if
President-elect Barack Obama
requests it, Pentagon Press
Secretary Geoff Morrell told
reporters at the Pentagon.
"The president-elect
has made it perfectly clear
throughout the course of the
campaign that he wishes to
address this issue early on in
his administration," Morrell
said. "So the secretary wants
to be prepared to assist him in
trying to figure out a solution
to this thorny problem."
Gates has stated that
requirements for closing the
facility include constructing
legislation that provides statu-
tory framework for housing
detainees outside the confines
of Guantanamo Bay, Morrell
said.
"He has asked his team for
a proposal on how to shut it
down [and] what would be
required specifically to close it
and move the detainees from
that facility, while at the same
time ensuring that we protect
the American people from
some very dangerous charac-
ters," he said.
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for inauguration














4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


NEW & U N\\ RAPPED TOYS ONLY




\ MARINE CORPS REli ER\ VI'


Marines manned the Winter in Wonderland Toys For Tots booth.
T.*I


By MC3 Eric Tretter
Periscope Staff


The 2008 Naval
Submarine Base
Kings Bay holiday
season went by in a flash.
Along the way, fami-
lies gathered at Winter
Wonderland Dec. 6
where "real snow" made
by a snow machine flew
and accumulated on the
Georgia ground in 60
degree temperatures. Pony
and train rides, musical and
dance performances, free
refreshments, Christmas
lights and decorations,
and a visit from Santa
helped make it fun for all.
Elves and walking, talking
Christmas trees were some
of Santa's helpers who keep
kids entertained between
snowball tosses.
Kings Bay service mem-
bers gathered early Dec.
11 to bring holiday cheer
to the residents of the
Department of Veterans
Affairs Carl Vinson Medical
Center. Sailors and Marines
sang Christmas carols and
handed out holiday care
packages along with games
and puzzles. The annual
day trip to Dublin, Ga.
warmed the hearts of mili-
tary men and women active
duty and long retired.
Numerous other com-
mand holiday parties
brought Kings Bay's service
members and civilians
together towards the end of
2008.


Santa makes his entrance at Winter in Wonderland


Children take time to send letters to the troops.


Musical performers helped elevate holiday spirits at Winter in Wonderland.


Live Christmas trees entertained children.














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 5


The Christmas spirit
was in full swing last
month at Kings Bay.
Above left, top, elves
help spread cheer at
Winter in Wonderland.
Above left, bot-
tom, the Navy Band
Southeast made the
rounds at Kings Bay
playing Christmas favor-
ites on Dec. 9.
Above, letters to
the troops was a nice
touch at Winter in
Wonderland.
Left, train rides were
a popular activity at
Winter in Wonderland.
Below, left, Lance
Cpl. Richard Schmidt,
left, and Lance Cpl.
Gerald Powell 00visit
with retired Marine
Gary Dabney during
the Dec. 11 visit to the
Carl Vinson Medical
Center in Dublin, Ga.
Below, Sailors and
Marines unload goody
bags to distribute to
patients at the medical
center.

All photos by MC3 Eric Tretter














6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009



CNO, MCPON visit Sailors in Afghanistan

By MC1 Monica R. Nelson year past where I've been the lf lent for morale;' said U.S. Navy


Chief of Naval Operations Public
Affairs

Chief of Naval Operation
Adm. Gary Roughead and
newly appointed Master Chief
Petty Officer of the Navy Rick
D. West met with Sailors
at International Security
Assistance Force Headquarters
in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the
start of their Christmas greet-
ings tour of the country, Dec.
20.
CNO thanked the troops
and their families for their
service, citing 14,000 Sailors
in the Middle East, a num-
ber almost equivalent to the
Marine Corps service mem-
bers within the same theatre.
He also expressed gratitude for
the reports he receives from
other military services about
the level of service the U.S.
Navy is giving.
"Everywhere I've gone over
the past couple of years, in
Pacific, Atlantic, and then the


ICNO, the comments that I
receive universally from Army,
Air Force, Marine Corps and
even the Navy commanders,
cannot say enough about what
our Sailors do day in and
day out, and the way that you
do it," said Roughead. "Its that
desire and competency that
you bring wherever assigned
that makes a huge difference,
and that is something we are
going to continue to do as
long as we are engaged in this
fight."'
During his visit, Roughead
took the opportunity to award
four Sailors and Marines
the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal, one the Joint
Service Achievement Medal,
another the Joint Service
Commendation Medal, and
frocked a petty officer to the
next pay grade. He also intro-
duced MCPON West to the
troops and the two held a
question and answer session.
"The CNO's visit was excel-


Navy photo by MC1 Monica R. Nelson
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead greets Capt. Kevin Callahan before an all-
hands call and awards ceremony at the International Security Assistance Force (IASF) head-
quarters in Kabul, Afghanistan.


Chief Hospital orpsman
George Ayala from Pueblo,
Colo. "We had a lot of ques-
tions that he had the right
answers for. For those people
who are here for the first time,
it's a little scary coming here.
It's reassuring that the upper
chain of command is con-
cerned about us."
Roughead and West arrived
in country the day prior
and spent the evening at
Camp Eggers near ISAF HQ.
Following his visit with ISAF
Sailors, Rougheadpaid avisitto
the American Embassy nearby
before returning to ISAF HQ to
meet with Commander, ISAF
and Commander, U.S. Forces
Command, U.S. Army Gen.
David McKiernon.
West held a separate chief's
call following the all hands
call at ISAF HQ. Roughead
and West planned to visit
Provincial Reconstruction
Teams in Afghanistan during
the remainder of their visit.


Plan your financial fitness in new year


By Lissa Ann Wohltmann
For LIFELines

Buy low, sell high.
That financial advice
doesn't help the average
Sailor who hasn't the time to
follow the stock market nor
the inclination to do so.
Instead there's an easier
solution that most Sailors can
pursue every payday.
"Put enough money away
as early as you can and
just leave it alone," advised
Charles Johnson a financial
consultant and former Navy
communications officer.
Sailors always will find
ways to spend every dime
they make, yet they first need
to consider what is impor-
tant.
"You can either buy toys
today that will be worthless in
the future," he said, "Or, you
can invest your funds and
enjoy (the financial benefits)


for decades in the future."'
The Thrift Savings Plan,
at www.tsp.gov, is consid-
ered the Sailors' most practi-
cal form of investment. This
Federal Government-spon-
sored retirement savings
and investment plan offers
the same type of savings and
tax benefits that many pri-
vate corporations offer their
employees under 401(k)
plans.
Unlike a Sailors' pension
after 20 years in the Navy,
the amount you receive after
retirement age has nothing
to do with your rate, rank or
years of service. It is contin-
gent upon the amount you
invest.
The added benefit of this
plan is that it's virtually pain-
less.


Once you sign up, it comes
out of your paycheck auto-
matically without the Sailor
giving it another thought.
"You don't miss it because
you don't see it," Johnson
said.
Another aspect of knowing
your financial health is learn-
ing how you are using your
money today.
Do you always have
enough money at the end of
the month to pay for the little
extras in life or are you con-
stantly stretched beyond the
limit of fiscal survival?
Have you planned for life's
unexpected disasters and
have enough insurance to
cover them?
Do you stick to an actual
budget or spend imprudent-
ly?
And, finally, do you shop
for necessities or is it more of
a sport where the only loser
is you?


If you want to improve
your personal finances, you
can start by taking a finan-
cial fitness quiz at najes.
rutgers.edu/money/ffquiz
from Rutgers University. This
should give you an idea of
how well you've managed
your money so far. Simply
choose the score that best
describes your current finan-
cial management practices,
then when you are done,
click on the "view results"
button for either a surprise or
a familiar supposition.
If you are beyond just the
basics of maintaining excel-
lent financial shape and
indulge in the stock market,
Johnson has a bit of advice.
"If the stock market fluctu-
ates, don't panic" and sell off
everything, he advised.
Instead, use that opportuni-
ty to buy more stock because
as it gets cheaper you have
the finances to buy more.


LiMWRNots


Holiday social
at Finnegan's
Stop by KB Finnegan's from
3 to 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 18
and enjoy some holiday cama-
raderie with co-workers and
friends at MWR's annual holi-
day gathering. Hors d'oeuvres
and door prizes will be ready
to pump up everyone's spir-
its and drink specials will be
available.


Outdoor Adventure
Center slashes prices
Duringthe month of January,
all camper rental prices have
been greatly reduced for all
military and civilians alike.
Take $20 off the daily rates, $50
off the weekend rates and $100
off the weekly rates for some
really great camping bargains.
Stop by Outdoor Adventure
and plan a great get-a-way for
you and your family for the
new year. Call (912) 573-8103
for more information.

Auto Skills Drawing
in January
During the month of January
at Auto Skills, any patron pay-
ing for a stall rental can put
their name in for a discount
drawing held at the end of the
month.

Parents Night Out
set for Feb. 13
Just imagine an evening with
no kids. Here's your chance for
that to happen. MWR's CYP is
holding a Parent's Night Out
on from 6 to 11 p.m., Friday,
Feb. 13 at the Youth Center
and CDC.
The cost is only $10 for the
first child and $5 for each
additional child. Register early
to claim your spot at (912)
573-2380 or (912) 573-3888.
Food, activities and games are
included in the cost.

December calendar
for KB Finnegan's
K.B Finnegan's has some
great specials during the
month of December. Start the
week on Mondays with from
6 to 7 p.m. happy hour prices
and $2 Nachos and cheese


from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays
are 35-cent wings from 4 to 7
p.m. On Wednesday from 6
to 7 p.m. happy hour prices
with 4 to 7 p.m. Shepard's Pie
Plate for only $6.50 then happy
hours on Thursday from 4 to 6
p.m. include discounts on all
beverages, 10 percent on pub
food items and hot dogs for
only 50 cents. Finish the week
with Margarita Dollar Night on
from 4 to 6 p.m. Fridays and a
Finnegan's Fish & Chips bas-
ket for only $5.50. If that isn't
enough then Saturdays have
some fun with mixed drinks
for $1 off from 4 to 7 p.m.

Sandwich Specials
of the Month
Take a bite out of high prices
with a great sandwich spe-
cial at Rocky Colletti and KB
Finnegan's. During the month
of December, pick up a fish
sandwich with chippers and a
fountain drink for only $6.50.
This special is good during
normal business hours. Call
ahead for an easy lunch pick-
up at 573-4029.

Youth Sports in need
of officials, scorekeepers
Officials and scorekeepers
are needed for the upcoming
Youth Sports Basketball sea-
son.If you are 14 years or older,
have knowledge of the sport
and are interested in earning
a little extra money, certified
or uncertified, all the training
is provided. If your are look-
ing to make a difference in
a child's life then here's your
chance. Call the Youth Sports
Office today at (912) 573-8202
for more information.

Massage therapy
available at Kings Bay
Is your job stressing you
out? Why not treat yourself
or that special person in your
life to a therapeutic massage?
Renee Crawford, a nationally
certified AMTA Member, is at
the Fitness Complex. Whether
you need to relieve stress or
tension, soothe pain or just to
relax, she has a massage to fit
any budget. Call the Fitness
Complex for more informa-
tion or to purchase gift cer-


tificates. Massages are avail-
able by appointment only. For
more information, call (912)
409-9331.

NFL Sunday Ticket
at Big EZ Sports Zones
Every Sunday inside the
Big EZ Sports Zones is NFL
Sunday Ticket. Doors open at
noon and for only $5 you get
all you can eat food and one
drink of your choice. Bring
your game face and watch all
the games that are playing. For
more info call (912) 573-4548

Free kids movies every
Saturday, Sunday
The Movie Zone is showing
kid movies every Saturday at
noon and Sunday at 1 p.m.
All youths, under 18 years of
age must be accompanied by
a parent or adult. Snack foods
and beverages are available for
purchase. If 15 minutes after
the proposed start time no one
shows up, then the movie area
will be open for open viewing.
Call for the latest information
at (912) 573-4548.

Car Wash is now open
at Auto Skills building
The Car Wash is now open
and ready to make your vehi-
cle cleaner than ever. Located
in front of the Auto Skills
building, its four bays wand-
operated washes are just what
you asked for. For only $2 for
five minutes, your car can look
sparkling. A super vacuum is
ready on the other side for


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cleaning out the inside of your
vehicle, too.

Paintball is open
at Etowah Park
Paintball adventure is just
waiting for you. The Paintball
field is open for special play,
with gun package rentals avail-
able. Bring your own or rent.
Special days and times can be
reserved for private parties. It
is inside Etowah Park which
is past housing after the Golf
Course. When you hit the dirt
road just keep on driving.
Call OAC for more informa-
tion at (912) 573-8103 or the
Paintball field at (912) 674-
4014.


Cheney says Iraq


'much better off'


By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

The U.S.-coalition military
campaign that deposed Iraqi
dictator Saddam Hussein in
the spring of 2003 has placed
Iraq in a much-improved sit-
uation today, Vice President
Richard B. Cheney said dur-
ing a nationally televised news
program Sunday.
"I think Iraq is much better
off than it was before we went
in in '03 and got rid of Saddam
Hussein," Cheney told host
Bob Schieffer on the CBS pro-
gram Face the Nation.
"I think we are close to
achieving most of our objec-
tives," he added.
Violence and death in
Iraq today are sharply down,
Cheney said, while Iraqis are
firmly on the path to democ-
racy after decades of cruel and
despotic rule under Saddam.
"We've seen a significant
reduction in the overall level of
violence, more now than any
time since we've been there


I wooworiKng ll


in the spring of '03," Cheney
said. "We've seen the elimina-
tion of one of the world's worst
regimes. We've seen the Iraqis
write a constitution [and] hold
three national elections'"
Cheney saluted the U.S.-
coalition military campaign
launched in March 2003 that
toppled Saddam's regime by
early April of that year. The
fugitive dictator was captured
by U.S. forces in December
2003 and was tried and found
guilty for his crimes by an Iraqi
court. He was executed on
Dec. 29, 2006.
Before the onset of hostili-
ties, Bush provided Saddam
the opportunity to surrender
his power and leave Iraq for-
ever, but the dictator refused,
Cheney noted. Instead of
departing Iraq, Saddam
attempted "to bluff his way
through," the vice president
said. "And we called his bluff."








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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 7


Contract for 8 subs inked


From Program Executive Office
Submarines Public Affairs
The Navy signed a five-
year, $14 billion Multi-Year
Procurement contract for
eight Virginia-class subma-
rines Dec. 22.
The contract, the third, or
Block III, for the Virginia-class,
calls for one ship per year in
fiscal years 2009 and 2010
and two per year in FY 2011,
2012, and 2013. The contract
also meets the Chief of Naval
Operations' and Virginia Class
Program's mandate to reduce
acquisition costs by approxi-
mately 20 percent for the FY
2012 ships.
"This contract is a prime
example of what you can
do when you provide moti-
vated people with a task and
a deadline," said Virginia-
class Program Manager Capt.
Michael Jabaley. As Jabaley
explained. "In FY 2005, then-
CNO Admiral Michael Mullen
said that if we could cut $400
million from the $2.4 billion
authorized for that year's
Virginia by FY 2012, the Navy
would buy two Virginias each
year. This contract achieves
both goals the price tar-
get and the two per year build
rate."
To reach its cost reduc-
tion goal, the Virginia-class
Program established a three-
element strategy. The first
element, which accounts for
one-half of the required say-


ings, involved increasing pro-
duction to two ships per year
in an MYP contract in order
to spread the shipyards' over-
head costs over more ships.
To achieve the remaining cost
savings, the Navyinvested $600
million to redesign portions
of the ship for more efficient
production and to improve
construction processes reduc-
ing the construction span
from 84 to 60 months. This
upfront investment reduced
the Virginia-class's total pro-
gram cost by $4 billion a 6:1
return on investment.
The cost reduction effort
resulted in more than 100
discrete design changes that
either reduced costs or short-
ened the construction span.
The most extensive modifi-
cation involves the replace-
ment of the traditional sonar
sphere with a Large Aperture
Bow Array and the 12 verti-
cal launch tubes with two
large diameter Virginia pay-
load tubes. The LAB and
VPTs, along with more than
two-dozen associated modi-
fications, save $40 million per
submarine beginning with the
FY 12 ships.
"While we focused on cost
reduction as our primary goal,
we paid attention to warfight-
ing capability and lifecycle
costs in making these chang-
es," said Rear Adm. William
Hilarides, program executive
officer for submarines.


In fact, the LAB Array uses
life of the hull hydrophones
that will provide improved
passive listening capability
over the traditional, transduc-
er-populated sphere.
Further, replacing 12 vertical
launch tubes with two 92-inch
VPTs not only reduces con-
struction and lifecycle costs,
but also significantly expands
their ability to accept future
payloads.
"The payload tube interface
is identical to the SSGN's tubes
so what we put in one, we
can put in the other, and with
two hatches instead of twelve
we've cut out a lot of mainte-
nance," Hilarides concluded.
Virginia-class submarines
are built under a unique team-
ing arrangement that includes
General Dynamics Electric
Boat as the prime contrac-
tor and Northrop Grumman
Shipbuilding as its partner.
Each shipyard builds certain
portions of each ship and the
two yards alternate delivering
the submarines.
"This multiyear contract is
a result of the Navy subma-
rine team's careful and highly
professional execution," said
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
for Research, Development,
and Acquisition Sean Stackley.
"They successfully met a chal-
lenging cost reduction plan,
added capability, and did it all
ahead of schedule. The Navy
will benefit substantially from


hi


Navy photo by General Dynamics Electric Boat
The nation's newest and most advanced nuclear-powered attack submarine and the lead ship
of its class, PCU Virginia (SSN 774) returns to the General Dynamics Electric Boat shipyard
following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas called "alpha" sea trials.


their success," Stackley said.
The Block III contract award
is the last of many signifi-
cant milestones reached by
the Virginia Class Program in
2008. For the first time in 12
years, the Navy commissioned
two submarines of the same
class in the same year, USS
North Carolina (SSN 777) May
3 and USS New Hampshire
(SSN 778) Oct. 25.
The program further cel-
ebrated New Mexico's (SSN
779) christening on Dec.
13 at Northrop Grumman
Shipbuilding's Newport News,


Va. shipyard. The Virginia class
also completed a number of
technical and operational tests
including the launching of
three Tomahawk cruise mis-
siles, 62 exercise torpedoes, 12
lock-in/lock-out evolutions,
and eight Dry Deck Shelter
flood and drain evolutions.
Additionally, Virginia-class
submarines spent a total of
469 days at sea in the first 11
months of the year and had
four of the five ships of the
class at sea at the same time
in August.
The Virginia class is designed


to dominate both the littoral
and deep waters while con-
ducting anti-submarine; anti-
surface ship; strike; special
operation forces; intelligence,
surveillance, and reconnais-
sance; irregular warfare; and
mine warfare missions. In
doing so, the Virginia-class
directly enables five of the
six Maritime Strategy Core
Capabilities sea control,
power projection, forward
presence, maritime security,
and deterrence.
For more news from around the fleet,
visit www.navy.mil.


Agency cooperation stressed for disaster preparedness


By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service
The commander of U.S.
Northern Command yester-
day urged closer cooperation
between local and state agen-
cies and groups that would
be the first to respond to a
disaster and the federal enti-
ties that stand ready to step in
and assist when needed.
Air Force Gen. Victor
E. "Gene" Renuart, who
also commands the North
American Aerospace Defense
Command, known as NORAD,


told the Ready Communities
Partnership's 2008 symposium
on community resiliency he's
impressed by the huge strides
in disaster preparedness at the
local, regional and state lev-
els.
"The more a community is
involved in planning for cri-
ses, ... the less demand there
is for federal support, be that
military or federal agencies,"
he told the group, a cross-sec-
tion of city leaders, former
governors and representatives
of industry and private-sector
groups.


Ninety-seven percent of the
events Northcom and NORAD
monitor each day are handled
at the local or state level and
don't need a federal response,
Renuart said.
"But we also have to be pre-
pared," he said, "because there
will be a time when the size of
the event is so big [and] hap-
pens so quickly that you have
to have an integrated team
of local and state and federal
responders, both from the mil-
itary and from our civilian first
responders."
So as local and state plan-


ners plan for the "what ifs,"
and practice their responses
to an attack or natural disas-
ter, Northcom, NORAD and
other federal organizations are
ensuring they are prepared,
too.
"Our role is to ensure that
when it is time to act, we are
prepared," Renuart said.
The general emphasized
that the federal government
has no interest in overstepping
its bounds or legal authorities.
Rather, he said, Northcom
and NORAD want to work as
partners with local and state


entities and to back them up
when needed.
"Everything we do in our
command is a matter of team-
ing with others;'," he told the
group. "We don't command or
control any of our partners."
Both NORAD and Northcom
were born in the face of cri-
ses NORAD in the Cold War,
and Northcom after the 9/11
terror attacks, Renuart noted.
Through their aerospace
warning and defense, mari-
time warning and homeland
defense missions, these com-
mands are dedicated to pre-


venting an attack on the U.S.
homeland, he said.
"In today's world, with
today's threats, we cannot
afford not to pay attention,"
he said.
These efforts, and partner-
ships formed among local,
state, federal and nongovern-
mental entities, have paid off
in big security dividends, he
said.
"The measure of success is
that it is quiet, at least for now;'
Renuart said. "We can't let our
guard down, but it certainly is
quiet today."


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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


Message based


in proud history


Navy pnoto oy MLI locad A. Scnafer
The Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 779) was commissioned in front of nearly 1,700 guests and crew-
members in December in Newport News, Va.


Newest submarine commissioned


By MC1 Class Todd A.
Schaffer


The Navy's newest Virginia-
class attack submarine USS
New Mexico (SSN 779) was
christenedDec. 13duringacer-
emony at Northrop Grumman
Newport News Shipbuilding
in Newport News, Va.
Cmdr. Mark Prokopius, the
ship's first commanding offi-
cer, stood by with his crew
of 120 officers and Sailors
as Mrs. Cynthia "Cindy"
Giambastiani, wife of former
Vice Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff retired Adm.
Edmund P. Giambastianii, the


ship's sponsor, christened the
sub, bringing them one step
closer to bringing the Navy's
next Virginia-class submarine
to life.
"When I look at this amaz-
ing submarine, I can't help
but think of three words -
duty, honor and country," said
Giambastiani. "Those three
hallowed words reverently
dictate what you ought to be,
what you can be, what you
will be."
Giambastiani also was pres-
ent to help lay the keel during
an authentication ceremony
held April 12.
Among the more than 1,700


guests and employees of
Northrop Grumman Shipyard
in attendance were three
members of the first USS New
Mexico (BB 40), the lead ship
of a new class of battleships
commissioned May 20, 1918,
near the end of World War I.
Designed to meet the Navy's
requirements in a post-Cold
War era, Virginia-class sub-
marines use advanced tech-
nologies to increase firepower,
maneuverability and stealth.
The 377-foot long Virginia-
class submarines are capable
of submerged speeds of more
than 25 knots and can stay
submerged for up to three


months at a time.
The Virginia-class sub-
marine's improved stealth,
sophisticated surveillance
capabilities, as well as special
warfare enhancements, will
enable it to meet the Navy's
multimission requirements.
Northrop-Grumman New-
port News and General
Dynamics Electric Boat part-
nered in building the first 10
submarines of a class expected
to reach 30. New Mexico, the
sixth boat in the Virginia Class,
is slated for commissioning in
late 2009.
For more news from Commander,
Submarine Force, visit www.navy.mil/
local/sublant/.


From American Forces Press Service

The chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff evoked the
Revolutionary War's Battle of
Trenton in the annual holiday
message he issued to U.S. ser-
vicemembers and their fami-
lies, Dec. 22.
Here is the text of NavyAdm.
Mike Mullen's message:
"Throughout our his-
tory, when faced with war at
this special time of the year,
American Servicemen and
women have risen with crisis
and fought with valor while
providing their fellow citizens
precious moments to enjoy
the season's joyous spirit with
loved ones at home.
"This tradition harkens to
our first holiday season as an
independent Nation, 232 years
ago. The bleak winter of 1776
found this Republic and its
leader, General Washington,
with a difficult and uncer-
tain future. At twilight on the
twenty-fifth of December,
faced with one of the dark-
est moments of the American
Revolution, Washington's
Army crossed the icy Delaware
River to defeat enemy forces
at the Battle of Trenton. Their
bravery on that cold winter's
night altered the course of the
war, and, ultimately, our road
to victory.
"AmongWashington's troops
that December was Thomas


Paine, who appealed to the
honor and patriotic duty of
his fellow soldiers with these
famous words: 'These are the
times that try men's souls.
The summer soldier and the
sunshine patriot will, in crisis,
shrink from the service of their
country; but he that stands it
now, deserves the love and
thanks of man and woman.'
"This holiday season, more
than 280,000 modern-day
patriots are deployed around
the globe, ensuring their fami-
lies and friends and ours
- can celebrate in peace and
comfort. Let us take pause to
honor their sacrifice.
"We also offer our thoughts
and prayers to the wounded,
their families, and the families
of the fallen. Theirs is an emp-
tiness we cannot know made
only deeper during the holi-
days. Although their sacred
void can never be filled, let
us look deep into our hearts
and honor them all for they
richly deserve the love and
thanks of a grateful Nation.
"On behalf of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff and our fami-
lies, I thank you for all that
you do for our country. We
wish you and your loved ones
a festive holiday season, and
tidings of peace in the coming
New Year."
Respectfully,
M.G. MULLEN
Admiral, U.S. Navy


Tragedy stresses safe driving


From Defense Media Activity -
Anacostia

The Naval Safety Center web
site has made one Sailor's story
of loss a compelling reminder
to emphasize driving safety
during the holiday season.
In a video posted on the
Naval Safety Center's Web
site www.safetycenter.navy.
mil/seasonal/winter08/index.
asp the campaign encourages
safe driving and offers tips to
mitigate risk including a list of
supplies in a vehicle for emer-
gencies.
Damage Controlman 1st
Class (SW) Neal Beard, of USS
Oscar Austin (DDG 79), shared
his personal tragic story about
safe holiday driving and why


Sailors should get plenty of
rest before hitting the road.
Beard's story, a "holiday wish"
for Sailors, reinforces "preven-
tion" as key to managing risks.
The Naval Safety Center
site also features the personal
account of former sport bike
rider Aviation Ordnanceman
3rd Class Mike Van Gunten,
who explained in a video clip
how his life changed after
four and a half months as an
inpatient with traumatic brain
injury and other multiple seri-
ous injuries and after endur-
ing 10 surgeries.
"I never saw all this coming,;'
said Van Gunten, "I hope no
one else has to go through this.
It's really rough."


Van Gunten's sportbike
wreck is part of what some
Navy officials call an epi-
demic in the past year. Of 58
Navy motorcycle fatalities in
fiscal year 2008, 51 were on
sportbikes. The Naval Safety
Center reminds Sailors to take
the Navy's Basic Rider Course
and Military Sportbike Rider
Course.
Van Gunten said five of
his shipmates got rid of their
sportbikes after they saw what
their friend went through.
The Naval Safety Center
also offers resources including
posters, magazines and videos
to help commands throughout
the fleet manage risk.
For more news from the Naval Safety
Center, visit www.navy.mil/local/nsc/.


Navy photo by MC3 Class Davis J. Anderson
Navy Reservist SK 2nd Class Mary Gauthier, a Virginia State Trooper, checks Lt. Cmdr. Jon
Hurst, both attached to Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Five Six (VR-56), for harmful items
during a simulated traffic stop at a safety stand down on board Naval Air Station Oceana.


Becoming a U.S. citizen an easy, one-two-three-step process


By Lt. j.g. Matthew Dursa
JAGC, USN

It is difficult to imagine a
more effective citizenship
test than the simple question
that servicemembers answer
everyday, such as, 'Are you
willing to fight for this coun-
try?"
Accordingly, for those who
have answered "yes," but are
not yet US citizens, the appli-
cation process is quick and
convenient.
If you are a member of the
Armed Forces, you are eli-
gible to apply for citizenship
under special provisions of the
Immigration and Nationality
Act.
Not only are there special
provisions for applying, the
United States Citizenship and
Immigration Services has
streamlined the application
and naturalization process for
military personnel.
All immigrants who have
served honorably on active


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Provided as a public service.


duty in the U.S. Armed Forces
or as a member of the Selected
Ready Reserve on or after
September 11, 2001 are eligi-
ble to file for citizenship under
special wartime provisions of
the INA.
There are certain require-
ments and qualifications to
become a citizen of the United
States.
To become a citizen, you
must demonstrate good moral
character, knowledge of the
English language, knowledge
of U.S. government and histo-
ry and a personal attachment
to the United States by taking
an Oath of Allegiance to the
US Constitution.
Qualified members of the


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Armed Forces are exempt from
other naturalization require-
ments, including residency
and physical presence in the
United States.
In addition to those exemp-
tions, there are extra resources
available to you during the
application process.
USCIS has established a
toll-free help line dedicated to
assisting servicemembers and
their families, (877) 247-4645.
USCIS has also developed a
web page, www.uscis.gov/mil-
itary, which contains informa-


tion and links to services spe-
cifically for servicemembers
and their families.
You can pursue citizenship
regardless of your location or
financial concerns. All aspects
of the naturalization process,
including applications, inter-
views and ceremonies are
available overseas to members
of the Armed Forces.
Servicemembers are not
charged a fee to file an
Application for Naturalization.
The process of naturaliza-
tion for servicemembers is
straightforward apply,
standby and verify.
First, apply.
Find your command's des-


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ignated point-of-contact to
help you with your applica-
tion. Every command should
have a designated immigra-
tion POC. If you need help
locating yours, contact your
legal assistance office.
Your POC will help you
submit three documents: an
application for naturalization,
a request for certification of
military service and biographic
information. These three doc-
uments are sent to a central
Service Center in Nebraska.
Second, standby.
The Service Center reviews
your application and performs
the necessary security checks.
The Service Center sends your


application to the district
office closest to you.
If there is a specific location
where you would like to be
interviewed, you can indicate
that when you submit your
application.
Third, verify.
The district office sets up a
date to verify your proficiency
in English and knowledge of
civics through an interview
and examination. If naturaliza-
tion is granted, USCIS informs
you of the day you can take
your oath of allegiance.
Apply, standby, verify it's
that easy. Legal assistance
offices can be reached at Kings
Bay at (912) 573-3959.


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Walker earns



more honors


Kings Bay Sailor

is Naval Hospital

Jacksonville's

Sailor of Year
By Loren Barnes
NH Jax Public Affairs

"It is an unexpected honor
to be selected as the overall
Naval Hospital Jacksonville
Sailor of theYear," said Hospital
Corpsman First Class Leilei L.
Walker, who works in Naval
Branch Health Clinic Kings
Bay's Dental Department.
Already selected as the
Senior Sailor of the Year for
the hospital's seven Branch
Health Clinics, she was named
the command-wide SOY in
December. Walker will now
vie for the Navy Medicine East
(Regional) SOY honors.
The Leading Petty Officer
of NBHC Kings Bay's Dental
Department, Walker has
been a stand-out throughout
her Navy career. A native of
Quincy, Fla., she enlisted in
January 1993.
As a general duty hospital
corpsman, she said one of
the most challenging jobs she
has filled was as the leading
petty officer deployed to Joint
Medical Group Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba from November,
2007 to May, 2008. There, she
oversaw 60 hospital corpsmen
supporting six doctors and 20
nurses.
"There was no other expe-
rience like it," she said. "It
was the most unique in my
career."
Besides supporting the
medical mission at GTMO, she
served as a fitness leader for
the Joint Medical Group and
was a key player in an exer-
cise for first responders called
"Operation Blue Advance."'
Back home at NBHC Kings
Bay, the sailors and civilians
benefiting from her leadership
realized amazing accomplish-
ments. Over the past year, the


clinic became one of the first
in Navy Medicine to merge
dental and medical records
functions. That task involved
formulating and directing new
operating procedures and
cross-training efforts after a
$250,000 Outpatient Records
renovation project. In all, more
than 29,000 medical and den-
tal records were integrated.
She also was a key player
in revamping the Dental
Department's "One-Stop
Shopping" initiative, increas-
ing patient visits by 50 per
month and enhancing pro-
ductivity by 30 percent.
Described by her supervi-
sor's as the "Sailorization Csar"
for the clinic, Walker said one
of her joys is being able to
mentor junior sailors.
"I push them to be the best
they can be by emphasizing
training," she said. "I want to
be sure that we have sailors
who are not just trained to fill
billets but to be successful in
their health care roles."
Her mentorship resulted in
a 98 percent enlisted reten-
tion rate. Her Sailors earned
honors including Junior Sailor
of the Year and Blue Jacket of
the Year. Others were selected
for "C" schools. They received
numerous medals recognizing
individual accomplishments.
Her support goes beyond the
work place.
"I also look out for them on
a personal basis," she said.
Walker enthusiastically
volunteers. For instance,
she is helping stand up a
Rape Recovery Task Force in
Camden County to provide vic-
tim counseling and assistance.
As the Navy Clinic's Sexual
Assault Victim Advocate she
said she was moved by how
devastating rape is to these
individuals. Still in the forma-
tive stage, she said she already
sees support from the Camden
County police and other victim
support agencies in the area.
"There is a great need for this
service and victims currently


THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 9



Navy tests




home-based




work plan


Navy pnoto
HM1 Leilei L. Walker will now vie for the Navy Medicine East
(Regional) Sailor of the Year honors.


have to travel to Jacksonville
for support services," she said.
Other roles she's devoted
herself to include service as the
Command Drug and Alcohol
Program Advisor, participation
in the Command Recreation
Committee, the Chapel Gospel
Choir, and the "Poetry Club"
which she co-founded. She's
served as the president of the
First and Second Class Petty
Officer Association among
other organizations.
Walker said she has two
people in her life vital to her
motivation and inspiration.
One is her 12-year-old daugh-
ter, Tyler, who she calls "the
light of my life."'
The other is her mother,
Albesta, who she said "is my
rock." She said she wouldn't
have been able to do many
important things in her career
without her mother being
there. This includes caring for
Tyler when she deploys and
even as she goes to Norfolk for
the Regional Sailor of the Year
interviews.
Walker's sights are set on
making chief petty offi-
cer. And she's right on tar-
get. A graduate of the Naval
School of Health and Science,
Advanced Medical Laboratory
Technician School, she has


also completed an Associate of
Science Degree from Darton
College in addition to numer-
ous courses broadening her
knowledge of medicine and as
a Navy leader. She's served at
various commands and clinics
from Norfolk, Va., to Keflavik,
Iceland, to Naval Hospital
Beaufort, S.C.
Through her tours she has
been recognized with numer-
ous medals and awards
including the Joint Service
Commendation Medal and
the Navy and Marine Corps
Achievement Medal.
In nominating Walker for
Navy Medicine East Sailor of
theYear honors, NavalHospital
Jacksonville Commanding
Officer Capt. Bruce Gillingham
described Walker as a "hard
charger" and the "Number
One" sailor under his com-
mand.
"Petty Officer Walker has a
cheerful, sincere, and profes-
sional attitude," Gillingham
said. "She is always polite and
courteous to seniors and is
demanding, considerate and
imaginative in her leadership
of Sailors. A sincere belief in
the Navy and tremendous
potential describe her service
and she is an outstanding
example to any Sailor."


From Navy Personnel Command
Public Affairs

The Navy announced
the Virtual Command Pilot
Program, allowing a select
group of officers to work from
home, even if their new assign-
ment would normally require a
permanent change of station.
"This program will allow offi-
cers to fill career-enhancing bil-
lets without necessarily having
to transfer to do so," said Capt.
James Oakes, in the office of the
chief of naval personnel where
the jobs will be located. "The
pilot offers the opportunity to
reduce permanent change-of-
station costs for the Navy while
providing stability for Navy
families. It's a win, win."
The test program will initially
be open to eight officer billets.
The officers selected for these
billets should be self-starters,
capable of working indepen-
dently and maintaining open
lines of communication with
their supervisors via phone and
e-mail. They must be able to
travel periodically to their par-
ent commands.
The parent command fur-
nishes the Navy Marine Corps
Intranet seat to include: laptop,
docking station, monitor, key-
board and mouse and govern-
ment cell phone for the officer's
daily work. The command clos-
est to where the officer is geo-
graphically assigned will assist
with administrative require-
ments like fitness reports, phys-
ical readiness tests and physical
health assessments.
"My geographic command is
Navy Recruiting District (NRD)
Pittsburgh. That is what my BAH
is based on, but my duty station
is Washington D.C.-based. It
saves the Navy a lot of money,


and I'm not a geographic bach-
elor," said Oakes, "If you call my
Washington D.C. office number,
it rings on my government cell
phone here in Pittsburgh."
In announcing the virtual
command pilot, Vice Adm. Mark
Ferguson, the chief of naval per-
sonnel, said the pilot will test
whether physical assignment
away from the parent command
is feasible.
"It offers individuals the
opportunity to work in high-
impact positions while main-
taining geo-stability to support
personal and family needs,"
said Ferguson.
The initial eight billets, all
within OPNAV N1, are:
Deputy, Manpower
Requirement Branch
Center for Career
Development Assistant Liaison
Officer
Navy Personnel Command
Planner/Strategic Roadmaps
and Production Management
Detachment
N131 Head Professional
Development
Staff Ops and Plans
IRR Force Management
Head Planner
ADP Program/IT/Web
Products Support
Director AED/AMD Career
Management
Only officers eligible for shore
duty as part of their normal
sea/shore rotation may apply.
Interested officers must request
a chain of command recom-
mendation be sent to their
detailers via an e-mail nomina-
tion by either their command-
ing officer or executive officer.
The nominating e-mail should
state that the officer is a vol-
unteer and provide justification
on why the officer is suitable for
this pilot.


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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


HERO campaign launched


By MC3 Jessica Pounds
U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public
Affairs

U.S. Fleet Forces Command
along with the Mid-Atlantic
Region Morale, Welfare and
Recreation program launched
the HERO designated driver
campaign Dec. 19 at Naval
Amphibious Base Little Creek,
Va.
The HERO campaign pro-
motes designated drivers for
persons who are intoxicated.
Its mission is to end drunk
driving fatalities, injuries and
accidents nationwide by pro-
moting designated driving and
reminding the public to drive
sober and to not let friends
drive drunk.
Rear Adm. Mark Buzby,
deputy chief of staff for Global
Force Management and Joint
Operations, from USFF, served
as a guest speaker at Little
Creek's Foc'sle Recreation
Center to communicate to the
local community that Navy
leadership is embracing the
HERO campaign as one more


tool to combat drinking and
driving.
"Through this initiative and
other Navy programs, we hope
that over time we can change
our Sailors' attitude about
drinking and driving, and do
our part in the community
to make our roadways safer,"
Buzby said.
The HERO campaign was
launched in August 2000 in
memory of Ensign John R.
Elliot who was killed by a
drunk driver just two months
after his graduation from the
U.S. Naval Academy.
On July 22, 2000, Elliot was
driving to his mother's house
to celebrate her birthday. A
sport utility vehicle swerved
into his lane and struck his
vehicle. The driver of the SUV
had been arrested three hours
earlier for driving while intoxi-
cated. After being released
from the New Jersey State
Police, the person charged
with the DWI resumed driv-
ing and hit Elliot's car, killing
them both.
Ensign John Elliot's father,


Bill Elliot, attended the kick-
off ceremony and shared his
experience.
"The phone call that we
received when our son was
supposed to be on his way
home to celebrate his moth-
er's birthday, is a shock that
no parent or family should
have to endure," said Elliot.
"The tragedy of DWI accidents
is not just the person who is
hit, but also the person who
causes the accident. It changes
their lives irreparably, and we
believe that two families were
killed the night our son lost."
Elliot's parents chartered
the HERO campaign to help
prevent avoidable fatalities
like their son's, by promoting
sober driving through edu-
cational posters, designated
driver wrist bands and part-
nering with facilities that serve
alcohol to supply designated
drivers with incentives such as
free sodas and juice.
Since its commencement,
the HERO campaign has seen
numerous victories includ-
ing support from restaurant,


f IMI f I:
Navy photo by MC3 Jessica Pounds
John Elliot holds up a HERO Campaign decal and urges service
members to display one of them in their car as a reminder to
always have a designated driver when drinking.


bar and tavern owners in a
number of states, colleges and
universities, and professional
sports teams.
In August 2008, Virginia
became the third state to
officially adopt the HERO
campaign. The Navy's MWR
adopted the campaign and


will utilize the program in the
on-base facilities that serve
alcohol. When a service mem-
ber comes in and says they are
a designated driver, the server
will sign them up on a card,
give them a wristband, and
will serve them non-alcoholic
beverages free of charge.


Emergency care, urgent care coverage different


By Kim Kinser
TRICARE


After the hustle and bustle
of the holiday season, sickness
or injury can occur unexpect-
edly. Health care facilities,
along with other businesses,
may have special hours of
operations.
Being armed with the right
information and an under-
standing of the difference
between Emergency Care and
Urgent Care can ease your
mind and be helpful during
an often stressful time of the
year.
Urgent care services are
medically necessary, non-life
threatening conditions requir-
ing professional attention
within 24 hours. Examples
of urgent conditions include
sprains, sore throats, rising
fever, coughs/colds, sinus
infections and earaches.
Illnesses are not confined to
regular office hours, Monday
through Friday. Ifyou and your
family are enrolled in Prime


or TRICARE Prime Remote
and find yourself in need of
medical attention after hours,
please contact your primary
care manager before you seek
urgent care. Most network or
MTF providers have an on-call
process available after hours
to assist in urgent situations. If
you are unable to contact your
PCM, or on-call provider for
direction, please notify your
PCM within 24 hours or the
next business day following
care to get a referral. Prime
enrollees have a $12 co-pay
when seeking urgent care from
a TRICARE-network Urgent
Care facility.
Emergency care services are
defined as medical, mater-
nity, or psychiatric emergen-
cies, believed to be serious
medical conditions, requiring
immediate medical attention.
Examples of medical emer-
gencies include, but are not
limited to severe bleeding,
chest pain, shortness/inability
to breathe, spinal cord or back
injury and severe eye injuries.


In the event of an emer-
gency, you should go or be
taken to the nearest emer-
gency room for care. TRICARE
defines an emergency room as
an organized hospital-based
facility for patients who pres-
ent immediate medical atten-
tion, and the facility must be
available 24 hours.
Prime beneficiaries seeking
emergency services in a net-
work facility ER have a $30
co-pay. Note that Prime ben-
eficiaries visiting an ER for ser-
vices that are determined to
be nonemergency or urgent
health care based on the ER
claim, may face higher charges
through the TRICARE Prime
Point of Service.
Prime beneficiaries should
not seek emergency care for
clear cases of routine illnesses.
To assist in keeping the cost
of health care as low as pos-
sible, you must obtain all of


your nonemergency care from
your PCM, or from other pro-
viders you have been referred
to by your PCM or Humana
Military.
TRICARE Standard ben-
eficiaries have the freedom to
choose a TRICARE-authorized
provider when seeking urgent
or emergency care, however if
the beneficiary chooses to use
the Extra benefit by seeing a
network work provider, their
out of pocket cost will be less.
If an Extra or Standard benefi-
ciary seeks treatment in an ER
and the claim reflects routine
care was provided, the facil-
ity charge may be denied and
the professional services shall
be allowed. If the contractor
refers an Extra or Standard
beneficiary to an ER, the care
will be allowed.
Before an emergency or ill-
ness arises, familiarize your-
self with TRICARE network or
authorized facilities in your
area. To locate a TRICARE
network facility or provider
in the South region, visit the


Humana Military Web site at
www.humana-military.com/
south/bene/tools-resources/
BeneSiteProvLoc.asp. Look
under the TRICARE Network
Facility section and click on the
appropriate link. If you don't
have access to the Internet,
or would prefer to speak with
someone for help in locating
a network provider, call ben-
eficiary services at (800) 444-
5445.
Beneficiaries should keep
their PCM informed of any
urgent or emergency services
they receive so referrals can
be written and follow-up care
arranged. By understanding
TRICARE's urgent/emergency
care guidelines, you can be
sure you're receiving the best
care from the proper providers
at the lowest cost to you.
To read more about this topic, visit
the blog site for Major General Elder
Granger, Deputy Director and Program
Executive Officer of the TRICARE
Management Activity, Office of the
Assistant Secretary of Defense Health
Affairs at www.health.mil/tmablog/
Article.aspx?ID+396.


TRICARE

working

overseas

By MC3 Bryan Reckard
Fleet Public Affairs Center Det. Japan

With the help of International
SOS, TRICARE has made it
possible for service members
and their families to receive
medical care while traveling in
some overseas locations.
TRICARE, the health care
program serving active-duty
service members and their
families, teamed up with
ISOS, a worldwide medical
assistance company, under
the TRICARE Global Remote
Overseas (TGRO) program to
provide active duty service
members and their families
with medical care in remote
overseas locations.
Although active-duty ser-
vice members already receive
the services of ISOS when they
require urgent and emergency
medical services while travel-
ing overseas, access to these
services is now available to
active-duty family members
enrolled in TRICARE Prime.
Lora Sanders-Vannoy, a
TRICARE Pacific market-
ing representative, said the
expanded service availabil-
ity is far-reaching. ISOS is the
company TRICARE collabo-
rated with to offer the TGRO
program to both active-duty
members and their families
traveling overseas.
"After that program was put
into effect, a need was identi-
fied to expand the program
through ISOS;'," said Sanders-
Vannoy. "ISOS will handle
the payments and handle the
claims filing for the beneficia-
ry, so there isn't any paper-
work or money exchange on
the beneficiary's end."
Sanders-Vannoy said the
TGRO program only applies
to emergency medical situa-
tions that threaten life, limb
or eyesight. When in doubt,
beneficiaries should seek help
immediately.
Sanders-Vannoy recom-
mends visiting the local
TRICARE Service Center and
picking up a TRICARE Pacific
Travel Card to find out more
information.


L rate Covemenu x*


Cycle 3-4
Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Home Fries
French Toast Puffs
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Parmesan
Meat Lasagna
Steamed Rice
Paprika Potatoes
Fried Okra
Italian Kidney Beans
Hot Dinner Rolls
* Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage Sand-
wich w/ Peppers & Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Cream of Mushroom Soup
Jagerschnitzel
Tomato Vegetable Gravy
Braised Pork Chops
Mashed Potatoes
Tossed Green Rice
Steamed Peas
Simmered Carrots
Hot Biscuits
Friday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Waffles
Oven Fried Bacon
Minced Beef W/ Toast
Oatmeal
Grits
Hash Browns Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Twice Baked Potato Soup
Turkey Ala King
Simmered Egg Noodles
Steamed Rice
Peas w/ Onions
Succotash
Hot Corn Muffin


* Speed Line
Cheeseburgers
Hamburgers
BBQ Chicken
Baked Beans
Potato Chips
Dinner
Chicken Corn Chowder
Teriyaki Chicken
Beef Stroganoff
Risotto
Corn On The Cob
Steamed Broccoli
Toasted Garlic Bread
Saturday
Brunch
Tomato Soup
Baked Chicken & Noodles
Open Face Roast Beef Sand.
Cream beef w/ Toast
French Fries
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Eggs to Order
Simmered Mixed Vegetables
Dinner
Vegetable Soup
Chili Macaroni
Grilled ham steaks
Steamed Rice
Collard Greens
Cauliflower Combo
Steamed Green Beans
Sunday
Brunch
Chicken Noodle Soup
Philly Cheese Steak
Beans & Weenies
Ham Slices
Potato Chips
Peas and Mushrooms
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Cream of Asparagus Soup
BBQ Chicken
Oven Roast Beef
Mashed Potatoes
Steamed Rice
Savory Summer Squash
Medley
Steamed Carrots
Hot Dinner Rolls


BOfKfS neessorie
3 LOCATIONS PROVIDING YOU WIT
QpEN1 6tDays a Yeari! II P(WrA'EIDArIiME1V1?S
,Kingsbay Village li
* 2603 Osborne Rd. Ste. M-N
St. Mary's, Ga. (912) 729-7880
978 East King Ave. #BCD 101 East Main Street #8 I
Kingsland, Ga. (912) 576-2770 -OR- Folkston, Ga. (912) 496-2333 IN
Fax: (912) 576-3362


Monday
Breakfast
Oven Fried Bacon
Breakfast Burrito
Oatmeal
Grits
Grilled Eggs to Order
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Hash Browns Potatoes
Hard Boiled Eggs
French Toast
Lunch
* Regular Line
New England Clam Chowder
Braised Pork Chops
Beef Stroganoff
Egg Noodles
Mashed Potatoes
Steamed Cauliflower
Peas and Carrots
Chilled Applesauce
* Speed Line
Chicken Wings
Pizza
French Fried Potatoes
Dinner
Vegetable Beef Soup
Savory Baked Chicken
Spicy Fish
Scalloped Potatoes
Noodles Jefferson
Steamed Broccoli
Simmered Carrots
Hot Biscuits
Tuesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Waffles
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal


Grits
Soft/Hard Coked Eggs
Creamed Ground Beef w/
Toast
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Tomato Soup
Spaghetti Sauce w/ Meat
Balls
Tempura Battered Fish
Boiled Pasta
Franconia Potatoes
Lyonnaise Green Beans
Dinner Rolls
* Speed Line
Grilled Ham & Cheese Sand-
wich
Tacos
Rice
Refried Beans
Potato Chips
Potato Bar
Dinner
Beef Barley Soup
BBQ Ribs
Chicken Tetrazzini
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Simmered Green Beans
French Fried Cauliflower
Chilled Apple Sauce
Dinner Rolls
Wednesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/hard Cooked Eggs


Home Fries
Pancakes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Cream of Potato Soup
Baked Ham
Roast Turkey
Cornbread Dressing
Mashed Potatoes
Cauliflower Combo
Lima Beans
* Speed Line
Corn Dogs
Cheeseburgers
Hamburgers
French Fried Potatoes
Baked Beans
Dinner
Beef Vegetable Soup
Baked Fish
Chicken Cacciatore
Scalloped Potatoes
Steamed Asparagus
Seasoned Mixed Vegetables
Toasted Garlic Bread
Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Hash Brown Potatoes
French Toast
Lunch
* Regular Line
Vegetable Soup
Grilled Salisbury Steaks
Cantonese Spare Ribs
Mashed Potatoes
4-


$2e;i2LL


Simmered Egg Noodles
Club Spinach
Squash and Carrot Medley
Hot Dinner Rolls
Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage Sand-
wich w/ Peppers & Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Cream of Mushroom Soup
Curry Chicken
Smothered Liver& Onions
Steamed Wild Rice
Rissole Potatoes
Simmered Golden Sweet
Corn
Peas and Carrots
Toasted Garlic Bread

Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15 a.m.
to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No breakfast Served.
Brunch 10:45 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

All meals served for lunch
and dinner also feature the
Healthy Choice Salad Bar
and various dessert items.
Menu items are subject to
change.

------------o-
YOU'RE Tnis CLOSE TO


Monday -Friday after 10am
excludes holidays


Saturday & Sunday after 12pm
excludes holidays


I -.. 1 w. l- I JA I ;.,I-


Expires 1/31/09. Not
valid with any other


L Ui I iICU ILlo 11 discou nts.
present coupon inperson
IOwith valid military ID.
I Valid for cart and greens
I -fees up to four players.
A Davis Love lff Designed Course .............................................



*.-----------------------------------------------*--*.


-18 HOLES OF
CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF


ACTIVE MILITARY SPECIAL















THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 11


Marine Corps loses a legend


By compilation
Quantico Sentry Staff, Marine Corps
Base Quantico

Veteran of three wars and
author, Lt. Gen. Victor H.
"Brute" Krulak, 95, died Dec.
29 in Southern California.
Krulak, a Denver native,
servedwith distinctionthrough
World War II, Korea and
Vietnam. He later penned First
to Fight: An Inside Look at the
Marine Corps, which remains
today on the Commandant's
Reading List.
Born Jan. 7, 1913, Krulak
began his distinguished career
began upon graduation from
the U.S. Naval Academy in
1934.
As a lieutenant colonel in the
fall of 1943, he earned the Navy
Cross and the Purple Heart
on Choiseul Island, where his


Classes on your site
now available
The Fleet and Family
Support Center will now take
its regular workshops on the
road if a unit can furnish a
conference room or classroom
and guarantee a minimum of
five participants. Additionally,
personnel will tailor presenta-
tions to cover a unit's General
MilitaryTrainingrequirements
when those requirements deal
with human resources and
social issues. Counselors also
can create a presentation in
response to a unit's area of
special concerns. Personnel
are available to participate
within areas of expertise in
the indoctrination of newly
assigned personnel and family
members of active duty per-
sonnel.

Anger management
seminar Jan. 28
Anger is often a smoke
screen for other emotions
and not an effective method
for getting what you want.
Workshops are slated for 8:30
a.m. to noon Jan. 28. It can
help you focus on identifying
the feelings anger hides and
explore behaviors helpful in
resolving primary issues. Pre-
registration is required. Call
573-4222 for details.

New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group meets
A New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group will meet
every other Tuesday at the
Fleet and Family Support
Center throughout the month.
This workshop is scheduled
for 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Jan. 20. This workshop is an
opportunity to share experi-
ences, meet and gain support
from others, and exchange
new ideas. To register, call 573-
4893.

Department of Veterans
Affairs services available
Cathy Fernandez, the
Department of Veterans Affairs
Representative for Kings Bay,
is in the office two to three
days a week. Appointments
are required. Service members
wishing to participate in the
Benefits Delivery at Discharge
(BDD) Program should be
within 180 to 60 days of dis-
charge or retirement and be
available for an exam by the
VA. For scheduled days con-
tact Fleet and Family Support
Center at 573-4513. For more
information, call 573-4506 or
573-4513.

Stress management
seminar Jan. 20
Events, schedules, daily
pressure and many other items
can cause undue stress in your
life. Stress may or may not be
good for your health depend-
ing on how you manage that
stress. This workshop is slated
for noon to 4 p.m., Jan. 20. Pre-
registration is required. Call
573-4222 for details.

Common Sense Parenting
classes upcoming
The parenting class is
based on the Common Sense
Parenting Model. This six-
week class will be 9 to 11
a.m. on Mondays Jan. 5, 12
and 26 Feb. 2, 9 and 16 from.
Attendees must complete all
six weeks in order to receive
a certificate of completion. A
minimum of six participants
will be needed in order for a
class to start. Registration is


battalion staged a week-long
diversionary raid to cover the
Bougainville Invasion. Later,
he joined the newly formed
6th Marine Division and took
part in the Okinawa campaign
and the surrender of Japanese
forces in the China area. There
he earned the Legion of Merit
with Combat "V" and the
Bronze Star.
After the war, he returned to
the United States and served as
assistant director of the Senior
School at Quantico, and, later,
as regimental commander
of the 5th Marines at Camp
Pendleton. He was serving
as assistant chief of Staff, G-
3, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific,
when the Korean Conflict
erupted, and subsequently
served in Korea as chief of staff,
1st Marine Division, earning a





required and is ongoing.
For more information, call
573-4222.

ASIST training
workshop Jan. 13, 14
Applied Suicide Intervention
Skills Training is a suicide inter-
vention workshop focused on
helping individuals become
ready, willing and able to
intervene with a person at risk
of suicide. It is geared towards
all populations, military, civil-
ian and contractors.
Registration is required. The
workshop is scheduled for
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Jan. 13
and 14. For more information,
call 573-4222.

Ombudsman Assembly
Meeting Jan. 15
The Ombudsman Assembly
Meeting will be held for all
OMB, COs, XO's, CMCs
and COBs at the Kings Bay
Community Center at 6 p.m.
on Jan. 15. The Ombudsman
Advanced Training is for
certified Ombudsmen, new
Ombudsmen and Command
Support Spouses and will fol-
low the Assembly Meeting.
For more information contact
Debbie Lucas at 573-4513.

Learn about car-buying
strategies at workshop
This two-hour workshop
provides in-depth training on
looking for a car, how not to
get taken for a ride and the
important do's and don't
before you step onto the car
lot. Topics include negotiating,
trade-ins, discounts, financing
and high pressure sales tac-
tics. This training is scheduled
fro 2 to 4 p.m. on January 15.
Registration is recommended.
For more information, call
573-9783.

Savings, investments
covered in workshop
This two-hour workshop
provides in-depth training on
how to start an investment
portfolio for as little as $25 a
month. Learn how to begin
investing in stocks, bonds,
mutual funds and more. This
training is scheduled from 2 to
4 p.m. on Jan. 29. Registration
is recommended. For more
information call, 573-9800 or
9783.

Ten steps to a Federal
job covered
A Certified Federal Job
Search Trainer will present
this fast-moving three-hour
workshop in a classroom for-
mat.
This workshop gives
Federal job applicants an
easy-to-understand 10-step
approach to managing their
Federal Job Search Campaign.
Comprehensive Federal
Human Resources Curriculum
includes selecting Federal job
titles, grades and agencies;
Writing both a Federal and
Electronic resume; an intro-
duction to KSA writing; "how
to apply" to various agency
systems; track and follow-up;


and interview tips.
This is a comprehensive
program, easy to follow and
understand, based on the best
selling career book, Ten Steps
to a Federal Job, by the author
and curriculum designer.
Participants will receive a copy
of the book for attending.
The workshop is sched-
uled at the Fleet and Family
Support Center from 8:30 to 11
a.m. Jan. 21.
Registration is highly rec-


second Legion of Merit with
Combat "V" and Air Medal.
General Krulak was pre-
sented a third Legion of Merit
by General Maxwell D. Taylor,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, for exceptionally meri-
torious service from 1962 to
1964 as special assistant for
counter-insurgency activi-
ties, Organization of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
On March 1, 1964, he was
designated commanding
general, Fleet Marine Force,
Pacific, and promoted to lieu-
tenant general.
For the next four years he
was responsible for all Fleet
Marine Force units in the
Pacific, including some 54
trips to the Vietnam theater.
He retired June 1, 1968, receiv-
ing a Distinguished Service


ommended, as class is limited
to 20 seats. For more informa-
tion, call 573-4513.

Learn to dress for
success at workshop
Does it really matter what
you wear to the job interview?
You bet it does, first impres-
sions are lasting impressions.
Take a fun look at what the
well-dressed job seeker should
be wearing to today's job inter-
views.
The workshop is scheduled
at the Fleet & Family Support
Center from 1 to 2 p.m. on Jan.
15. Registration is highly rec-
ommended, as class is limited
to 20 seats. For more informa-
tion, call 573-4513.

Transition Assistance
Program seminars soon
TAP is a seminar for those
separating, retiring or con-
templating leaving the mili-
tary that provides informa-
tion on benefits, job search
skills, employment resources,
resume writing, interviewing,
and other related transition
skills. Spouses are encouraged
to attend.
The seminars are 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Jan. 26 to 29 (Retirement).
You must be registered by
Command Career Counselor.
For more information, call
573-4513.

Base-wide indoctrination
scheduled Jan. 13
Base Wide Indoctrination,
held at the Navy College, Bldg.
1030, provides a program that
familiarizes you with the Kings
Bay Submarine Base, facili-
ties and services. Spouses are


Permission of the Publisher
Victor H. Krulak, a decorated Marine Corps officer who saw action in World War II, Korea and
Vietnam, authored First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps.


Medal for his performance
during that period.
His son, retired Gen. Charles


encouraged to attend. Due to
limited seating, do not bring
children
This workshop is sched-
uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Jan. 13. You must be regis-
tered by Command Training
Coordinator. For more infor-
mation, call 573-4513.

Job search workshop
has upcoming dates
A job search workshop will


Krulak, served as comman-
dant from 1995 to 1999.
Funeral services were set


be 1 to 3 p.m. Jan. 22. The
Family Employment Readiness
Program gives assistance,
information and referrals
on employment and educa-
tion resource opportunities.
Services are available to fam-
ily members of military per-
sonnel, retiring and separat-
ing military, and family mem-
bers of relocating civil service
personnel. Appointments are
required. Call 573-4513 to reg-
ister.

Resume writing class
shows how
This class explores resume
writing for today's job mar-
ket. Resume "stuff', including
skills, experience, education
and values as well as sim-
ple, effective and easy to use
resume formats that get job
interviews.
Part-time, full time or per-
manent positions matters not,
this workshop is for you. This
program will assist the job
seeker in completing a product


for 2 p.m. Jan. 8 at the chapel
at Marine Corps Air Station
Miramar, Calif.





that will "get them in the door."
The workshop is scheduled at
the Fleet & Family Support
Center 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
on Jan. 20.
Registration is highly rec-
ommended, as class is limited
to 20 seats.
For more information, call
573-4513.

Sponsorship training
covers many topics
The Fleet and FamilySupport
Center is offering Sponsorship
Training to all Command
Representatives. This training
will cover topics to including
letter writing, transportation,
temporary lodging, orienta-
tion to installation and expla-
nation of Command mission.
The workshop is scheduled
at the Fleet & Family Support
Center from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on
Jan. 12.
Registration is highly rec-
ommended, as class is limited
to 20 seats. For more informa-
tion, call 573-4513.


THE


LOCATION
A RAZORS EDGE
ACE HARDWARE
ACE HARDWARE
AFFORDABLE INSURANCE
AIRWAVES
AMOCO GAS
ARMY SURPLUS STORE
BENNETT CHEVEROLET
BENNETT CHRYSLER JEEP
BIG DADDY'S BBQ
BP GAS
CAMDEN COUNTY LIBRARY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHARLTON COUNTY
CHEVRON
CITY HALL
COLERAIN OAKS
COMFORT SHOWCASE BY LANE
CUMBERLAND INN & SUITES
DICKS WINGS
DIVERS DEN
DOLLAR GENERAL STORE
DRY CLEANERS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
HALL'S BEACH STORE
HARDEE'S RES.
HESS FOODS
HILLIARD PHARMACY
KING FOOD STORE
KMART
LIL CHAMP FOOD STORE
MAIL AND MORE
MAIL OR MORE
MAIL PLUS
MARKET ON THE SQUARE
MOM AND POP #1
MOM AND POP #2
MOM AND POP #3
MOM AND POP #5
MOM AND POP #7
MOM AND POP #8
MOM AND POP #9
NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


K ING
F-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
ADDRESS
4515 HWY 40 E SUITE C
SR 40
1282 SR 40
2803-K OSBORNE RD
1000 E KING AVE UNIT 2
US HWY 301
HWY 17
HWY 40
HWY 40
SR 200 & CR 107
US HWY 17&A1A
1410 SR 40 E
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
JOEY OR HAMP WILL DELIVER
1330 E BOONE AVE
OSBORNE RD
2716 OSBORNE RD
HWY 40
HWY 40
139 CITY SMITTY DR
MARINER'S VILLAGE
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD & A1A.
A1A@PKWY
S. 8TH ST & SADLER RD.
ATLANTIC AVE. & S FLETCHER AVE.
SADLER RD.& WILL HARDEE RD.
195 & SR 200
SADLER RD & S. FLETCHER AVE.
S. KINGS RD.
A1A @ PKWY
N. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD..
1601 SR 40 E
ATLANTIC AVE. & S. 10TH ST.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #8
994 E KINGS BAY RD
K-BAY CROSSING
100 OSBORNE RD
3380 SR 40 (BROWNTOWN)
946 POINT PETER RD
915 DILWORTH
1875 SPUR 40 (CROOKED RIVER)
100 ALEX DR (SHADOWLAWN)
2800 COLERAIN (SUGARMILL)
1371 SR 40 E(THE LAKES)
569 SPUR 40


I NflATINu


CITY
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
WOODBINE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
YULEE
YULEE
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
CHARLTON
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
KINGSLAND
FERNANDINA BEACH
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S


AnDRE.qR


PATRICIA ANN'S RES.
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
QUALITY AUTOS
QUALITY AUTOS
RAMADA INN
RAMADA INN
SALVATION ARMY
SALVATION ARMY
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHELL
SHELL
SHELL GAS
SMILE GAS
SONNY'S BBQ
SONNY'S BBQ
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SPRINT STORE
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
STEAMBOAT LILLY'S
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUPER TEST GAS
SUPER TEST GAS
THE PIG BBQ
TNT LANES
TNT LANES
UPS STORE
UPS STORE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WATSON REALTY
WATSON REALTY
WAYFARA RES
WHISTLE STOP
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE #168
WINN DIXIE #168
WOODBINE LIBRARY
WOODBINE LIBRARY
Updated: FEBRUARY 1, 2007


S. KINGS RD.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
9 QUALITY RD
9 QUALITY RD
1215 SR 40 E
1215 SR 40 E
1901 OSBORNE RD
1901 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
N. KINGS RD. A1A & N KINGS RD.
SADLER RD.
1380 E BOONE AVE
1380 E BOONE AVE
KENNETH GAY DR
KENNETH GAY DR
JONAS RD. LEM TURNER RD.
101 HERB BAUER DR
101 HERB BAUER DR
S. KINGS RD.
102 ST MARY'S ST W
102 ST MARY'S ST W
N KINGS RD.
S. 8TH ST.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
2210 OSBORNE
2210 OSBORNE
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
SR 40 E
SR 40 E
6588 SR 40
6588 SR 40
2015 OSBORNE RD
2015 OSBORNE RD
195 & SR 200
N. KINGS RD.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
S.8TH ST.IN WALMART PLAZA
SR 200 --A1A
CAMDEN CORNERS
CAMDEN CORNERS
311 CAMDEN AVENUE
311 CAMDEN AVENUE


HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
YULEE
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
WOODBINE
WOODBINE


PIK P OU PRICE TANYO TEE OATIN 1


T*~baseq ejessatien Cassa


anuary 12, 15, 20, 22

:30-6:30pm

To register, contact Jessica Landreth

at (912) 882-7295


Eg ; Iit


I


LvUnl I lMnmu i coa L I..













12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


Female M

By Cpl. Aaron Rooks
2nd Marine Logistics Group
Two Female Marines from
the 2nd Marine Logistics
Group came together this hol-
iday season to donate more
than 26 inches of hair to finan-
cially disadvantaged children.
Cpl. Kendra Hernandez, a
legal clerk with Headquarters
and Service Company, Combat
Logistics Regiment 27, 2nd
MLG, and Cpl. Kimberly Pike,
an administrative clerk with
the 2nd MLG Administrative
Section, cut off 14 and 12 inch-
es of their hair respectively to
give to Locks for Love.
The non-profit organization
provides hair pieces to chil-


[arines give up locks for
dren under the age of 18 who states and Canada. With con- ble with the p
suffer from long-term medical tinued support, the organiza- The Powell, V
hair loss. According to Locks tion will move closer to its goal she originally
for Love, recipients suffer pri- of helping "every financially of hair, which
marily from an autoimmune disadvantaged child suffering for donating.
disorder called alopecia area- from long term hair loss." be sure that t
ta, which causes hair follicles The organization also strives would have
to shut down. In addition to to return a sense of self-confi- help someone
loss of scalp hair, many lose dence and normalcy to chil- to grow an e:
their eyelashes, eyebrows and dren affected by hair loss. those next twc
all body hair. Many children are embar- "Children ar
"It benefits kids and young rassed about their conditions they don't kn
adults;'," said Pike, a native of and receive ridicule from oth- mother of a
Wilson, N.C. "I wanted to cut ers growing up, often with- daughter. "Mo
my hair anyway, so this was drawing themselves from nor- understand wl
a great way for me to help mal childhood and adolescent children suff
another person in need." activities, according to the loss and there
Donations from individu- organization's Web site. act with them.
als like these Marines have This loss of self-confidence The two N
contributed to Locks for Love and normalcy in others was that it would b
helping more than 2,000 chil- what motivated Hernandez to female Marir
dren to date throughout all 50 grow her hair as long as possi- because of ho


love
plan of donating.
Wyo. native said
had 10 inches
is the minimum
She wanted to
the organization
enough hair to
e, so she chose
extra four inches
months.
re afraid of what
now," said Pike,
15-month-old
st childrenwon't
hat's wrong with
ring from hair
fore won't inter-

Marines agreed
be easy for other
ines to donate
w often they cut


Marine Corps photo
Cpl. Kimberly Pike, left, and Cpl. Kendra Hernandez donated
more than 26 inches of their hair to Locks of Love.


their hair to shorter lengths.
They hope that others will see


their efforts and join in to help
others in need.


Watch your step when you go out for that long jog or run


From the Sub Base Safety
Department
So you're a jogger or,
excuuuse me, a runner!
Joggers and runners do
much of their training on city
streets. Their faster speed and
their lesser attire make them
less visible to traffic. Running
or jogging comes with its fair
share of natural injuries so it
makes sense taking precau-
tions to prevent unnatural
accidents, the kinds usually
caused by the bumper of a
car.
The Navy says that, "At night,
or in periods of reduced visibil-
ity, personnel are encouraged
to wear reflective clothing or
other reflective garments when
running, jogging, walking, or
traveling near roadways."
It continues to state that
"Individuals are not autho-
rized to run, jog or walk in the
roadways during high traffic
density and peak traffic peri-
ods. Personnel jogging on a
Navy installation roadway shall
jog facing oncoming traffic,
in single file and obey traffic
rules. Wearing portable head-
phones, earphones, cellular
hands-free devices, iPods, or
other listening devices while
running and jogging, in road-
ways and streets impairs rec-
ognition of emergency signals,
alarms, announcements, and
the approach of emergency
vehicles. Use of these devices
while performing the noted
activities on Navy installations
is prohibited."
The following good safety
tips apply to off-duty/off base
as well:
Stay on the sidewalk!
Unless you're running with
a 200-pound rubber bumper
wrapped around your knees,
you cannot compete with
traffic for space on asphalt.
Runners that insist on running
right on the road are difficult
to see and unpredictable.
Runners on busy city streets
antagonize all drivers against
runners and make it worse for
everybody else.
There are six exceptions
to the "stay off the street" rule
where the street is better than
the sidewalk: an organized
road race, a quiet residential or


4 BEDROOMS


country road, a road without
sidewalks, a time of day where
traffic is virtually nonexistent,
sidewalks which are hazard-
ous because of icy conditions,
or to sidestep a sidewalkwhich
presents a temporary hazard
greater than running on the
street such as an aggressive
animal or a construction site.
Run or jog facing traffic as
much as possible.
If you are running or jog-
ging on a road and a car is
approaching without taking a
wide berth, don't challenge the
car or try to "hold your ground"'
Swallow your pride and get off
the road even if it means stop-
ping for a moment.
If you are involved in a
near accident or a danger-
ous or aggressive maneuver
by a driver, try to remember
the license number and report
the incident to the police.
Unless you are in training for
a heavyweight boxing bout,
thin and lightly-clad joggers
(angry though they may be)
are no match for testosterone-
overdosed drivers nor is there
anything to gain from a shov-
ing match or fisticuffs with
a drunk or "mentally-chal-
lenged" driver.
If a car appears to be fol-
lowing you at low speed, jog
calmly into a public building
and call the police and from
safety, try to get the license
number and watch the vehi-
cle's reaction. If the vehicle
reacts in such a way as to indi-
cate that you were or are being
followed, call the police. If you
are far from public buildings,
a residence can be used as a
refuge-of-last-resort.
Don't run on a nagging
injury or skimp on the stretch-
ing before your run. Why is
this a safety issue, you ask?
Because stretching can alert
you to a pull or a strain which
might stop your run midway
and in the middle of nowhere.
Also, stretching will minimize
the risk of pulled muscles
during your run or jog, thus
minimizing the risk of having
to stop midway through your
run.
Always carry a cell phone
with you. Spraining your ankle
on a can, stick or rock you did
not see, some six miles from


home, is painful so use your
phone to have someone come
and pick you up! In addition,
accidents like this could hap-
pen in crime areas of a city,
late at night or during a cold
spell. We recommend one
piece of paper money because
it will be easier to slip into a
sock or is less likely to jump
out of a pocket.
Double-knot your laces
before leaving. You may not
notice an untied lace until it
trips you or, worse, you may
suddenly need to avoid an
object, person or vehicle and
the sudden movement causes
you to step on your untied
lace, aggravating the danger-
ous situation.
When crossing a road,
always use the "look thrice"
rule which means looking for
traffic coming from the direc-
tion closest to the curb, look-
ing the other way and then
checking one last time in the
direction closest to the curb.
The reason for this is twofold.
First, small vehicles such as
roller-bladers or bicycles may
evade your peripheral vision
at first glance. By the moment
of your second scan, they will
have moved into your periph-
eral vision. Also, runners or
joggers tend to "deep think"
when jogging, or might be
engrossed in conversation
with a partner. This reduces
the runner's attentiveness to
hazards. The "look thrice" rule
will become a habit and will
eliminate many hazardous sit-
uations which were not caught
by a cursory first glance.
Do not jog or run with
a walkman or portable radio
or music-player under any
circumstances. Some serious
injuries can be avoided given a
moment's notice of an onrush-
ing vehicle. Earphones will rob
you of that chance by virtually
eliminating your hearing. You
will be oblivious to car horns
or hollers to "watch out."
Avoid running or jogging in
darkness. If you must, always
tell someone what your route
is and how long you expect
it to last. That way, in case of


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serious assault or injury, you
have a person to rely on to
search for you.
For night jogging/running,
always wear clothing with
reflective articles. At the very
least, wear light colored cloth-
ing.
For winter running or jog-
ging, always carry a warm hat
with you. Even though you
may not need a hat to keep
your head warm while actu-
ally running, you will freeze
without it if you have to stop.
Too much perspiration is bet-
ter than any amount of hypo-
thermia or frostbite. The body
loses 30 percent of its heat
from the head. Even here is


the South, the temperatures
can drop into the 20s and 30's
at times.
If you twist your ankle on
an object, try to fall and roll
loosely into the twist. This may
result in some scraping of the
skin on the hand or elbows
but it will minimize the sprain.
Unless you are fully confident
that the sprain is extremely
minor, and there is no swell-
ing, walk or take the bus home.
A properly treated sprain will
heal much faster than if you
continue to run on it right after
the sprain.
The biggest constant threat
to urban runners is alleys or
driveways from which cars


could emerge at any time. A
runner must learn to constant-
ly monitor the path before
them and anticipate vehicles
at every cross-path.
While running in pairs or
a group, exercise extreme cau-
tion if you are running side-
by-side, especially on country
roads. Cars coming up behind
you could result in one try-
ing to pass another with the
back car having not seen you,
crossing the yellow line and
engaging on the side on which
you are jogging at high, pass-
ing speed. The runner on the
extremity would be in grave
danger of sudden impact at
great speed.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 13


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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009







TPeriscoPe
KINGS BAY. EEORG I A


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


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incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for
any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbrevia-
tions are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.

kf, The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


ssifie


CLASSIFIED INDEX


Auctions Employment


Real Estate for Rent Merchandise


Financial Transportation

E2 M 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at
no additional charge.


KINSBAY Share lare Area Salale Distributionships/ pot es
POSTAL WORKER COME ON PEOPLE
nus mon gmale.POst office now hiring, This is ridiculous! Week
Clubs and Organizations E r N& Pool. 912-510-9676 average pay $20/ hour, after week I run ads for
Cls Commercial/IndustrialCommercial/Industrial Business Opportunities 57K a year, including different departments in
Rides/Travel For Sale Fr Sale Distributionships/ ot organization & get
Notices Commercial/Industrial Commercial/Industrial Franchises affiliated with USPS are no gimmicks, no
Personals For Rent For Rent Ficticious Names whohires1-866-748-8707 prfacors anwehave
Businesses For Sale Businesses For Sale everything anybody else
Dating and Kingsbay FinancialServices can offer, in other
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O$425 each, *take income, but all the good-
Office Space For Rent ne or bth. Office Space For Rent Mortgages Bought/Sold ies too, Commissions &
L t n RaFrUtilities incl.iMortgages
Retail ForSale mie from KB Retail For Sale Incentives, vacations,
R etaFr.Ren ersOkay. p C1 l Ri Fork-ent Thank you! trips, rewards, health,
Retail For Rent er omkaY. mCal Retail For RentBdental, life & vision
LOST CALICO CAT- 4 St Johns Commercial/ 80s-598-3163. St. Johns Commercial/ 9 Besides protecngour insurance and a 401(k).
white paws, Greenland Industrial ForSale Industrial ForSale count,.military Starting income, up to
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St. Johns Commercial/ St. Johns Commercial/ entral Florida locations personnel stationed in You can even qualify for
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St Johns Businesses St. Johns Businesses donated 610,620 far, doesn't it? That's
For Sale Atlantic Beach /Ocean- For Sale hours of lunteer why i can't understand
ink-435 naostr why in the world you
Florida Nurse Historian St. Johns Office Space a 4/ ear bh. St. Johns Office Space service in Northeast wouldn't investigate this
Florida Nure isoran Sto eSpce $2500 mo. 411 Snapping
searching for nursing For Sale Turtle Ct E. 708-0731 For Sale Rodda and Southeast opportunity. This week
pin issued by St. I'm hiring for sales in
Vincent's Hospital St Johns Office Space St. Johns Office Space Georgialast year. our Jacksonville office:
School of Nursing. High- $ Noan For Rent For Rent heirttme was n t No Experience neces-
issue. David 352-542-7259 St Johns Retail For Sale St. Johns Retail For Sale Private Instruction community Call Harold, 680-0577, or
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1-800-733-5342, 24 HRS. publications dis- vents scouting and more. TELESALES $10hr to
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ORANGE PARK 1/1, i l M-Th 8-5, Fri 8-3. Sales
comfortably urn, quiet local bases in the Fr R t 4kl- exp. req. 645-0707 ext. 300
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$0 DOWN! Atlantic Beach Town-
hu$0 DOWN! A lant kesj I A rea lPlk CDL TRAINING IN JUST WEEKS! PARATRANSIT
Ifyounhavlandor of Atlantic Beach. 2BR .8. i DRIVERS NEEDED
plus loft 2-1/2baths, fire- l fimpe lM d Must have good driving
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land isourCRESfT!!! p lgranitded appliances.i M' Must be 25 years or older
Enjoy morning coffee CDL & P-endorsement a
LUV HOMES looking at a lagoon and C t2- Call Lisa 493-5246
fountain from Your or Tracy 493-5262
904-772-8031 screened back porch.
Fenced courtyard, $1,200 ___________
per month. Available
immediately. Call (904) Drivers
233-3881 or (904)
556-9184. N Need 14 Full Time
bord m e to o *DRIVERS
20+ CRES& HosesMust have good DL
20+ ACRES & lmnegtI record, & be 25 yrs old.
NEW BARN Unfurnished M9 Can earn $700 weekly!
Only $119,900_HONDACIVIC 9 12 8 8 2" d0Call1493-5228 or Valerie
Onl $119,900 HODA CI 9 12 -8 8 5 0 899-3368 M-F 9am- 4pm.
New 22X30 Post&beam EX898 2dr""
barn built on 20+ coun- coupe, 78Kmi,
subdivide. Near FL/GA i mai nt gained, $0 Move in- No Deposit
border 90 minutes orag. owner,
Jacksonville. Excellent newtires. 904-771-0699 DRIVERS/
financing! Call now 1t nt FR I TRAINEES NEEDED
1-800-898-4409, x.2171 ORANGE PK- 4/2, fenced 1 St Month FREE Covenant needs
yd, newly remodeled, 9 OTR Truckers NOW!
$950/mo, Ist/last/sec. 380 Cheapest Climate control in Camden Co.. A No exp needed!
__ Gano. 904-653-1117 We Beat all Climate Control Prices! $700+/wk ear ningo
Re WedTownhoeuse 2/2 Call Mark: 912-552-2615 2 1 AMASTE.I lWWW.ROAfDMISTER.COM AvoabbemTrainingOW
Kingiand. GA: enw piyn Downtown Kingsland 1409 PICIETTIILE RE ROD 800-820-4521
Attractive tiled and ami- ---___ _
1 6 3 3 s q. ft. nate flooring 2
3BR/2BA home car parking $850.00m THE O AT MILL TAPARTMENTS
faorsale. Open owner 912-729-3252. THE OAKS AT MILL CREEK APARTMENTS
floor plan e
w/spacious rropoms, Yu I e e
cobblestone repolac,. 3B BA COME LEASE TODAY! SAVE BIG!
car garage, fenced back cul-de-sac 1.75
yard, 400 sq. ft. screen acres
porch and much, much .I w/kitchen,
GABLESand motivatedVisitICROLIN DIRECT
http;//www.infotube.net/ whether big FL roomlG A BL
190940 to get a full w/new pool tabe RESIDENTIALT
descriptio an.d to see $1,600mo & sec. dep RESIDENTIAL
pictures of this amazing ( option to bu y )
home. Call Stacy at 904-583-4425 officially
912-8 823507 to ask ues a reassigned. Only 10 miles away from NAS Jacksonville
viewing.___t and Mayport Naval Station 10% off for all military
Kin gsland- WhY s support THE OAKS AT MILL CREEK personnel & dependents
a landlord when you can
OWN for about $750/mo. WESTSIDE -TIMUQUANA 653 Monument Road
NEW 3/2, in Kingsland MOVE IN SPECIAL. $50 off 65 on umenti R oad
for only $99,900. Built by 2 & 3br's $425- $550 Jacksonville, Florida 32225
Dave Addink 954-328-3513 + dep. 904-771-3811 Phone (904) 727-0898 536230
Buying a Home?P
Contact your VA Don't cheat yourself,
Home Loan Expert- treat yourself!
Laurie M. Potter
YNCM (USN Ret) Enjoy Beach s, a
Buying, Selling or StartingJ atA O LF

(904) 256-205 Laurie for any of your
Cell (904) 463-2065 financing needs, including L n
Email: laurie potter VA, FHA, home equity orYear Long
@countrywide.com conventional loans.
Website: 6 006 I e
www.countlywidelocal. .. ... eff. 1,2,&3 Bedroom Apts. Clubhouse,
com/lauriepotter i Ue 3 Pools, Balconies
4601 tond 3190 HOME LOANSAPARTMENTS

Brick with over 1800 sq. ft NCALL NOW (904) 2495611
3/2 473 South Cherry St. $900/mo. Kingsland Neptune Beach (Corner of Penman & Seagate)
(Move in Special $700 for 1st Month Rent) J
Large Fenced Backyard! ob I
3/2 256 Cypress Ave.* $985/mo. Kingsland
1 Mile from NSB Kings Bay Historic Avondale We are interview
3/2 304Woodlawn Dr*$825/mo.St. Marys RIVIERA PARKWAY RN, CNA & L


WOWzA APTS Linda Pinson C
[iK REALTY Q3 ^31- Friday, January 9, 2:
912-882-5151 www.wowzarely.com 2798 St. Johns Ae.


r o more znformatron


AC, Heating, Fuel Adopt a Pet
Antiques Pets & Supplies
Appliances Livestock & Supplies
Arts & Crafts ivesies
Auctions Animals Wanted
Building Supplies Mercedes-Benz
Business/0ffice Equipment
Clothes 2003 E320
Collectibles Boston Terriers, Shih Black/Black Sun-
Computer tzu's, Maltipoo's, Regis- roof, CD, loaded,
Craft/Thrift Stores 912-322-6933 or 322-6 new body style!
Electronics $17,951
Estate Sales I 20 K
Fanm/Ding 2004 SLK 230
Farm/Plantinges Kompreasor pe-
Fruits/Vegetables cial Ed. loaded w/
Furniture/Household Aviation automatic trans
Garage Sales Boats and only 46K miles
Garden/Lawn Sailboats $21,952
Hot Tubs/Spas ailoas
Jewelry/Watches Boat Dockage & Rentals 2002 CL500
Kid's Stuff Marine Equipment Comfort Pkg.
Machinery & Tools & Supplies electronic trunk
closer, only 43K
Medical RV Rentals Mil Purchased
Miscellaneous Merchandise RV's & Suppliers Here Traded Here
Musical Merchandise Motorcycles & Mini Bikes $25,954
Portable Buildphyings Auto Brokers 2006 R Class
Public Sales Auto Parts pano roof, Harmon
Sporting Goods Antiques/Classics Kardon stereo,
navi, pwr liftgate
Tickets Automobiles $27,951
Trailers Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Wanted to Buy or Trade 2006 SLK w/only
Wanted to Buy or Trade Vans/Buses 16K miles, auto
$2000 or Less pwr seats, sat
Commercial Vehicles radio, Vavrona
SG nsstop Misc. Auto trim pkg. $31,951
Stove GE new Autos/Trucks Wanted 2006 ML350
3-Pc set,4
burner/sim- Auto Rent/Lease 19" sport wheels
mer overhead Harmon
vNenit. GD E Kardon Stereo
Nentilus Dishwasher T iI po/aa onl
$600/OBO. Officially IpodIsat radio only
reassigned. 904-583-4425 15Kmi 3.99% APR
W1 3 9' Sea.ra.y $34,949
Washer/Der y Yacht for sale
Kenmore, light 1990, express
beige, good cruiser twin 2006 E320 CDi
condition $300 454 engine diesel, leather Sun
OBO (904) runs great,.oo C, cn
491-7996. beautiful interior $70,000 Roof, CD, changer
9- 1 (305) 731-9962. Loaded w/low
Eu mn 2007 CLS500 only
4K miles! loaded
Party Event Business a w/keyless go, nav
For Sale Everything Propel ler 21' voice control
From Casino to Wed- p itch Mer $59,951
ding. Call 904-728-5182 cruiser. Call
St | (H) 904-261-0134 20078550
$240.00. 2007 550
* |Jrnitu____ Blackw/Cashmere
loaded w/naviga-
l Mtion Parktronic,
S Lazyboy Sat radio $59,954
good condition
$50.00 or best Harley Sports- Car Fax Proudly
J offer. Call ter 2004 1200 Displayed On
912-882-2339 custom. 8000
onylee sPearlntor


9R 912-510-7104 ) Honda CBR 2006
hi te,0saddle


leave message. m 2 I e 2s. 00
---- 1 owner. Garage
kept, rear seat :
B and cowl wind-
BARGAIN HUNTERS 74-et 5578sh Excellent cndi- 88,000
This Sat & Sun Have T 04, 3 K m ies OBO. 904-223-1732
50The Market Placeora ti Kept $29650000 OBO. CallOYOTA AVALON
e Bakes 9576Like New $22980
99125070 203 or (904) 4CBR 2006
ee'00LExUS mF JACKs25NVILLE00


lies. m One AlVh icle
oBARGAIN HUNTERS 674-5578. 2001./"$30 hw -y8000
Call 912-882-2339. LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLEORESuuki Savage miles runs strong$6500



T Crib, ike new LS 2004 lightles B. 904-223-1732
Your Gano scratches gold, beige
7059 Ramona, 78-LAExcellent condi-'08 leather interiorTouring Edition
iroof, b (301ow NADA Re Nw $22,980ale
I$13,500 OBO Call (904) P 8-rice$23080012




24 05091. LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE

0 Volkswagen
SPachmayr Beetle 2001 Ford Escape
"riapp fo rei G S-yT# 02" 53 gHreatcon



igreatcondition. black leather ditio Kmiles
Grmodel 03265 interior, 60K $7000 OBO
ion $50 C miles, 5 speed black, roofrack,
S912-882-2339. 35 mpg, cold A/C, Tow packageNov,


S(912) AM/FM, Cassetlowte, CD 4WD (904) Retil225-0509 Oe
0 Vented Mani- 904-491-7996. -
| paid $1300.00 0 Toyota Camry PATHFINDER SE
cure bowl all $120.00$13,500 OBO Cal Price $15,49 998-0012
882-6672. 912-409-2234. LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
Fa hmyrVolkswagen


Us for Our


Fair!

ing ON-SITE for
PN positions!

conference Room
00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
call: (912) 466-3100


TI


$102,900 -$17,90


LsthnI m iefo ingsBayNaal as

CallHamockCov ono


AFFORDABLE LU


*i *
ESTWO Oii KSAPRTMN'
1000 EdwoodRd ilar 94 8522


SOUTHEAST GEORGIA
HEALTH SYSTEM




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009 15


$41,995


wwwcaitoauoexres co 9 800May@0 Roa, AlntcBec,5L323 *(04 415599Hor:*oda-atray90-

Cr dt0 x en s u je tto c edt veiic t o. I


I I I I l li-l] 'r iMT


To list your dealership,

please call

904-359-4321


Before you buy, shop these local dealerships first!


ACURA OF ORANGE PARK
7200 Blanding Blvd.
777-5600



AUDI JACKSONVILLE
4660-100 Southside Blvd.
565-4000



TOM BUSH BMW
JACKSONVILLE
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH BMW
ORANGE PARK
6914 Blanding Blvd
777-2500


GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060


CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111

NIMNICHT CADILLAC
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700

PARKER CADILLAC
375 Belz Outlet Blvd
(904)824-9181


NIMNICET CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com


GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

GORDON CHEVY
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200

JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567

JERRY HAMM CHEV
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036

PINEVIEW CHEVROLET
Macclenny 259-6117


ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
2330 US1 South 354-4421

CARUSO CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
10979 Atlantic Blvd. 904-642-0000
www.carusocjd.com

GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Spdngs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

MIKE SHAD CHRYSLER JEEP
1736 Cassat Ave. 389-7792

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454


ATLANTIC DODGE
2330 US1 South 3544421

CARUSO CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
10979 Atlantic Blvd. 904-642-0000
www.carusocjd.com


JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

ORANGE PARK DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454

WESTSIDE DODGE
1672 Cassat Ave. 384-6561


BOZARD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
St. Augustine 824-1641
Florida's Super Duty
Headquarters
PAIl. CLARlK FORERCURY
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673
GARBER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com
MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325
MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060

MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673



NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy
854-4826


.GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900

LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300

LUCAS HONDA OF JAX
7801 Blanding Blvd. 269-2277


HYUNDAI OF ORANGE PARK
7600 Blanding Blvd. 899-0900
KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060



ATLANTIC INFINm
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200


CITY ISUZU
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
www.cityautomotive.com



ATLANTIC JEEP
2330 US 1 South
354-4421

CARUSO CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
10979 Atlantic Bl. 904-642-0000
www.carunisocjd.com

GARER JEEP
Green Cove Springs
264-2416
www.garberautomall.com


JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS.
493-0000

MIKE SHAD CHRYS-JEEP
ON CASSAT
1736 Cassat Ave. 389-7792

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454



LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd. 721-5000
LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.com



NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN MERCURY
4620 Southside Blvd. 642-4100

MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


LOTUS OF JACKSONVILLE
www.lotusoliacksonville.com
11650 BEACH BLVD. 998-9992



TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

MAZDA CITY
6916 Blanding Blvd. 779-0600



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080


MERCEDES BENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 777-5900


TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911


CITY MITSUBISHI
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
565-2489
www.cityautomotlve.com



MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 Cassat Ave.
3893621
PARKER NISSAN
2755 U.S. 1 South, St Aug.
904-794-9990
MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
1565 Wells Rd.
269-9400
COGGIN NISSAN-ATLANTI1C
10600 Atlantic Blvd.
888-519-0818
COGGIN NISSAN-AVENUES
10859 Philips Hwy.
888-542-4858


GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com
JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577
NIMNICHT PONTIAC GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy.
854-4826


BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155


NIMNICHT SAAB
7999 Blanding Blvd, Jax
904-778-7700
www.nimnicht.com


SATURN OF AVENUES
10863 Philips Hwy. 262-7145

SATURN OF ORANGE PARK
8105 Blanding Blvd.
779-0071
SATURN OF REGENCY
8600 Atlantic Blvd. 725-8200
8600 Atlantic Blvd.
725-8200



SUBARU OF JACKSONVILLE
10800 Atlantic Blvd.
641-6455



CITYSUZUKI
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
www.dtyautomotive.com



KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circle.
771-9100
ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 CassatAve. 389-4561


VW OF ORANGE PARK
1481 Wells Road 269-2603


TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100



O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486


PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694






BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
www.beachblvdautomotlve.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511

BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd.
724-1080

LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd.
998-0012

TOM BUSH BMW
9910 Atlantic Blvd.
3714381

TOM BUSH MINI
USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd.
371-4877

WORLD IMPORTS
www.woddimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.


B543367,


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 8, 2009


'rS


4 BeyeRS M*META^ A


08 CR-V EXL
oSRP 26/
YOUR PRICE 23,w995


08 CR-V LX
.MSRP P2, 370
YOUR PRICE 19,495


08 Ridgeline RTL
MsRp 33,4760
vOUR PRICE 26995


ij| 08 Ridgeline RT
M.R s$2 670
YOUR PRICE $/2 995


AS LOW AS


08 Element LX
NSRP, 20,450
YOUR PRICE 6, 995


Car buying made easy...
* Lifetime Limited Power Train Warranty
* 6 complimentary Oil Changes


08 Element EX
SRP. 22.460
YOUR PRICE /6 995


Ft OuVAL HO#oA EXPER/Ef#cE


* Free service loaners
* One stop shopping experience.


* Deal only with a manager
and drive home!


A ^1325 Cassat Avenue, Jacksonville
Ea ^ (904) 899-19001(866) 277-7221
~ vmawww.duvalhonda.com
*Excludes Nonda Fit. Prices limited to available units in stock until supplies last Art for Illustration purposes only, pdces valid on date of publication only, prior sale subject to early deadlines, not responsible for typographical errors.


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