Group Title: Kings Bay periscope
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098617/00099
 Material Information
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher: Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: December 11, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly[july 1988-]
biweekly[ former 1979-june 1988]
weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay -- Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
Coordinates: 30.791 x -81.537 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body: Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note: Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note: Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098617
Volume ID: VID00099
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881

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It's snowing
Winter in Wonderland
draws enthusiastic crowd

Page 13


Write On
Get MC3 Eric Tretter's take
on maintaining the holiday spirit

Page 3


TRF Friday
Sailors make weekly
visits to area schools

Pages 6,7


Vol. 43 Issue 48


Shinseki


VA leader


By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service


President-elect Barack
Obama has selected retired
Army Chief of Staff Gen. Eric K.
Shinseki as his nominee to be
secretary of veterans affairs.
"As we seek a new national
security strategy that uses all
elements of American power,
we must also remember those
who run the greatest risks
and make
the greatest
sacrifices to
implement
that strategy
- the men
and women
who wear
the uniform
of the United
States of Shinseki
Ame r ric a,"
the presi-
dent-elect said in an-nounc-
ing his choice.
Obama echoed the words
of Abraham Lincoln when he
said the nation has a sacred
trust to serve those who have
borne the cost of battle.
"We must show them and
their families the same devo-
tion that they have shown this
country," he said.
If confirmed by the Senate,
Shinseki will succeed retired
Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) James B.
Peake in leading the second-
largest federal department,
with 240,000 employees. Some
23.4 million veterans are alive
today, and the department
is their point of contact for
compensation and pensions,
medical care, education and
training, home loans and other
benefits. Last year, the VA had
a budget of $93.4 billion.
The government must do


www.subasekb.navy.mil www.kingsbayperiscope.com THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2008


takes sWest


rship


everything it can to help those
veterans who suffer "from
the signature injuries of the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan -
post-traumatic stress disorder
and traumatic brain injury,"
Obama said in Chicago.
Obama also promised to
help those who leave the ser-
vice to find work.
The United States needs to
modernize the VA, cut red tape
there and eliminate shortfalls,
the president-elect said.
"That is the kind of VA that
will serve our veterans as well
as they have served us," he
said. "And there is no one
more distinguished, more
determined, or more qualified
to build this VA than the leader
I am announcing as our next
secretary of veterans affairs
- General Eric Shinseki.
"No one will ever doubt that
this former Army chief of staff
has the courage to stand up
for our troops and our veter-
ans," he continued. "No one
will ever question whether he
will fight hard enough to make
sure they have the support
they need."
Shinseki retired as chief of
staff in 2003 after a four-year
term. He graduated from the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point, N.Y., and served two
combat tours in Vietnam as a
young officer. He lost part of his
foot in Vietnam, was awarded
three Bronze Star awards and
two Purple Hearts.
Shinseki said today's veter-
ans "are a part of an unbro-
ken line of heroes that stretch-
es back to the American
Revolution.' Still, there are
veterans worried about keep-
ing their health care or homes,
he said.
See Shinseki on Page 5


Pearl Harbor rem em bered Navy photo by MC3 Jeremy S. Brandt
Wreaths adorn the USS Arizona Memorial Dec. 6 in preparation for events scheduled for
Pearl Harbor Day at the memorial. The wreaths serve as a tribute to service members killed
during the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. President George W. Bush named the USS
Arizona Memorial as one of five Hawaiian sites to become part of the World War II Valor
in the Pacific National Monument. More photos on Page 15.


Development guide available


From Center for Personal and
Professional Development Public
Affairs
The Center for Personal and
Professional Development
completed the 2009 edition of
the Naval Leader Development
Guide and posted it to Navy
Knowledge Online Dec. 4.
"In this year's edition of
the guide, you will find not
only the annual calendar with
important dates every naval
leader should know but a
host of other resources that
will help in your day-to-day
activities," said Capt. Jonathan
Picker, CPPD commanding
officer. "From course listings
that Sailors can use to further


their development to planning
worksheets Sailors can use to
organize professional growth."
NLDG brings together myr-
iad information. This year's
edition includes a 15-month
calendar (January 2009 to
March 2010); a complete list
of CPPD courses and services;
Navy and Marine Corps selec-
tion board and fitness report
and evaluation schedules; and
the Navy and Marine Corps
Professional Reading Program
lists.
Also returning is the personal
and professional development
section, which includes plan-
ning steps; goal development
assistance and worksheets;


and the mentoring compass.
Commands can download
the portable document format
version of the guide free from
NKO or order copies from the
Document Automation and
Production Service by logging
on to the Naval Forms Online
Web site navalforms.daps.
dla.mil/web/public/home
and ordering by Navy Stock
Number 0115-LF-133-4800.
To download the 2009 Naval
Leader Development Guide,
visit www.nko.navy.mil and
select the leadership link. The
guide can be downloaded as
either a PDF file for printing or
as an Excel file for importing
into Microsoft Outlook.


named


MCPON
By MC2(SW) Rebekah
Blowers
Chief of Naval Operations
Public Affairs
Chief of Naval Operations
Adm. GaryRougheadannounc-
ed his selection of Fleet Master
Chief (SS/SW) Rick D. West,
as the 12th Master Chief Petty
Officer of the Navy, Dec. 5.
West is serving as Fleet
M a s t e r
Chief, U.S.
Fleet Forces
Command,
and pre-
viously
served as
Fleet Master
Chief, U.S.
Pacific Fleet.
He brings West
to his new
assignment 27 years of fleet
experience, including six tours
at sea highlighted by leader-
ship positions aboard subma-
rines and surface ships.
In addition to his experi-
ence as Fleet Master Chief in
the Pacific and Atlantic, he
served as Chief of the Boat
in USS Portsmouth (SSN
707), Command Master Chief
in USS Preble (DDG 88) and
Submarine Squadron 11, and
Force Master Chief, Submarine
Force U.S. Pacific Fleet.
"From my earliest days in
the Navy, and throughout my
career, Chief Petty Officers
have shaped and influenced
me," Roughead said. "Master
Chief West has the experience,
insight and confidence to con-
tinue to provide me that which
I need to hear, not want to
hear. He will have that degree
See Campa on Page 5


Trio at Kings Bay


clinic earn honors


By MC3 Eric Tretter
Periscope Staff


The Naval Submarine Base
Branch Health Clinic Kings
Bay recently announced its
Blue Jacket, Junior Sailor and
Sailor of the Year for 2008.
These men and women
help keep Kings Bay Sailors
and Marines in good working
order, relying on hard work
coupled with Navy core values
to do so.
HM3 Eric Reid was award-
ed Blue Jacket of the Year in
the clinic and frocked as a 3rd
Class Petty Officer with just
more than two years in the
Navy. Kings Bay is the Macon,
Ga., native's first duty station,
and he has earned the one and
only position as Kings Bay's
Dental Fleet Liaison.
"To do things right at all
times, to the best of your abil-
ity," is what Reid cites as the
mentality that helped earn his
Blue Jacket nomination and
one that he uses to set exam-
ples for his peers. Reid aspires
to finish his bachelor's degree,
complete dental school and
eventually became an officer.
HM2 Leonardo Diaz shows
much modesty about his Junior
Sailor of the Year honor.
"Anybody could have been
selected, the competition was
tough," he said. "I work hard.
They do too.":'
Some of the Havana, Cuba,
native's daily duties involve
assisting Leading Petty Officer
HM1 Leilei Walker with the
clinic's mission of managing


the flow of patients, both civil-
ian and military, plus dealing
with time keeping, depart-
ment supply, watch bill coor-
dination, supervision of the 31
civilian and military personnel
and a plethora of other tasks.
He also finds time to volun-
teer with Camden House and
Angel Food Ministries.
This is Diaz' fourth year of
service in the Navy and his
second command after being
attached to a See Bee unit in
Gulf Port, Miss.
"I'm proud of the accom-
plishment," Diaz said of his
Junior Sailor award. "It makes
me want to excel even more."'
HM1 Leilei Walker's impres-
sive list of responsibilities and
collateral duties made her
a candidate for Sailor of the
Year.
A native of Quincy, Fla.,
this Leading Petty Officer
for Medical Records and the
Dental Department at Naval
Branch Health Clinic Kings
Bay also fills the shoes as
her department's Drug and
Alcohol Program Advisor
(DAPA) and Sexual Assault
Victim Intervention (SAVI)
representative, among other
things.
"I have a supportive com-
mand that fosters an environ-
ment conducive to success,"
she said. "I have a multitude
of job responsibilities, but my
first and foremost responsibil-
ity is to my sailors. I try to make
sure they succeed profession-
ally as well as personally."'
A significant portion of her


Photo by MC3 Eric Tretter
HM3 Eric Reid, left, HM2 Leonardo Diaz and HM1 Leilei
Walker were recognized for their work at the Branch Clinic
this year.


job entails making sure her
sailors have the skills and
training needed to perform
their jobs.
"I love it," Walker said of her
16th year of Naval service.
She has been stationed


in Norfolk, Va., Albany, Ga.,
Puerto Rico and Iceland.
"The longer I'm in, the
prouder I become, and the
more I want to give back. Every
duty station I'm at, I strive to
make it better," she said.


Overseas boxes


get group effort


By MC1 (SW) Joe Sabo
Periscope Staff


The Fleet and Family
Support Center joined hands
with the Chief Petty Officer
Association, the St. Mary's
Submarine Museum and
the Girl Scouts to send care
packages to servicemen and
women in Iraq and other plac-
es.
FFSC Family
Life and Work 1 1
consultant It *
Lisa Mastone small
said she was
pleased with thing
the efforts and brea
the contents of
the care pack- mon(
ages. of a
"These care
packages are gruelin
full with stuff
for the Sailors
over there Submar
serving with-
out there loved
ones around
them," Mastone said. "We had
a lot of support from people to
make this happen. I am look-
ing forward to a bigger, more
successful care package drive
in the summer for the Fourth
of July holiday."'
The care packages have the
added love of Christmas cards
from local Girl Scout Troop
No. 30265 and each box was
packed with the care of a
Girl Scout. The boxes includ-
ed USO phone cards and
candy donated by the Kings
Bay Commissary. Video key


S

s

k



g
Jo
in


chains, toiletries, foot and
body warmers and other items
were packed in the boxes.
"This would not be success-
ful with out help and support
for the troops," Mastone said.
"These people care, and I want
to thank them for the care and
support.
"It is nice that the commu-
nity cares about the military
so deeply. The gift of giving is
so strong when
a group of
the people come
little together to
that help a cause'."
that St. Mary's
r the Submarine Mu-
seum manager
tony John Crouse
flnn gran a care pack-
if age donation
tours. drive for three
weeks, collect-
)hn Crouse ing boxes of
e Museum supplies, books
and $500 in
donations.
Crouse said even more can
be done.
"The turnout we got for
three weeks was impressive,
but with more time and plan-
ning, we could get even more
supplies for the sailors over
there," Crouse said. "It is a
worthwhile cause, because
when you are away from your
homeport, it's the small, little
things that break the monot-
ony of a long, grueling tour.
Something as small as a toy, or
even a crossword puzzle, can
prove to be an escape from the
daily routine'."


THIdE














2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


LOCAL NkEWS VIEws


Briefly Speaking


Suggestions for improving the Periscope?
Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in
the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at
573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.

Naval Branch Health Clinic upgrade to Jan. 5
In order to enhance the delivery of care available at Naval
Branch Health Clinic, Kings Bay, X-ray equipment is being
upgraded and will soon be 100-percent digital. To meet that
requirement, space and equipment upgrades began Nov.
24. and will last until approximately Jan. 5. During that time,
the Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay will not have the
capability to perform any X-ray services. The necessary provi-
sions have been made with the network to ensure that all of
beneficiaries have access to necessary X-ray services. NBHC
Kings Bay staff appreciates your understanding during this
period and anticipates complete X-ray services will resuming
Jan. 5. For questions or concerns, contact the clinic at (912)
573-4204.

Personnel transaction timeliness is important
Department of Defense (DoD) policy is to achieve a 99
percent timeliness rate for associated pay transactions. While
the local PSD has a major role and responsibility in the timely
submission of transactions, personnel administrations, CPCs,
the service member and his/her command is ultimately
responsible for providing the required documentation to
PSD in a timely manner. It is imperative that personnel who
divorce, marry, have a child, occupy government quarters or
move out in the economy, come to PSD within five working
days to update their Page Two and to turn in all associated
documentation. This will ensure that all pay entitlements are
either stopped, changed or started in a timely manner, ensur-
ing no overpayments are posted to the service members pay
account. It is imperative that your CPCs, Admin Office's and
Chain of Commands disseminate this information to your
Sailors to ensure they understand the importance of turning
in their paperwork to PSD as soon as it is available. Timeliness
associated with personnel transactions (officer and enlisted),
specifically: Gains/Losses/Reenlistments/Extensions/UAs/
NJPs/Crew Changes/Leave impact operational planning,
personnel accounting, and mission success. To be consistent
with DOD pay policy, Navy policy is to achieve a 99 percent
timeliness rate for all personnel transactions within four
working days of the effective date. Effective immediately, PSD
Kings Bay will closely monitor all paperwork received for
submission and will provide feedback on each commands
timeliness via an end of month message.

New photo requirement for officer records
All officers are now required to have a full-length color pho-
tograph in their official military file, according to NAVADMIN
103/07 distributed to the fleet April 24. Officers who do not
have a photograph on the electronic military personnel
records system in their current grade must submit a photo-
graph. The preferred uniform will be service khaki without
a cover. When service khaki is unavailable, any regulation
uniform is acceptable. The public affairs center detachment
located at NS Mayport, Fla. is the tri-base source for all offi-
cial photographs. It is recommended officers needing a full-
length photo for selection board purposes call (904) 270-7762
and set up an appointment with the detachment. When offi-
cial facilities are not available, officers are authorized to use
commercial sources. If commercial sources are unavailable,
officer may submit any color photograph that complies with
the requirements outlined in MILPERSMAN 1070-180.

PSD hours expanded to Saturdays
PSD Kings Bay's ID card section announces expanded ser-
vice hours. The ID card section will be open from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturdays. Personnel are encouraged to utilize the new
ID card appointment scheduling Web site. Appointments are
available Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons from
1:30 to 4:30 p.m. To access the ID card appointment schedul-
er, visit https://es.cac.navy.mil/signup.pl. Be sure you use the
PSD Kings Bay link, not the NSD Kings Bay link. Additionally,
the dynatouch kiosk located in the Navy Exchange may be
used to schedule appointments. Personnel without appoint-
ments will be assisted as scheduling permits during these
times. The ID card section is open 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

Military Sport Bike Class registration ongoing
In accordance with OPNAVINST 5100.12 (H) chg 1, all mili-
tary and DcD civilian sport biker riders are required to com-
plete the Military Sport Bike Class as soon as possible. There
are one-day classes at Naval Station Mayport which will meet
the required three year refresher that has also been required
by the new OPNAVINST. Participates must have completed
either a BRC or ERC within the past 18 months and use their
own motorcycle. No borrowed or loaner bikes can be used
to take this class. Class starts at 7 a.m. at Building 1 (we can
provide directions if needed). All riders must carry their MSF
completion card with them in order to ride on NS Mayport.
Additionally you must have base decals on your bike other-
wise you will be required to trailer your bike to this class. No
temporary passes will be issued. Currently active duty has
first priority for seats, to register for class call Mayport Safety
at (904) 270 5218 ext 1524 then call Kings Bay Safety at either
2525 or 0414 to obtain the necessary paperwork.








NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. Ward Stevens

NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer


Ed Buczek

Editor
Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719

Staff
MC1 (SW) Joe Sabo
MCSN Eric Tretter


Here's good news about the economy


There is good news?
Good economical
news? Well, I confess
I used that title to get your
attention but I believe there is
some good economical news
in the midst of this economi-
cal mess. Perhaps it is a return
to value.
I recently heard a man-on-
the-street cable-news report
that most of us are cutting
way back on Christmas pres-
ents this year. This report
mentioned the man-on-the-
street is looking for more
"practical;' or "needs-based"
gifts this year such as clothing,
small appliances and needs as
opposed to the flashy extras
like gaming peripherals or
latest "must have." Another
shopping aspect identified is
we are looking for quality and
value in our gift purchases.
Is it just me or in recent
years have you sensed or
picked up on a fevered,
almost crazed, need to have
the latest everything? Cell
phones have about a six-
month life cycle, if that, lap-
tops, gaming, even fashion


and cars. I have to admit I am
too lazy to keep up with the
latest and greatest. I just want
the best value for my money
and for it to last to the end of
its extended purchase agree-
ment/warranty. I am a simple
woman.
The downturn in the econ-
omy is changing the way we
shop and spend, and I loudly
applaud this return to san-
ity! This year I don't have to
figure out how to cover high
priced holiday gifts. Bargains
are the new chic. Frugal is the
"new black." Bargain shop-


Holiday emotions


A h Christmas! I love this
time of year. My tree
s up at Thanksgiving
and our lights are turned on
the night after. The house
feels warm and full with the
decorations filling any empty
space that we have through
the rest of the year. It can be
magical. But, that magic can
fizzle when going through a
deployment.
Many of us have holiday
traditions that make this time
of year special. How does that
change when your husband is
deployed? I try to keep things
the same, but let's face it, you
can't. You can try and get it
pretty close, but the reality is
that you are only one person.
Don't exhaust yourself try-
ing to do what you and your
husband could accomplish
together. Some things can be
adapted.
A good example would
be holiday lights. My husband
normally climbs on the roof
and spends hours lining ever
peak and trim with beautiful
lights. Knowing that my hus-
band didn't marry me for my
grace, I will not be on the roof
this year. Instead, I will deco-
rate everything I can reach
with a ladder. And if that
seems to be too much, why
not just do the bushes,
palms or line the doors and
windows? Be creative. Don't
skip this just because your
husband isn't there. Once the
lights are up, you and
your children will love every
light bulb.
Another thing to keep in
mind is to ask for help. It
doesn't have to be a neighbor.
It could be a friend or visiting
relative. Have them help you
get the tree or your lights up.
Some traditions will be hard
for us as wives. I know that
we normally decorate the tree


together, go driving to look at
Christmas lights and watch
Christmas movies every
weekend in December. These
are things I can do without
my husband, but it's going to
be hard. If you have traditions
like this that you know may
pull a heart string or two,
prepare yourself. Have that
box of tissues handy when
you find your "First Christmas
Together" ornament.
The more you are aware
of your feelings, the better
off you'll be. You don't want
to hold it all in and have a
moment like I did. Here's my
story.
I was doing fine, so I
thought. I knew the husband
was going to be deployed
through the holidays this year.
It wasn't a surprise. We have
done this many times before,
and I thought I was ready.
I was so wrong.
The first holidays went
smoothly. Halloween was fun.
We missed dad, but took a
ton of pictures and made the
best of it. As Thanksgiving
approached, I started to feel
"it" That little nagging
feeling in the back of my
heart telling me I'm missing
him. This is more than the
normal, missing him. It's "I
just realized it's going to be


ping, coupon clipping "Frugal
Frannies," our day has come!
I participate in a couple
online forums. Many ladies
are discussing the change in
their gift giving. They're mak-
ing gifts for family and friends
this year. The creativity that is
coming out of these women is
amazing and, OK, intimidat-
ing. One military spouse from
the East Coast remarked, "My
kids and I are having the time
of our lives making these gifts.
How can Christmas Day top
this?"
Could another change be
ushered in by this change in
spending habits? Could our
fast-food, short-shelf-life, dis-
posable, move-at-light-speed
culture see a change as well?
Could our focus turn from
accumulations and acquisi-
tions to relationships, family
and friends? I think maybe it
could really happen.
We are accumulating less,
trying to save, expanding our
creativity, but perhaps most
importantly realigning our
priorities. It truly isn't the size
or price of the gift. It is the


iave way o
Christmas, and I'm with out
him" missing him. I took a
deep breathe and kept going.
Thanksgiving Day was
spent will friends whose
husbands were deployed with
mine. It was wonderful. I said
grace at dinner, and it took all
I had not to cry when asking
to keep our husbands safe
and to bring them home to us
soon. Again, I took a deep
breathe and was able to hold
it together.
Then, this last week I had
gone to the store and on my
way home a song came on.
It was Elvis, I'll Be Home for
Christmas, and I lost it. Darn
Elvis and his sweet serenades.
I think I could have made it to
Christmas morning if it
wasn't for him and his hyp-
notic voice. It was the first
time I cried since the husband
left. Tears swelled up in my
eyes and streamed down
my face. I couldn't change the
station. I listened to the whole
song, and then turned off the
radio. I sat in my driveway in
silence.
Later that night, I lay in
bed hurting. My eyes hurt.
My head hurt. My heart hurt.
I had taken some headache
meds, but there is no cure for
this. I had tried to hold it in
for too long.
We are going to hurt, but
it's how we handle it that is
going to make us or break us.
I should have taken time to be
sad. There is nothing wrong
with it. I miss my husband
and there are moments where
my life is amazing and I am
on top of the world, and there
are moments that bring me to
my knees. We are not super
heroes. And even though
there are wives who seem to
have it all together, they don't.
They have their moments,
like you and I do. It is not a


heart and love behind it.
Trista wrote, "A few months
ago we started cutting back.
The budget was just so tight.
My husband and I grabbed
fast food on our way home
from work. We rarely cooked
or ate together. We gave up
that practice to save money.
He lost 20 pounds in four
months. I lost 12. We saved
over $350 per month. But the
most amazing thing is our life
changed. We're less stressed
about finances, and we're
talking, every night, at the
dinner table. I didn't realize
we had stopped 'talking!' We
decided we are getting a joint
Christmas gift an espresso
machine. We're giving up our
daily run through Starbucks
to start our day together over
a cup of coffee. You and June
[Walberg] offered us tips to
save money, you impacted
our marriage as well."'
Here's to a new priority!
Questions for Beth? Write her at
beth@homefrontinfocus.com. Don't
miss this month's broadcasts on Navy
Homefront Talk!, Beth's internet talk
show at www.blogtalkradio.com/nht.


f building
shameful thing to cry. That
fact that you want to cry only
confirms the love you have
for your deployed husband.
It is a sad thing that he is
missing the holidays. Allow
yourself to feel that, and let
your kids know it is OK as
well. Sometimes they get
caught up in the "everything
is fine" movement. We forget
that they hurt too. We can
only distract them so much.
We cannot fill the hole that is
left by a deployed father. We
can only do our best to love
them.
I am happy to be home
and I am looking forward to
spending the time with my
children and my military fam-
ily. But, it won't be easy.
Christmas morning our chil-
dren are going to run out of
their rooms and their faces
are going to be lit up brighter
than the Christmas tree. They
will tear through paper and
their wishes will have come
true.
But, as they bury them-
selves in sparkly ribbons and
bright shiny paper, I will turn
to my left to make a com-
ment and there will be no
one there. It will hurt. I will
have the camera video taping
everything for dad and a box
of tissues for me. There is no
way around it. I am grateful,
I am happy and I am proud,
but it will hurt.
So, what do you do? How
do you get though these
moments when your heart is
literally broken? You breathe.
It's all you can do. Be proud
of your husband and yourself.
And let yourself cry.
He misses you too, I prom-
ise.
Have questions, comments, or topic
ideas? E-mail Marie at: marieangela@
mac.com. Want More? Visit Marie's
Blog www.theycallmedependent.
wordpress.com


NMCRS can help you make holiday budget


By Marie Hobson
NMCRS PR Chairman


If you looked though the
pictures of your childhood
Christmases, it is almost a
guarantee that you would find
a picture of yourself and your
siblings happy, excited and
amazed with not a toy, but the


box that it came in.
This is just a friendly
reminder from your local Navy
Marine Corps Relief Society
that Christmas is not about the
number of presents, the size of
your gift or having the hottest
most popular toy of the year.
It is about family, traditions
and faith. The NMCRS sug-


gests giving your time, energy
and love to your family and
not worry about the Joneses
next door. It doesn't matter
how much they spend or what
their kids receive. Your family
will not become closer with
anything other than the gift of
yourself.
Call today to make an


appointment with a casework-
er to do a budget. NMCRS
budgets are extremely detailed
and will get you on track to
smart spending and saving. A
budget can tell you how much
money you have for Christmas
this year and help you plan for

See Budget on Page 3


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publication.
The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-
4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official
views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of
Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida limes-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy
of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gen-
der, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida limes-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida limes-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert
Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168


Russ Martin, Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336 FAX (904) 366-6230














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 3


This single Sailor finds way to maintain holiday cheer


f I couldn't crack open a
cold beer amongst the safe-
ty and security of my family
back home in the Midwest
on Thanksgiving, by golly, I'd
open a warm one in solitude
surrounded by the palmettos
and live oaks nestled within
the interior wilderness of
Cumberland Island National
Seashore. And so it goes.
Holiday cheer is what we
make of it. And after just a year
in the military, even spoiled
homebodies from Indiana, like
myself, must step up to the
plate and recognize that ser-
vice to one's country involves
some sacrifice. Needless to
say, many a young service
member spent turkey day
hovering over a barely warm
MRE in some foreign, sand-
filled land, relishing the days
of fighting over the remote
with siblings versus fighting
for another nation's way of life
agaisst nameless enemies. And
so it goes.
Either way, I hope those


brave American abroad
appreciated what they have
and had just as much as I on
a solo backpacking holiday.
Though Kings Bay may not
attain Mayberry-like, down-
home-style, feel-good family-
ness anytime within the next
millennium, I wish for single
Sailors and Marines stationed
here to recognize the comfort-
able little hamlet we provide
one another.

The week after Thanks-
giving I received a seem-
ingly unexciting package
from mom and pops back
home in Hoosierland. Its con-
tents included a Tupperware
container of chocolate chip
cookies, two-gallon freezer
bags stuffed full of peanuts
and a letter. "Greetings! Just
thought you might enjoy a
little taste of home'," the letter
read. And I did.
The cookies were distinctly
mom's own recipe. Being a
cookie connoisseur, they're


always a little dry (too much
baking powder?), fall apart
upon first bite (she clumps
'em on the baking sheet rather
thick), and contain way too
many chocolate chips (no
complaints). They are mom's
cookies, absolutely wonderful.
The peanuts are roasted in a
mill that sits in the gently roll-
ing hills of southern Indiana.
Ironically, they're grown
somewhere in Georgia. Every
holiday season my father pur-


chases a 50-pound sack and
attempts to shove them down
everyone's throats. He scat-
ters bowels filled with peanuts
around the house and con-
stantly offers friends and fam-
ily more than they can handle;
knowing they're the most eco-
nomical, tastiest snack money
can buy. He's right, simply
marvelous.
After a few days I've man-
aged to munch enough to fill
my poor barracks room floor
with shells and crumbs while
significantly supplementing
my Pirates Cove diet. And so
it goes.

My last holiday
season, includ-
ing Thanksgiving,
Christmas and New Year's, was
spent in and around the frigid
cold weather and hearts of
Naval Boot Camp, Great Lakes,
Ill. Ugh. I remember thinking,
"man, at least in prison they
get to watch television, smoke
cigarettes and don't have to


deal with jumping jacks in
sweat-drenched, rash-induc-
ing, utilities.
One of our Recruit Division
Commanders continued to
offer warm solace. "DO you
guys realize there are people
fighting for our country right
now, and you can't give me
50 eight-count bodybuilders?
... And you smell like hot gar-
bage!" My mind re-tolerated
with, "Well, if I could only
exchange my current posi-
tion with one of these hard-
fighting chaps, giving way to
something more satisfying,
maybe both self and superi-
ors could find some meaning
in our miserable little lives.:'
Nevertheless, I left boot camp
with a greater appreciation for
former and future exploits. I
had no idea that after roughly
five months of A school I'd
end up spending much of my
next holiday season in comfy
southern Georgia. Exciting?
Maybe not. Satisfying? It's
what we make of it.


Local performers to appear in The Nutcracker


One of the ways you
can predict good arts
performances is from
the depth of its sponsorships.
This is not to say that the per-
forming and fine arts cannot
be excellent without financial
backing, but the economies of
production are such that the
presence of corporate back-
ing and private donations go
a long way to providing the
resources that make produc-
tions memorable.
So when I received the
poster via e-mail for The
Florida Ballet's performance
of The Nutcracker, I was inter-
ested to see that their primary
sponsor was Winn Dixie.
I am sure that most of you
remember that not so long
ago Winn Dixie was barely
alive as a business, struggling
to survive bankruptcy. For
them to have recovered so
well and to have the business
acumen and vision to under-
stand the importance of busi-
ness investment in the arts
says their new management


"gets it:' Kudos to the gener-
ous folks at Winn Dixie.
The other reason I was
interested in this event is
that accompanying the show
poster was a paragraph let-
ting me know that four young
women from Camden County
were in this production of
The Nutcracker. Thanks their
company folks, I got the
skinny on these talented and
hardworking young dancers
from Camden County that will
be seen onstage during this
annual tradition.
Amanda Way, Caroline
Snyder and Marena Galluccio
all auditioned in September.
They are all students at
Florida Ballet Training Center
where they attend classes four
or five days a week. They will
appear together in Waltz of
the Flowers. Way and Snyder
will dance two of the soloists
and Galluccio will be a flower.
They have been rehearsing on
weekends in addition to their
class schedules.
Another local dancer that


is now a collegiate dancer,
Emily Way will be return-
ing from Florida State
University to dance the
roles of Snowflake Fairy and
Marzipan Shepherdess. Way
the elder is a sophomore in
the Florida State University
Dance Department and has
recently been accepted into
the school's Dance Repertory
Theater.
While all of these dancers
have appeared in The Florida
Ballet's past Nutcracker pro-


ductions in children's roles,
in recent years Emily Way has
earned the opportunity to
dance roles normally reserved
for more mature dancers.
Way, while she was previ-
ously a student at Douglas
Anderson School of the Arts,
also attended the Florida
Ballet Training Center six days
a week and was a member of
Florida Ballet II.
In the same manner,
the three junior dancers
have danced younger roles
of Angels, Bonbons and
Children in Party Scene, and
Cooks in the Land of Sweets,
As part of the special tradi-
tion of The Nutcracker, due to
their experience and ability,
they are now assuming roles
usually danced by older per-
formers. Congratulations to
these talented young dancers
on their progress and dedica-
tion!
The Florida Ballet's
Nutcracker will take the
stage of The Florida Theatre
in Jacksonville at 7:30 p.m.,


Friday, Dec. 19, at 2:30 and
7:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 20,
and at 3 p.m., Sunday, Dec.
21.
Tickets range from $15.50
to $18.50 for students and
seniors; $18.50 to $24.50 for
adults. Group rates are avail-
able. Order tickets by calling
The Florida Theatre box office
at (904) 355-2787.
If you have ideas or events
you want me to share with
readers, send me a note at
pkraackl@tds.net. Local Nuts,
children from Fernandina
Beach, Callahan, Hilliard, St.
Mary's and Kingsland made it
through the rigorous audition
process. This collaborative
arts effort is presented in part
courtesy of a grant from the
Florida Division of Cultural
Affairs. Tickets are $25 for
adults and $5 for children.
Call (904) 277-1225 for more
information or to purchase
tickets.
If you have ideas or events you want
me to share with readers, send me a
note at pkraackl@tds.net.


And here goes my genuine
disappointment with anyone
who is angered or aggravated
to be stationed here. Yes, as
stated, it's not the most excit-
ing place. To some of us, that's
quite alright.
On the evening of
Thanksgiving, I cuddled
next to a campfire alone. I
had other invitations for the
holiday but choose to spend it
alone, with family and friends
present only in my heart. After
all, it's those little memories
and thoughts within our lives
that make everything all the
more satisfying.
Some of you may have done
the same, with a cold turkey
sandwich or a bottle of brew in
a lonely barracks room. Either
way, we all have made the bed
we sleep in. We must not be
sad or doubtful for the life we
have chosen. We are strong,
independent members of the
United States military. And as
the holiday season encroach-
es, let us all be grateful for that.

Budget

Continued from Page 2
next year so the only thing you
have to worry about is your
in-laws.
Here are some quick tips:
Plan ahead. Decide now
how much your family can
afford to spend for presents.
Use cash whenever pos-
sible. Easy credit will cost
you in the long run. If using
a credit card, treat it as cash.
Deduct the amounts charged
from your checking account
balance so that you will have
the money to pay your state-
ment in full when it comes.
Compare prices and qual-
ity. Shop around.
Learn to say"no." Recognize
advertising on TV and in the
stores continually influences
you and your family.
Shop early so that you can
buywhat you plan, at the price
you planned. Don't end up on
a last minute shopping spree.
Start a Christmas account
for the next year so that you'll
have the money available for
next Christmas.


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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Drive on


to help


veterans

Chapel collects
items to help
at medical center

By MC1 (SW) Joe Sabo
Periscope Staff
With the holiday season
approaching, take a minute to
give something back to oth-
ers.
The Kings Bay Chapel is
sponsoring its annual trip to
the CarlVinsonMedical Center
in Dublin, Ga. The medical
center is a 329-bed facility
that employs 700 people and
provides acute and extended
medical care to veterans in the
mid-Georgia region.
This is an opportunity for
the caring people aboard
Kings Bay to give something
back. The trip is always fond-
ly remembered by military
members who participate. It
is something special to share
time and converse with people
who served in a different era.
The trip is scheduled to
depart at 6 a.m. and return at
approximately 4 p.m. today.
The chapel is asking for help
in an ongoing donation drive
to get supplies for the veterans
of the medical center. The fol-
lowing items are wanted:
lotion
toothpaste
tooth brush
shaving creme
disposable razors
shampoo
solid stick deodorant
ink pens
envelopes
writing/note pads
jumbo print word search
books
board games
cards
signed christmas cards
Anyone interested in going
on the visit or interested in
donating to the worthwhile
cause, contact the Chapel at
(912) 573-4501/4502.


Navy photo
Sailors wear the Navy working uniform (NWU) while shopping at the Naval Air Station Oceana
Navy Exchange. The NWU is intended for year-round wear and will be the standard working
uniform ashore by October 2010.


Working uniform unveiled


From Chief of Naval Personnel
Public Affairs
The Chief of Naval Personnel
released information about
the delivery schedule, manner
of wear and occasion for wear
for the Navy Working Uniform
Dec. 2 in NAVADMIN 343/08.
An instructional video was
also posted on the NPC Web
site www.npc.navy.mil/com-
mandsupport/usnavyuni-
forms/ and on NKO at https://
wwwa.nko.navy.mil/por-
tal/alertscommunity/home/
whatsnewonnko.
According to the message,
the NWU is intended for year-
round wear and shall be the
standard working uniform
ashore. The NWU will replace
working utilities, tropicalwork-
ing uniforms, wash khakis,
winter working blue, aviation
working green and non-tac-
tical/environmental usage of
camouflage utility uniforms.
The NWU is designed to be
worn in sea and ashore envi-
ronments that do not require
special clothing, such as flight,
flight deck or engine room.
Unless otherwise prescribed
by the regional commander,
the NWU is authorized to be


worn at all facilities on base,
while commuting to/from
work and home via POV, pub-
lic transportation, and on gov-
ernment/military flights to/
from OCONUS locations.
Routine stops while com-
muting are not authorized
with an exception for genuine
emergencies, such as medical
emergencies.
For environmental extremes
the following modifications
are authorized when granted
by appropriate authority.
The NWU shirt may be
removed on job sites or in
work spaces.
NWU trousers may be
worn unbloused on job sites
or in workspaces.
During the winter or
inclement periods, the parka
hood is authorized for wear in
addition to head gear. Black
leather gloves are authorized.
The NWU will be avail-
able for purchase via desig-
nated Navy Exchange Uniform
Centers as follows:
Dec 08 Navy leadership
(flagofficers, commandingoffi-
cers/OICs, (9580/9579/9578)
command master/senior chiefs,
and chiefs of the boat) via Navy
Exchange Uniform Support


Center at (800) 368-4088 or
(757) 502-7450.
Jan 09 Tidewater
Apr 09 Southeast
Jul 09 Northeast
Oct 09 Capital region
Jan 10 Western/north-
west
Apr 10 Gulf region
Jul 10 Hawaii
Oct 10 Europe/Japan/
Guam
All existing working uni-
forms will continue to be
authorized for wear until
December 2010. Sailors who
have not been issued NWU's
at recruit training command
or purchased NWU's while
assigned to an active rollout
location must maintain their
current working uniforms
until the NWU is available in
the area assigned. This policy
also applies to Sailors wear-
ing the new service uniform
announced earlier in 2008.
FY08 and FY09 clothing
replacement allowances have
been adjusted to facilitate
purchasing four sets of shirts
and trousers by 2010. Reserve
Sailors will receive their uni-
forms via their respective Navy
Operational Support Centers.


There is light


for the journey


By Cdr. A. "Jeff" Jefferson
Kings Bay Command Chaplain
The holidays are here.
There will be many
festive occasions to
celebrate the holidays which
occur in December.
Holiday is a shorten ver-
sion of holy day. Holy days
call for us to reflect on our
lives. We reflect on how well
we have done and on the
things we have not done so
well.
In those things we have not
done so well, the holy days
remind us once again there
is hope for renewal and
change.
Hanukkah, a Jewish cel-
ebration, this year begins on
Dec. 22 and ends Dec. 29.
Hanukkah means
"dedication" and is also
referred to as "The Festival of
Lights." Among other things,
the celebration commemo-
rates an event in Biblical
times when an oil lamp that
only had enough oil in it for
one night burned for eight
days.
On each one of the eight
days, one candle is added to
a special candleholder called
a menorah. The middle
candle, called the shamash,
is used to light each of the
other candles and it is lit
every night.
Therefore, on the first night
of Hanukkah, two candles
are lit (the shamash and the
candle for the first night) and
on the last night, there are
nine lit candles.
Christmas occurs on Dec.
25. The word Christmas is
a shorten version of Christ
Mass.
Christmas is the celebra-
tion of the birth of Jesus,
and it's celebration starts on
the first day of advent in the
Christian Church calendar.
There are four days of
advent before Christmas day.
Each day of advent is rep-
resented by a candle. These
candles are Hope, Peace, Joy


and Love.
One candle is lit during the
Christian service on each day
of advent.
Kwanzaa is a seven-day fes-
tival celebrating the African-
American people, their cul-
ture and their history. It is a
time of celebration, commu-
nity gathering and reflection.
Kwanzaa begins on Dec.
26 and continues until New
Year's Day, Jan. 1.
Each evening a family
member, usually the young-
est child, lights candles in a
special candleholder and the
family discusses one of the
seven principles of Kwanzaa.
The first candle symbolizes
unity. The second self-deter-
mination. The third sym-
bolizes collective work and
responsibility. The fourth
symbolizes cooperative eco-
nomics. The fifth is for pur-
pose. The sixth symbolizes
creativity. And, the seventh is
for faith.
It is interesting to note that
in each of these celebrations
candles are used. Though
each holy day is unique in it's
history and reasons why it is
celebrated, each one calls to
remembrance events of the
past with a hope that tomor-
row will bring more mean-
ingful and enriching lives. In
the darkness of frustration,
despair, and broken relation-
ships, these candles light the
way to hope, tranquility and
wholeness.
The lighted candles reas-
sures every heart that the
possibility of change is in
within our reach.
The journey begins as
we reach out to others in a
genuine effort to bring hope
and peace in their lives. Only
when we reach out and think
otherness during these holy
days will we have enough
light for our journey.


Marchant tabbed for Academy post


From the U. S. Naval Academy
Alumni Association and the U. S.
Naval Academy Foundation
The chairmen of the boards
of the U. S. Naval Academy
Alumni Association and the U.
S. Naval Academy Foundation
announced the selection of
Byron F. Marchant as the next
President and CEO of the asso-
ciation and the foundation.
In aj oint statement the chair-
men of the Naval Academy
Alumni Association and the
Naval Academy Foundation,
Admiral Carlisle A. H. Trost,
USN (Retired), and Admiral
Charles R. Larson, USN
(Retired), said, "We are very
pleased with the process that
enabled the search commit-
tee, under the leadership of
Admiral Bob Natter, to review
a large number of superbly
qualified candidates and select
Byron to lead our organization
to the next level of success.
We could not have asked for a
better leader to join our team
during this exciting and chal-
lenging time.'
"I am deeply honored to
have been selected the next
president and CEO of the U.
S. Naval Academy Alumni
Association and Foundation,"
Marchant said. "As a Naval
Academy graduate, I share the
Association and Foundation's


deep commitment to cultivat-
ing our nation's next genera-
tion of leaders, particularly in
these challenging times.
"We need a strong Naval
Academy more than ever,
and more than ever the Naval
Academy needs our support.
I look forward to serving our
Alumni and engaging them to
create enthusiasm among our
diverse constituencies in sup-
port of the Naval Academy and
Brigade of Midshipmen.
"I also look forward to work-
ing closely with our larger
and valuable community
of supporters to provide the
Academy the margin of excel-
lence it deserves to be the
world's premiere leadership
institution.
"On the eve of the 109th
Army-Navy game, I want to
extend my sincere gratitude
to our men and women of the
armed forces, and to our Naval
Academy alumni who have
served or are serving our coun-
try in assignments around the
world. Further, I will be think-
ing of our wounded veterans
and those who have made
the ultimate sacrifice in the
defense of our nation, during
Army-Navy game festivities
this weekend. Their bravery
and the sacrifice of their fami-
lies, should be remembered
by us all."


Prior to accepting this posi-
tion, Marchant served as the
executive vice president, gen-
eral counsel, & chief admin-
istrative officer for Black
Entertainment Television,
Washington, DC.
He has also served as senior
vice president and general
counsel for Annapolis-based
Telecommunications Systems
Inc. and senior legal advisor
to Federal Communications
Commissioner Andrew Bar-
rett.
Marchant graduated
with distinction from the
U. S. Naval Academy in 1978
earning a bachelor of sci-
ence, Engineering & Political
Systems; and earned his juris
doctor from the University of
Virginia Law School. He was in
the submarine service before
transferring to the Naval
Reserve in 1984 where he ful-
filled numerous assignments in
the Naval Reserve Intelligence
program and obtained the
rank of Commander in the
U.S. Naval Reserves.
The United States Naval Academy
Alumni Association and the United
States Naval Academy Foundation are
two independent, not for profit 501(c)
(3) corporations who work together
to support the United States Naval
Academy as it develops leaders for the
naval service and the nation. For more
information, visit the Web site at www.
usna.com.


, -F.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 5


Vets tell their stories in Library of Congress program


By Amy Tortoriello
Periscope Staff


As a part of the largest
world history project in the
country, Northeast Florida's
Community Hospice Veterans
Partnership is sponsoring the
local Veterans History Project
in Duval County.
The project, which is being
conducted by the Library of
Congress, will collect and pre-
serve the oral histories of vet-
erans from World War I, World
War II, the Korean, Vietnam
and Persian Gulf wars and the
Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.
With such a large veteran
population in Duval coun-
ty, the Community Hospice


Veterans Partnership decided
to organize the project locally
as an outreach to the veteran
community. While neighbor-
ing Nassau County has thrived
with veteran outreach pro-
grams, this project is a first for
Duval County.
With the project still being
organized, there have been
only a few initial interviews per-
formed at community events.
However, the majority of the
interviews will begin after the
first of the year. The first inter-
views scheduled will be with
veterans in hospice care.
The interview process is
quite simple. Veterans sign up
to be interviewed at the Web
site www.vhpfirstcoast.com


Obrien Edwards
or by calling (904) 407-6956.
They are sent questionnaires
ahead of time so volunteers
get an idea of how to conduct
the interview to ensure their
entire story is told. Some coun-
ties are conducting video and
voice interviews. Duval county
is doing voice only. Additional
paperwork is filled out after
the interview and then the


packet is sent to the Library
of Congress. Only 5 percent of
the interviews will be available
for download on the Library of
Congress Web site. However,
in Duval County, they plan to
publish every interview on the
Web site, once it is set up.
Two veterans who will be
taking part in the program
are Marvin Edwards and J.J.
Obrien. Obrien, a veteran of
World War II, was a ground
pilot in the Army Air Force.
Edwards was a navigator of a
wooden attack airplane called
the Mosquito during World
War II. He served in the Army
Air Force and was active in the
Office of Strategic Services.
Their war stories, along with


thousands of other veterans'
stories, will help give genera-
tions to come a more accurate
account of wars in American
history.
Steve Kaufman, co-chairman
of the local veterans history
project and a veteran himself,
is excited and honored to be a
part of the process.
"The thing all of us under-
stand is the need to capture the
veterans' stories properly," he
said. "Their stories are moving
and meaningful. Want to make
sure we get it right.
"This project will provide
a piece of our history that is
often missed in the telling of
history. Historians are finding
that some of the events that


we read about in history books
didn't quite happen the way it
is currently written when talk-
ing to the people involved, so
in a sense we are writing histo-
ry that will be used by scholars
for years to come."
There is still a great need
for volunteers for the project.
Volunteers can sign up at the
Web site, and there will be
training in January. There is
such a great amount of veter-
ans and therefore a great need
for volunteers.
Volunteers and veterans are
invited to sign up for interviews
at the Web site www.vhpfirst-
coast.com or call (904) 407-
6956 to leave contact informa-
tion.


Plan early for tax season


Certain expenses

can be deducted

By Lt. j.g. Kirt Marsh
JAGC

Tax season is still a few
months away, but it's not too
early to start planning for it.
Several areas of tax law and
policy uniquely affect mili-
tary personnel. Understanding
those provisions ahead of time
can save you and your family
time, energy and maybe even
some money.
Combat Pay If you are a
member of the Armed Forces
who serves in a combat zone
or a qualified hazardous duty
area, you can exclude certain
pay from your income, gen-
erally referred to as "combat
pay." The month for which
you receive the pay must be
a month in which you actu-
ally served in a combat zone
or were hospitalized due to
injuries or illness sustained
while serving in the combat
zone. For enlisted members,
warrant officers and commis-
sioned warrant officers, you
can exclude from taxes all pay
earned during that month. For
commissioned officers, you
can exclude all pay up to the
highest rate of enlisted pay,
plus imminent danger/hos-
tile fire pay received, for each
month you served in a combat
zone or qualified hazardous
duty area.
The "Boomer" Deduction -


The IRS and federal tax courts
have determined that for sail-
ors assigned to two-crew fleet
ballistic missile submarines,
the submarine is the sailor's
tax home for tax deduction
purposes. Therefore, when
the sub deploys and is being
manned by the other crew, the
Sailor is "forced" away from
his tax home, the subma-
rine, thereby turning his liv-
ing expenses during that time,
including rent, meals and util-
ities, into deductable expens-
es. Sailors can use Form 2106
to itemize expenses on their
return. Also remember that a
naval vessel in dry dock can't
be considered a sailor's home
for tax purposes, so any days
the boat is in dry dock or refit
cannot be used for calculating
Form 2106 expenses.
Filing Extensions The
deadline for filing tax returns,
paying taxes and filing claims
for refund is automatically
extended if you serve in the
Armed Forces in a combat
zone or qualified hazardous
duty area, are deployed over-
seas in support of operations
in a qualified hazardous duty
area or are deployed while
participating in contingency
operations.
If any of these situations
apply to you, your spouse is
entitled to the same extension.
Extensions last for 180 days
after the last day you are in
the combat zone or contin-
gency operation. In addition
to the 180 days, your deadline


is extended by however many
days you had left to meet the
deadline before you left. For
example, if you deployed in
mid-January, you would have
three months plus 180 days
to file your taxes after you
return.
However, remember that if
you qualify for a refund, delay-
ing filing will delay receiving
your refund. You may want to
see your Navy Legal Assistance
Office to get a tax power of
attorney for your spouse to file
taxes during your deployment,
expediting the process of get-
ting a refund.
Where and How to File
- Active duty personnel and
their dependents are eli-
gible to have free tax return
preparation services provid-
ed by Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) centers at
all US military installations.
At these centers, IRS-trained
volunteers can help with your
return and help you maximize
your tax savings.
These centers will be open
shortly after e-filing begins on
19 January 2009. Additionally,
www.militaryonesource.com
will offer free online tax filing,
a great option for basic tax
returns.
For more information, visit your
local Navy Legal Assistance Office or
go online to www.irs.gov/publications/
p3/index.html.
Kings Bay legal assistance offices
can be reached at 573-3959 This article
is not intended to substitute for the
personal advice of a licensed attorney.


Outgoing Campa praised by CNO


Secret Santa
From left, HMC Florencia Dean and HM3 Kristina Mounce display some of 90 holiday stock-
ings collected from Secret Santas throughout Naval Hospital Jacksonville to be sent to deployed
hospital and Branch Health Clinic staff members in Iraq, Afghanistan, Djibouti, the Philippines
and Cuba. The stockings contained items such as electronic games and CDs, personal hygiene
items, candy, books and even Starbucks coffee. Overseeing this operation was NH Jax
Ombudsman Tina Bettencourt. Assisting with the collections were staff from the Customer
Relations Office.


Country Christmas Saturday

From Renaissance Public Relations at Big Horse from 1 to 6 p.m., Madison Road. Call (912) 573-
Saturday, Dec. 13. 4564.
Kings Bay personnel and Base tickets are available For more information on
their families are invited to from Morale, Welfare and a Country Christmas at Big
enjoy old-fashioned holiday Recreation, located in build- Horse visit www.bighorseclub.
fun at the Country Christmas ing 1039 at 950 U.S.S. James com or call (912) 778-6477.


From Page 1
of access and trust. I look for-
ward to working closely with
him in all that is ahead."
Roughead also praised
MCPON (SW/FMF) Joe R.
Campa Jr., who took the helm
in July 2006, citing numerous
milestones Campa achieved in
his time serving as the senior
enlisted member of the Navy.
"MCPON Campa can take
great pride in his many con-
tributions during his watch,"
he said. "His extraordinary
leadership, keen insight, and
sound judgment enhanced the
role of the Chief Petty Officer.
He authored the Chief Petty


Officer's mission, vision, guid-
ing principles, revitalized the
Master Chief Petty Officer of
the Navy's Leadership Mess,
and empowered Fleet, Force,
and Command Master Chiefs.
"Most importantly, he re-
established the deckplate
leadership that is the essence
of a U.S. Navy Chief Petty
Officer. His efforts significantly
increased the impact of Navy
Senior Enlisted Leaders and,
in doing so, improved the
readiness of the Navy."
The Master Chief Petty
Officer of the Navy serves as an
advisor to the Chief of Naval
Operations and to the Chief
of Naval Personnel in matters


of importance to enlisted per-
sonnel and their families.
The MCPON also is an advi-
sor to the manyboards focused
on enlisted personnel issues, is
the enlisted representative of
the Department of the Navy at
special events, may be called
upon to testify on enlisted per-
sonnel issues before Congress
and maintains a liaison with
enlisted spouse organizations.
For more news from Chief of Naval
Operations, visit www.navy.mil/local/


Shinseki ready to take command


From Page 1
"Veterans who have served
in Iraq and Afghanistan, in
particular, are confronting
serious, severe wounds, some
seen, some unseen, making
it difficult for them to get on
with their lives in this strug-
gling economy," he said. "They


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deserve a smooth, error-free,
no-fail, benefits-assured tran-
sition into our ranks as veter-
ans, and that is our responsi-
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"A word to my fellow veter-
ans: If confirmed, I will work
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that we are serving you as well
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pursue a 21st-century VA that
serves your needs. We will
open... new doors of opportu-
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support your families when
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... we will always honor the
sacrifices of those who have
worn the uniform, and their
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Call only if you're ready to make it happen.


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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008

Refit facility

staff promotes

student Sailor

of the Week

By MC3 Eric Tretter
Periscope Staff

Just after 8 a.m. on the
first Friday of December,
Trident Refit Facilities'
1 Sandra Butler prepared
to make an announcement
over the Kingsland Elementary
School's intercom system.
And, just like every Friday,
a hard-working student in
each grade, pre-kindergarten
through fifth, was rewarded as
the Sailor the Week.
Butler read the winning
students' names with a clear
"Sailor's" voice. She was
excited, genuine and friendly,
with the right words accentu-
ated, sounding like that school
teacher everyone loved as she
read through each grade's win-
ner, along with reasons they
were selected.
"Jamaia has a great atti-
tude,"' Butler said of second
grader Jamaia Houston. "She is
always enthusiastic about what
is going on in the classroom.
Jamaia gets along well with
her classmates and has shown
determination in reaching all
her goals. She is always will-
ing to help others and can be
relied upon to do her best.":'
After the announcements,
Butler, with TRF sailors SKI
James Williams, ET1 Jason
Howes, SKC Brian Mack, EMC
Earl Lake and Lt. Comdr. Larry
Wells, travel the school's halls
to congratulate each Sailor of
the Week. A bulletin board in
the hallway displays pictures
of last week's honorary sailors
posed with the TRF crew, serv-
ing as a motivator and remind-
er of what good behavior and
hard work will get them.
Once in the classroom, each
student sailor was called to
the front and center and given
their own TRF badge to be
worn the following week.
"It's a good relationship to
have with the sailors on the
base and the students here,";'
said Kingsland Elementary
principal Charles Curry. "The
kids love it. You can tell by the
looks on their faces when the
sailors come into the room
that they love them being
there, and I think the sailors
like it too."
The Sailors asked students
why they thought their peers
earned the Sailor of the Week
honor. Hands quickly went up.
"Because she is nice," "He
is hard working," "He helps
out the teacher," were popular
responses. By this time the
Sailor of the Week was glowing
from praise.
"Sometimes it gets over-
whelming," Butler said of the
students' excitement. "It is that
sense, that feeling of accom-
plishment. It's a commitment
that we make to the children.
Every Friday, somebody's
going to be there to congratu-
late them."
The TRF sailors made safety
announcements, reminding .
the kids to buckle up, stay
clear of matches and not talk .
to strangers among other
things.
While exiting Mary Blalock's
kindergarten class an excited
student shouted, "We love
you Sailors!"


Kingsland
Elementary first-
grade students
welcomed Trident
Refit Facility Sailors
to their classroom
Dec. 5. It's part of
the school's and
TRF's Sailor of the
Week program,
which rewards
students for good
classroom work and
behavior.

Photos by MC2 Eric Tretter


NC1 Sandra Butler brings great enthusiasm to the Sailor of the Week program.














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 7


SKC Brian Mack speaks to Mr. Fegel's fifth-graders ET1 Jason Howes works through a fifth-grade math quiz.


NC1 Sandra Butler announces Sailors of the Week.


Mekeigh Hamilton is called front and center.


Students anxiously awaiting Trident Refit Facility sailors to arrive.


Another school visit mission is in the books for the Sailors.


Classmates praise Ryan Rogers for his good grades.














8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Gunny Ermey visits ship deployed in Arabian Gulf


By Cpl. Jason D. Mills
26th MEU

"I am Gunnery Sergeant
Ermey, I am your senior drill
instructor," announces the
actor and Marine Corps icon.
"From now on you will speak
only when spoken to. The first
and last words out ofyour filthy
sewers will be 'Sir!' Do you
maggots understand that?"
The Marines and sailors
aboard the USS Iwo Jima
respond immediately and with
fervor, "Sir, yes Sir!"
"Bull--! I can't hear you;
sound off like ..." responds
the former Marine Corps drill
instructor, repeating lines he
immortalized on the silver
screen.
This time even louder, the
Marines and sailors answer,
"SIR, YES SIR!"
"If you ladies leave my
island, if you survive recruit
training, you will be a weapon;
you will be a minister of death,
praying for war. But until that
day, you are pukes, you are
scumbags, you are the lowest
form of life on earth, you are
not even human beings. You
are nothing but a lot of little,
unorganized, grab--, pieces of
amphibian --! Oorah!"
Repeating these lines to most
people would scare and offend
them. But nothing could moti-
vate the Marines and sailors of
the 26th Marine Expeditionary
Unit more.
R. Lee Ermey, most famous
for his role as Gunnery Sgt.
Hartman in the movie Full
Metal Jacket, paid a visit to the


USMC photo by Cpl. Patrick M. Johnson-Campbell
Actor and Marine Corps icon Gunnery Sgt. R. Lee Ermey speaks to Marines and Sailors aboard
the USS Iwo Jima in the Arabian Gulf, Dec. 8. Ermey visited the USS Iwo Jima as a Moral,
Welfare and Recreation event for deployed troops during the holiday season. The 26th Marine
Expeditionary Unit and Iwo Jima Strike Group are deployed to the 5th fleet area of operation.


Marines and sailors aboard
the USS Iwo Jima, Dec. 8. On
his entrance to the Iwo Jima
hanger bay, where hundreds
of Marines and sailors await-
ed his arrival, Ermey greeted
them with this rendition one
of his most memorable on-
screen moments. The Marines
and sailors responded with
resounding cheers.
Ermey's visit was part of a
Morale, Welfare and Recreation


event for deployed troops dur-
ing the holiday season.
"I've worked it out with
MWR where we'll make this
a traditional thing'," he said.
"They'll bring me over every
year for a couple of weeks and
we can do this. And you know,
maybe I'm not a great enter-
tainer, maybe I'm not that
much of a novelty to some, but
you guys are stuck out here
in the middle of nowhere, so


Enterprise Net Chief named


By Eddie Riley
Next Generation Enterprise Network
Public Affairs

Chief of Naval Operations
Adm. Gary Roughead named
the commander of Naval Air
Forces Atlantic on Nov. 20
to the lead the Department
of the Navy's largest, enter-
prise-wide IT initiative as
the new Assistant Chief of
Naval Operations for the
Next Generation Enterprise
Network System Program
Office (NGEN SPO).
As ACNO (NGEN), Rear
Adm. John W. Goodwin will
oversee the DoN's develop-
ment, acquisition and deploy-
ment of NGEN the follow-
on to the Navy Marine Corps
Intranet (NMCI) contract that
ends Sept. 30, 2010.
The NGEN SPO, a first-of-its-
kind organization in the DoN,
was approved by the CNO and
CMC earlier this year. It brings
together the DoN's governance
areas for NGEN policy,
resources and requirements,
acquisition, and fleet readi-
ness, support and operations
- under a single command.
The elevated coordination at
the ACNO level will ensure
stakeholders are included in
the design and implementa-
tion process and help facili-
tate a smooth transition from
NMCI to NGEN with continu-
ity of services to end users.
The SPO includes all of
the functions of the existing
NGEN, NMCI and OCONUS
Navy Enterprise Network
(ONE-NET) program offices.
It resides within the Navy staff,
leveraging the institutional
support of both CNO and
Headquarters Marine Corps
staffs.
Goodwin will join the
NGEN SPO early next year.
Interim ACNO (NGEN), Rear
Adm. David G. Simpson, will
lead the SPO until Goodwin


arrives. Simpson continues
to set the foundation for the
office as the NGEN resource
sponsor in his assigned posi-
tion as the director of Navy
Networks on the deputy
chief of Naval Operations for
Communication Networks
(OPNAV N6) staff. Marine
Corps Col. David M. Hagopian
will continue to serve as the
deputy director, NGEN SPO.
The NGEN initiative is
focused on re-establishing
government design and oper-
ational control over Naval
networks, creating a more
secure and agile intranet, and
recruiting and developing the
future Naval IT workforce. It is
a central pillar in the depart-
ment's goal of building the
Naval Network Environment
(NNE), the DoN's vision for a
highly secure reliable enter-
prise IT system that provides
ready access to data, services
and applications when and
where it is needed. The NGEN
SPO will coordinate continued
service for existing shore and
garrison networks, including
NMCI; support consolidation
of legacy networks; and direct
the transition to NGEN while
providing implementation
oversight to enable enhanced
capabilities within the future
NNE by 2016.
Goodwin, a native of Dublin,
Ga., graduated from the
University of South Carolina,
commissioned in May 1975,
and designated a naval avia-
tor in 1977. Goodwin's first
assignment was to the Attack
Squadron 66, flying the A-7E
Corsair. He completed deploy-
ments with Carrier Air Wing
14 and USS Constellation (CV
64) while assigned to Strike
Fighter Squadron 25, flying the
FA-18 Hornet. Goodwin's first
command was Strike Fighter
Squadron 94 in August 1992.
He has served as executive
officer of USS Carl Vinson


Site salutes wounded


By Lt. Jennifer Cragg
Special to American Forces
Press Service

Defense Department offi-
cials launched the Wounded
Warrior Diaries, a multime-
dia Web tribute in which
American servicemembers
wounded in combat share sto-
ries of their service, including
their hard-won battles on the
road to recovery and the ups
and downs of life in the wake
of injury.
Located at http://www.
defenselink.mil/home/fea-
tures/2008/0908 wwd/index.
html, the Wounded Warrior
Diaries feature videos of ser-
vicemembers relaying their
stories in their own words.
The videos are accompa-
nied by a written account of
ooo


their experiences. The site
launched with four diaries,
and a new diary will be added
each month.
"The diaries are intended to
be sources of strength, encour-
agement and reassurance for
other wounded troops and
their families," Navy Lt. Cmdr.
Brook DeWalt, DoD's direc-
tor of new media, said. "They
illustrate the ultimate triumph
over injury returning to full
and active lives through hard
work and the support of loved
ones, the community and the
military family."'
In addition, the process of
creating the diaries is meant to
be therapeutic for the service-
members, DeWalt said, not-
ing that in some cases, their
spouses and children take part
in the interviews.


(CVN 70), and commanding
officer of USS Rainier (AOE 7),
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76),
and Abraham Lincoln Carrier
Strike Group.
The NGEN initiative is cur-
rently in the pre-decision
phase with a requirements
document approved earli-
er this year by the CNO and
CMC.
A system specification,
currently under develop-
ment, will further define the
required system functions and
performance parameters. The
acquisition approach, cur-
rently under draft, is expected
to be based on a notional seg-
mentation concept that breaks
existing network functions into
groups and separates services
into those that may be run by
the DoN and others that could
be outsourced.
Under the current NMCI
contract, network services are
provided by one prime con-
tractor. The DoN has released
four Requests for Information
and held one Industry Day
to get feedback from the
Information Technology com-
munity on the NGEN initia-
tive.
For more news from around the fleet,
visit www.navy.mil.


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5 OUT OF 5 STARS
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2008
NEW HOME QUALITY S


I know you will laugh at my
corny jokes ... right? And that's
the important thing to me."'
Going on, "There's noth-
ing like ... getting the troops
to laugh at my corny jokes.
Because it makes me feel good,
it breaks the monotony for
them, so it works both ways.
It's good for everybody."'
During his visit Ermey gave
away thousands of tee shirts,
dozens of hats, took hundreds


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of photos with Marines and
sailors, handed out mail, and
toured the ship greeting
every Marine or Sailor he saw
along the way.
He also presented flags to ten
Marines who helped reinforce
levees during the June flood-
ing of Elnora, Ind. The flags,
donated to the 26th Marine
Expeditionary Unit by citizens
from Elnora, represented the
town's gratitude to all of the
Marines and Sailors who par-
ticipated.
Ermey was grateful toward
every Marine and Sailor he
saw throughout his visit.
"As far as I'm concerned,
you're over here doing the
hard work, the heavy lifting
and the least I can do is come
over and say hello to you, give
you a little pat on the back and
maybe a word of encourage-
ment," he said. "For me it's a
privilege to be able to come
over here and just hang out
with you guys for a little bit."'
However, the privilege was
not all his. Having been at
sea for nearly four months,
some of the Marines and sail-
ors aboard the Iwo Jima were
glad to have something break
up the monotony of everyday
work.
"It's a definite motivation
boost when we heard Gunny
was coming aboard," said Cpl.
Trevor Blackburn with Golf
Co., Battalion Landing Team
2/6. "For me it's like meeting a
living legend ... It's just a great
motivation boost for all of us.
We've been out here for a few
months, it's starting to get


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tedious, and for him to show
up and break the monotony,
it's just great. The motivation
just went through the roof with
him showing up'."
Corporal Cory Beverick with
Marine Medium Helicopter
Squadron-264 (Rein) said he
was happy to have someone
come aboard who understood
what he was going through.
"Gunny Ermey's a pret-
ty well-known character
throughout the Marine Corps,"
he said. "It just lets us know
that everyone's still thinking
about us, and we're on every-
one's minds. It's always good
to have someone like [him]
come out and put a smile on
your face and make you laugh,
ease the transition:'
"He knows what it's like to
be away from your family,"
he said. "He can just relate to
everythingwe're going through
right now. So it's always nice to
talk to someone like that."'
Despite the obvious follow-
ing Ermey has aboard the ship,
he made sure the Marines and
sailors knew this visit was not
about him, rather it was for
those who choose to serve.
"It's a pleasure to be out
here with you. I consider this
an absolute honor to be able
to come out here and social-
ize with you folks, 'cause you
are the people that I admire,"
Ermey said. "You guys are my
heroes."
The 26th MEU is forward
deployed aboard the Iwo Jima
Expeditionary Strike Group in
the Arabian Gulf in support of
Maritime Security operations.


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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Navy photo by MC1 Tiffini M. Jones
CNO Adm. Gary Roughead, with his wife, Ellen, deliver a holiday greeting to the fleet from
their home in Washington D.C. CNO reminded Sailors to be safe while celebrating at home and
Mrs. Roughead thanked them for their service.


CNO Roughead, wife


deliver holiday greeting


By MC2(SW) Rebekah
Blowers
Chief of Naval Operations
Public Affairs
Chief of Naval Operations,
Adm. Gary Roughead and his
wife, Ellen, released a holiday
greeting to the fleet Dec. 6.
CNO and Mrs. Roughead
wished Sailors and their


abroad a safe and happy holi-
day season.
"While we all celebrate the
holiday at home with friends
and family, let's keep in mind
our shipmates who are serving
forward. Because of them, we
can enjoy this special time,"
Adm. Roughead said.
"Wherever you are spending


know that we appreciate your
service. What you do preserves
our way of life and makes a dif-
ference in our Navy and our
nation," Mrs. Roughead said.
They also reminded Sailors
and their families to use good
judgment and to be respon-
sible while celebrating.
To view the holiday greeting,


dau.mil
The DAU also will be adding classes to its
present fiscal year 2009 schedule. Registration
for these additional classes are available. The
DAU-South Robins AFB Satellite Campus will
offer the following classes:
* ACQ 201B, Intermediate Systems Acq, Part
B 23-27 Feb 2009
* ACQ 201B, Intermediate Systems Acq, Part
B 11-15 May 2009
* BCF 205, Contractor Business Strategies
9-12 June 2009
* BCF 211, Acq Business Management 10-14
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* BCF 301, Business, Cost Estimating & FM
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* CON 120, Mission Focused Contracting 6-
17 Apr 2009
* CON 120, Mission Focused Contracting 1-
12 Jun 2009
* CON 120, Mission Focused Contracting 14-
25 Sept 2009
* CON 215, Intermediate Contracting for
Mission Support 6-17 Apr 2009
* CON 217, Cost Analysis & Negotiation
Techniques 22-26 Jun 2009
* CON 218, Advanced Contracting for
Mission Support 15-26 Jun 2009
* CON 353, Advanced Business Solutions 24
Aug-4 Sept 2009
* SYS 302, Technical Leadership in Systems
Engineering 20-31 July 2009
Register for all classes at http://www.dau.mil
Any questions please contact the follow-
ing: Debbie Johnson, site manager at (478)
926-9409 or email debbie.johnsonadau.mil or
Donna Casey at (478) 988-6800 ext. 3005 or
email donna.casey@dau.mil.


From the Defense Acquisition University
The Defense Acquisition University is intro-
ducing the following Continuous Learning
Modules now on-line. The number of continu-
ous learning points are listed per module. You
can register for these CLMs at http://clc.dau.
mil.
New Modules:
* Condition Based Maintenance Plus
(CLL029) 1.5 CLPs
* Forecasting Techniques (CLB026) 2 CLPs
* Contract Management: Strategies for
Mission Success(FAC033) 3 CLPS
* Time Space-Position Information (CLE038)
6 CLPs
* Small Business: A Requirements Approach
(FAC032) 3 CLPs
* DTEPI Introduction to Probability &
Statistics (CLE035) 2 CLPs
* Technical Refreshment Implementation
(CLL119) 3 CLPs
* Electronic Subcontract Reporting System
(CLC054) 1.5 CLPs
Modules Coming Soon December 2008
* Testing in a Joint Environment (CLE029)
* Joint Logistics (CLL016)
* Logistics for the Rest of Us (CLL004)
* Telemetry (CLE037)
* EITE (CLE039)
Register for all modules at http://clc.dau.mil
Continuous Learning Resources
* General Information http://clc.dau.mil/
* Browse modules http://learn.dau.mil/
html/clc/Clc.jsp
* Register for modules https://learn.dau.
mil/html/clc/Register.j sp
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families serving at home and the holidays this year, please visit www.navy.mil.


DAU offers on-line courses


I














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 11


New Defense Department team taking shape


Gates Will Lead New Obama
Team at Defense Department
By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service
While Defense Secretary
Robert M. Gates will stay in
office in President-elect Barack
Obama's administration, other
Bush administration political
appointees will move on, a
Pentagon spokesman said.
More than 600 politi-
cal appointees work in the
Defense Department, 49 of
them in positions requir-
ing Senate confirmation. The
Senate confirmed Gates in
December 2006, and he does
not have to go through that
process again.
During a news roundtable
last week, Gates said the vast
majority ofpolitical appointees
will leave Jan. 20 as planned.
Others will remain until their
successors are named and
confirmed, Pentagon spokes-
man Bryan Whitman told
reporters.
"There may be a very small
number of folks that are asked
to stay beyond that," Whitman


Navy photo by MC1 Molly A. Burgess
Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates smiles as the U.S. Naval Acadamy Band and cheerlead-
ers stop outside his office during their annual pep rally through the halls of the Pentagon in
anticipation of the 109th Army-Navy college football game.


added.
Deputy Defense Secretary
Gordon England announced
that he will leave Jan. 20 or
upon confirmation of his
replacement. The defense
undersecretaries for policy,
personnel and readiness,
intelligence, comptroller, and
acquisition, technology and
logistics, as well as most of
the assistant defense secretar-
ies, are expected to leave then
also.
"I would expect to see a new
team," Whitman said.
Some positions will be
"gapped," meaning that the
incumbent will leave the posi-
tion Jan. 20 and it will be left
vacant until the Senate con-
firms the nominee.
Some positions are so impor-
tant, however, that the secre-
tary may ask the incumbent
to remain in place, Whitman
said.
"At this point, I am not aware
of any that he has asked to do
that;'," Whitman said. "We will
see in the days ahead whether
that becomes necessary and


how quickly the new team
gets aligned and is ready to
come into position. If there
are some positions that the
secretary feels he cannot gap
and instead [needs to] bridge
with somebody, [he will see]
if those individuals are willing
to do that.'
Those bridging the gaps
will not have definite dates for
departure, and thereforewould
not be able to make plans
with potential new employ-
ers, Whitman explained. But
he expressed confidence they
would remain until their suc-
cessors are in place if neces-
sary.
"The people in these posi-
tions have a tremendous sense
of duty," he said.
Gates will be involved in the
president-elect's DoD staffing
process, Whitman said, inter-
viewing the senior people and
giving his opinion to Obama.
"Still, the people nominated
will serve at the pleasure of
the president, and Obama will
have the final say," Whitman
said.


Procurement initiative secures DoD computers


By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

The Pentagon is among doz-
ens of departments and orga-
nizations that have improved
security for their laptop com-
puters and saved taxpayers
more than $92 million by using
a new procurement initiative,
a senior Defense Department
official said here.
The Defense Department
and the General Services
Administration are among
the many federal agencies
that participated in the Data
At Rest Tiger Team initiative


that resulted in the purchase
of about $112 million worth
of information security prod-
ucts for interagency users at
an actual cost of about $19
million, David Hollis, the
team's program manager for
the Pentagon, said.
The DARTT involved 20
defense agencies, 18 other fed-
eral or civil agencies, as well as
state and local and NATO par-
ticipation, Hollis said.
Data at rest refers to digital
information stored on com-
puters, personal digital assis-
tants and thumb and flash
drives.


Advancement info


found free on-line


By Ed Barker
NETC Public Affairs


Buyer beware! Some sites
on the Internet are charging
Sailors money for advance-
ment information, which is
available free from the Navy
Advancement Center.
Sailors are wasting their
money by paying for what is
available free of charge. The
most current and authorita-
tive advancement information
for active duty and Reserve
Sailors is available from their
Command Career Counselor
and by going online to the
Navy Advancement Center's
Web site at www.advance-
ment.cnet.navy.mil.
"Everything you need to be
successful on the advance-
ment exam is available for free
from the Navy," said Master
Chief Electrician's Mate Robert
McCombs, Command Master
Chief for Naval Education
and Training Professional
Development and Technology
Center(NETPDTC), Pensacola,
Fla. "In fact, our sites are
where the commercial venues
get a lot of their information.
Sailors don't need to go out
and buy commercial products
in order to advance."
Professional military knowl-
edge and rating specific ref-
erences for advancement are
just a click away. Two of the
most popular products avail-
able through the Advancement
Center Web site are the
Sailor's Profile Sheet and the
Advancement Exam Strategy
Guide, advised McCombs.
The Profile Sheet is spe-
cific to the individual Sailor,
and uses results from previ-
ous examinations to show
the Sailor where his or her
weaknesses are in compari-
son to their peers. It shows
them what areas they need to
improve in order to be com-
petitive on the test.
Sailors can use their Profile
Sheets to build their study pro-
gram by topic and subtopic.
The Advancement Exam
Strategy Guide contains a bib-
liography specific to the exam-
ination that the Sailor will be
taking.
"A Sailor can go to the exam
section, look up their specialty,


and download their informa-
tion including the bibliogra-
phy," McCombs said. "We give
them the references we use for
exam questions, so it's just a
matter of becoming familiar
with the material."'
To help Sailors understand
what skills and knowledge
exam developers are assess-
ing, specific rating information
is broken down by paygrade
into topic and subject areas
for all exams in their rating.
This section of the Web site
also includes information on
"how to prepare for and take
an advancement exam."
"If a Sailor uses their past
Profile Sheet(s), which shows
their weak areas compared to
their peers, along with the bib-
liography and topics/subtop-
ics, they can develop a more
focused study product than
any commercial product can
provide." McCombs said.
Kirk Schultz, head of
Advancement Assessment
Concepts at NETPDTC, relat-
ed that there are many other
Navy-sponsored Web sites
Sailors can visit to help with
their advancement needs.
"Since just about everything
has gone electronic, many
Navy and Department of
Defense instructions are avail-
able through the Web;'," Schultz
said. "Additionally, we intend
soon to provide the capability
for Sailors to link to many of
their references directly from
the Advancement site:'
"Our site has features and
helpful tools to better prepare
for upcoming exams such as
access exam to statistics by
rating, non-resident training
courses, as well as final mul-
tiple computations charts,"
McCombs said.
Sailors without direct access
to a computer should see their
Educational Services Officer or
Command Career Counselor
for instructions on where com-
puter access can be obtained
and for other information they
need to prepare for their next
advancement examination.
For more information visit the Navy
Advancement Center's Web site at
www. advancement.cnet.navy.mil.
For more information on Naval
education and training, visit www.netc.
navy.mil.


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"The DARTT has been very
successful in improving the
government's mobile data
security posture while offer-
ing deep product and service
discounts across the govern-
ment," Hollis said.
Publicized accounts of lost
government laptops and other
computer devices in recent
years prompted U.S. agencies
to seek ways to better safe-
guard sensitive information,
Hollis said.
The government requested
proposals from private indus-
try in December 2006. About
six months later, the Defense


Department's Enterprise
Software Initiative purchase
program, in partnership with
the GSA's SmartBUY program,
awarded 12 blanket purchase
agreements for various com-
puter-security-related prod-
ucts and services, he said.
For example, the use of
encrypted software and other
security products with mobile
computer devices prevents
sensitive information from
being accessed by unauthor-
ized users, Hollis said.
The initiative also helps the
federal government meet an
Office of Management and


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Budget directive that requires
the encryption of all data on
mobile computers and associ-
ated storage devices that carry
sensitive information, Hollis
said.
The U.S. government saved
$93 million through the pro-
gram because of its business-
pricing and competitive-bid-
ding processes, Hollis said.


Pentagon participation in
the initiative falls under the
purview of Chief Information
Officer John G. Grimes, the
assistant secretary of defense
for networks and information
integration.
The DARTT program was
among three finalists for
"Government Information
Security Program of the Year."


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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Report outlines possible


future threats to country


By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service


Courtesy photo

Zumwalt award winners
Navy Gateway Inns and Suites received the Admiral Zumwalt 5 Star Accreditation this summer.
The award was presented in New York recently. Taking part in the award presentation were,
from left, Chris Mehrer, manager Fleet Readiness; Virginia Edwards, housekeeping supervisor,
NGIS; Anne Taylor, front desk clerk, NGIS; Ada Ferran, front desk supervisor, NGIS; Master
Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Joe Campa Jr.; Terri Darwin, Bachelor Housing manager; and
John Baker, Director Fleet & Family Readiness.


Program helps get Navy story out


From NAVCO


The Expanded Hometown
Interviews program deliv-
ers the Navy story, as seen
through the eyes of Sailors, to
regional and local media mar-
kets across the United States
in an effort to expand aware-
ness and understanding of our
Navy mission.
Commanding offi-
cers love these "Expanded
Hometowners," and most
story clips run in the CHINFO
Clips, which are widely read
by senior Navy leadership.
The key to this proactive
media marketing effort is an
international headline. With
that, print, radio and television


editors across the nation can
easily and immediately local-
ize the story by interviewing a
Sailor with a hometown tie.
An example of a 2008 head-
lines is "A Great Sailor and a
Good Samaritan," which was
published in the_St. Louis Post-
Dispatch
To feature your Sailors, com-
mands must have telephone
connectivity and submit the
following:
Current operational details
making international head-
lines
A list of at least 10 articu-
late, well-spoken, informed
Sailors and their hometowns
A current high resolution
photo of each Sailor


A primary point of con-
tact to coordinate through the
command
With this information,
NAVCO will find the media,
coordinate the interview
opportunities, and provide you
a consolidated list of report-
ers who want to talk to their
hometown Sailor. NAVCO
will provide each participating
command a media feedback
report with all coverage.
Get more information on
this program and submit
your Sailors' names and story
ideas by contacting: Lt. j.g. Jan
Shultis at (901) 874-2824, jan.
shultis@navy.mil or Lt. Amy
Carmickle at (901) 874-5823,
amy.carmickleanavy.mil.


Regional conflicts driven by competition for
food, water and energy, increased urbanization
and the possibility that nonstate actors could
obtain high-tech components for enhancing
lower-tech weapons are among the global chal-
lenges U.S. joint military leaders likely will face
over the next quarter-century, a senior officer
said here today.
These scenarios are part of the Joint Operating
Environment 2008 report recently issued by
Norfolk, Va., -based U.S. Joint Forces Command,
Navy Rear Adm. John M. Richardson told
American Forces Press Service and Pentagon
Channel reporters.
The report outlines potential threats and
opportunities U.S. joint forces may confront dur-
ing the next eight to 25 years, said Richardson,
JFCOM's strategy and policy director.
While the nature of warfare will not change,
the character of future joint military operations
is going to change, Richardson said, as "the stra-
tegic landscape changes, as the enemy adapts,
as new technologies come on, as resources
become more scarce."
The report states that 5 billion of the 8 billion
people of the world in the 2030s likely could live
in cities, Richardson said. Such a circumstance,
he said, increases the opportunity for conflict.
Joint warfighters, therefore, should be studying
the challenges of carrying out military opera-
tions in densely-populated cities, he said.
Conducting military operations in urban
environments is different and challenging,
Richardson said, because enemies can blend
in among the population and unintended civil-
ian casualties are more likely.
Another potential future challenge, he said,
involves nonstate actors or terrorists obtain-
ing relatively inexpensive, commercially avail-
able global positioning systems to enhance the
guidance systems of older rockets and missile
systems.
"Now we have GPS devices that we can stick
on our windshield, and we have the computer


programming that would allow you to work out
the most expeditious or optimum route from
point to point," Richardson explained. "They
are much smaller, they're miniaturized; you
can put them on rocket systems or any kind of
a launch vehicle."
It is likely that the United States and its allies
will be involved in conducting irregular war-
fare against global terrorists for many years to
come, Richardson said.
That viewpoint is shared by JFCom's com-
mander, Marine Gen. James N. Mattis, who
wears a second hat as NATO's supreme allied
commander for transformation. American
sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines will
be fighting terrorists during the next decade
or so, Mattis told attendees at the 2008 Joint
Warfighting Conference held at Virginia Beach,
Va., during summer.
"Irregular warfare, from my perspective, is
the key problem that we face today," Mattis said
at the conference. The threat of global terror-
ism, the four-star general added, is "not going
away any time soon."
Increased global competition for resources
such as food, water and energy also will present
challenges for U.S. joint military forces in the
future, Richardson said.
Yet, although regional competitions for
resources "may serve as flashpoints" for future
military operations, Richardson said, they may
also "give the joint force an opportunity to exer-
cise its powers of inspiration." U.S. forces, he
said, could assist other U.S. agencies or coali-
tion partners by furnishing food, water and
other forms of "soft power" support to troubled
regions to diffuse tensions before they erupt
into conflict, he explained.
A follow-on document, Richardson said, will
describe how U.S. joint forces would respond
operationally to potential future challenges and
opportunities outlined in the JOE 2008 report.
Yet, despite technological or sociological
change in the world in coming years, mili-
tary conflicts "will remain a human endeavor
between two human forces that learn, adapt
and respond to one another," Richardson said.


Birthday gifts bring holiday cheer


Navy 34, Army 0 Navy photo by MC2 Kevin S. O'Brien
U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen rush the field in a victory celebration following the end of
the 109th Army-Navy college football game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. The
Midshipmen defeated the Cadets 34-0 for a seventh-straight victory over the Black Knights.


By Pfc. Justin W. Wiemers
Marine Corps Base Quantico

For many children cel-
ebrating a birthday is about
receiving presents, but for a
10-year-old Arlington, Va., girl
it became about giving gifts to
the less fortunate.
Lauren A. Proulx celebrat-
ed her birthday with a party
Sunday, and instead of having
her guest bring presents for
her, she asked them to bring
unwrapped toys that could be
donated to Toys for Tots.
"I donated the toys, because

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I don't play with all the toys I
get for my birthday. So I give
them to other kids who will
treasure them," Proulx said.
"I think it's wonderful that
she wants to do this," said Cathy


J. Proulx, Lauren's mother.
The younger Proulx said she
had a great birthday.
For additional information about the
Toys for Tots campaign and volunteer
opportunities, visit www.quantico.usmc.
mil.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 13


Taking a ride with Santa and his elves.


A snowman attracts one child's attention.


Photos by MC3 Eric Tretter
Fifteen tons of snow on a 60-degree day made for Winter in Wonderland fun.


Winter in Wonderland enjoyed by all


By MC1(SW) Joe Sabo
Periscope Staff

Cookies, hot cocoa, Santa
Claus and snowballs were
where the fun was at Saturday
at the Winter in Wonderland
Celebration.
Fifteen tons of snow were
enough for lots of snow ball
fights. There were enough
cookies to feed more than
900 people, with horse rides,
train rides and even an early
appearance by Santa Claus.
Anne Myhre, recreation
manager of the Big Easy, said
she really enjoyed the festival.
"I have really enjoyed this
event. The support from the
commands in planning the
event was awesome," she said.
"It is nice give something fun
back to the families here on
base. There are some people
who have never seen snow,
and what is better than snow
in 60 degree weather?"
The Winter in Wonderland


had a Toys for Tots booth
where the Marines tried their
hardest to get toys for less-
fortunate families. The Fleet
and Family Support Center
staffed a booth where children
gathered to make a Christmas
cards for the troops in Iraq.
Children lined up for pony
rides, and families rode the
train. There was a selection of
classic Christmas music by the
Cumberland Sound. Lisa Allen
Dance put on a Christmas per-
formance which showed the
holiday spirit.
The main attraction didn't
disappoint. There was a white
pile of snow with a mountain
of children of all ages in a mass
snowball fight. Large snow
flakes peppered all.
The snow was shot through
a cannon.
"The snowball machine
was the best thing here," said
Maddy Clark, a Mary Lee Clark
Elementary third grader. "The
chocolate chip cookies and


What's better than a ride on a pony?


hot cocoa were really good,
too. I am having a lot of fun
playing in the snow, I even
made a Christmas card for
someone."
At 6 p.m., a siren and flashing
lights announced the arrival of
Santa Clause, hitching a ride


from Kings Bay's firefighters.
The Kings Bay Christmas
Tree was the centerpiece of
Winter in Wonderland, with
ornaments from different com-
mands and families showing
the unity and spirit of the holi-
day season at Kings Bay.













14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Fire department offers tips for a safe holiday season


Christmas trees,
lights all present
potential dangers

From the Kings Bay Fire Department


Feelings go crazy during the holi-
days. It's exciting and exasperating,
it's fun and it's a hassle, and in spite
of all that, it's still full of wonder. The
real beauty lies in the fact that chil-
dren get to feel all the joy and won-
der, minus the traffic, crowds and
costs that drive their parents nuts.
Yet, within the wonder lies hazard.
Children are drawn to the glittering
electric lights and to the glow of can-
dles, both of which can potentially
cause injury. Each year fires occur-
ring during the holiday season claim
the lives of over 400 people, injure
1,650 more, and cause more than
$990 million in damage.
By taking action before the holi-
days, you can help keep your family
safe. Here's what the Kings Bay Fire


Department recommends:
Check and/or replace the batter-
ies in your smoke alarm. According to
the National Fire Protection Agency,
85 percent of all fire deaths occur in
the home, and the majority occurs
at night when most people are sleep-
ing. Smoke alarms, when properly
installed, can give you the early warn-
ing needed to safely escape from fire.
Smoke alarm batteries need to be
replaced once a year. Pick an easy
date to remember, such as an anni-
versary or a birthday, to remind you
to change out the batteries.
Test smoke alarms once a month
by using the alarm's test button.
Replace smoke alarms every ten
years. They will not last forever.
Choose and maintain Christmas
trees carefully.
How do you pick a fresh tree?
Choose one that's green, with nee-
dles that are difficult to pull from the
branches. When you bend a needle
between your fingers, it should not
break.
When you get it home, cut about


an inch from the bottom of the tree to
help it absorb water. Mount the tree
in a stand that's designed not to tip,
then water the tree constantly. A six-
foot tree will use one gallon of water
every two days. A dried out tree can
be totally consumed by fire in less
than 30 seconds.
To play it safe, some families may
choose an artificial tree. Before you
buy, check the label to make sure it's
fire retardant or fire resistant.
Be careful with holiday lights.
When you purchase new lights,
choose brands that bear the mark of
a testing laboratory.
As you pull out old sets of lights,
check them for broken or cracked
sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose
connections. If the lights are broken,
throw them away.
Use no more than three standard-
size sets of lights per single extension
cord. Don't overload electrical out-
lets, and always unplug lights before
you leave home or go to sleep.
To eliminate risk of electrocution,
never use electric lights on a metal-


lic tree. Make sure the lights you use
outside are weatherproof and labeled
"for outdoor use."
Be smart about candles. Candles
are among the leading causes of fires
in the home. If you have children,
keep the candles up high and out of
their reach.
Never leave a child alone in a room
with a lit candle. Don't let teenagers
keep candles in their bedrooms, and
don't use candles to decorate the
Christmas tree.
Keep a flashlight close by for those
times when the power goes out, rath-
er than relying on candles for emer-
gency light.
Be careful when you cook for the
holidays. The NFPA says unattended
cooking is the leading cause of home
fires in the U.S. When you've got
guests in your home, remember to
keep an eye on the range.
Clean cooking equipment, to
reduce the risk of a grease fire and
keep potholders and rags away from
cooking surfaces. Don't use ovens
or other cooking equipment to heat


your home.
Have a home escape plan. Even
young children can learn what to do
in the event of a fire in your home.
Make sure you have working smoke
alarms, that there are two ways out of
each room, that home exits are unob-
structed and easy to use, and that the
family has a designated meeting place
outside. Most important: practice the
escape plan at least twice a year with
every member of the family.
Finally, even though the weather
has changed and the swimming pool
is the last thing on your mind, you
must still watch your children around
water. Drowning can happen no mat-
ter what the temperature is outside.
Remember, too, that buckets, toilets,
bathtubs and even dog dishes can
hold the small amount of water it
takes for a child to drown.
By planning ahead, paying atten-
tion to the hazards and taking the
right steps to avoid them, you can
have a safe and very happy holiday
season. Best wishes from Kings Bay
Fire Department.


Classes on your site
now available
The Fleet and Family
Support Center will now take
its regular workshops on the
road if a unit can furnish a
conference room or classroom
and guarantee a minimum of
five participants. Additionally,
personnel will tailor presenta-
tions to cover a unit's General
MilitaryTrainingrequirements
when those requirements deal
with human resources and
social issues. Counselors also
can create a presentation in
response to a unit's area of
special concerns. Personnel
are available to participate
within areas of expertise in
the indoctrination of newly
assigned personnel and family
members of active duty per-
sonnel.

Anger management
seminar Dec. 31
Anger is often a smoke
screen for other emotions and
not an effective method for
getting what you want. This
workshop is slated for 8:30
a.m. to noon Dec. 31. It can
help you focus on identifying
the feelings anger hides and
explore behaviors helpful in
resolving primary issues. Pre-
registration is required. Call
573-4222 for details.

New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group meets
A New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group will meet
every other Tuesday at the
Fleet and Family Support
Center throughout the month.
This workshop is scheduled
for 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
Dec. 23. This workshop is an
opportunity to share experi-


ICenter

ing on how you manage that
stress. This workshop is slated
for noon to 4 p.m. Dec. 16. Pre-
registration is required. Call
573-4222 for details.

Ten Steps to a Federal
Job program Dec. 17
A Certified Federal Job
Search Trainer will present
this fast-moving workshop,
three-hour workshop in a
classroom format. This work-
shop gives Federal job appli-
cants an easy-to-understand
10-step approach to manag-
ing their Federal Job Search
Campaign.
A comprehensive program,
easy to follow and under-
stand based on the best sell-
ing careers book, Ten Steps
to a Federal Job by the author
and curriculum designer. The
workshop is scheduled at
the Fleet and Family Support
Center from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30
p.m. Dec. 17. Registration is
recommended, as the class is
limited to 20 seats. For more
information, call 573-4513.


ences, meet and gain support
from others, and exchange
new ideas. To register, call 573-
4893.

Department of Veterans
Affairs services available
Cathy Fernandez, the
Department of Veterans Affairs
Representative for Kings Bay,
is in the office two to three
days a week. Appointments
are required. Service members
wishing to participate in the
Benefits Delivery at Discharge
(BDD) Program should be


SUBASE Safety will again
conduct a teenage Driver
Improvement Class during
holiday season.
This year's class is sched-
uled for Dec. 22. Class is from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. in Building 1063
(Fluckey Hall) room 127.
There are only 30 seats avail-
SFellowship
S ~E of Christian
Athletes








Raise money for your
Group, Organization
or Cause.

NO COST OR Fees.


Hel isheefl Cll o0


able. Teens must possess either
their drivers license or permit.
The class is free, the only thing
needed is something to write
with. Attendants might consid-
er bringing a sweater or jacket.
To sign up, call Dean or Russ
at ext. 2525 or 0414 respective-
ly.







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SHOWTIMES LISTED ARE FOR112/12 1718/08
Why wait in line? QUANTUM OF
PRINT TICKETS AT HOME SOLACE (PG13) 1:15
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FOURTH CHRISTMASES 7:4010:10
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9:00 9:40NBESO 9:0
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BOLT (PG) 1:404:10 ZONE (R) 2:00 4:40
6:40 9:10 7:30 10:05
WE PROUDLY ACCEPT VISAMASTERCARD,AMEX& DISCOVER


within 180 to 60 days of dis-
charge or retirement and be
available for an exam by the
VA. For scheduled days con-
tact Fleet and Family Support
Center at 573-4513. For more
information, call 573-4506 or
573-4513.

Stress management
seminar Dec. 16
Events, schedules, daily
pressure and many other items
can cause undo stress in your
life. Stress may or may not be
good for your health depend-


Bowling All Night, Pizza,

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SoContinental Breakfast,
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Dinner Buffet at 8 pm

Continental Breakfast at 12:00 am


All U- Can Eat Pizza Buffet
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0 Continental Breakfast served at 12:00 a.m.
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Specialty Adult Drinks will be available
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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL RACK-N-ROLL LANES AT 573-9492


AN OFFICIAL GAME OF THE


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Teen driver class offered


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 15

Pearl Harbor

Day 2008


Navy photo by MC2 Class Michael A. Lantron
Pearl Harbor Survivors render honors for a Joint Service
Color Guard during a joint U.S. Navy/National Park Service
ceremony commemorating the 67th anniversary of the attack
on Pearl Harbor. More than 2,000 distinguished guests and the
general public joined servicemembers, Pearl Harbor survivors
and their families and friends for the annual observance.


Navy photo by MCC David Rush
A Sailor from the U.S. Pacific Fleet Band plays taps during a joint U.S. Navy/National Park Service ceremony.


Navy photo by MC2 Jay C. Pugh Navy photo by MC2 Jay C. Pugh
Daniel Martinez, historian for the National Park Service at the USS Arizona Memorial, walks with the cremains of Seaman 1st Herb Weatherwax, a survivor of the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on
Class Charles Guerin Jr. during an interment ceremony at the USS Arizona Memorial. Guerin was a former Sailor stationed Pearl Harbor, salutes during a joint U.S. Navy/National Park
aboard the battleship USS Arizona (BB 39) during the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Service ceremony.


$3,000 in Free Upgrades & 1,000 Military Discount
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Prices, plans, dimensions, specifications, material, and availability are subject to change without notice. Illustrations are artistist depictions only and may differ from completed improvements. We [1
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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


Give thought to eating healthy for the holiday season


By Lt. Cmdr. Donna
Sporrer
Registered Dietitian, Naval Hospital
Jacksonville Nutrition Dept.

Did you know you do not
have to give up all of your
favorite foods during the holi-
day season? If you watch your
portion sizes, the amount you
eat from each food group, you
can still eat your favorite foods,
maintain your weight and sur-
vive the abundance of holiday
treats served at special meals
and many holiday functions.
Here are some tips to help
you. Make sure your plate is no
bigger than nine inches. The
bigger our plate is, the more
food we put on them. Fill half
of your plate with mostly low-
fat vegetables. Put sauces, gra-
vies and dressings on the side,
you'll use less.
Starchy foods like rice or
potatoes should fill no more
than one quarter of the plate,
about the size of a tennis ball.
Meat should fill the remaining
quarter of the plate, about the
size of a deck of cards.
Portion control is the key to
eating sensibly. Try not to over-


Navy photo
Eating until you are satisfied, not stuffed, is also important. By eating slowly and waiting 20
minutes before you go back for seconds, you should eat considerably less food.


load your plate. If it is there,
you will eat it. Instead, serve
yourself a smaller portion and
go back for seconds after wait-
ing about 20 minutes. You will
most likely find you don't want


seconds anymore. Eat slowly.
You will eat less. Have a fruit
or high-fiber snack before you
attend a function. This will
help you eat less "party" foods
that are loaded with calories.


Eating until you are satisfied,
not stuffed, is also important.
By eating slowly and waiting 20
minutes before you go back for
seconds, you should eat con-
siderably less food. If you have


food left on your plate and you
are not hungry, let it go to waste
(not waist)! Drink lots of water.
Eat meals regularly. Skipping
meals will cause you to overeat
later in the day.
Remember, beverages have
calories. Stick to water, sugar-
free beverages or small por-
tions of your favorite drink.
Watch those extra calories.
About 100 extra calories each
day over a year can add up
to 10 pounds of weight gain.
How many extra calories are
you eating each day during the
holidays? Read labels or visit
www.Mypramid.gov to get the
calorie content of the foods.
For example, 3.5 ounces of
fudge has about 450 calories,
three pieces of assorted choc-
olates have 190 calories and
one sugar cookie has about
135 calories. Nibbling on
treats throughout the day can
increase your caloric intake
contributing tremendously to
holiday weight gain.
You should be exercisingyear
round to maintain our weight.
Do some type of activity daily:
walk, play tennis, ride a bike, go


to the gym with a friend. Visit
Mypyramid.gov to determine
how many calories you burn
based on the type of exercise
you are doing.
Don't wait until the New Year
to begin shedding those 10 to 20
extra pounds. Your goal should
be to limit holiday weight gain
start now. Exercising should
be part of our daily routine.
Schedule time and make it a
priority.
Maintaining a food log or
daily diary makes you more
aware of what you are actu-
ally eating and can help you
to eat less. Add up the calories
and use the Web site to see if
you are eating the appropriate
amount. Weigh yourself daily.
If you see the pounds adding
up, you may be motivated to
cut back on some of the holi-
day treats. Avoiding the scale
does not solve the problem.
If you follow these simple
guidelines for "most" meals,
you should be able to limit or
better yet eliminate holiday
weight gain. Don't wait for the
weight to creep up on you,
start today.


TRICARE urges flu shots


From TRICARE


TRICARE officials urge uni-
formed service families to be
prepared for this year's flu sea-
son and an important step to
do so is receive a flu vaccine.
In the United States more
than 220,000 people are hos-
pitalized and 36,000 die every
year as a result of the flu and
flu-related complications. Al-
though infants and the elderly
are most at risk for serious
illness or death, many young
people are also hospitalized or
die from the flu each year.
According to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention, a record number
of flu vaccine doses (over 140
million) have been created for
use in the United States during
the 2008-09 flu season. The
Department of Defense has
secured more than 3.5 mil-
lion doses; influenza vaccina-
tions are required for all active
duty and National Guard and


Reserve service members.
For the first time, the CDC
recommend children from age
6 months to 18 years get the flu
vaccination. Previously, the
CDC recommended flu vac-
cinations for children from age
6 months to 5 years.
TRICARE covers the vaccine
in two forms: The flu shot is an
inactivated vaccine containing
a killed virus and given with a
needle. This form of the vac-
cine may be used in all age
groups. The nasal-spray flu
vaccine, or Flu Mist, is a vac-
cine made with live, weakened
flu viruses. This form of the
vaccination is limited only to
healthy people who are not
pregnant or between the ages
of 2 and 49.
The flu shot is covered for
beneficiaries, as long as it is
administered in a doctor's
office. Flu shots administered
in a civilian pharmacy, drug-
store or other location are
not covered by TRICARE. For


TRICARE for Life beneficia-
ries, Medicare covers flu vac-
cines and TRICARE is second
payer, if needed.
Military treatment facilities
and clinics also offer flu vac-
cinations. Check locally for
more information.
Find out more about flu vaccines on
the CDC's flu page http://www.cdc.gov/
flu or the Military Vaccine (MILVAX)
Agency Web site http://www.vaccines.
mil/default.aspx.







(//Volunteers
ofAmerica*


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Don't let holiday


cheer ruin the fun


From Health Promotion by the
Ocean Branch Health Clinic Mayport

December is recognized as
National Drunk and Drugged
Driving Awareness Month to
raise awareness of the human
toll that driving impaired can
take.
It serves to remind us during
the holiday season and year-
round that celebrating respon-
sibly and avoiding driving
under the influence of alcohol
is the right thing to do.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention report
36 people in the United States
die everyday and about 700
more are injured in motor
vehicles accidents that involve
an alcohol-impaired driver.
According to the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office, from Jan. 1 to
Dec. 2, the Traffic Homicide
Unit, the Florida Highway
Patrol, the Neptune Beach
Police Department and
the Atlantic Beach Police
Department have responded
to 122 traffic fatalities. Of those,
36 drivers were confirmed
driving under the influence.
The JSO indicates nearly
one-third of all traffic fatalities
in Florida involve impaired
drivers. A person with a .08
Blood Alcohol Content (BAC)
is considered driving under
the influence (DUI) in Florida.
However, you can be arrested
and convicted with a lower
limit. Florida law prohibits the
possession of open contain-
ers of alcoholic beverages in
a motor vehicle. And, anyone
under the age of 21 with a
BAC of .02 or above will auto-
matically lose their driving


privileges if apprehended.
Florida takes a "zero toler-
ance" stance.
The National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration
states about three in every ten
Americans will be involved
in an alcohol-related crash at
some point in their lives. In
one year, more than 1.4 mil-
lion drivers were arrested for
driving under the influence
of alcohol or narcotics. This
accounts for less than 1 per-
cent of the 159 million self-
reported episodes of alcohol-
impaired driving among U.S.
adults each year. From these
statistics it is clear that more
Americans are driving under
the influence. NHTSA offers
some tips for keeping you,
your family and friends safe
for the holidays.
First, plan ahead. Always
designate a non-drinking driv-
er before any holiday party or
celebration begins.
Second, take the keys. Do
not let a friend drive if they are
impaired.
Third, be a helpful host
or hostess. If you're hosting
a party this holiday season,
remind your guests to plan
ahead and designate their
sober driver. Always offer alco-
hol-free beverages and make
sure all of your guests leave
with a sober driver.
The holiday season is a
time to spend with family and
friends, a time to celebrate.
Have a plan in place if you
are going to be drinking or
serving alcohol. Don't let poor
judgment, a DUI conviction,
or worse yet an auto accident
"wreck" your holiday.


Monday- Saturday 9-6 2106 Sadler Road Owned and Operated by Sears Retail Outlet
Sunday 1-6 (904) 261-5511 Bill & Beverly Hughes appliances, electronics, hardware, lawn & garden
Fernandina Beach


Monday- Saturday 9-6
Sunday 12-5


28 Hawthorn Lane
(912) 882-5858
St. Mary's, Georgia


Owned and Operated by St. Mary's Sears
Norm Duchscherer
Home appliances, electronics, hardware, lawn & garden


DEERE INTRETPRMTINA. .FR. . ..FIACECHRESacre. na. moioa prh ask rmtedt*oIhIucaeatterglrprcaert*nefetfo iet
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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 17


IA symposium a success


By MC3 Coleman
Thompson
Fleet Public Affairs Center, Atlantic

A symposium detailing the
resources available to indi-
vidual augmentee Sailors was
held at the Navy Mobilization
Processing Site on Naval
Station Norfolk Dec. 4.
Because of the evolving pol-
icies and support services for
IAs and their families, Sailors
may be misinformed to the
most recent processes and
tools available to help them
and their families prepare for
such a dramatic change.
The symposium gathered
senior leadership and com-
mand IA coordinators (CIACs)


from several local commands
to ensure that everyone knew
the same information and
could take that information
with them to provide their
future IA Sailors with a proper
plan.
"The most important thing
is that we are all on the same
page and that we're not dupli-
cating services," said Colleen
Charlton, chief of services
for Fleet and Family Support
Center at Naval Air Station
Oceana and Dam Neck. "The
bottom line is, that we want
the service member and their
families to get the best pos-
sible service they can get."
Cmdr. Thomas Trotter, exec-


utive officer, Expeditionary
Combat Readiness Center,
said Sailors may have a lot of
misconceptions about the IA
process and what it entails.
"These symposiums allow
them to come together and
understand what the truth
really is," said Trotter. "It really
takes away the stress of the
unknown."
To get more information
on what to expect and how to
prepare for an IA deployment,
Sailors and their families are
encouraged to visit www.
ia.navy.mil or contact the Fleet
and Family Support Center.
For more news from around
the fleet, visit www.navy.mil.


Navy photo by MC2 RJ Stratchko
Cmdr. Thomas Trotter, executive officer of Expeditionary Combat Readiness Command explains
the process on where individual augmentee Sailors should expect to go for training, screening
and processing.


Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Hash Brown Potatoes
French Toast
Lunch
* Regular Line
Vegetable Soup
Grilled Salisbury Steaks
Cantonese Spare Ribs
Mashed Potatoes
Simmered Egg Noodles
Club Spinach
Squash and Carrot Med-
ley
Hot Dinner Rolls
* Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage
Sandwich w/ Peppers &
Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Cream of Mushroom
Soup
Curry Chicken
Smothered Liver& Onions
Steamed Wild Rice
Rissole Potatoes
Simmered Golden Sweet
Corn
Peas and Carrots
Toasted Garlic Bread


Friday
Breakfast
Waffles
Oven Fried Bacon
Minced Beef w/ Toast
Oatmeal
Grits
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
New England Clam
Chowder
Southern Fried Catfish
Rigatoni w/ Cheese &
Italian Sausage
Hush Puppies
Lyonnaise Potatoes
Green Beans
Cajun Black Eyed Peas
Hot Corn Bread
* Speed Line
Cheeseburgers


Hamburgers
BBQ Chicken
Baked Beans
Potato Chips
Dinner
Navy Bean Soup
Beef Porcupines
Hot & Spicy Chicken
Oven Browned Potatoes
Simmered Beans
Okra Tomato Gumbo
Toasted Garlic Bread

Saturday
Brunch
Spanish Soup
Monte Cristo Sandwich
Beef Ravioli
Potato Chips
Simmered Green Beans
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Oven Fried Bacon
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Chicken Corn Chowder
Beef Pot Pie
Lemon Baked Fish
Steamed Rice
O'Brien Potatoes
Fried Cabbage
Broccoli Combo
Hot Dinner Rolls

Sunday
Brunch
Logging Soup
Fish Portions
Cannonball Sandwiches
Sausage Gravy w/ Bis-
cuits
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Crisp Potato Chips
Corn Combo
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Saurbratin
Herbed Baked Chicken
Mashed Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Glazed Carrots
Savory Brussels Sprouts
Hot French Bread

Monday
Breakfast
Oven Fried Bacon
Breakfast Burritos
Oatmeal
Grits
Grilled Eggs to Order
Soft/Hard Cooked eggs
Hash Browns Potatoes
French Toast


Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Egg Drop Soup
Beef with Broccoli
Sweet and Sour Pork
Pork Fried Rice
Egg Rolls
Stir Fry Vegetables w/
Pancit
Fried Cabbage with Ba-
con
* Speed Line
Chicken Wings
Pizza
French Fried Potatoes
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Oven Fried Fish
Herbed Baked Chicken
Mashed Potatoes
Hush Puppies
Steamed Rice
Peas with Onions
Cauliflower Parmesan

Tuesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Waffles
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Creamed Ground Beef w/
Toast
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Tomato Soup
Blackened Fish
Roast Pork
Steamed Rice
Oven Browned Potatoes
Green Beans w/ Mush-
rooms
Calico Corn
* Speed Line
Grilled Ham & Cheese
Sandwich


Tacos
Rice
Refried Beans
Potato Chips
Potato Bar
Dinner
Beef Vegetable Soup
Chicken Alfredo
Roast Beef
Mashed Potatoes
Buttered Egg Noodles
Steamed Broccoli
Simmered Carrots

Wednesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Home Fries
Pancakes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Country Fried Steak
Chicken Vega
Au Gratin Potatoes
Simmered Corn
Club Spinach
Texas Toast
* Speed Line
Corn Dogs
Cheeseburgers


Hamburgers
French Fried Potatoes
Baked Beans
Dinner
French Onion Soup
Turkey Pot Pie
Spaghetti w/ Marinara
Sauce
Paprika Buttered Pota-
toes
Steamed Squash
Peas with Onions

Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Hash Brown Potatoes
French Toast
Lunch
* Regular Line
Texas Tortilla Soup
Chicken Quesadillas
Beef Enchiladas
Refried Beans
Spanish Rice
Mexican Corn
Simmered Green Beans
Cornbread
* Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage


3 LOCATIONS PROVIDING YOU WIT
OEN1365 Dys a Year!
Kingsbay Villag
2603 Osborne Rd. St. M-N
St. Mary's, Ga. (912) 729-7880
978 East King Ave. #BCD 101 East Main Street #8
Kingsland, Gax: (912) 576-3362770 -OR- Folkston, Ga. (912) 496-2333
Afr Beut, Bvery *ohnonHolywod


Sandwich w/ Peppers &
Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Creole Soup
Beef Balls Stroganoff
Fried Catfish
Boiled Noodles
Lyonnaise Potatoes
Simmered Asparagus
Cauliflower Combo

Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15 a.m.
to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No Breakfast Served.
Brunch 10:45 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
All meals served for lunch
and dinner also feature the
Healthy Choice Salad Bar
and various dessert items.
Menu items are subject to
change.











Dog Houses,
Shadow Boxes
Made to order

Manuel Bello
Woodworking i

645-7767I
.r'Tm, ", ==Tz


THE


LOCATION
A RAZORS EDGE
ACE HARDWARE
ACE HARDWARE
AFFORDABLE INSURANCE
AIRWAVES
AMOCOGAS
ARMY SURPLUS STORE
BENNETT CHEVEROLET
BENNETT CHRYSLER JEEP
BIG DADDY'S BBQ
BP GAS
CAMDEN COUNTY LIBRARY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHARLTON COUNTY
CHEVRON
CITY HALL
COLERAIN OAKS
COMFORT SHOWCASE BY LANE
CUMBERLAND INN & SUITES
DICKS WINGS
DIVERS DEN
DOLLAR GENERAL STORE
DRY CLEANERS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
HALL'S BEACH STORE
HARDEE'S RES.
HESS FOODS
HILLIARD PHARMACY
KING FOOD STORE
KMART
LIL CHAMP FOOD STORE
MAIL AND MORE
MAIL OR MORE
MAIL PLUS
MARKET ON THE SQUARE
MOM AND POP #1
MOM AND POP #2
MOM AND POP #3
MOM AND POP #5
MOM AND POP #7
MOM AND POP #8
MOM AND POP #9
NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


KING
F-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
ADDRESS
4515 HWY 40 E SUITE C
SR 40
1282 SR 40
2803-K OSBORNE RD
1000 E KING AVE UNIT 2
US HWY 301
HWY 17
HWY 40
HWY 40
SR 200 & CR 107
US HWY 17&A1A
1410 SR 40 E
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
JOEY OR HAMP WILL DELIVER
1330 E BOONE AVE
OSBORNE RD
2716 OSBORNE RD
HWY 40
HWY 40
139 CITY SMITTY DR
MARINER'S VILLAGE
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD & A1A.
A1A @ PKWY
S. 8TH ST & SADLER RD.
ATLANTIC AVE. & S FLETCHER AVE.
SADLER RD.& WILL HARDEE RD.
195 & SR 200
SADLER RD & S. FLETCHER AVE.
S. KINGS RD.
A1A @ PKWY
N. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD..
1601 SR 40 E
ATLANTIC AVE. & S. 10TH ST.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #8
994 E KINGS BAY RD
K-BAY CROSSING
100 OSBORNE RD
3380 SR 40 (BROWNTOWN)
946 POINT PETER RD
915 DILWORTH
1875 SPUR 40 (CROOKED RIVER)
100 ALEX DR (SHADOWLAWN)
2800 COLERAIN (SUGARMILL)
1371 SR 40 E(THE LAKES)
569 SPUR 40


I flATIONM


AfnnRElS


PATRICIA ANN'S RES.
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
QUALITY AUTOS
QUALITY AUTOS
RAMADA INN
RAMADA INN
SALVATION ARMY
SALVATION ARMY
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHELL
SHELL
SHELL GAS
SMILE GAS
SONNY'S BBQ
SONNY'S BBQ
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SPRINT STORE
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
STEAMBOAT LILLY'S
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUPER TEST GAS
SUPER TEST GAS
THE PIG BBQ
TNT LANES
TNT LANES
UPS STORE
UPS STORE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WATSON REALTY
WATSON REALTY
WAYFARA RES
WHISTLE STOP
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE #168
WINN DIXIE #168
WOODBINE LIBRARY
WOODBINE LIBRARY
Updated: FEBRUARY 1,2007


S. KINGS RD.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
9 QUALITY RD
9 QUALITY RD
1215 SR 40 E
1215 SR 40 E
1901 OSBORNE RD
1901 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
N. KINGS RD. A1A & N KINGS RD.
SADLER RD.
1380 E BOONE AVE
1380 E BOONE AVE
KENNETH GAY DR
KENNETH GAY DR
JONAS RD. LEM TURNER RD.
101 HERB BAUER DR
101 HERB BAUER DR
S. KINGS RD.
102 ST MARY'S ST W
102 ST MARY'S ST W
N KINGS RD.
S.8TH ST.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
2210 OSBORNE
2210 OSBORNE
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
SR 40 E
SR 40 E
6588 SR 40
6588 SR 40
2015 OSBORNE RD
2015 OSBORNE RD
195 & SR 200
N. KINGS RD.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
S.8TH ST.IN WALMART PLAZA
SR 200 --A1A
CAMDEN CORNERS
CAMDEN CORNERS
311 CAMDEN AVENUE
311 CAMDEN AVENUE


HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
YULEE
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
WOODBINE
WOODBINE


PIK P OU PRICE TANYO TEE OATIN 1


SKINNY

&PETE'S WINGS





Buy I 20pc order

of Wings at regular price

& get 1 single lOpe

ORDER OF WINOS


ABSOLUTELY


FREE! Expires 12/31/08I
Preset this coupon when ordering. Cannot be combined with any other
specials or offers. Limit one coupon per visit. Kingsland, GA locations.
-------------- m





1200 Hospitality Ave. Kingsland (The Lakes)

882-6656

CALL IN ORDERS WELCOME!
525760


CITY
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
WOODBINE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
YULEE
YULEE
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
CHARLTON
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
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ST. MARY'S
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HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
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YULEE
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CALLAHAN
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HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
KINGSLAND
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ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
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ST. MARY'S
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ST. MARY'S
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KINGSLAND
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I


LUUni ll n~wiiUM u aL i.I I


Pht@m Com M(;=













18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


kfWH~ft


Holiday social
at Finnegan's
Stop by KB Finnegan's from
3 to 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 18
and enjoy some holiday cama-
raderie with co-workers and
friends at MWR's annual holi-
day gathering. Hors d'oeuvres
and door prizes will be ready
to pump up everyone's spir-
its and drink specials will be
available.

Bring in the New Year
with Rack-N-Roll Lanes
It's time to start planning
your big New Year's Eve kick
off event! Let Rack-N-Roll
Lanes start your new year off
with some strikes and spares.
Bowling all night from 7 p.m.
to 2 a.m., Wednesday, Dec. 31.
Shoe rental, music, door priz-
es, party favors, pizza buffet,
champagne toast at midnight
with a continental breakfast
being offered to you at a low
cost of only $20 per person
or rent a lane for only $100
for up to six people. Get an
additional $10 off if you pay
for a lane before Dec. 24. Adult
specialty drinks will be offered
for purchase throughout the
evening. Rack-N-Roll Lanes
are taking reservation now, so
sign up early and don't miss
your chance to get "bowled
away into the new year." For
reservations, and information
call 573-9492.

Outdoor Adventure
Center slashes prices
Duringthe month ofJanuary,
all camper rental prices have
been greatly reduced for all
military and civilians alike.
Take $20 off the daily rates, $50
off the weekend rates and $100
off the weekly rates for some
really great camping bargains.
Stop by Outdoor Adventure
and plan a great get-a-way for
you and your family for the
new year. Call (912) 573-8103
for more information.

Auto Skills Drawing
in January
During the month of January
at Auto Skills, any patron paying
for a stall rental can put their
name in for a discount drawing
held at the end of the month.

Parents Night Out
set for Feb. 13
Just imagine an evening with
no kids. Here's your chance for
that to happen. MWR's CYP is
holding a Parent's Night Out
on from 6 to 11 p.m., Friday,
Feb. 13 at the Youth Center
and CDC. The cost is only $10
for the first child and $5 for
each additional child. Register
early to claim your spot at (912)
573-2380 or (912) 573-3888.
Food, activities and games are
included in the cost.

December calendar
for KB Finnegan's
K.B Finnegan's has some
great specials during the
month of December. Start the
week on Mondays with from
6 to 7 p.m. happy hour prices
and $2 Nachos and cheese


MWR holiday hours

MWR Admin. Bldg.
1039
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Auto Skills
Wednesday, Dec. 24, 8
a.m. to noon
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 8
a.m. to noon
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Rack-N-Roll Lanes
Bowling Center
Wednesday, Dec. 24, 1 to
6p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 7
p.m. to 2 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Big EZ "Entertainment
Zone"
Wednesday, Dec. 24,
noon to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, noon
to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 31,
noon to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, noon to
8p.m.
Youth Center
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Child Development
Center
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Conference Center
Dec. 20 to Jan. 4, Closed
Fitness Complex
Wednesday, Dec. 24,
5 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Friday, Dec. 26, 11 a.m. to
5 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 5
a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Friday, Jan. 2, 5 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Pool
Nov. 15 to April 1, Closed

from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays
are 35-cent wings from 4 to 7
p.m. On Wednesday from 6
to 7 p.m. happy hour prices
with 4 to 7 p.m. Shepard's Pie
Plate for only $6.50 then happy
hours on Thursday from 4 to 6
p.m. include discounts on all
beverages, 10 percent on pub
food items and hot dogs for
only 50 cents. Finish the week
with Margarita Dollar Night on
from 4 to 6 p.m. Fridays and a
Finnegan's Fish & Chips bas-
ket for only $5.50. If that isn't
enough then Saturdays have
some fun with mixed drinks
for $1 off from 4 to 7 p.m.

Sandwich Specials
of the Month
Take a bite out of high prices
with a great sandwich spe-
cial at Rocky Colletti and KB
Finnegan's. During the month
of December, pick up a fish
sandwich with chippers and a
fountain drink for only $6.50.
This special is good during
normal business hours. Call
ahead for an easy lunch pick-
up at 573-4029.

Winter Break Camp for
youths Dec. 22 to Jan. 7
Winter Break Camp will be


Trident Lakes Golf
Club
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
but patrons invited to walk
course, free
ITT
Wednesday, Dec. 24, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
K.B. Finnegan's Irish
Pub
Wednesday, Dec. 24, 1 to
6p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 7
p.m. to 2 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Liberty/Oscar's
Recreation
Wednesday, Dec. 24,
noon to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 25, noon
to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 31,
noon to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1, noon to
8p.m.
Outdoor Adventure
Center
Wednesday, Dec. 24, 8
a.m. to noon
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 8
a.m. to noon
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Recycling Center
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed
Vet Clinic
Monday, Dec. 22, Closed
Tuesday, Dec. 23, 9 a.m.
to noon
Wednesday, Dec. 24,
Closed
Thursday, Dec. 25, Closed
Friday, Dec. 26, Closed
Wednesday, Dec. 31,
Closed
Thursday, Jan. 1, Closed

held from Dec. 22 to Jan. 7,
excluding Christmas Day and
New Year's Day, from 6:30 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at the Youth Center.
Registration for school age
care is going on through Dec.
15.
Price is based on total family
gross income.
For more information call
(912) 573-2380.
If the kids are home, you can
let them come over to Rack-
N-Roll Lanes Bowling Center
for some afternoon bowling at
a reasonable rate. Games are
only $1 each plus shoe rental
is $1.
They offer food specials from
Rocky Colletti's, also. This spe-
cial runs during the week of
winter break.

Turkey Shoot
at Rack-N-Roll Lanes
Why not win your turkey
for this year's holiday feast.
Through Dec. 21, Rack-N-
Roll Lanes invites you to play
"Turkey Shoot'
Here is how it works. Pre-
pay $1 per game, get a strike in
the first, third, sixth and ninth
frame in one game and win a
turkey.
For more information, call
573-9492.


NAVV LAKE SITE ALLATOONA

"OFF-SEASON GET-A-WAY"





HUCTE SAVINGS DAILY & WEEKLY -

TO FIT YOUR DGET!


Off-Season Rates Run October 1 March 31*
*Excludes Nov. 26 28, 2008,
Q Dec. 24 26, 2008 E& Dec. 31, 2008 Jan. 2, 2009


Off-Season
Daily
$60


$50


$45


1 ROOM W/LOFT $40 $240 $85


CAMPER CABIN $20 $120 $30

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL LAKE ALLATOON,

AT 770-974-6309


4 BEDROOMS


3 BEDROOMS


2 BEDROOMS


Off-Season
Weekly
$360


$300


$270


Peak
Daily
$115


$105


$90


Youth Sports in need
of officials, scorekeepers
Officials and scorekeepers
are needed for the upcoming
Youth Sports Basketball sea-
son.
If you are 14 years or older,
have knowledge of the sport
and are interested in earning
a little extra money, certified
or uncertified, all the training
is provided. If your are look-
ing to make a difference in a
child's life then here's your
chance. Call the Youth Sports
Office today at (912) 573-8202
for more information.

NFL Sunday Ticket
at Big EZ Sports Zones
Every Sunday inside the Big
EZ Sports Zones is NFL Sunday
Ticket. Doors open at noon and
for only $5 you get all you can
eat food and one drink of your
choice. Bring your game face
and watch all the games that
are playing. For more info call
(912) 573-4548

Free kids movies every
Saturday, Sunday
The Movie Zone is showing
kid movies every Saturday at
noon and Sunday at 1 p.m.
All youths, under 18 years of
age must be accompanied by
a parent or adult. Snack foods
and beverages are available for
purchase.
If 15 minutes after the pro-
posed start time no one shows
up, then the movie area will be
open for open viewing. Call for


the latest information at (912)
573-4548.
Massage therapy
available at Kings Bay
Is your job stressing you out?
Why not treat yourself or that
special person in your life to
a therapeutic massage? Renee
Crawford, a nationally certified
AMTA Member, is at the Fitness
Complex. Whether you need to
relieve stress or tension, soothe
pain or just to relax, she has a
massage to fit any budget. Call
the Fitness Complex for more
information or to purchase gift
certificates. Massages are avail-
able by appointment only. For
more information, call (912)
409-9331.

Car Wash is now open
at Auto Skills building
The Car Wash is now open
and ready to make your vehicle
cleaner than ever. Located in
front of the Auto Skills building,
its four bays wand-operated
washes are just what you asked
for. For only $2 for five minutes,
your car can look sparkling. A
super vacuum is ready on the


other side for cleaning out the
inside of your vehicle, too.

Paintball is open
at Etowah Park
Paintball adventure is just
waiting for you. The Paintball
field is open for special play,
with gun package rentals avail-
able. Bring your own or rent.
Special days and times can be
reserved for private parties. It
is inside Etowah Park which
is past housing after the Golf
Course. When you hit the dirt
road just keep on driving. Call
OAC for more information at
(912) 573-8103 or the Paintball
field at (912) 674-4014.

Georgia Aquarium
tickets sold at discount
ITT is selling tickets to the
Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta.
Adult tickets are $19.60, chil-
dren 3 to 12 years of age are
$16.75. Senior tickets are
$14.75. These tickets are dis-
counted by $10. Make reserva-
tions any date by calling (404)
581-4000. Visit the Web site at
www.georgiaaquarium.org.


:-8.00 Special



.handsofaloha.com



Restoration Hands of Aloha, Inc. 912-510-0264


Back by Popular Request!
Let Drees show you how easy and affordable it
is to qualify for and purchase a brand new home.
* Lock your interest rate up to 180 days
* Low V.A. financing
* Affordable monthly payments
* FREE closing costs and prepaids
* FREE credit repair consultation from Credit FX
Discover Drees Homes priced from $135,600 in
11 communities throughout Northeast Florida.


Drees
HOMES
Famil owned. National recogniwd.s
dreeshomes.com


$1 downoleravailablehiroughFirstEquityMortgage.EqualHousingLender.Subjectoborrowerqualificalion
andabnderin theanmountof$1,928,whichl llberefunded atdosing; some limtaaionsnd estricionsap*.
--- Ofer effrecve fra limited imeandavailable onfirmno-ontngentpurchaseagreements. Offers subjectto
I_......._. ................. d,,ch an d may be wtdrawn, at any tme.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 19


Courtesy Photo
Navy Lodges offer military families and their friends an inexpensive, convenient place to stay,
especially during the busy holiday season.

Navy Lodge offers great value


From NAVSUP
Visiting family and friends
this holiday season is as impor-
tant as ever. Saving money is
also important during these
economic times.
Navy Lodges help you do
both this holiday season with
rates 40 percent below compa-
rable hotels.
Plus with 43 convenient
locations worldwide, there is
a Navy Lodge wherever you
need one.
When guests visit you this
season, call the Navy Lodge
on base to reserve your extra
bedroom. As an added con-
venience and a way to save


on kennel fees, most Navy
Lodge's worldwide now allow
dogs and cats up to 50 pounds
in weight to stay when travel-
ing with their owners, if a pet
room is available.
"Navy Lodges offer military
families and their friends an
inexpensive, convenient place
to stay, especially during the
busy holiday season," said
Linda Bird, Navy Lodge man-
ager Kings Bay. "Our associ-
ates are dedicated to providing
quality service to every guest.
Best of all, there are no extra
person charges when staying
at a Navy Lodge'
Every Navy Lodge guest
room is oversized with cable


TELL US YOUR


The USO is looking for your
photos and videos!


TV with premium channels,
a DVD/CD player, direct-dial
telephone service, high-speed
Internet access, and a kitchen-
ette complete with microwave,
refrigerator and utensils.
Navy Lodges also have
housekeeping service, vend-
ing machines, DVD rental ser-
vice and guest laundry facili-
ties as well as handicapped
accessible and non-smoking
rooms.
Free local calls, free in-room
coffee and newspapers as well
as convenient on-base parking
are also available.
To make a reservation toll
free at (800) NAVY-INN or log
onto www.navy-lodge.com.


STORY!


stories,


If you have a USO story you'd like to share
with us, send us an e-mail at:
usostory@uso.org.

We'd also like to put a face with a name, so send
along photos or videos to accompany your
stories. Photos should be high-resolution jpeg
images, because we want you to look good.

For more details and release agreement, visit
www.uso.org/story

W ,,,


PD W Ack NJ o-ff Lam
1R November 1 thru
December 20
Get a strike in the 1 st, 3rd, 6th & 9th Frame in one gan
WIN a turkey!
After winning you
may not play again for one week!

To enter, pre-pay $1 per gamE
before beginning each game
Sign-ups taken at counter,
counter person must
verify game before game is clear
You may NOT pre-pay games


Formorinf .Or aton
..IB. UD^l1^%r 74aIQ IQ2


SOME FOOTBALL?


THE MiIi HAS SOME

GREAT PRICED TICKETS FOR YOU!

FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED
(LIMITED TO 4 FOR MARRIED ACTIVE DUTY, 2 FOR SINGLE ACTIVE DUTY)

TICKETS ONLY $10 EACH

SELLING AT THE SPORTS ZONE
(INSIDE THE BIG EZ, BLDG. 1039)
TICKET SALES ARE FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL SOLD OUT!!!

SCHEDULED DATES FOR TICKET SALES:
Sept 4 sell tickets to the Sept 14 game vs. the Bills
Sept 18 sell tickets to the Sept 28 game vs. the Texans
Sept 25 sell tickets to the Oct 5 game vs. the Steelers
Oct 16 sell tickets to the Oct 26 game vs. the Browns
Nov 6 sell tickets to the Nov 16 game vs. the Titans
Nov 13 sell tickets to the Nov 23 game vs. the Vikings
Dec 4 sell tickets to the Dec 14 game vs. the Packers
Dec 11 sell tickets to the Dec 18 game vs. the Colts

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT THE USO AT 904-778-2821/7921



"WE BRING THE MILITARY

MARKET To You!"
FVI.- G I -nE-


Military Publications reach
PO 81% of the military community




Military Community
Includes 92,103 Acdive-
Duty, Reserves, Retirees and
Contractors






Working On Base -


Active-Duty, Reserves, Civilians, Contractors



Published by
Vhe florida imeS- inion 312817


I


I











20 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008









Periscope
K I N G S BAY E EOR E I A


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE 366-6300
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30a.m.-6:00p.m.
Fri. 7:30a.m.-5:30p.m.
Toll Free 800-258-4637
BY FAX 904-359-4180
IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classifieds in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines


Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction and
billing adjustments.
Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324.To answer questions about payments
or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all advertise-
ments under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of publication.
Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was
incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for
any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbrevia-
tions are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


Classified


CLASSIFIED INDEX

Anoucmet Intuio


Auctions


Employment


Real Estate for Rent Merchandise
ComrilRelEtt PesAnml


Financial


I Transportation


=Eoi 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com

FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at
no additional charge.


II _____________________


unm C


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment



NEED A LAWYER?
Accident? Arrest? Divorce?
AAA Attorney Referral Svc
1-800-733-5342,24 HRS.


Military personnel
stationed in our
communities
donated 6=0,@80
hours of volunteer
service in Northeast
Florida and Southeast
Georgia last year.


.l ris.epe


Spacious ranch style
home in quiet neighbor-
hood for sale by owner.
Ready to move into. 4/2
1860-sq-foot concrete
block/brick home
located on approxi-
mately 1/2 acre in
Orange Pa rk. New
flooring and freshly
painted walls. New
granite counter tops in
kitchen and bath. Fea-
tures include separate
family room with a fire-
place, living room, din-
ing room, 2 car garage
with utility are, covered
back porch over looking
a 30,000 gallon in-ground
pool, storage building,
swing set and fenced
yard. Conveniently
located in Orange Park
in quiet neighborhood
with a park. Half a mile
from the Moody Road
YMCA and in an excel-
lent school district.
Within easy walking or
biking distance from
Publix, post-office,
churches, and many
other business, yet
seemingly secluded.
3518 Fortuna Drive
(904)318-8636.




$0 DOWN!
If you haveland or
own family land, your
land is vur CREDIT!!!


Open Houses
Argyle
Arlington
Avondale/Ortega
Beaches
Downtown
Fernandina/Amelia Island
Intracoastal West
Keystone Heights/Melrose
Mandarin
Middleburg
North Jacksonville
Orange Park/Clay County
Riverside
San Marco
Southside
Springfield
Westside
Waterfront
Condominiums
Manufactured Homes
Lots
Farm Acreage
Investment Property
Retirement Community
Baker County
Georgia Real Estate
Nassua County
Putnam County
St. Johns Open Houses
St. Johns Homes
St. Johns Waterfront
St. Johns Oceanfront
St. Johns Intracoastal
St. Johns Marshfront
St. Johns Condos
St. Johns Duplex/
Townhouses
St. Johns Manufactured
Homes
St. Johns Lots/Acreage
St. Johns Active Adult
Comn.
St. Johns Investment
Income Property
Miscellaneous
Out of Area/Town/State
Real Estate Wanted


Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent



SAN MARCO/St. Nicholas
2/2, tile/cpt, fully eqpt kit;
$750m; 1/1, 1st fir $595;
pool. 904-803-6603


Westside Waterfront
2/2 Condo, boat slip,
ramp, priv pkng, 1st fir,
sec, $1095. 904-757-0775
251-4778


S. Jacksonville Bch Huge
2/2, 4 to ocean, wood/tile
floors, Ig deck, W/D
hookup, 1100 sq ft, low-
est rent at bch 20 yrs,
$995+ 904-247-3191
ST. MARY'S 2 miles from
Kingsbay 2/1, Irg shaded
lot. Rent to own. $475/mo.
Vacant lot also available
for 2br or 3br SW $225m.
904-410-0410 or 912-882-2884
0 St. Marys for
rent 3 br/ 2 1/2
ba LR, DR
inside laundry
d ou b I e car
garage, large
fenced back yard
$1350.00 mo. 729-7643.
Q Westside
Townhouse 2/2
new paint,
fenced yard,
tiled and lami-
nate flooring 2
car parking $850.00m
owner 912-729-3252.



WESTSIDE -TIMUQUANA
MOVE IN SPECIAL. $50 off
2 & 3br's $425- $550
dep. 904-771-3811


Brick l
3/24
$10C
Large
$9
$99


1 633sq. ft. .
3BR/2BA home U f n e
f orsale. Open
f lo o0 r I a n ORANGE PARK Brick
w/spacious rooms, home 3/2, $1150. Middle- 2- 5
cobblestone fireplace, 2 burg 3/2 on 1.80 acres,
car garage, fenced back $900. 904-887-5090
yard, 400 sq. ft. screen
porch and much, much
more. Asking $165,500
and motivated! Visit
http;//www.infotube.net/
190940 to get a full
description and to see
pictures of this amazing ___
home. Call Stacy at C n ra
912-882-3507 to ask ques-
viewing.
Kingsland Why support
a landlord when you can Holidays
OWN for about $750/mo.
NEW 3/2, in Kingsland t
for only $99,900. Built by 1
Dave Addink 954-328-3513 the
0 Sugarmill,
rent, sale,
fi repa sty huge ff. 1,2,&3 Bedroom Apts. Club
PCS. Totally 3 Pools, Balconies
new $950.00 or 3 Pools, Balconies
$150,000.00 673-7424.

Thank you! CALL NOW (904
Besides protectng our Neptune Beach (Corner
country military personnel
stationed in our communi-
tes donated MO ,020
hours of volunteer service
in Northeast Rorda and
Southeast Georgia last Histri Avondal
ear.Their time was gven Historic Avondale
to community organize RIVIERA PARKWAY
tons, church goups, youth IVIERA PARKWAY
actvites, scoutng and and^ A TS
more. #P|T A P T
Please Call "O 389
904-359-4336, 389-3 179
Fax 904-36-6O230. 2798 St. Johns Ave


912-882-4150

$0 Move in- No Deposit


1st Month FREE
Cheapest Climate control in Camden Co..
We Beat all Climate Control Pricesil
Call Mark: 912-552-2615
Downtown Kingsland

Buying a Home?
Contact your VA
Home Loan Expert-
Laurie M. Potter
YNCM (USN Ret)
Buying, Selling or
refinancing? Contact
(904) 256-2051 Laurie for any of your
Cell (904) 463-2065 financing needs, including
Email: laurie_potter VA, FHA, home equity or
@countrywide.com conventional loans.
Website:
www.countrywidelocal. Count de
com/lauriepotter COuntryWde-
4601 Touchton Rd E#3190 -M
Jacksonville FL 32246 HOME LOANS





1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms_______


SKingsland,
KINGSBAY Share beautirge


ful home onr
golf course,
poo I g y m ,
cable, internet
included. (912) 674-5500.


To advertise
in the military
publications dis-
tributed at the
local bases in the
area,
Please call
904-359-4336,
Fax 366 6230.


rith over 1800 sq. ft.
73 South Cherry St.
50/mo. Kingsland
Fenced Backyard!
1/2 256 Cypress
90/mo. Kingsland






120 www.wowzarealty.com






e fhe
L tn Starting at
'v'ig $550

each





) 249-5611
of Penman & Seagate)


EASTWOOD OAKS APARTMENTSi 1 i', ~
ggg ~on


EU I


Navy

Classified

Ads


THE FLEET


MARKET Rank/Grade:

ADVERTISING' Name (please print):
ADVERTISING


RULES

Please fill out
this form in
black or blue ink.


DEADLINES


THE

PERISCOPE


Noon

Monday


1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Naval
Submarine Base, Kings Bay.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such as
sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED
FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL
BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED
INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY
REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATE-
MENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be written
independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, The Periscope,
Public Affairs Office, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, GA 31547, or to The Periscope,
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202


Work Phone #


EMil"m
RDA] rU ---tato


-lull-


Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent



PIZZERIA FOR SALE
Due to illness. No rea-
sonable offer turned
down! Please call,
904-504-1017






Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold



CONVENIENT STORE -
Mayport Rd. Call for
more info 904-662-9528
Janitorial Franchise




#1 in 2008
FOR THE 21ST TIME
OWN YOUR OWN
JANITORIAL FRANCHISE
FREE BROCHURE
&VIDEO
346-3000

RESIDUAL INCOME
Working from home
www.makeitnow.net
904-304-7164
SKIN CARE COMPANY
Estab. profitable
upscale, heading toward
second homerun looking
for exceptional reps in
Jax, NO Home Parties
On-line sales only. Opp.
on ground floor. Call
615-479-2727, 4 Interview.






Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events


Advance Your Career
* Business Computers *
* Health Care Legal *
1-888-205-3471
KEISER UNIVERSITY
DENTAL ASSISTING
Hot New Program!
Start Training with
Everest University
CALL TODAY!!!
888-291-1351


Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance


ELECTRICIAN &
RHVAC CAREERS!

888-886-5904

Medical Careers
Begin With Us!
Start Training with
Everest University
CALL TODAY! !
888-461-3609





POSTAL WORKER
Post office now hiring,
average pay $20/ hour,
57K a year, including
federal benefits, OT,
placed by adSource not
affiliated with USPS
who hires. 866-748-8707









Canteen Correctional
Services is now
accepting applications
for Food Service
Supervisors. Knowl-
edge of food Produc-
tion, Inventory, Sanite-
tioon and Safety
Standards Preferred.
Good starting wages
and benefits offered.
Apply at D. Ray
James Prison, High-
way 252, Folkston, GA
31537 Attn. Grady
Bawkin.


Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted



APPOINTMENT
GENERATOR
If you are a motivated,
self-starter that is
enthusiastic, and loves
to talk to people, call
224-1085 or email your
resume to
hrdept@abmrtkg.com






Area Sales
COME ON PEOPLE
This is ridiculous! Week
after week I run ads for
different departments in
my organization & get
limited response. There
are no gimmicks, no
surprises & and no hid-
den factors. We have
everything anybody else
can offer, in other
words, not iust a great
income, but all the good-
ies too! Commissions &
Incentives, vacations,
trips, rewards, health,
dental, life & vision
insurance and a 401(k).
Starting income, up to
$45K $85K per year.
You can even qualify for
a $2,000.00 signing
bonus. Sounds good so
far, doesn't it? That's
why I can't understand
why in the world you
wouldn't investigate this
opportunity. This week
I'm hiring for sales in
our Jacksonville office:
No Experience neces-
sary, we will train you.
Call Harold, 680-0577, or
email your resume to
hrdept@abmrktg.com


866-467-9826
IOADMASTER WWWW.ROADMRSTER.COM
10 .o 1 1 9 PICKETTVILE ROAD


Organization:
Signature:


APPOINTMENT
GENERATOR
If you are a motivated,
self-starter that is
enthusiastic, and loves
to talk to people, call
224-1085 or email your
resume to
hrdept@abmrtkg.com





DRIVERS/
TRAINEES NEEDED
Covenant needs
OTR Truckers NOW!
No exp needed
$700+/wk earning
potential. No CDL? No
problem! Training
Available! CALL NOW
800-820-4521




AC, Heating, Fuel
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade


Date Submitted:


6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the above
requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or all ads.
7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by calling
366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed on an
original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: U 1 wk U 2 wks U 3 wks U 4 wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Periscope.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more than
one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per family, per
week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.

Category:


"Periscope
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


0 MOVING
SALE: white
antique high-
bo y china
cabinet with
glass doors
including breakfast
table and two bench
seats WOW! $250.00
904-254-1503 Middleburg



0 Washer/Dryer,
Kenmore, light
beige, good
condition $300
OBO
904-491-7996.



WAREHOUSE SALE
T-shirts/shoes/clothing
samples $5. Teak and
Mahogany Bookcases,
Benches, Tables, Cabs
and Shelves $50-$275. 55'
of iron fence $300. Unbe-
lievable savings on
minor scratch and dent
home furn. Thurs & Fri
Dec 11th & 12th, 8:30am
-4pm Sat., Dec 13th
8am-12pm Go Fish and
Calabash 250 Indigo
Dr. McBride Industrial
Park, Brunswick GA
912-554-3836 Cash only
bring your truck.



BED A Bargain $150
Queen Pillow Top $
Brand New 904-674-0405
BED King Size Set
New in plastic, $225
Must sell 674-0405
Clayton Martin Sofa For
Sale- 81" length, Navy
Blue, with Burgundy
and Beige design. Excel-
lent condition.Paid
$1500-will sell $500.
762-5998 or 573-9344.
L Cazyboy
7 R ec liner, ta n
good condition
$50.00 or best
Sf offer. Call
912-882-2339
anytime.
MATTRESS FULL Size
NEW Must Sell $140
Call Carter 674-0405 $

MATTRESS A Queen Set.
Brand New in plastic
$150 904-674-0405


Thank you!


Besides protecting our

country, military

personnel stationed in

our communities

donated 650,620

hours of volunteer

service in Northeast

Florida and Southeast

Georgia last year. Their

time was given to

community

organizations, church

groups, youth activities,

scouting and more.


LUV HOMES -
904-772-8031

MI G -


_ __


9 9 9 4. iI


eI FREeFE REoFE REoFEEeFE REeFE REeFE


a I-


1


I


















chased fromlBadcock.
4 Ok Bunkbed
BARGAnice, 6 piece
This et. Lots of
Yr storage.
HONDA Includes
Kingsland.90TVstand pur-
chased fromBadcock.
Call Nikki $650.00 OBO
912-882-6636.
Q Queen Bed,
Cofee tamplete set.
HONDA E$150. Decortable
e|rtive Baker's
VlJ R a c k $40.
*11L912-510-7104
leave message.



BARGAIN HUNTERS
GALORE
This Sat & Sun Have
Your Garage Sale at
The Market Place!
7059 Ramona, 786-FLEA



HONDA EU1000i Portable
Generator $400 firm.
Kingsland. 904-875-4800



Dining Rm Glass Table
w/ 4 cloth chairs, $300.
Coffee table w/ glass
inserts $25. 2 end tables
w/ glass inserts, $25/ ea.
904-325-0426
HONDA EU1000i Portable
Generator $400 firm.


510-7104 leaveS&W modelssage
iK/L square butt (912)
510-7104 leave message.


Cargo Trailer 5X8 Pace
trailer with spare tire,


-m


German Shepherd Christ-
mas Pups ready now
White, cute $500 251-4777


wheel iack, tongue lock.
15 inch tires. Used
twice, kept in garage.
Purchased 04/08. White
like new. $1400. IM,


Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted


Appleheads to Yorkies
CHRISTMAS SALE
VV $299 & UPVV
www.petworldpets.com
904-262-4646 Open 7 days
0 Ball Pythons
(two) for
adoption.
Medium size,
handled daily,
healthy.
Aquarium, heater,
accessories available.
(912)510-7785 or


Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 21


S 39' Searay
Yacht for sale
1990, express
cruiser twin
454 engine
runs great,
beautiful interior $70,000
(305) 731-9962.




0 Harley Sports-
ter 2004 1200
custom. 8000
m iles, pearl
white, saddle
b. bags, wind-
shield. Excellent condi-
tion. $6500.00OBO. Call
912-576-4416.



ry BMW M5 '06
Only 36,000 Miles
$51,890 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
, Chevy Impala
2004 LS light-
gold, beige
leather inte-
rior, 45 K miles
32 mpg, moon
roof, below NADA
$13,500 OBO Call
904-491-7996.

f Ford ZX2 02' 2
dr, 5 spd, 35
Im.p.g. 94K mi,
$3400 OBO
| 912-729-7643.


Mercedes-Benz




















TOYOTA AVALON
'08 Touring Edition
Like New $23,980


11 Autm obi


Toyota Camry
98 champagne
S AC, PL, PW,
as e a u t o trans,
132K $5000
912-409-2234.

i Vol kswagen-
Beetle 2001
GLS yellow
p black leather
interior, 60K
miles, 5 speed
35 mpg, cold AM/FM,
cassette, CD stereo
$8700 OBO Ca l
904-491-7996.


Thank you!
Besides protecting our
country, military
personnel stationed in
our communities
donated 650,620
hours of volunteer
service in Northeast
Florida and Southeast
Georga last year.
Their time was oven to
community
organizations, church
groups, youth activities,
scouting and more.
Please Call
904-359-4336,
Fax 904-366-6230.


VW BEETLE '05
#53 HERBIE
MOBLILE 13,000 mi,
$14,990 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE





(y ACURA MDX'06
Touring, Nov,
Retail $30,000 Sale
Price $24,990 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE


d Chevy S-10 cus-
to0m low-rider 5
spd cold A/C
must see ask-
ing 5K OBO
S 912-729-7643.

PGMEC Suv for
sale 1 owner
O $78,000 miles,
al $excel lent con-
cd l ition 1999
GMC Jimmy
garage kept $6300 deep
blue 904-881-2717 or
912-576-7694.

S NISSAN
PATHFINDER SE
'06 Fully Equip.
Only 39,000 Mi
Retail $21,250 Sale
Priced $15,490 998-0012


Thank you!


wolkMii Mirror -Periscope


If -


City Automotive Group
City Mitsubishi on Atlantic
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
City Mitsubishi at the Avenues
10857 Philips Highway
260-9222
City Mitsubishi of Orange Park
7505 Blanding Blvd
779-8100
City Isuzu on Atlantic
10575 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
City Suzuki on Atlantic
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111


Thanking Our Troops






TOM BUSH MINI JACKSONVILLE


www.Mazdacity.com
6916 Blanding Blvd.
(904) 779-0600


5ervwnx yPK FiTx*
w;tA napr t. www.tombush.com
teirty S nat 9850 Atlantic Blvd.
770 (904) 725-0911


A TlliM illl, Ii 1iI


To list your dealership,

please call


904-359-4321


Before you buy, shop these local dealerships first!


ACURA OF ORANGE PARK
7200 Blanding Blvd.
77-5600


AUDI JACKSONVILLE
4660-100 Southside Blvd.
565-4000


BENLEY ORLANDO
895 N. Ronald Reagan Blvd.
Longwood/Odando Fl
407-339-3443



TOM BUSH BMW
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
725-0911

TOM BUSH ORANGE
PARK BMW
6914 Blanding Blvd 777-2500



GARBER BUICK
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

KEY BUICK
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060



CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111

NIMNICHT CADILLAC
7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700

PARKER CADILLAC
375 Belz Outlet Blvd
(904)824-9181


NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave. 425-6312
www.nimnichtchevy.com
GARBER CHEVY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com
GORDON CHEV
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200

JACK WILSON CHEVROLET
2255 US1 South 797-4567

JERRY HAMM CHEVY
3494 Philips Hwy. 398-3036

PINEVIEW CHEVROLET
Macclenny 259-6117



ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
2330 US1 South 354-4421

CARUSO CHRYSLER
1750 Southside Blvd. 725-7300

FRANK GRIFFIN
Chrysler of Orange Park
1515 Wells Rd. 269-1033

GARBER CHRYSLER
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493000

MIKE SHAD CHRYSLER JEEP
1736 Cassat Ave. 389-7792

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454



ATLANTIC DODGE
2330 US1 South 354-4421


JACK CARUSO
REGENCY DODGE
10979 Atlantic Blvd. 642-5600

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS. 493-0000

GARBER DODGE TRUCK
Green Cove Springs 264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

ORANGE PARK DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454

WESTSIDE DODGE
1672 Cassat Ave. 384-6561


BOZARD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
St. Augustine 824-1641
Florida's Super Duty
Headquarters

PAUL CLARKFORDERCURY
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673

GARBER FORD-MERCURY
Green Cove Springs 264-4502
www.garberautomall.com

MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325

MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060

MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


NIMNICHT PONT11AC-GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826

GARBER GMC TRUCKS
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garberautomall.com


DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900

LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300

LUCAS HONDA OF JAX
7801 Blanding Blvd. 269-2277


HYUNDAI OF ORANGE PARK
7600 Blending Blvd. 899-0900

KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd. 642-6060



ATLANTIC INFINITI
10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200



CITY ISUZU
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
www.dtyautomotive.com


JAGUAR JACKSONVILLE
11211 Atlantic Blvd.
642-1500


ATLANTIC JEEP
2330 US1 South
354-4421
CARUSO JEEP
1750 Southside Blvd. 725-7300


FRANK GRIFFIN
Jeep of Orange Park
1515 Wells Rd.
269-1033

GARBER JEEP
Green Cove Springs
264-2416
www.garberautomall.com

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS.
493000O

MIKE SHAD CHRYSJEEP
ON CASSAT
1736 Cassat Ave. 389-7792

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454


LAMBORGHINI ORLANDO
895 N. Ronald Reagan Blvd.
Longwood/Odando FI
407-339-3443



LAND ROVER JACKSONVILLE
11211 AtlanticBlvd. 642-1500



LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
10259 Atlantic Blvd. 721-5000

LEXUS OF ORANGE PARK
7040 Blanding Blvd. 777-5100
www.lexusoforangepark.comrn


NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN MERCURY


MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN MERCURY
7700 Blanding Blvd. 777-3673


LOTUS OF JACKSONVILLE
www.lotusojacksonville.com
11650 BEACH BLVD. 998-9992


TOM BUSH MAZDA
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911

MAZDA CITY
6916 Blanding Blvd. 779-0600



BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080

MERCEDES ENZ
of ORANGE PARK
7018 Blanding Blvd. 777-5900



TOM BUSH MINI
9875 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911



CITY MITSUBISHI
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
565-2489
www.clyautomotlve.com



MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF JAX
1810 Cassat Ave.
389-3621
PARKER NISSAN
2755 U.S.1 South, St Aug. 904-
794-9990

MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP
1565 Wells Rd. 269-9400
COGGIN NISSAN-ATIANTIC
10600 Atlantic BWd.
888-519-0618

COGGIN NISSAN-AVENUES
10859 Philips Hwy.
888-542-4858


GARBER PONTIAC
Green Cove Springs
264-4502
www.garbemutomall.com

JACK WILSON PONTIAC
BUICK GMC
2250 US1 South
797-4577

NIMNICHT PONTIAC GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy.
854-4826


BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC.
10100 Atlantic Blvd. 725-9155


ROLLS ROYCE ORLANDO
895 N. Ronald Reagan Bid
Longwood/Odando FI
407-339-3443



NIMNICHT SAAB
7999 Blanding Blvd, Jax
904-778-7700
ww.nimnicht.com



SATURN OF AVENUES
10863 Philips Hwy. 262-7145

SATURN OF ORANGE PARK
8105 Blanding Blvd.
779-0071

SATURN OF REGENCY
8600 Atlantic Blvd. 725-8200
8600 Atlantic Blvd.
725-8200



SUBARU OF JACKSONVILLE
10800 Atlantic Blvd. 641-6455


CITYSUZUKI
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
ww.cilyautomotive.com


KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circe.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310 CassatAve. 389-4561


VW OF ORANGE PARK
1481 Wells Road 269-2603

TOM BUSH VW
9850 Atlant Blvd. 725-0911

O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
11401 Philips Hwy. 322-5100


O'STEEN VOLVO
2525 Philips Hwy. 396-5486


PROFESSIONAL
AUTO LEASING
10231 Atlantic Blvd. 722-1694





BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
www.beachblvdautomotive.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511

BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
10211 Atlantic Blvd.
724-1080

LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
PRE-OWNED CENTER
10384 Atlantic Blvd.
998-0012


TOM BUSH BMW
9910 Atlantic Blvd.
371-4381

TOM BUSH MINI
USED CAR
SUPER CENTER
9875 Atlantic Blvd.
371-4877

WORLD IMPORTS
www.worldimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
998-9992

O'STEEN VW CERTIFIED
PRE-OWNED CENTER
11401 Philips Hwy.
322-5100














YOU



DE LE S IP'








PLEAS


525523


S *


el


650,620


Hours


Besides protecting our country, military
personnel stationed in our communities
donated 650,620 hours of volunteer
service in Northeast Florida and
Southeast Georgia last year. Their time
was given to community organizations,
church groups, youth activities, scouting
and more.


0 V








22 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


$269 per month $269 per month $269 per month
plustax plus tax plus tax



2009 VW NEW BEElU 2009 VW ABB 2009VW
$0 down $0 down $0 down
$0 Secuty Depose $0 Secuty Depoe $0 Secuty Depos
$0 Fr, Mmonhs Paymene $0 Frl* Monihs Paymen $0 FPr Mmonhs Paypmen
*U.S. cars only. Finance plans available through Volkswagen Credit on approved credit. Dealer sets actual price. **Lease offers: New Beetle $269 a month
plus tax for 39 months. With SO due at signing and SO first month's payment. Based on MSRP of $17,990. Monthly payments total $10,491. Requires
dealer contribution if $273.56, which could affect final negotiated transaction. Purchase option at lease end for $10,512.50. Rabbit S269 a month plus tax
with SO due at signing and SO first month payment. Based on MSRP of $16,540 for a Rabbit S 2-door with manual transmission. Monthly payments total
$10,101. Requires dealer contribution of $143.80, which could affect final negotiated transaction. Purchase option at lease end for $9,262.50. Jetta $269
a month plus tax with SO due at signing and SO first months payment. Based on MSRP of S18,640 for a Jetta S with manual transmission. Monthly payments
total $10,101. Requires dealer contribution of $281.64, which could affect final negotiated transaction. Purchase option at lease end for $10,054.80. For
all lease offers: closed-end lease offered to highest-qualified customers by Volkswagen Credit through participating dealers. Prices do not include tax, tag
or title. Lessee responsible for insurance. At lease end, lessee responsible for S.20/mile over 36,000 miles and for damage or excessive wear. Additional
charges may apply. Models featured may have optional equipment not included in lease offer. Dealer sets actual price. Offers end December 31, 2008.
tNew Beetle estimated MPG: 20 city/28 highway. Rabbit estimated MPG: 22 city/29 highway. Jetta estimated MPG:21 city/29 highway. All estimates based
on manual transmission models. Fuel economy estimates for other VW models available at vw.com. Always obey local speed and traffic laws. See dealer
for details or call 1-800-Drive-VW. Supplies limited.

Burn lots of rubber. U


Not lots of fuel.


tombush-vw.com


A 2008 Edmunds' Inside Line "Ideal SUV for the driver who dreams of a MX-5, 2008 North American
Editors' Most Wanted Vehicle but needs space and utility for a family." Truck of the Year
MOTOR TREND 04/2008


'08 MAZDA3i Sport '08 Mazda CX-7 '08 Mazda CX-9 Sport


starting at 14,950
31 MPG


Starting at 19,994
with 24 MPG


Optional equipment shown. *EPA estimated mileage MAZDA61 automatic. Actual results may vary.
Art for illustration purposes only. All advertised mpg's are based on EPA highway mpg by veh.. wac 36 mo lease no sec. de total due at sign n 2800


Das Auto:


Das Auto;
9850 Atlantic Blvd. 904-725-0911


Serving you with honor and integrity since


www.Mazdacity.com
6916 Blanding Blvd.
(904) 779-0600


C5 erif n ynn

MCC www.tombush.com
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
(904) 725-0911


Serving Jacksonville with honor
and integrity since


*AA4iys Offering The Best Prices
* Over 300 Cars to Choose From
* 3 Day Unlimited Mileage Money Back Guarantee
* 90 day/ 3,000 mile Warranty on Vehicles w/less than 75,000 Miles.


* Our Vehicles go through A Rigorous Inspection by
our Certiied Reconditioning Center.
* Serving Jacksowille with Honesty and Integrity for Over 38 Years
* If you don't buy our cars, well buy yours


96 BUICK ROADMASTER LOADED $4,988 05 CHEVY EQUINOX LS PWR PKG $8,988
01 DODGE RAM 1500 XCAB RUNS GREAT $6,288 03 FORD ESCAPE LEATHER ROOF $9,988
02 CHEVY ASTRO VAN RUNS GREAT $6,388


CHEVY
***04 SS MONTECARLO LOADED W/ALLOY WHEELS REDUCED TO SALE .................. $13788
***05 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE W/PWR TOP*** LOW MI DUAL PWR LTHR SPORT SEATS
BOSE 6SPD NAV SELECT RIDE HEADS UP DISPLAY
*** WOW THIS IS THE ONE REDUCED NOW ...........................................$37990***

CHRYSLER/DODGE
07 SEBRING LIMITED SEDAN LTHR PWR PKG........................................................... $14,990
08 DODGE AVENGER LOADED ..................................................................................... $15,788
07 DODGE MAGNUM POW ER PACKAGE ...................................................................... $15,988
08 DODGE MAGNUM POWER PACKAGE LOADED ........................................................ $17,988

DODGE TRUCKS
05 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD CAB REDUCED NOW.......................................................... $13,788
05 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT W/20 INCH WHEELS ......................................................... $17,788

FORD
06 MUSTANG ALLOYS PWR PKG 23K MI ........................................................................ $13,990
05 MUSTANG GT A/T 22K MI LTHR LIKE NEW .............................................................. $17,990

HYUNDAI
08 SONATAS 4 TO CHOOSE FROM OPTIONS VARY FROM ........................................$15,990

ISUZU
07 ASCENDER LS ONLY 2K MI PW R PKG .................................................................. $15,988


9875 Atlantic Blvd.
Directly across from Tom Bush BMW


NISSAN
04 NISSAN FRONTIER XCAB LOW MILES .......................................................................$13,988
05 NISSAN TITAN SE KING CAB ......................................................................................$15,988

PONTIAC
08 G6 GT LOADED W/ROOF ............................................................................................. $16,988
08 GRAND PRIX W/ROOF VERY NICE .......................................................................... $16,988

TOYOTA
05 RAV 4 PWR PKG MUST SEE ............................................................................. $13,988
06 RAV 4 PWR PKG VERY CLEAN ................................................................................ $14288
05 HIGHLANDER V6 W/3RD ROLL ............................................................................... $17,988
05 CAMRY XLE LOADED ..........................................................................................$17,988
08 SIENNA VAN DUAL PWR DOORS ................................................................................ $19,788
JEEP
08 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIKE NEW ........................................................................ $18,988
07 JEEP WRANGLER W/NEW TOP AUTO ........................................................................ $21,788
SUZUKI
06 SUZUKI FORENZA LOW MILES .............................................................................. $10,988
04 SUZUKI XL-7 LOADED W/MOONROOF ....................................................................... $13,988
08 SUZUKI SX-4 LOW MILES FUN CAR ...................................................... $14,988


CALL 371-4877
www.tombushautoplex.com |


Was $30,070 A
Starting at 25 ,900
with 24 MPG


We qeadu^ c^a~c
PIcked Vehicles!
0^4 TeAesit!






THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008 23


W 0 999
, DON


EW00 9 99


The Power to Surprise'


6373 BLANDING BLVD. JACKSONVILLE, FL


103 RD ST. TIMUQUANA RD.


I -
> 118THST.
z
6373 BLANDING BLVD.
z JACKSONVILLE


KV 94ii "LN $rjmf866mif:GE :~um A~


NW2089 I


JEWHEN Y~CNG07BOWNDINEWAFOOR -I7SS








24 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 11, 2008


BMW 2008
328i



bmwusa.com
1-800-334-4BMW


The Ultimate
Driving MachineP


25 MPG +. We Don't Offer Just One Fuel Efficient


Vehicle. We Offer A Fuel Efficient Fleet.


$374 per mo. for 36 months


BMW 328i
"One Of Car and Driver


10 Best For 17th Consecutive Year" CAR AND DRIVER, January 2008


BMW 135i Coupe
"the 1 Series does a stellar job of incorporating the hallmarks
of the 2002 Series- rear, drive, powerful engine, and space for
four---into a modern, attractive package."
AUTOMOBILE MAGAZINE, "08 All Stars"


Financing



As Low As



0.9%


BMW 750i
"The 7 Series is contemporary in style, with barrels
of luxury and technology."
AUTOWEEK, Buyers Guide Crain


BMW X5
"On the freeway, the X5 displays a very firm, almost
sports-car-like ride."
AUTOWEEK, January 21,2008


"This has to be one of the best pieces on the road. The 6 Series is
clearly a car for those few who appreciate automotive perfection
when they see it." AUTOWEEK, May 2008


BMW 535i
"{we} recommend the 535i to anyone looking for a
sport sedan that's not only a blast to drive, but well
worth the money."
Caranddriver.com, February 2008


BMW 335i Coupe
"the 3 Series continues to be the perennial bench-
mark of the entry luxury-sports-coupe, -sedan,
-convertible class."
CAR AND DRIVER, "10 Best Cars"


BMW Ultimate ServiceTM


Pay nothing. 4 years/50,000 miles. The most comprehensive maintenance plan


(including wear-and-tear items) in its class.**


Brake Pads: $0


Brake Rotors: $0


Engine Belts: $0


Oil Changes: $0


Wiper Blade Inserts: $0


Scheduled Inspection: $0


Experience The Tom Bush Advantage
Price Match Guarantee 24-Hour Emergency Service Free Loaner Car Service Complimentary Car Wash With Service

*Special Lease or Financing available through BMW financial services on the new 2008 BMW 328i, 135i, X5, 535i, 335i, 650i, and 750i vehicles. Offer valid through December 31, 2008. 2008 BMW 328i Sedan monthly lease payment $374 for 36 months 10k per year, based on MSRP of $34,450. $2874 due at lease signing,
includes $374 first payment, $0 security deposit (total lease payments due $16,904). Excludes tax, title, license, and registration fees. Lease financing subject to credit approval. Dealer contribution may affect terms. Lessee must cover insurance and all items not covered under the full maintenance program. At lease
end, lessee will be liable for disposition fee ($350), any excess wear and use as set forth in the lease agreement and excess mileage charges of $.20 ($.25 for 750Li Sedan) per mile for miles driven in excess of 30,000 miles per lease terms (36 months). Mileage will be prorated in the event of early termination. For more
information, call 1-800-334-4BMW, or visit bmwusa.com. All BMW's come with BMW Ultimate Service and Warranty standard for 4 years. See the Service and Warranty information booklet for more details and specific terms, conditions and limitations. For more information, all 1-800-334-4BMW, or bmwusa.com 02008 BMW


BMW
Jacksonville
9850 Atlantic Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32225
(904) 371-4728
tombushbmw.com


BMW
Orange Park
6914 Blanding Blvd.
Orange Park, FL 32244
(904) 777-2500
tombushbmworangepark.com




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