Group Title: Kings Bay periscope
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098617/00046
 Material Information
Title: The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher: Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: November 8, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: weekly[july 1988-]
biweekly[ former 1979-june 1988]
weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay -- Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay
Coordinates: 30.791 x -81.537 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body: Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note: Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note: Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098617
Volume ID: VID00046
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881

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Spouses View
Get Beth Wiruth's take on the issues
affecting military families
Page 2


Subvets
Kings Bay honors submarine
veterans during ceremony
Pages 8-9


FFSC
The FFSC is here to
support you
Page 22


THE


www.subasekb.navy.mil www.kingsbayperiscope.com THURSDAY, November 8, 2007


Kings Bay honors



submariners on



eternal patrol


Base recognizes WWII Submarine


Photo by MC2(AW/NAC) Will Tonacchio
As the American flag flies in the background, USS Steelhead Submarine Veteran Jim Toban
salutes as Taps is played for all the lost Submariners during WWII.


Veteran's during memorial


By MC2(AW/NAC) Will Tonacchio
Periscope staff

It's been many years since Germany invaded
Poland without warning, leading to a war
that would cost countless lives and draw
America into the battle. During the years that
followed, the U.S. Navy's submarine force played
a vital role in the Allied victory over the Axis
power.
The submarine force provided crucial sighting
reports to the fleet; also they scored heavy hits
by sinking and heavily damaging hundreds of
Axis power ships.
Many submarine veterans who played key
roles in securing the world's freedom in World
War II and the Cold War reunite annually at
NSB Kings Bay to celebrate and remember their
fellow shipmates who gave their lives to defend
freedom and democracy around the world.
During WWII, the submarine force lost 3,897
submariners and 67 boats. Despite the losses,
submarines are credited with sinking more than
half the enemy's ships during the war, con-
tributing greatly to the defeat at sea of the Axis
powers.
"This is my first year coming to the Kings Bay's
Sub Veteran's Memorial, said Gordon Hiatt, a
retired Bonefish Submariner. "It was hard to sit
through, because of all the emotions that were
brought back. When they started to toll the
boats, I could hardly hold back my tears for all of
my old friends that had died during the war."


service


Created in 1994 and dedicated by the com-
manding officer of Submarine Group Ten that
same year, the Submarine Veterans World War
II Memorial Pavilion has played host to the
WWII Submarine Veteran's Memorial Service,
which is held every year during the first Friday in
November. The service is in honor of the 67 U.S
submarines overdue and the 3,897 Submariners
on eternal patrol.
"When they talk about the guys that died dur-
ing the war, I can't help but remember all the
horror stories I had heard about other boats
and how they went down, said Doug Jensen,
a retired Cold War veteran. The "Tolling of the
Boats" was the climax of the event. It provided
those in attendance with a solemn moment of
remembrance for the submariners that gave the
ultimate sacrifice for their country.
"It always great to come to the memorial
because it's good to see old friends, said Lennard
Marcoux, a retired Cold War veteran. "It's hard to
go through the ceremony, but it's worth it just to
enjoy old friends and revisit our past together."
With WWII long over and the Cold War in his-
tory books, these battle hardened submariners
will not forget what it took to keep this county
free, and they will not forget the sacrifice that
their brothers-in-arms made in that pursuit.
The Submarine Veterans World War II
Memorial Pavilion is a reminder to all the gen-
erations past, present, and their sacrifice will not
be forgotten.


FFSC, MWR host open house


By MC2(AW/NAC) Will
Tonacchio
Periscope staff

Free food, raffles, families,
and information booths
were the common
sight as the Kings Bay Fleet
and Family Support Center's
(FFSC) opened their doors
during an open house Oct. 30.
The open house was held for
people interested in learning
about the host of programs
that FFSC and Moral Welfare
and Recreation (MWR) sup-
port.
"This is a perfect opportu-
nity for NSB Kings Bay mili-
tary members, Department of
Defense employees, and their
families to get a feel for the
programs FFSC and MWR have
to offer," said Debbie Lucus,
acting director of the Kings
Bay FFSC. "We want to create
a warm welcoming environ-
ment where people can look
around, grab a hot dog, and
get information on a program
that they didn't know was pro-
vided."
With all kinds of raffles,
free hot dogs and chips peo-
ple were encouraged to walk
around and see where the
FFSC is located. Theywere also
encouraged to investigate the
children's youth area. During
the open house, visitors were
meet with the smiling faces
of the FFSC and MWR staff,
equipped to answer any ques-


See FFSC, Page 7


Photo by MC2(AW/NAC) Will
Tonacchio
(Above) Brownies were
handed outas military moms
looked at the Children and
Youth Programs at the Fleet
and Family Support Center's
open house Oct. 30.


S(Left) EN1 (SW) Steven
Pryor and PCSN Lerone
White talk with Wayne
Farley about some of the
many programs that the
Fleet and Family Support
Center and MWR have to
offer. "I think this is a great
way for people to physi-
cally see some of our great
programs," said Farley."
This way people can just
Photo by MC2(AW/NAC) Will Tonacchio show up and look around."


Vol. 42 Issue 44


Are you covered?

Several servicemembers are
still without renter's insurance

By MCSN Dmitry Chepusov
Periscope staff
The Southern California wildfires swept across hundreds
of thousands of acres, leaving many families with dam-
aged homes, burnt furniture, scorched electronics, and
destroyed clothing. Many have put in claims with their insur-
ance companies. The large concentrations of Navy families in
the San Diego area were also affected. Those who did not have
renter's insurance have been left without a means to rebuild
their lives.
"I have personally seen 10 military families who suffered


losses from the fires'" said Regional Coordinator of "Operation
Prepare" Jim Guerin of Fleet and Family Support Center. "They
are now going to bear the cost of temporary living expenses
and the repair or replacement of their personal property."
According to Guerin, one Navy officer's home suffered
smoke damage, making it impossible to return to his rental
house in Rancho Bernardo. Guerin was able to get the officer,
See INSURANCE, Page 7


~-~13



3\


Rent-


ance














2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


LOCAL NEWS & VIEWS


Briefly Speaking


Technical Job Fair
The Career Support and Retention Office of the Fleet
and Family Support Center will host a Technical Job Fair
Nov. 28 in the library on base building 1066, from noon to 4
p.m. In anticipation of this event, a Job Fair Prep Workshop
will be held Nov. 14 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Please
call 573-4513 to register. This workshop will be held at the
FFSC, building 1051, conference room A.

Dolphin Store
The Dolphin Store, located on the quarterdeck of the
off crew building, is now open Thursdays from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Extra hours will be added on a week by week basis.
Call 573-8706 to confirm hours or request an appointment.
Check out our merchandise at www.kingsbaysowc.com/
dolphinstore. Proceeds benefit the Dolphin Scholarship
Foundation

Naval Submarine League Meeting
The Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Naval Submarine
League will hold its quarterly meeting today from 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the "Goat Locker" aboard the NSB
Kings Bay. At this meeting our chapter will recognize
a Kings Bay enlisted person, selected by the Kings Bay
Master Chiefs, for performing above and beyond their nor-
mal duties. Sandwiches and soda will be available. Cost is
$5. The meeting is open to everyone, military and civilian,
and buying lunch is not a requirement. Please join us in
support of the world's greatest submarine force. Contact
Bill Weisensee at 729-2939 or bwnw0527@tds.net if you
have any questions.

Volunteers Needed For USO Welcome Center
The USO Welcome Center Jacksonville International
Airport (JIA) is a wonderful facility providing a safe haven
to military members. Our scheduled hours are 9 a.m. to
midnight Monday through Thursday; and 9 a.m. Friday
through 9 p.m. Sunday, 365 days a year. Our goal is to
remain open 24/7, but we need your help. Visitors to
the Welcome Center are either departing the area and
need a place to "hang out" until their flight leaves, or are
arriving and need assistance traveling to their duty sta-
tion. Since opening on Veteran's Day 2004, we've assisted
more than 7,000 visitors annually and continue to receive
many expressions of gratitude. Due to the time involved in
training, operational procedures, and security issues, we
only accept volunteers who can make a weekly commit-
ment to a specific shift. Individuals must be able to attend
training before they can volunteer. Training is generally
held on Monday, Friday, or Saturday evenings from 5 to 9
p.m. In order to volunteer, you must have access to email
and be able to check daily. For specific details regarding
Volunteering at the USO JIA, please email lynne@usojax.
com

New Photo Requirement For Officer Records
All officers are now required to have a full-length color
photograph in their official military file, according to
NAVADMIN 103/07 distributed to the fleetApril 24. Officers
who do not have a photograph on the electronic military
personnel records system in their current grade must sub-
mit a photograph before Sept. 30. The preferred uniform
will be service khaki without a cover. When service khaki is
unavailable, any regulation uniform is acceptable.
The public affairs center detachment located at NS
Mayport, Fla. is the tri-base source for all official photo-
graphs. It is recommended officers needing a full-length
photo for selection board purposes prior to Sept. 30
call (904) 270-7762 and set up an appointment with the
detachment. When official facilities are not available, offi-
cers are authorized to use commercial sources. If commer-
cial sources are unavailable, officer may submit any color
photograph that complies with the requirements outlined
in MILPERSMAN 1070-180.

Protect Your Base Identification
Operational Security is the responsibility of all hands.
Controlling access to the base is one of the most important
roles of our security force as they provide a safe and secure
environment for all of us. Control of your issued base
access badge is a critical component of controlling base
access. Do not leave your badge unattended, especially in
your vehicle, the gym locker room, or other places where
it could be stolen.

Camden Army, Navy Game
In honor of Veterans Day, the Camden County High
School Wildcats will once again host the Army Navy
match up between the Wildcats and the Bradwell Tigers of
Hinesville Nov. 9. Admission for all military personnel with
ID will be $4. Regular gate admission price is $7.

Suggestions For Improving The Periscope?
Do you see an event on base you think deserves cover-
age in the Periscope? Let us know by calling Editor Mike
England at 573-4719 or sending an e-mail to periscopekb@
yahoo.com.

See BRIEFLY SPEAKING, Page 7


On The Home Front

Disaster preparedness important for families


By Beth Wiruth
Periscope contributor


In the past two weeks, I
have military friends or
acquaintances that were
affected by the apparent tor-
nado in Pensacola, Fla. evac-
uated by fires in southern
California, and lost their home
to a tree felled in the Santa Ana
winds. All of them are fine. All
have similar comments, "We
weren't prepared. We never
thought it would affect us.'
One San Diego family stated
they had about six minutes to
evacuate. Not enough time to
gather anything. "We left with
just the clothes on our back
and a few pictures.
As military families we regu-
larly hear about the topic of
'readiness. I recently had cof-
fee with a seasoned wife who
mentioned she was notgoingto
the command pre-deployment
night because she "would hear
the same old stuff." And just
last night I attended a meet-
ing of ombudsmen who were
asked by the base CO, "How
many of you have a disaster
kit?" The room was full but
only two hands were raised.
I am going to be blunt, and
in so doing I hope to help us
all avoid disaster compound-
ed by a lack of readiness. It is
OUR responsibility to be pre-
pared for disaster. Our nation
has experienced enough
disasters/crisis in the past six
years to realize a few things.
The federal government is
not God and therefore can-
not redirect hurricanes, calm
tornados, redirect flood waters
to drought-stricken areas or
disperse a blizzard. Further,
they are NOT omnipresent
and cannot be there within a
three-minute response time.


And it is not their job.
Local authorities are our
first-responders. In a disas-
ter first responders include
police, fire fighters, and medi-
cal personnel to name a few
- and they are finite in their
numbers and abilities. And
they work miracles. But we
must take personal responsi-
bility seriously. Let me repeat
that, we must take personal
responsibility very seriously.
Now is the time to create that
disaster plan for you and your
family. And it is not as difficult
as you think!
A disaster plan involves
three main areas: a commu-
nication plan, a disaster kit
and an evacuation plan. An
effective communication plan
is easy. Determine a fam-
ily member or friend out-
side your local area to call to
'report in. Often phone lines
(including cell phone) and
circuits are swamped in the
affected area. By contacting
grammy in Phoenix or Aunt
Delia in Pittsburgh all family
members can report in and
all can be ascertain where
they are and their status. For
Navy families there is another
number that needs to be part
of that communication plan:
1-877-414-5358. This num-
ber is manned 24/7 and able
to direct the right services to
you for your situation. Put this
number in your wallet; pro-
gram it into your cell phone.
This is the Navy's customer
service hotline which during
a crisis becomes the conduit
to provide support and assis-
tance to Navy families. Make
sure all family members know
who to call.
Step two is the disaster kit.
Please check out the Red Cross
site: www.arcventura.org/get-


prepared.html for specific
information on the items for
your disaster kit. Remember
to assemble these items in
a closet or areas that every-
one knows where it is locat-
ed. Make readiness a family
effort. Check out this link for
helping your children learn
about readiness: (http://
www.redcross.org/services/
prepare/0,1082,0 85 ,00.
html). Take the time to read
and utilize the information on
these two sites and remember
the motto: Three days, three
ways. Be prepared to survive
for three days and have three
ways to evacuate your home
and neighborhood. Practice
these evacuation plans.
Most importantly as Navy
families, register your fam-
ily before disaster at
https: //www.navyfamily. navy.
mil/. This is the Navy Family
AccountabilityandAssessment
System. This system enables
the Department of the Navy to
assist each family affected by
a national disaster/crisis or a
personal situation, as well as
IA's and their families. Logon
to the site and complete the
registration information. In an
emergency you may either call
the toll free number (1-877-
414-5358) or logon to update
your status and indicate your
needs if any. A case manager
will be assigned and proper
resources will be brought
to bear to meet your needs;
whether an ambulance to a
chaplain. Military Families
(and all families) should
assemble a "readiness binder"
or folder or even a backpack
with important papers (copies)
that can be easily grabbed as
you dash out the door. Papers
and information to include in
this binder would be a copy of


Beth Wiruth
Periscope contributor


your most recent orders, cop-
ies of driver's licenses, mili-
tary ID's, medical information
(medications and dosages), all
account numbers (bank, credit
card, insurance policies), copy
of birth certificates and mar-
riage license to name a few.
And tuck into this same bind-
er CASH. Put away $15 per
pay for one year and you will
have $360 for gas, hotel, food,
and other expenses in case
you cannot access your bank
account immediately. Let's
learn from those who recently
endured much and help lessen
the impact of a disaster on our-
selves and our families. Join
me in becoming a prepared
Military family. Establish your
disaster plan, and practice it,
by Thanksgiving.
Note to readers from other
branches of the service. For
specific information on disas-
ter services for your branch
contact your local family ser-
vice center or contact me at
beth@homefrontinfocus.com
and I'll be glad to give you
contact information.
Questions or comments for
Beth? Drop her a note at bethL
homefrontinfocus.com or check
out her internet talk show for
Navy spouses, Navy Homefront
Talk, at www.blogtalkradio.
com/nht.


Local View

The arts play important role in child's education


By Paul Kraack
Periscope contributor


few years ago, two
University of Illinois
researchers under-
took a unique endeavor. What
they wanted to examine was
the role of the arts in educa-
tion and how or why it might
matter in terms of student
achievement and educational
excellence (or lack thereof).
They looked at nearly 200
studies that examined every
aspect of how student involve-
ment in the arts impacted stu-
dent performance. What they
found was that the arts, while
impacting student ability and
performance in unique ways,
were not the causal force imag-
ined by some past researchers.
From a policy standpoint, they
offered this caveat: second-
ary, non-arts effects should
not be the sole justification
for arts education. Just as we
do not (and could not) justify
the teaching of history for its
power to transfer to mathe-
matics, policy makers should
not justify (or reject) the arts
based on their alleged power
to transfer to academic subject


tk


Paul Kraack
Periscope contributor


matters.
The arts have typically
played a relatively unimport-
ant role in American schools,
although in recent years,
arts educators have tried to
strengthen the position of the
arts in our schools by arguing
that the arts can be used to
buttress the 3Rs. The arts, they
said, could help children learn
to read and write and calcu-
late and understand scientific
concepts. The reasoning was
clear: perhaps schools under
pressure would value the arts
because the arts potentially
strengthened skills in "val-
ued" areas. This approach


became a favored strategy in
the United States for keeping
the arts in the schools and for
making sure that every child
had access to arts education.
Such instrumental claims
are a double-edged sword. If
the arts are given a role in
our schools because people
believe the arts cause academ-
ic improvement, then the arts
will quickly lose their position
if academic improvement does
not result, or if the arts are
shown to be less effective than
the 3Rs in promoting literacy
and numeracy. The arts are
the only school subjects that
are challenged to demonstrate
transfer to non-arts skills as a
justification for their useful-
ness. If we required physical
education to demonstrate
transfer to science, the results
might be no better, and proba-
blywould be worse. We should
make this argument for the
arts: the arts are good for our
children, irrespective of any
non-arts benefits that the arts
may in some cases have. Just
as a well-rounded education
requires education of the body
through physical education, a
balanced education requires


study of the arts. The arts offer
ways of thinking unavailable
in other disciplines.
Let's bet on history. The
arts have been around longer
than the sciences; cultures are
judged on the basis of their
arts; and most historical eras
have not doubted the impor-
tance of studying the arts. Let's
assume, then, that the arts
should be apart of every child's
education and treat the arts as
seriously as we treat mathe-
matics or reading or history or
biology. Let's remember why
societies have always included
the arts in every child's edu-
cation. The reason is simple.
The arts are a fundamentally
important part of culture, and
an education without them is
an impoverished education
leading to an impoverished
society. Continued research in
this area is important. There
is value in searching for links
between the arts and non-
arts outcomes, but those links
should not be used to justify
the arts.
If you have ideas or events
you want me to share with
readers, send me a note at
pkraackl @tds.net.


NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. Ward Stevens

NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer
Ed Buczek

Editor
Mike England 573-4719

Staff
MC2(SW) Michael Wiss
MC2(AW/NAC) William Tonacchio
MCSN Kenneth Abbate
MCSN Dmitry Chepusov


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publication.
The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-
4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official
views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of
Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy
of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gen-
der, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert
Military Publications Manager
1 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Linda Edenfield, Advertising Sales Manager
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336
Beeper (888) 980-3874 FAX (904) 366-6230












THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 3


Kings Bay


Chapel hosts


'Dinner on Us'

By MCSN Kenneth Abbate
Periscope staff
German food was on the menu as people, both civilian
and military gathered at the monthly "Dinner on Us" at
the NSB Kings Bay Chapel Oct. 30.
The chapel sponsors the "Dinner on Us" for Sailors and fami-
lies, who can get on base, on the last Tuesday of every month
where chapel volunteers provide home cooked dishes for the
community.
"This is a great opportunity for families to come and enjoy
a home cooked meal food right before payday," said volunteer
Donna Horn. "This also gives families an opportunity to com-
municate with others."
According to Horn, the "Dinner on Us" events are so success-
ful because it gives the community a chance to meet with the
chaplains as well as the other religious groups without having to
worry about discussing religious beliefs.
"Some guests have commented on being a little nervous dur-
ing the events because they feel that they will be questioned on
their religion," she said. "This is the complete opposite because
we are just here to provide them with a good meal and great
conversation as well as allow them to meet new people."
Although the turnout was not what they had expected com-
pared to the other years, the chapel volunteers still think that it
was very successful.
"The turnout was on the low side this month but our goal was
to do what we set out to do which was let the community know
that the chapel is here for them," said Horn. "It is not always
about the numbers, what matters most is the camaraderie and
people coming in and being able to relax with no pressure on
them. I did not get a chance to talk to everyone but they all
seemed to enjoy it"'
The chapel and the volunteers hope to see an even bigger
turnout on Nov. 27 for their crock pot "Dinner on Us" featuring
all kinds of food that can be cooked in a crock pot.


SPORTS CAMPS LEADERSHIP CAMPS YOUTH CAMPS
PARTNERSHIP CAMPS COACHES CAMPS AVAILABLE NATIONWIDE
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Provided as a public service- a CFC participant


Photos by MC1 (SW) Joseph Sabo
MA3 Darryl Johnson and his wife, Jessica, serve themselves some home-cooked German food during Dinner on Us at NSB Kings
Bay Chapel Oct. 30. "This is a great opportunity for families to come and enjoy a home cooked meal food right before payday,"
said chapel volunteer Donna Horn. "This also gives families an opportunity to communicate with others."


Fred Alexander and his
grandaughter, Aislin,
enjoy the German
cuisine at Dinner on
US Oct. 30 at NSB
Kings Bay Chapel.
"The turnout was
on the low side this
month, but our goal
was to do what we set
out to do, which was
to let the community
know that the cha-
pel is here for them,"
said chapel volunteer
Donna Horn. It is
not always about the
numbers. What mat-
ters most is the cama-
raderie and people
coming in and being
able to relax with no
pressure on them."


A world of thanks.


"I can't imagine a more rewarding career.
And any man who may be asked in this
century what he did to make his life
worthwhile, I think can respond with a
good deal of pride and satisfaction.
I served in the United States Navy.
- President John F. Kennedy

SEDA Homes would like to express
a heartfelt thank you to all of our
dedicated military men, women,
and their families. You protect
the one item that we all
cherish the most; our home.

Your daily efforts, commitment,
enthusiasm, and accomplishments
are recognized with gratefulness
and indebtedness.

We appreciate you each and every day.
A world of thanks to all.





SEDA
SEDACONSTRUCTION.COM


Building homes for military families
and Jacksonville for 25 years.


~I I













4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


Security officer promises stricter enforcement


By MC2(SW) Michael Wiss
Periscope staff

reating violators with a
"Firm, but Fair" hand
is the philosophy of Lt.
Cmdr. Eddie Davis as he takes
over as Security Officer at NSB
Kings Bay.
Davis relieved Cmdr.
Richard Tucker as the head of
security on base in October.
According to Davis, the name
plate on the door might
have changed, but the game
remains the same: to protect
personnel and assets on base
and off.
"We have to make sure and
keep security at a high level,
making sure to protect the
gates from any form of terror-
ism," he said. "The challenge
is to continue to improve, to
bring the security level up
another notch."
Davis is no stranger to
the Southeastern Georgia,
Northeast Florida region as
he recently completed a 16-
month tour as a security advi-
sor for Commander Navy
Region Southeast at Naval
Air Station Jacksonville. The
transfer was a lot easier than
the many stops he has made
to points all over the world.
Being a West Palm Beach Fla.
native, this area allows him
to be around his family for
a few more years. "This area
allows me to keep in contact
with my family in Florida," he
said. "Being able to have some
quality time with my wife and
three year son is motivating
considering the many deploy-


ments I have made."
Great leadership means
great support from your com-
mand. According to Davis, his
main goal is to make sure his
personnel can be the best they
can be.
"I want the personnel to
become the best MAs they can
be," he said. "I want the mili-
tary personnel to study and
advance their careers and also
enroll in off duty education
while they are here. For the
civilians, I want to provide a
work environment that moti-
vates them to come to work to
enforce the rules and regula-
tions to keep the installation
secure.'
One of the toughest chal-
lenges is the easiest to correct.
The problem of seatbelt and
speeding violations on base
has been an ongoing problem
for the last few years. There
have been many steps to help
cure this problem, everything
from safety stand downs to
safety checkpoints. According
to Davis, continuing education
is the onlyway to get people in
the mind set to make sure and
practice safe driving habits.
"I am concerned with peo-
ple not paying attention to the
driving safety rules on base.
Doing something as simple as
putting on a seatbelt could pre-
vent a fatality," he said. "I am
going to be paying attention to
vehicle violations. Everyone
when they register their car
knows the rules, if they choose
to break the rules they will be
ticketed."
The main mission of NSB


Photo by MC2(SW) Mike Wiss
"Firm but Fair" is the philosophy emplyed as Lt. Cmdr.. Eddie Davis took over the reigns as new NSB Kings Bay Security
Officer.


Kings Bay is to support the war
fighter. There are many secu-
rity practices that are involved
to make sure personnel can
complete this mission. In
addition, with the waterfront
there is also the issue of anti-


terrorism protection which is
an on going threat since the
9/11 bombings six years ago.
A big challenge is to work as a
team to take care of the small
day to day issues before you
can take on the bigger tasks.


Taking care of the small tasks
is the key to make the security
program work. "Performing
the small day to day work
schedule tasks is what makes
the program work," Davis said.
"The majority of my time will


be paying attention to detail,
ensuring the pieces of the puz-
zle are put into place to make
sure the right people are doing
their job to provide the protec-
tion we need to complete the
mission."


Fire prevention is


everyon(

By MCSN Kenneth Abbate
Periscope staff
O perational Risk
Management is a suc-
cessful tool that helps
to eliminate safety hazards
in the work place and many
think should be considered a
way of life. Several residents at
NSB Kings Bay base housing
have had a difficult time trying
to make this so.
Unattended kitchen and
garage fires are some of the
on-going hazards that seem to
be happening at base housing.
Although accidents happen,
people need to have a plan
in order to better prepare and
prevent these incidents from
occurring.
"Our biggest hazard at this
time, not just in Kings Bay but
nationwide, is unattended
cooking fires'" said Assistant
Chief of Fire Prevention
Danny Young. "The problem
with this is that people will be
cooking something that con-
tains grease and either gets


's responsibility


interrupted by a phone call,
hurt child, the doorbell, and
in worse cases where they for-
get something at the store and
leaving the stove unattended
for the whole time.'
Other than just unattended
kitchen fires, several of the
cases in housing of fire inci-
dents are caused by human
error. In this case, the sub-
ject is working in the garage
and either does not know that
something could cause a fire
or that he or she is unaware
at the time that they are doing
it so close to something that
could catch on fire.
"We had a gentleman clean-
ing his motorcycle and was
being bitten by mosquitoes,"
said Young. "He put a mosqui-
to candle in very close prox-
imity to the motorcycle fumes
and continued to clean the
vehicle by removing the gas
tank. In doing so, the fumes
from the gas tank reach the
candle and caused excessive
damage to the garage area.
Thankfully, the individual was


not hurt.'
According to a NSB Kings
Bay Sailor (who wishes to
remain anonymous), this inci-
dent was something he would
remember forever and hopes
to prevent this from ever hap-
pening again.
"This helped me learn how
to watch for fire hazards and to
prepare for things like this by
taking those preventative pre-
cautions to not have it happen
again," he said. "I also learned
that I should not have used a
candle so close to the gas tank.
It's hard to get out of the habit,
when you are working on the
floor and with candles all the
time, of using candles instead
of bug spray. I guess some-
times you just get used to the
situation and forget the conse-
quences of your actions."
There are many things to
watch out for that can cause
fires in the house. For more
information on what you to
look for, call Assistant Fire
Chief Danny Young at 573-
8503.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 5


Remember food safety during the holiday season


By Kay Blakley
Defense Commissary Agency


Sharing holiday meals with friends and
family is an important part of the holiday
season. Do partake of the season's mer-
riment, but don't invite food poisoning to join
the party by using careless food-handling prac-
tices. With a little bit of care and knowledge,
foodborne illness is almost entirely prevent-
able. Consider these four tips:
1.Cook thoroughly: If a golden-brown,
whole turkey will be the centerpiece of your
holiday table, a meat thermometer should be
among your "must-have" kitchen utensils. It's
the only sure way to tell if food has reached
the desired state of doneness and a tempera-
ture high enough to destroy harmful bacteria.
Use an oven temperature no lower than 325
degrees Fahrenheit and continue to roast until
the thermometer shows a minimum internal
temperature of 165 degrees. This is the lowest
temperature at which bacteria and viruses are
destroyed, according to food safety experts.
However, for reasons of personal preference,
consumers may choose to cook turkey to the
traditional temperature levels of 175 to 180
degrees Fahrenheit in the thigh and 165 to 170
in the breast. Check the temperature in the
innermost part of the thigh and wing and in the
thickest part of the breast. Make sure the ther-
mometer is not touching bone, fat or gristle. For
safety sake, it is best not to stuff the turkey, but
to bake the stuffing separately in a casserole.
If you simply must cook the stuffing inside the
bird, check the stuffing temperature separately.
Even if the turkey itself has reached the desired
temperature, cooking must continue until the
center of the stuffing has reached 165 degrees.
2.Keep it clean: Wash your hands, including
under your fingernails, thoroughly and often
with soap and water. Remember that bacteria
can enter the picture from numerous sourc-
es-handling the telephone, petting the dog,
taking a bathroom break, wiping the baby's


runny nose or brushing her hair out of her face,
even handling dirty dishes. Wash up again after
any of these or other interruptions, and dry
hands thoroughly with a clean towel or paper
towel. Change kitchen towels, sponges and dish
cloths often. Bacteria can linger on linen used
repeatedly between launderings. Always laun-
der these items in hot water, because the cold
water wash may not kill all the bacteria. Use
paper towels to wipe counters and floor spills.
Wash countertops, cutting boards and ut Sils
in hot soa ater between each ste d
preparat' n. B sure dishes are f e
dry befol putti hem away. E myits o
food soil a rith sture tp
the dishes sets up aer t n4 nmei for
bacteria to grow.
3.Separate raw and c o
agree that accidental foc -foodo surface-
to-food cross contamina o is on the big-
gest culprits in the sprea -e food ness.
For example, say some j c frh a i d
turkey seeps onto the con o or
cutting board.
You wipe up the spill wh a p wel, e
cut lettuce and e et b 0 o sa e
contaminate co dcr award.
Although th s face ma r ok clean, bacteria
from the po lt may stil e resent-and may
have transfe re to th s id makings. Your
friends and f ilyf th salad and now run
the risk ofbecomi
Even more common is the following sce-
nario. You prepare the turkey for roasting by
removing the giblets and neck from inside the
bird. You rub the inside cavity with salt, using
your fingers and generously apply butter to the
outside of the bird with, you guessed it, your
bare hands! (We'll assume your hands and
nails have been thoroughly scrubbed before-
hand.) You lift the turkey into the roasting pan,
wiping your hands on the kitchen towel sev-
eral times throughout the process. You use that
same towel to open the oven door and slide
the turkey in. The pan of potatoes on top of the


stove starts to boil over, so you use the towel
as a potholder to lift the lid. As you turn down
the heat with one hand, you pick up a spoon
with the other hand, and give the pot a good
stir. As you stir, you notice the yeast rolls set to
rise on the back of the stove look a little dry, so
you dampen the notorious towel with a little
water from the faucet, and carefully lay it over
the rolls. e could carry this on and on, but by
no re fu have the picture. You've con-
ta ate f thelt n by transferring any
or in the turkey,
el and finally
iter th touched. We
n enti n fi you've cre-
d hthe a b ose to the

nmin m sibilities
very ste f the w eginnin irour gro-
ery bask t contin n to your a or poul-
S i the ,flgerator and a the way
th t mea paration pro s. Wash
hands and ute ss o en with soap d water.
se paper towels d ispose of th m imme-
ately after handlin ra meat or poultry, and
change c l o els often.
r s 'rve and store foods
properly Iep hot foc s hot and cold foods
cold: N d ubt you'v h ard this at least a hun-
dred ti es, ut go a vice bears repeating.
Follow th e guTiel es to assure food safety
when prepari e hoT ay feast.
*Thaw the turkey completely before cooking.
Thawing in the refrigerator is best, but requires
some planning-allow a minimum of five hours
per pound thawing time. If planning failed, do a
quick thaw by placing the turkey, in its original
wrapper, in cold water. Allow 30 minutes per
pound for thawing to take place and change the
water every 25 to 30 minutes.
*Egg-based desserts such as pumpkin, pecan
or sweet potato pie can be made a day ahead,
but must be stored in the refrigerator.
*Cornbread dressing can be partially pre-
pared a day ahead, as long as you refrigerate


the ingredients separately-breadcrumbs and
crumbled cornbread in one container, sau-
t6ed onions and celery in another and crisp
crumbled bacon in yet another. Combine all
ingredients with eggs, seasonings and broth the
next day. Bake and serve immediately.
*Even deviled eggs can be made ahead fol-
lowing these safety precautions. Boil, peel and
slice the eggs lengthwise. Refrigerate the egg
whites in one container and the yolks in a
separate container. Three to four hours before
mealtime, mash the yolks with a fork and com-
bine with mayonnaise and seasonings. Fill the
egg whites with the yolk mixture and chill till
serving time.
*If serving buffet style, keep foods warm with
chafing dishes or warming trays. Cold foods
should be kept on ice, if possible.
*Cover and refrigerate leftovers within two
hours of serving.
*Store leftover meats or poultry in their own
separate containers. Do not combine with other
items such as gravy, dressing or vegetables in
the same container.
*Use leftovers in a timely fashion. For most
items this means within one to three days.
About DeCA: The Defense Commissary
Agency operates a worldwide chain of com-
missaries providing groceries to military per-
sonnel, retirees and their families in a safe and
secure shopping environment.
Authorized patrons purchase items at cost
plus a 5-percent surcharge, which covers the
costs of building new commissaries and mod-
ernizing existing ones. Shoppers save an aver-
age of more than 30 percent on their purchas-
es compared to commercial prices savings
worth about $3,000 annually for a family of
four. A core military family support element,
and a valued part of military pay and benefits,
commissaries contribute to family readiness,
enhance the quality of life for America's mili-
tary and their families, and help recruit and
retain the best and brightest men and women
to serve their country.


o sITHlll BYBllAY
A free program of support and information about pregnancy
& and newborn health especially for military families. Created by
March of Dimes, with the VFW and the Ladies Auxiliary VFW.


marchofdimes.com/vfw

a CFC participant
Provided as a public service


March
ofDimes*


VETERAN'S DAY SPECIALS











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t INTEESTREST FREE PROMOTIONAL PLANS- WHEN YOU USE YOUR PREFERRED CREDIT CARD ISSUED BY WFNNB, FINANCE CHARGESARE DEFERRED FOR PRMOTIONAL CREDIT PLAN
PURCHASESANDTHEN ACCRUE FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE THROUGHAND INCUDNGTHELAST DY OF THEPROM OTIONAL PERIOD. I THEPURCHSEAMOUNT IS NOTPAD IN
FULL BY THE PROMOTIONAL PERIOD END DATE (12 MONTHS FROM DATE OF PURCHASE FOR TOTAL PURCHASES ABOVE $500), PAYMENTS ARE REQUIRED DURING THE PROMOTIONAL
PERIOD (AS DESCRIBED IN YOUR CREDIT CARD AGREEMENT). IF THE PROMOTIONAL CREDIT PLAN IS NOT PAID IN FULL BEFORE THE PROMOTIONAL PERIOD ENDS OR REGULAR-
REVOLVINGANDIORANY PROMOTIONALPLAN PAYMENTSARE NOT PAIDWHEN REQUIRED FORTWO CONSECUTIVE BILLING CYCLES, UNDERTHIS ORANY OTHERFRIEDMANS PROMO-
TIONAL CREDIT PLAN, THE REMAINING BALANCE AND THE AMOUNT OF FINANCE CHARGES THAT HAVEACCRUED FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE THROUGH AND INCLUDING THE LAST
DAY OF THE PROMOTIONAL PERIOD WILL BE INCLUDED IN YOUR REGULAR REVOINIG BALANCE AND REGULAR CREDIT TERMS WILL APPLY. AS OF OCTOBER 1, 2007, APR OF 24.%%,
THIS RATE MAY VARY, MINIMUM MONTHLY FINANCE CHARGE OF $1.00. SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL. SEE STORE ASSOCIATE FOR DETAILS.
* CLEARANCE DISCOUNTS RANGE FROM 40% TO 80% OFF ORIGINAL PRICES. MERCHANDISE SUBJECT TO STOCK ON HAND. NO RAIN CHECKS. NO SPECIAL ORDERS. NO
LAYAWAYS. NO HOLDS. MERCHANDISE ENLARGED TO SHOW DETAIL.TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS ARE SUBJECT TO CORRECTION. CTW APPROXIMATE TOTAL CARAT WEIGHT
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Use of released U.S. Navy imagery does not constitute product or organizatonal endorsement of any kind by tie U.S. Navy. U.S. Navy Photo. Copyright 0 2007 Navy Federal
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Surf tfWf Scope!


www. kingsbayperiscope. corn














6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


Operation Homefront assists servicemembers affected by wildfires


By MCSN Dmitry
Chepusov
Periscope staff
Operation Homefront
is proving itself to be
essential to many ser-
vicemembers who are victims
of the San Diego County wild-
fires. Monetary grants, tempo-
rary housing and household
goods are only a few of the
many services they can pro-
vide during difficult times.
What started as an Internet
chat site for female service-
members and spouses in the
late 90s transformed into a
large, non-profit organiza-
tion, which has local chapters
spread across the country.
When Meredith Leyva's hus-
bandwas deployed in 1999 she
developed a Web site called
CinCHouse.com to connect
military wives and women in
uniform. As the Armed Forces
saw a surge of deployments
after Sept. 11, 2001, Operation
Homefront was formed as an
extension of the Web site to
offer emergency assistance
and morale to troops, the fam-
ilies they leave behind and to

Enrollment

open for

computer-

based learning

program

By Kings Bay Navy College
Learning Center
T he Navy College
Learning Center pro-
vides comprehensive,
computer-based, self-paced
instruction for adult learners.
The program offers an open-
entry/open-exit enrollment
that allows service members to
acquire a solid foundation of
skills when it is convenient to
their schedules. It incorporates
comprehensive tutorials and
real life applications through
mastery-based courseware
that is relevant to adult learn-
ing styles and ensures a thor-
ough understanding of the
materials presented.
Take advantage of a unique
educational opportunity and
improve your learning skills at
NCLC. Our center is equipped
to assist active duty military,
retired military, reservists,
spouses and eligible adult
family members. The courses
are ideal to refresh or upgrade
academic skills in an individu-
alized, self-paced, learning
environment. NCLC can help
you prepare for the SAT, ACT,
ASVAB, CLEP, college place-
ment exams, or GED. NCLC
can help you prepare for col-
lege classes, tech schools or
advancement exams. Or you
maywant to improve yourwrit-
ing skills, improve your reading
comprehension, improve your
present work skills, or strive
for basic or advanced math
mastery. Studying for your
own personal development
is highly encouraged as well!
Begin to improve your skills
or just refresh skills that you
already possess. NCLC courses
are offered for free. This study
program can be personalized
for your particular needs and
according to your particular
schedule. So enroll and use
NCLC as a steppingstone to
success!
The center is located in the
Navy College Office, building
1030, and is open Monday
through Thursday from 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 673-1888 or come in
to enroll.


He's got a cold nose,
a warm heart,
and eyes for two.
Since 1946, the Guide Dog
Foundation for the Blind has been
providing guide dogs free of charge
to blind people seeking increased
mobility, independence, and the
companionship a guide dog provides.
3- 71 F Jericho Tpke
ideDo Smilhtwn. NY 117X7
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F m.uc,, www.guidc eg.orig
a CFC parlicipant Provided as a public service


wounded warriors when they
return home. Now Operation
Homefront is working hard to
help Navy wildfire victims in
San Diego get back on their
feet.
"We are here for any kind
of emergency situation in a
servicemember's life, includ-
ing the results of the San Diego
wildfires, which has put a
serious strain on many Navy
families," said Tricia De La
Paz, Operation Homefront's
Southern California interim
chapter president.


Operation Homefront pri-
marily serves junior enlisted
Sailors, however excep-
tions are made on a case-by-
case basis. After filling out
a short financial application,
a servicemember or military
dependent has an interview
with a client services repre-
sentative, who assesses the
client's needs and determines
how the organization can use
many of its resources to help.
"Originally we started with
our deployed servicemem-
ber programs," said De La


Paz. "This included mov-
ing assistance and help with
car repairs, which are issues
spouses may have when the
servicemember is deployed.
We don't provide loans, but
we usually give grants when
emergency situations arise.'
Besides car repair servic-
es, Operation Homefront's
deployed servicemember pro-
grams can assist with handy-
man services, computer hard-
ware, appliance repair, and
local moves. The organiza-
tion can also pay for a military


family's eye care and provide
donated furniture, baby items,
vehicles, and food, even when
the service member is not
deployed.
"The best thing is when
I can see the faces of a ser-
vicemember and his fam-
ily when they receive assis-
tance," said De La Paz, who
handed Hull Maintenance
Technician 1st Class (SW)
Daniel Mask of Southwest
Regional Maintenance Center
Submarine Maintenance
Division the keys to a refur-


bished 1995 Dodge Ram 1500
Oct. 31. His vehicle broke
down while he was helping
to evacuate horses during the
wildfire in Ramona, Calif. "I
like knowing that at the end
of the day I did something to
substantially help someone,"
added De La Paz.
For more information about
Operation Homefront and the
services they can provide, or
to schedule an interview, visit
www.operationhomefront.
net/sandiego or call toll-free
(866) 424-5210.


Let's Build Something Together


Limited time only!

11/8/07 11/12/07


How It Works:


Make any in-store

purchase of at least $50

between 11/8/07 and

11/12/07 and get a $10

coupon to use between

11/8/07 and 11/21/07.

Your $10 coupon will print out

at the register and is valid on your

next purchase. $50 purchase must


if paid in full by January 2009
on any purchase of $299
or more made on your
Lowe's Consumer Credit Card
11/8/07 through 11/12/07.


+ next-day local delivery and haul-away available"
tReceive 10% off all major appliances priced $397 or more before taxes and all applicable discounts and/or
instant rebates to qualify. This offer can be combined with other rebates instant or mail-in) and/or credit
financing offers. Includes refrigerators, dishwashers, and clothes washers. Discount taken at register. Not
valid on previous sales, installation fees, extended protection plans or select Fisher & Paykel items. Offer
valid 11/8/07-11/18/07. "Next day local delivery, hook up and haul away on major appliance purchases
$397 or more via mail-in rebate. Additional fees may apply for deliveries outside 20-mile local area. Rebate
values and additional charges may vary. See store for details.


For the Lowe's nearest you, call 1-800-993-4416 or visit us online at Lowes.com
Prices may vary after 11/12/07 if there are market variations. 'Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 11/1/07 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities.
*Applies to single receipt, in-store purchases of $299 or more made 11/8/07 through 11/12/07 on a Lowe's Consumer Credit Card account. No monthly payments will be required and no finance charges will be assessed on this promotional purchase if you pay the following in
full by January 2009: (1) the promotional purchase amount, and (2) any related optional credit insurance/debt cancellation charges. If you do not, finance charges will be assessed on the promotional purchase amount from the date of the purchase and monthly payments will
be required. Standard account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. APR is 21.99%. Min. finance charge is $1.00. Offer must be requested at time of purchase. Offer is subject to credit approval. Excludes Lowe's Business Credit Accounts, Lowe's Project Cards"
Accounts, and Lowe's@ Visa Accounts. Spend & Get offer is in store only. Spend & Get offer valid 11/8-11/12. Coupon effective until 11/21. Eligibility for a $10 Lowe's coupon through Lowe's(r) Spend & Get program requires a valid qualifying purchase of at least $50.00 on
a single receipt between November 8, 2007 and November 12, 2007. A limit of one (1) $10 Lowe's(r) coupon per household per day will be issued for any qualifying purchase under the program. No amount spent with any rebate redemption, prior purchase, extended warranty
purchase, discount, delivery, service fee or returned merchandise will be included to determine a qualifying purchase under the program. No purchases after 11:59:59 November 12, 2007 EST, will be eligible for the program. Each $10 Lowe's(r) coupon issued will be valid
towards any purchase made at a participating Lowe's(r) store. Not valid on previous sales, purchase of Gift Cards, Fishel & Paykel appliances or John Deere products. The $10 Lowe's(r) coupon will have an expiration time/date of 11:59:59 EST, November 21, 2007, but
Lowe's reserves the right to modify and/or end the program at any time in its discretion without providing written notice to you. Program is void where prohibited by law. Full terms and conditions are available at the Customer Service Desk. KITCHEN CABINET INSTALLA-
TION OFFER: Basic cabinet installation includes all hardware, installation of fillers, scribes, toe kicks, installation of one layer of molding for top or bottom of wall cabinets, haul-away of cabinet cardboard and daily cleanup of jobsite.
Additional charges will apply for installation of over 10 cabinets, permits, and for other services and/or accessories. Offer valid through 11/21/2007. Customers must purchase job site detail by 11/21/2007 and purchase eligible cabinets
and sign installation contract by 12/7/2007 in order to qualify. Additional restrictions apply, see store associate for details. All installation services are guaranteed by Lowe's warranty. See Installed Sales contract for details. Professional installation available
through licensed independent subcontractors. Lowe's contractor license numbers: AK#28341; AL#5273; AZ#ROC195516; CA#803295; CT#558162; FL#CGC1508417; HI Contractor's License No.: C 23784 see store; IL Plumber #058-100140; IL Roofing #104014837; LA
Master Plumber #1440 WSPS; MD# 91680,50931; MI#2101146786, Lowe's Home Centers, Inc., 6122 "B" Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014; NJ Plumbing see store; NM#84381; NV#2-45450; Brooklyn, NY#1162261; Staten Island, NY#1160554; Suffolk County,
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000 00 0'P YTII MI

JOHN0 uMPL,' 01195mtm FOR Zg'lf:'lll B iV11 iij j


I


















Briefly Speaking

Continued from Page 2

Silver and Gold Auction Volunteer Meeting
There will be a Silver and Gold Auction volunteer meet-
ing Nov. 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the base golf course club house.
For more information, email silvergoldchairs@yahoo.
com.

PSD Hours of Operation
PSD Kings Bay has changed it's hours of operation. The
ID card section will operate as follows: Monday Friday
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Thursdays when doors will open
at 9 a.m. ID cards will be available from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
will operate on the first Saturday of each month, including
the holiday weekend of Columbus Day Oct. 6. SATO will
also now operate the same Saturday hours as ID cards for
passport application and issuance only. The hours for all
other PSD business (except ID Cards) will be unchanged
and are as follows: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
except Thursdays when doors will open at 9 a.m.

Homefront Talk Radio
Homefront in Focus is pleased to announce Navy
Homefront Talk, our new Internet talk radio initiative.
Beth Wiruth will host a weekly Internet talk radio show
for Navy spouses. "We'll talk all things Navy spouse," said
Wiruth, "from deployment and loneliness, TriCare and
LES's, to moving, childcare, Individual Augmentees, kids
and yes, even house-breaking that new puppy. I am look-
ing forward to talking with and hearing from Navy spouses
across the country'. Navy Homefront Talk will air live each
Wednesday at 7 p.m. Eastern Time (4 p.m. Pacific). Calls
will be taken as well as instant messages. Each show is
recorded and archived for listening at alternate times.
To join the conversation, log on to www.blogtalkradio.
com/homefrontinfocustalk. Callers can speak with Beth
at 718-508-9617 or IM to navyhomefronttalk during the
live show. For more information or an interview, please
contact Homefront in Focus at 805-201-7821.

Commissary Holiday Hours
The NSB Kings Bay Commissary will close on the
Tuesday following Columbus Day, Christmas, New Year's
Day, Martin Luther King Day, President's Day, Memorial
Day and Labor Day. The commissary will also close on
Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July, but will remain open
on Veterans Day.

Impact Aid Survey
If you have a child attending public school in Camden
County, please remember to fill out your Federal Impact
Aid Survey and return it to you child's school as soon as
possible. In order to secure Impact Aid funds, the school
district must conduct a survey to identify the number of
military and civilian employee children attending school.
The amount of funds received is directly based on the
number of these children who are identified in the survey.
Failure to properly account for the number of military and
civilian employee children attending school could lead
to a budgetary shortfall and negatively effect your child's
education. Please do your part to ensure your child's edu-
cation is the best that it can be.

Troops To Teachers
The Georgia Troops to Teachers Program provides eli-
gible servicemembers up to $10,000 to become public
school teachers. Under the Spouse to Teachers Programs,
eligible military spouses maybe reimbursed for the cost of
state required certification tests up to a total of $600.

Base Housing Curfew/Quiet Hours
Quiet hours at NSB Kings Bay Housing and curfew times
for base residents under the age of 17 are as follows: week-
ends 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., Monday Friday 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.
For more information, contact the base housing office at
573-2056.

Help NMCRS Help Others
Now, more than ever, you can help at Navy-Marine
Corps Relief Society. Death or serious illness in the imme-
diate family, rent/mortgage, utilities, food, car repair, car
payment, insurance, dental, medical ... you can make a
difference in the life of a fellow servicemember. You can
provide them with the funds, education and tools to find
solutions to their emergency needs. Call 573-3928 today.



Cancer Treatment
Research Foundation
PHONE 888.221.CTRF www.ctrf.org
A CFC Participant. Provided as a public service.






Harbor Pines

2000 Harbor Pines Drive St. Marys, GA
912-882-7330
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments
* Quiet Relaxing Community Pool
* Gourmet Kitchen 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
* Washer/Dryer Connections Office Open 6 days a week
* Playground (Closed Sunday)


or a complete listing of performance times &r ticKts
visit: www.comedyzone.com or call: 292-HIAHA
15 &r an lose Blvd. (located inside the Famada-lng


THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 7

Guidelines for submitting articles/photos to the Periscope


From the Editor
The Kings Bay Periscope
welcomes articles and
photographs pertain-
ing to base employees, fam-
ily members, commands
and community events. The
Periscope is published every
Thursday.
The deadline for submis-
sions is Monday at noon.
The following are some tips
on writing articles and taking
photographs for the paper:
Always include rates such
as: Lt., AS1, PR2.
We use the Associated Press
Stylebook to edit stories.
Include first and last names.
No call signs.
Spell out all acronyms
- many people have no idea
what they all stand for.


Write in simple terms -
imagine your readers are on a
sixth grade reading level.
Don't just send us award
stories. How about some fea-
ture stories about the people
in your command? Everyone
has a unique story to tell. Do
a story on someone's hobby,
if they volunteer out in town,
something interesting that
happened to them, etc.
Use quotes.
Send us stories in a time-
ly manner. We are a weekly
newspaper. We don't want
something that happened a
month or two ago. Send us
a story right after it happens.
Email ensures faster submis-
sions.
Stories must be in Word
documents. Do not embed
photos into Word documents.


Send photos, with captions, as
a separate jpg file.
Make stories as long as
needed, but remember we
will chop them as needed. We
normally start chopping at the
bottom so make sure you put
your more important informa-
tion up front.
Photographs:
Use 200 dpi or higher only
(set cameras to highest quality
settings).
If storage space is a con-
cern, get extra cards, so you
don't have to jeopardize qual-
ity for number of photos.
Photos with a file size of
less than 2mb will not repro-
duce well in print for newspa-
per purposes.
If people are involved,
don't get backs or backs of
heads only. Include faces.


Don't shoot into sunlight.
Correct your angle as best you
can.
Use indoor camera set-
tings for indoor shooting, and
lowlight settings can vastly
improve indoor shots.
Shoot from the level of your
subject.
Fill the frame.
Avoid standing in front of
windows that can wash out
your photos, either by flash
bounce back or direct sunlight
coming in.
Cell phone and disposable
camera shots do not repro-
duce well and may not be used
when submitted.
Articles and photos can be
submitted via email to peri-
scopekb ayahoo.com.
For more information, call
573-4719.


INSURANCE: Renter's insurance can be an important tool


Continued from Page 1
his wife, and three children a
room in the Navy Lodge at $70
a night.
Because the officer did not
have renters insurance, he
spent in two nights what he
could have spent on full cov-
erage of his belongings for a
year.
"Military families who
live in military housing have
$10,000 coverage as part of the
rental agreement with Lincoln
Military Housing," continued
Guerin.
"But if a family adds up the


replacement cost of a personal
computer, television, stereo,
digital camera, MP3 player,
home entertainment center,
etc., they quickly go through
the $10,000. Additional cover-
age from an insurance com-
pany is not expensive, and for
someone residing in the bar-
racks, coverage is ridiculously
inexpensive. The four out of
10 families I dealt with did not
have any renters insurance,
and I see that they and many
others now wish they had got-
ten insurance coverage."
NSB Kings Bay Navy and


Marine Corps Relief Society
Director Gail Tate thinks rent-
er's insurance is an impor-
tant tool servicemembers can
use to rebuild their lives after
disaster strikes.
"Even with renter's insur-
ance, it is difficult to rebuild
your life after you lose every-
thing. Without this insurance,
if a fire occurs it is absolutely
catastrophic," Tate said. "I
have had some people come
to see me after a disaster
and the first thing they say
is I should have had renter's
insurance. The relief society


can help with the basics, but
you will basically have to start
from scratch. It is better to be
safe than sorry'.
According to one insurance
policy service representa-
tive, $5 per month will give
$2,500 in coverage, and $30
per month will give $100,000
in coverage.
For more information on
renter's insurance and to
receive policy price quotes
call your favorite insurance
provider or visit the Fleet and
Family Support Center for
additional assistance.


FFSC: Servicemembers given chance to view FFSC, MWR services


Continued from Page 1
tion. The goal of the open house was to give servicemembers,
DoD employees and their families an opportunity to get a non-
committal, no pressure, no-hassle, hands-on experience of the
service that FFSC and MWR provide. There was subject matter
experts on-hand to explain all of their many programs.
"We did this open house to show case our programs, and to
spread the word about what we do here at FFSC and MWR," said


Call Wy m AnyTm
:es ~ ee


Felipe Gonzales. In addition, it was a great way to market the
FFSC and MWR; I think we really reached a lot of people."
The open house also showcased many of the programs that
the FFSC and MWR have to offer and dispelled many of the
misconceptions they might have had about some of their pro-
grams. Anyone interested about getting more information on
the services that FFSC and MWR provide are encouraged to call
573-4512 for FFSC and 573-2538 for MWR.




C'anc-r nr omoion 7 C7unselinn Lne
800-525-3777
M-d -~ ..... -...i.. ., ~ v ,-R-.... .W .


II.






AFTER MAIL-IN REBATE ON ANY APPLIANCE OVER $399
Offer applies to any appliance over $399 after discounts and coupons when you use a qualifying Sears card and if paid in full by January 2009 and account is kept in good standing See Important Defened Interest Promotional Offer Details
below. Excludes Outlet stores. Free standard local delivery on any appliance over $399 after discounts and coupons. Standard delivery includes delivery within the local delivery area Mon. thru Fri. and delivery not requiring
additional services or time. Outside local delivery area, customer pays an additional charge. Rebate values, local areas and additional charges vary. Maximum rebate value $75. See store for details. Excludes KitchenAid'
built-in refrigeration and Outlet stores. Offer good thru November 16, 2007.


Monday Saturday 9-6 2106 Sadler Road Owned and Operated by Sears Retail Outlet
Sunday 1-6 (904) 261-5511 Bill & Beverly Hughes Hom appianes, eletonics, hardware, an & garden, tools
Fernandina Beach

Monday-Saturday 9-6 28 Hawthorn Lane Owned and Operated by St. Marys Sears
(912) 882-5858 Home appliances, electronic, hardware, lawn & garden, tools
Sunday 12-5 St. Marys, Georgia Norm Duchscherer

Important Deferred Interest Promotional Offer Details: FINANCE CHARGES accrue on a promotional purchase from the date of purchase and all accrued FINANCE
CHARGES for the entire promotional period will be added to your account if the purchase is not paid in full by the end of the promotional period or if you default under
your card agreement. Making the minimum monthly payment will not pay off your promotional purchase in time to avoid FINANCE CHARGES. With credit approval, for
qualifying purchases made on a Sears card (Sears Commercial One* and Sears Home Improvement Accountv accounts excluded unless otherwise indicated) Offer is only valid for
consumer accounts in good standing and is subject to change without notice. May not be combined with any other credit promotional offer. Promotional offers of 14 months or
more require minimum monthly payments as disclosed in the offer. Sears cards: APRs up to 25.99%, but if your account has a variable APR, the APR is up to 31.74% as of 9/21/07
and may vary. Minimum Monthly FINANCE CHARGE: up to $1. See card agreement for details, including when the default rate applies. Sears cards are issued by Citibank (South
Dakota), N.A. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK": Exclusions apply. See Sears Return Policy for more details. Appliance prices shown are for white unless otherwise
indicated. Colors, connectors, ice maker hook-up and installation extra. No extra charge for dishwasher colors. Excludes stainless steel finishes.*FuR is a registered trademark of Procter
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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


All the WWII Submarine
Veterans who were in atten-
dance "mustered" for a group
photo after the ceremony had
ended. "It's sad to say, but
every year the group shot
gets smaller and smaller,"
said Bill Castleberry, a WWII
Submarine Veteran. "But we
will not be forgotten."


The day before the WWII Submarine Veterans Memorial Service, the Submarine Veterans and spouses had break-
fast with Kings Bay's commanding officers and chiefs at the Pirates Cove Galley.


During the Tolling of the Bell, Trident Training Facility Command Master
Chief EMCM(SS) Stan Jackson had the solemn honor of tolling the bell as the
names of the lost WWII Submarines were read.


i~~
ii
:
;I
gill.


E iCfFIT


Through out
the WWII
Submarine
Veteran
Memorial
Service, the
children of
the Kingsland
Elementary
School Choir
delighted
the audience
with patriotic
songs.













THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 9


The NSB Kings Bay Ceremonial Guard stands ready during the WWII
Submarine Veterans Memorial Service at the NSB Kings Bay WWII Submarine
Veterans Memorial Pavilion. After the Tolling of the Boats, they fired a 21-gun
salute to the fallen.


All present lowered their heads in reverence as Father Kaul gave the invocation to start the WWII Submarine
Veterans Memorial Service. The invocation was about the great sacrifice made by the WWII Submariners.


MC2(AWNAC) Wil Tonah(io


After the Tolling of the Boats, the NSB Kings Bay Ceremonial Guard fired a 21 -gun salute to the fallen during the WWII Submarine Veterans Memorial Service at NSB Kings Bay WWII Submarine
Veterans Memorial Pavilion.



The WWII Submarine
Veterans were lost
in thought about old
friends, good times,
and a Navy long ago as
CDMCM(SS/SW) Joe
Kunz read aloud the
remembrance speech
during the WWII
Submarine Veterans
Memorial Service. "I
F I especially remember
how tough it was know-
ing that your friends
were on a bout that
was sunk, said Gordon
Hiatt (center), a WWII
Bonefish Submariner.
"I just remember try-
ing to recall all the fun
times we had together,
and how much I was
going to miss them."
The POW/MIA Presentation Table is a symbol of honor that shows the sac-
rifice that many servicemembers made to defend freedom and democracy
'around the world. The table is set for lost WWII Submariners.











10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


Health Alert:Bug bite


or Staph Infection?

By Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay
taphylococcus aureus, or "staph" as it is sometimes called, is a common bacterium that
may be found on the skin or in the nose of humans. While it is usually harmless, it may
cause moderate to severe skin infections. Cases of skin infections caused by methicillin-
resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been identified in hospitals since the 1960's. A
newer form of staph infection known as CA-MRSA (community-acquired or community associ-
ated) has appeared with increasing frequency in the United States. Closer to home, Kings Bay
has seen a steady increase in the numbers of CA-MRSA. This form causes serious skin infections
in otherwise healthy persons who have not been hospitalized or undergone invasive medical
procedures. These skin infections can appear as a pimple, rash, boil or an open wound. MRSA
is often misdiagnosed as spider bites. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, pus, ten-
derness of the skin, pimples, boils or blisters. These skin conditions may progress quickly from
a skin irritation to an abscess or serious skin infection. If left untreated, it can infect blood and
bones.
MRSA lives on skin and can survive on objects for over 24 hours. The drainage from the skin
lesions can spread MRSA to other parts of the body as well as to other persons. It can be found
in places where there are crowds of people or on commonly shared objects such as benches in
hot tubs, athletic equipment, towels, soap, or anything that may have touched the skin of an
infected person.
Some tips to help prevent the spread of infection include:
Wash hands with soap and warm water
Keep cuts and scrapes clean with soap and water
Avoid skin contact and sharing personal items with people suspected of being infected
Wash towels/washcloths/clothes that may be infected
Clean athletic equipment that is shared with other people
If you think that you have a skin infection, consult your doctor or healthcare provider. Early
treatment will prevent the infection from getting worse. If you are told that you have MRSA:
Keep the infected area clean and covered with drybandages, dispose of bandages prop-
erly
Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water
Clean your bathroom, kitchen, etc regularly
Wash clothes with hot water/bleach and dry using hot dryer
Inform any healthcare provider that you seek for treatment that you have a MRSA infec-
tion
The best prevention against the spread of MRSA infections is good personal hygiene.
The following recommendations should be implemented in the sailors quarters and among
the shipmates to contain the spread of MRSA infections:
Good Housekeeping in the barracks
All common-use surfaces in the barracks or berthing area need to be disinfected daily with
a general purpose disinfectant. A general cleaner only removes dirt, and will not kill germs.
Therefore, a disinfectant must be used.
Some examples of good disinfectants are:
Pine Oil Disinfectant
Lysol Disinfectant
Bleach/water in a 1:100 dilution (one tablespoon per quart of water)
Common use surfaces include door knobs, sinks, shower stalls, faucets, phone receivers,
games, television controls.
Good Personal Hygiene Among the Sailors
WASH YOUR HANDS use soap and water and friction for 15 seconds to really clean your
hands. Wash often, but especially after going to the rest room, and before eating. Keep a bottle
of hand sanitizer with you to use when soap and water is not available.
Shower every day with a good antibacterial soap. Dry your skin thoroughly after the shower.
Bacteria grow and multiply on warm, moist surfaces.
Launder your clothes on a regular basis. Wet, dirty clothing can cause skin irritation and
increase the risk of infection.
Also important is remembering to be selfish with your personal items DO NOT SHARE
linens and razors, or any other personal items. Do not share bar soap. If possible, does not use
bar soap. For more information, contact your healthcare provider or call the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention at 800-CDC-INFO (232-4636).




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Newsstand!

www.kingsbayperiscope.com


Chapel Events Schedule


Thursday, Nov. 8
9 a.m ................................................................................................Craft and Conversation

Saturday, Nov. 10
5 p.m................................................................................. ........................Holy Mass

Sunday, Nov. 11
9 a.m ... ....... ........................................ ........................................................... .......H oly M ass
10:30 a.m ........................ ... .................................................................Protestant W orship

Monday, Nov. 12
11 a.m ... ......... ................................................................................................. . ....D aily M ass

Tuesday, Nov. 13
11 a.m ... ......... ................................................................................................. . ....D aily M ass

Wednesday, Nov. 14
11 a.m ... ......... ................................................................................................. . ....D aily M ass

Thursday, Nov. 15
9 a.m ................................................................................................Craft and Conversation
Tuesday, Nov. 27
6 p.m........................................ ......... .........................Dinner On Us


I


Girls .

www.girlsandboystown.org
SCFC participant provided as a public service


/

*I




Frank J. D'Anna, MP,.
411 West King Ave., Suitt
Kingsland, GA 31548
912-729-2955


I want to take this opportunity to thank all my
patients, staff, and professional community for many
years of loyal patronage and services to my medical
practice. My new location is 411 West King Ave., Suite
D, Kingsland, GA 31548. The new telephone number is
912-729-2955.
I will be serving as a Family Practice and Women's
Health physician, including weight management. I am
now scheduling appointments to facilitate the best
quality of care possible. Most insurances will be
accepted, inclusive of TriCare-Humana and Georgia
Medicaid.


0_












THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 11

KINGS BAY GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY


Photo by MCSN Kenneth Abbate
As a part of the Adopt-a-Highway Program, MA3 John Kearns (left) and MASN Jabril
Muhammad, from the Marine Corps Security Force Company, pick up trash alongside Kings
Bay and Spur 40 Nov. 5.


Photo by MCSN Kenneth Abbate
During the Combined Federal Campaign Charity Fair held Nov. 2 in front of the Navy
Exchange at NSB Kings Bay, NEX Administrative Assistant Debbie Munoz cooks up some hot
dogs for the guests to enjoy. "We are here to show the people on base what the local chari-
ties have to offer them as well as enjoy some hot dogs and soda," said CFC Loan Executive
Jeff Willadsen.


Many Sailors not attending required NAVLEAD class


By MC2(SW) Michael Wiss
Periscope staff


March and September are important
months for all Navy personnel. This
is the time of year when all the study-
ing could pay off with advancement to a higher
pay grade and enhancement in naval careers.
There is another requirement many people
don't know about which could be the differ-
ence whether or not you put on that petty
officer's crow or chief petty officer's anchor.
According to Naval Administrative Message
033/06 in-residence Leadership Training
Course completion is required for advance-
ment eligibility for E-5 and E-7 Sailors and reit-
erated E-6 eligibility requirements for advance-
ment to chief petty officer. Requirements
that went into effect in January for advance-


ment are the completion of the Work Center
Supervisor Leadership course (WCSLC) for
participation in the E-6 exam. First class petty
officers must complete the Leading Petty
Officer Leadership Course (LPOLC) to partici-
pate in the E-7 advancement exam and Chief
Petty Officers must complete the Leading Chief
Petty Officer Leadership Course (LCPOLC) to
be considered for promotion to senior chief.
According to Center for Naval Leadership
(CNL) Commanding Officer Capt. Jack Webb,
the top priority for command leadership needs
to be effectively developing the Navy's future
leaders to ensure all Sailors reach their poten-
tial. "What we're after at CNL is for all Sailors
to recognize the value added to developing
21st century leaders, and for them to take
advantage of the opportunities to better pre-
pare themselves and their subordinates for
positions of authority and responsibility," he


said. "We are looking for an understanding
of the leadership responsibility and commit-
ment to the personal and professional devel-
opment of all our Sailors."The LTCs managed
by CNL have been completely revamped from
the legacy leadership courses. The course
was shortened from two weeks to a 40 hour in
residence course held eight hours a day over
a five-day period. The WCLCS, LPOLC and
LCPOLC curriculums also include 20 hours of
e-learning on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO).
According to NSB Kings Bay Training Officer
CSC(SS) Todd Young, Sailors careers could
depend on these courses for advancement
purposes and command leadership must real-
ize how important and beneficial the training
can be to the Navy leaders of tomorrow. "The
Navy Leadership Program provides the means
for Sailors to hone and develop their skills as a
leader," he said. "The program teaches Sailors


different means to solve problems or things
they might run into, with different methods on
how to correct the problem'.
One of the major goals of this course is
communication with an enphasize on public
speaking. To be a leader you have to overcome
your fear of talking to a crowd of people.
According to Young this skill is a major ingre-
dient of the class. Sailors need to seize the
opportunity to attend the leadership training
as soon as they are eligible instead of waiting
until the last minute before an advancement
exam because the training is most effective
when it is used to prepare them for positions
of authority and responsibility before they are
actually in a position that requires that knowl-
edge.
"This course is very important for more than
just advancement purposes, it teaches a lot
about the Navy in general," Young said.


EVNlFYO 'E O I HEML ITR.





















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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


Troops to Teachers



Program is ready



to help you teach


By MCSN Kenneth Abbate
Periscope staff
There are several dif-
ferent ways a service-
member can give back
to their community once
they've left the military. One
way to give back and start a
second career is the Troops to
Teachers Program.
The Troops to Teachers
Program has been around
since 1994 and is available
for all the military branches.
With the Troops to Teachers
Program, the federal govern-
ment will provide qualified
members $5,000 dollars to pay
the cost of getting certified in
teaching.
In addition to that, there
is a one-time bonus of up to
$10,000, if they start teach-
ing at a high-need school. A
high-need school is classified
as such if it 50 percent or more
of the students that attend that
school qualify for Federal Free
Reduced Lunch Assistance. In
order to qualify for Troops to
Teachers, you must meet two
requirements: time in service
and education.
Time in service is equiva-
lent to six years active duty,
10 years drilling reservist or
have been medically separat-
ed from the service due to a
medical disability.
To meet the education
requirement, you must have
a four-year degree from an
accredited university in any
subject area or have 30 cred-
it hours of college with six
years military experience in
an area that is taught voca-


tionally at the high school
level. According to Georgia
Troops to Teachers/Spouses
to Teachers Program Manager
Bill Kirkland, if you choose
to go through the troops to
teachers program, you must
teach at least three years at a
public school.
"We do not assign service-
members to a school, it is up
to the servicemember where
they feel that they would like
to teach. They can then use
the funding for the Troops to
Teachers Program to pay the
cost of making themselves
competitive for the position
they want to obtain," said
Kirkland.
"There are some small
restrictions that limit service-
members choices on where
they can teach based on the
economics of the school sys-
tem."
There are a number of dif-
ferent certification routes
that an individual can take.
In the State of Georgia, ser-
vicemembers and spouses can
have a four-year degree and
pass the two GAGE (Georgia
Assessment for Certification of
Educators) tests.
One of the tests is a basic
skills exam with math, read-
ing and writing questions and
the other is a subject content
assessment which grades you
on the subject area that you
choose to teach. Once you
complete the two GACE tests
and have a four-year degree,
you are considered highly
qualified to be hired but not
certified yet.
"Even though this means
that you are not quite certified


yet, you can receive a five-year
renewable teaching certificate
which means you have up to
five years to complete your
additional requirements," said
Kirkland.
Spouses to Teachers is a
similar program to Troops
to Teachers except that the
money is a lot different.
The federal government
can provide military spouses
up to $600 to pay for the two
GACE tests. Unlike Troops to
Teachers, spouses have no
commitment to ever teach
although it is highly recom-
mended.
With spouses the two
requirements are that you are
married to a military mem-
ber, whether it is active duty
or reserves, and must have
either a four-year degree or
be enrolled in a program that
eventually leads to a degree.
According to Kirkland, the
purpose of the program was to
help provide quality teachers
who wanted to teach in high
need schools and who wanted
to teach in high need subject
areas.
"The quality of military
who have gotten out of the
service and gone through the
Troops to Teachers program
have far exceeded anything
we had ever hope for as far
as teaching quality," he said.
"To date, we have had over
10,500 folks who have become
teachers through this program
nationally and 650 alone in the
State of Georgia."
If it isn't enough just know-
ing the amount of military that
have gone through the pro-
gram, it is the fact that military


Photo by MCSN Kenneth Abbate
Georgia Troops/Spouse to Teachers Program Manager Bill Kirkland explains the Troops to
Teachers program to QM1(SW/AW) April Greggs during the monthly class. "The information
about the program was very beneficial because it actually made me get my thoughts together
and help me plan out how to get the stuff I need in order to qualify for the program," said
Greggs.


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Wekiva Springs offers confidentiality, privacy and comfort in a secluded, peaceful setting.
We develop specialized treatment plans for:
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Other mental wellness issues
We are a certified Tricare provider.
Wekiva Springs and Ten Broeck Hospital offer help for the entire family.
Contact us today at 1.877.339.6636 or 904.899.7980


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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007



There are hundreds of



ways you can save energy


By Staff

If you reduce the temperature setting of your water heater
from 140 degrees to 120 degrees F, you could save over 18
percent of the energy used at the higher setting. Even reduc-
ing the setting 10 degrees will save more than 6 percent in water-
heating energy.

*Air-conditioning energy use can be reduced 40 percent or
more by shading windows and walls. Position trees and shrubs
to keep the sunshine off the building and nearby ground.
*A dripping faucet can waste up to 20 gallons of water a day.
*A leaking toilet can waste up to 200 gallons of water a day.
*If every gas-heated home were properly caulked and weath-
erstripped, we'd save enough natural gas each year to heat about
4 million homes.
*The human body gives off heat, about 390 Btu's an hour for a
man, 330 for a woman. Dressing wisely can help you maintain
natural heat in the winter. Wear closelywoven fabrics. They add
at least a half degree in warmth.
*If every household in the United States lowered its average
heating temperature 6 degrees over a 24-hour period, we would
save the equivalent of more than 570,000 barrels of oil per day.
*If every household in the United States raised air-condition-
ing temperatures 6 degrees, we'd save the equivalent of 190,000
barrels of oil every day.
*Approximately 80 percent of the energy consumed by a dish-
washer is used to heat water; a typical dishwasher uses 14 gal-
lons of hot water per load.
*The amount of solar radiation that reaches the earth's surface
in approximately 3 days equals roughly the total energy content
of all known supplies of fossil fuels.
*Fluorescent lights convert electricity to visible light up to 5
times more efficiently than incandescent lights and last up to 20
times longer.
*The incandescent light is the most common lighting source
in U.S. homes. It also wastes the most energy. Ninety percent
of the energy consumed by an incandescent light is given off as
heat rather than visible light.
*Between 1978 and 1991, there was a 4-5 percent loss of ozone
in the stratosphere over the United States, which represents a
significant loss of ozone.
A thinned-out ozone layer could lead to more skin cancers
and cataracts; scientists are also investigating possible harm to
agriculture. Destruction of stratospheric ozone is attributed to
CFCs and related chemicals. CFCs are widely used as refriger-
ants in such appliances as refrigerators, freezers, air condition-
ers, and heat pumps.
*A transit bus with as few as seven passengers uses less fuel
per passenger mile than a typical car with only a driver in it.
*A transit bus with full rush hour load of 44 passengers uses
much less fuel than 11 cars with 4 passengers each.
*A fully loaded rail car is 15 times more energy efficient than
the average automobile.
*Increasing mass transit ridership by 10 percent in the five
largest metropolitan areas would save 135 million gallons of
gasoline a year, while also reducing emissions of air pollutants.
*Boosting the occupancy of automobiles in rush hour from
one to two persons would save 40 million gallons of gasoline
a day (or over 15 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption), while
reducing the number of vehicles on the road.
*One gallon of used motor oil when recycled yields the same
amount of refined lubricating oil--2.5 quarts-- as 42 gallons of
crude oil. Recycle your used motor oil!!!
*The United States uses 400 billion gallons of water per day.
*If every American home installed low-flow faucet aerators,
250 million gallons of water would be saved every day.
*New energy-efficient motors are about 5 points higher in
efficiency and operate about 10 degrees C cooler than repaired
standard design motors.
In a study of over 100 motors, they also operated just under
their full load rated current, compared to repaired standard
motors which exceeded full load rated amps by about four per-
cent.
*Trains are among the most energy-efficient mode of trans-
port. In the United States, trucks use more than eight times as
much energy to transport freight between cities as trains.
*Trains are among the most energy-efficient mode of trans-
portation. Based on a measure of the amount of energy required
to move one passenger one kilometer in the United States, an
intercity train uses 948 kilojoules. A commercial airplane, on
the other hand, uses three times this amount of energy, and an
automobile with a single occupant uses six times this amount
of energy.
*Electronic ballast manufacturers suggest that new energy-
efficient electronic ballast and T-8 lamp systems offer energy
savings of up to 41 percent over conventional electromagnetic
ballast and lamp systems, with no loss of light or performance.
*Replacing an incandescent bulb with a compact fluorescent
will save the energy equivalent of 46 gallons of oil as well as
one-half ton of carbon dioxide emissions over the lifetime of the


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bulb.
*A new model refrigerator uses about a third the energy to
operate as a similarly sized refrigerator from the early 1970s. If
you replace a 1973 18-cubic foot refrigerator with an energy-
efficient 1996 model of the same size, each year you would save
over 1,000 kWh of electricity and reduce emissions of carbon
dioxide, a greenhouse gas, by over a ton and emissions of sulfur
dioxide, the leading cause of acid rain, by over 20 pounds.
*Horizontal-axis clothes washers use a third less water than
conventional vertical-axis clothes washers. This not only saves
you water, but also the energy to heat some of that water when
you use hot water.
*For every kilowatt-hour of electricity you save, you also avoid
pumping over two pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmo-
sphere. This helps the environment because carbon dioxide is
the number one contributor to global warming.
*For every mile-per-hour over 55 mph, the average car or truck
loses almost two percent in gas mileage.
*If the energy used to power office equipment were cut in half
using available technologies, the resultant reduction in carbon
dioxide emissions would be equivalent to removing 6,750,000
automobiles from U.S. streets.
*The average U.S. home uses the energy equivalent of 1,253
gallons of oil every year.
*Americans receive enough junk mail in one day that could
heat 250,000 homes.
*If 100,000 people stopped their junk mail, we could save
about 150,000 trees everyyear. If a million people stopped their
junk mail, we could save about 1.5 million trees.
*It is estimated that 50 percent to 80 percent of the tires roll-
ing on U.S. roads are underinflated. Driving with tires that are
underinflated increases "rolling resistance," wasting up to 5%
percent of a car's fuel. We could save up to 2 billion gallons of
gasoline annually simply by properly inflating our tires.
*If all the cars in the United States were equipped with
the most efficient tires possible, the fuel savings would equal
400,000 barrels of oil per day.
*If 10,000 families with four members each installed inexpen-
sive low-flow aerators on their kitchen and bathroom sink fau-
cets, they'd reduce water consumption by more than 33 million
gallons a year.
*The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy esti-
mates that if each of us increased the energy efficiency of our
major appliances by 10 to 30 percent, we'd reduce the demand
for electricity by the equivalent of 25 large power plants.
*In 1994, for the first time in its history, the United States
imported more than 50 percent of its petroleum, a level of
dependence that aggravates the trade deficit and leaves the
American economy vulnerable to oil price shocks.
*Residents of Los Angeles drive 142 million miles every day--
roughly the same distance between Earth and Mars.
*According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, leaky
automobile air conditioners are the single largest source of CFC
emissions to the atmosphere in the United States.
*Cars emit 20 pounds of carbon dioxide for every gallon of gas
consumed.
*According to one expert, if America refined the billion gal-
lons of motor oil they use every year, we would save 1.3 million
barrels of oil every day, which represents half the daily output of
the Alaska Pipeline.
*According to the American Paper Institute, the average
American consumes about 120 pounds of newsprint each year
-- the equivalent of one tree.
*If everyone in the United States recycled one-tenth of their
newspapers, we would save about 25 million trees every year.
*More than 500,000 trees are used to supply Americans with
their Sunday newspapers every week.
*Manufacturing glass from recycled cullet uses up to 32 per-
cent less energy than producing glass from raw materials.
*The energy saved from recycling one glass bottle will light a
100-watt bulb for four hours.
*Producing glass from recycled glass cullet rather than from
raw materials reduces related air pollution by 20 percent and
water pollution by 50 percent.
*Disposable (throwaway) bottles consume three times as
much energy as reusable, returnable bottles.
*Each ton of glass produced from raw materials generates
about 385 pounds of mining waste; using 50 percent recycled
glass reduces this waste by almost 80 percent.
*Recycling and reusing the material in tin cans reduces related
energy use by 74 percent; air pollution by 85 percent; solid waste
by 95 percent; and water pollution by 76 percent.
*According to the Aluminum Association, Americans recycled
62.7 billion aluminum cans in 1995.
*Producing aluminum from recycled aluminum consumes 90
percent less energy than producing it from raw materials and
generates 95 percent less air pollution.
*Waterbeds can be the largest consumer of electricity in the
home, exceeding even the refrigerator and water heater. If you
heat your water bed, practice simple energy conservation mea-


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Installing fluorescent light bulbs in your home is just one way
to save energy and money.


sures to reduce its energy consumption.
*Globally, each year we pump 20 billion tons of carbon diox-
ide into the atmosphere--which comes to four tons for every
man, woman, and child. Of this amount, the United States is
responsible for one quarter, or five billion tons per year.
*It is estimated that as a result of the appliance efficiency stan-
dards that went into effect at the beginning of 1990, Americans
saved more than 30 billion kWh of electricity in 1995.
*Between 1973 and 1986 the U.S. economy grew by 36 percent
with no increase in energy use. If Americans had not become
more energy efficient, annual energy bills would have been $150
billion higher.
*Boosting the fuel efficiency of cars in the United States by a
mere 1.5 miles-per-gallon would save more oil than is estimated
to lie under the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
*Adding low-emissivity (low-E) coatings to all windows in the
United States would save the equivalent of 500,000 barrels of oil
per day--one-third the amount of oilwe import from the Persian
Gulf.
*Approximately 90 percent of the energy consumed by a
clothes washer is for heating water.
*Every year in the United States we throw away 1.741 billion
incandescent bulbs enough to fill two large stadiums.
*A typical soda machine uses 120 watts of non-essential light-
ing, costing more than $60 per machine each year. If only one
tenth of the 400,000 DOD buildings took out a soda machine
lamp, over $2.4 million could be saved annually!
*A failed open steam trap with a 3/8-inch orifice at 100 psig
pressure loses 4,680,000 pounds of steam annually.


ACTIVE MIL]


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 17


New program available


to degree seeking chiefs


By MCSN Dmitry Chepusov
Periscope staff


The Chief of Naval Operations released
instruction NAVADMIN 263/04 Sept.
7 describing the Advanced Education
Voucher (AEV) which gives E-7 through E-9
the opportunity to complete their baccalau-
reate and masters degrees more efficiently.
According to the instruction, AEV will provide
financial assistance to senior enlisted person-
nel to complete post-secondary, Navy-relevant
degrees, covering 100 percent of tuition, books
and related fees.
Unlike the Tuition Assistance Program,
which limits servicemembers to $3000 or 16
semester hours per year, AEV gives as much
as $20,100 for a bachelors degree program
completed within three years, and as much as
$40,000 for a masters degree program com-
pleted within two years. TA covers only tuition,
where AEV is designed to cover all other costs
as well, allowing chiefs, senior chiefs and mas-
ter chiefs the opportunity to finish higher edu-
cation without putting any strain on their bud-
get.
"Each individual eligible for AEV will need
to decide if it is better for them than tuition
assistance," said NSB Kings Bay Navy College
Director Susan Wheless. "The degrees that
can be pursued in the AEV program are related
to Navy specific jobs, but TA has no degree
requirement, allowing Sailors to take any class-
es they want."
According to Wheless, the Navy College staff
can assist Sailors with analyzing and defining
educational goals and capabilities by reviewing
previous college work and can assist with plan-
ning future education and training.


"If an E-7 through E-9 decides to take advan-
tage of AEV, the program can be either a class-
room format or a distance learning format,"
continued Wheless. "Sailors can get the degree
they want through any college that is an institu-
tion of higher learning accredited by an accred-
iting agency recognized by the Department of
Education. Many of AEV compatible degrees
are available through the Navy College Distance
Learning Partnership Program. Any Sailor
interested in continuing his or her education
should come in and talk with a Navy College
advisor to explore the best options:'
The degrees covered by the Advanced
Education Voucher include Construction
Management, Emergency Disaster
Management, Human Resources, Paralegal,
Engineering, Information Technology, Nursing,
Electrical, Homeland Defense and Security,
Education and Training Management, and
Leadership and Management.
According to program instructions, partici-
pants who completed orwithdrew from the pro-
gram agree to remain on active duty for a peri-
od equal to three times the number of months
of education completed or three years, which-
ever is less. E-7 through E-9 personnel who are
interested in AEV must submit an application
to Naval Education and Training Command
no later than Feb. 22, 2008 for consideration by
the selection board. Applications must include
endorsements by both Commanding Officer
and Command Master Chief following a spe-
cific format outlined in the instructions.
For more information about the Advanced
Education Voucher program go to the navy
College website at https://www.navycollege.
naw.mil or call the Kings Bay campus at 573-
4574.


TELL US YOUR


STORY!


The USO is looking for your stories,

photos and videos!



If you have a USO story you'd like to share

with us, send us an e-mail at:

usostory@uso.org.


We'd also like to put a face with a name, so send

along photos or videos to accompany your

stories. Photos should be high-resolution jpeg

images, because we want you to look good.


For more details and release agreement, visit

www.uso.org/story


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tend aeUSO peIfo ance
deployed oveseas?


Able to callhome with
a USO phone card?


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Relax in a


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18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007



IA families making a virtual connection


By Zona Lewis
CNIC Public Affairs Specialist


T he Navy is now connecting with families of indi-
vidual augmentee (IA) Sailors in cyberspace.
Navy Fleet and Family Support Programs (FFSP) is offer-
ing IA Family Connections Virtual Meetings several times a
month for spouses and families of IAs to connect and share
issues.
"IA families say the one thing they miss most about their
Sailor deploying as an IA is the sense of community and con-
nection that families have when a Navy command deploys as
a unit," said Pat Johnson, a deployment support specialist with
Commander, Navy Installations Command's (CNIC), FFSP.
"Virtual groups allow IA families, including reservists and
extended families who do not live near a military installation,
the opportunity to learn about resources available should a need
arise," said Johnson.
The definition of Navy deployments has changed since
the global war on terrorism began. Deployment no lon-
ger means "haze grey and underway" where Sailors go to
sea for six months with their unit or command. Sailors are
now serving individual augmentations in places like Iraq,
Afghanistan and the Horn of Africa for up to one year.
Reserve families, who are used to "one weekend a
month and two weeks are year" are experiencing, for
the first time, extended deployments, and the stress-
es and challenges that come with long deployments.
These changes in the definition of deployment significantly
impact Navy spouses and families. Previously, spouses and
families had a built-in network of support during deployments -
other spouses and families from the parent command who lived
in the same community and a FFSC within driving distance.
During IA deployments spouses and families may not have
that network immediately available. Active-duty IAs may not
be deploying with their command, but on their own, leav-
ing families without the traditional support group. Reserve
Sailors are deploying from America's heartland, leav-
ing behind families who are hundreds of miles away from
a military base where typical support services are offered.
Tricia, the wife of a Sailor serving a year-long IA deploy-


ment in the support of the global war on terrorism, said, "The
unknown and the worry no one can really tell you what that is
going to be like boots on the ground in a foreign country during
war."
Tricia said the reality of the significance of this deployment
hit home when she was told her husband was to wear the Army
combat uniform.
"My husband said they [Sailors] wear the uniform [digitalizes
camouflage] to avoid becoming targets," said Tricia. "Before, my
only worry was about his safety on the flight deck of a carrier."
Navy FFSP realized that they had to expand the definition and
delivery of deployment support programs for the Navy family.
"IA families have unique challenges," said Johnson. "Virtual
meetings are a unique way for IA families to network, share
information and provide mutual support with others who aren't
in the same 'boat,' but who are having similar experiences."
Virtual meetings allow Navy spouses and families scattered
across the globe to participate in discussions where they can talk
and share files all in real time. No special software is needed. All
the participants need is a telephone and a broadband internet
connection (internet access that doesn't require dial-up so the
user is free to use their telephone to participate in the meeting).
"Virtual groups allow IA family members from all over
the world an opportunity to 'meet' just as they would if they
were a part of a traditional Navy command that deploys,"
said Johnson. "Virtual groups provide a sense of commu-
nity and a venue to share and receive information."
Carrie, whose husband began his IA deployment just over a
month ago, has missed the sense of community from the Navy
on this deployment.
In the past she has attended all the pre-deployment briefings
and workshops her husband's command offered; but for this
IA deployment those support mechanisms weren't in place.
She has found that sense of community in the virtual meet-
ing groups, "I've attended all of the virtual meetings. They have
helped me understand the challenges my husband will face
upon returning home such as what it will be like for him, going
from carrying an M16 everywhere he goes to suddenly not."
Carrie said she especially enjoyed the session, "After four regu-
lar Navy deployments, this will be our first R&R. The ses-
sion provided tips on making the most of that time together."
Participating is easy. Attendees log on to the Navy FFSP Web


site and register in advance for the virtual meeting topic they
would like to attend. FFSP will send the attendee a confirmation
e-mail.
At the time of the virtual meeting, attendees log on to the des-
ignated meeting Web site and call the toll-free phone number
provided.
"Participants dial into a conference call, and at the same time
log on to a Web site for those who like visuals," said Johnson.
"Anyone without a computer can still participate via tele-
phone as the bulk of the meeting is IA family members talking
with each other."
Past virtual meeting topics have dealt with loneliness as well
as listening to feedback from reserve Sailors who have returned
from deployment to Iraq.
"I was struck by the number of people finding ways to
take care of themselves [while their Sailor is on deployment]
and how many realized how important that is," said Tricia.
She said this realization was a change from what she had expe-
rienced during previous deployments and she was impressed
by the creativity of the ideas the virtual group was sharing.
Both spouses said they encourage other family members of
IAs to attend the virtual meetings, especially young spouses.
Carrie said she knows the comments participants make dur-
ing the meetings are confidential and ideas they generate
will be carried back to people who will really listen to them.
"I believe the Navy has recognized that there has not been
a smooth transition for families going from a standard Navy
deployment to an IA deployment," said Carrie. "IA deploy-
ments are different; and, through new outreach programs like
the virtual meetings, they are working to improve the sup-
port they are providing IA families. I will be patient through
the growing pains. I think they [the Navy] will get it right."
The next IA Family Connection Virtual Meeting will be
hosted Oct. 19 at 9 p.m. eastern standard time. Attendees will
share tips on how to make the best use of phone calls from
Sailors after the "I love yous" and "I miss yous" have been said.
Ground rules are set at the beginning of the session.
Information shared by virtual meeting attendees is considered
private and will not be shared.
For the complete schedule of IA Family Connection Virtual
Meetings visit the Fleet and Family Support Program Web site,
http://www.ffsp.navy.mil


Kings Bay NMCRS is here to help during hurricane season


By Marie Hobson
NMCRS Chairman of Public
Relations


The NMCRS is an excel-
lent resource for active
duty personnel, retirees
and their families throughout
the year by providing confi-
dential financial assistance
and guidance to those in need.
But, did you know that the
NMCRS is here to help you
during a hurricane? Here are
some frequently asked ques-
tions about the NMCRS and
what assistance they can pro-
vide during a hurricane.
Q: What would I need assis-
tance for?
A: Evacuation expenses
which include food, shelter,
and transportation. You will
need enough gas to reach a


safe location outside of the
hurricanes path, keeping in
mind that it will take more gas
and time to reach your loca-
tion due to the large number of
evacuees causing long delays
while in route. You will need
a safe place to stay along with
food and a disaster plan/kit.
Q: When should I apply for
assistance?
A: This is a very impor-
tant question! The NMCRS
will provide assistance when
a VOLUNTARY evacuation
has been ordered. Once
the evacuation has become
MANDATORY, the NMCRS
will close its doors and will
evacuate the area. If you need
assistance leaving the area,
you must come in while the
evacuation is VOLUNTARY.
Q: Who is eligible for
NMCRS assistance?


A: All active duty or retired
Navy and Marine Corps ser-
vice members and their eligi-
ble family members. (Certain
exceptions can be made, con-
tactyour local office with ques-
tions concerning eligibility.)
Q: Where do I go to receive
assistance?
A: Contact your local
NMCRS by using the informa-
tion below.
Q: What do I need to bring
in for assistance during a vol-
untary evacuation?
A: This is considered an
emergency and requires your
basic information and a mili-
tary ID.
Q: How much money will
the NMCRS be able to pro-
vide me?
A: The amount will be deter-
mined by need:
Initial short term assis-


tance will be based on the size
of the family and the circum-
stances of the need.
Clients may return for
additional assistance once
long term needs are identi-
fied.
Q: Is this assistance a loan
or a grant?
A: Initially, the assistance is
a loan. Once the emergency
is over, a budget is completed
to establish what government
and insurance reimburse-
ments are available.
A determination is then
made if the assistance will
remain a loan or be converted
to a grant.
Q: What should I do so that
I am prepared for an evacu-
ation?
A: First, set aside money into
savings. You can come into
the NMCRS before a disaster


occurs to do a budget. This
budget is confidential and
will give you the knowledge
to see where your money is
going and how much you can
afford to save. Call your local
NMCRS to make an appoint-
ment and start saving today.
The NMCRS can help educate
you on ways to make your
evacuation go smoothly. You
will also need a disaster plan
and kit. Your plan should
include where you will evacu-
ate to, maps, transportation,
contact information, plans for
pets, insurance whether you
are a home owner, renter, or
live in government quarters,
and you will need to have all
of your important documents
such as your driver's license,
ID card, Social Security card,
birth/marriage certificates,
bank/credit information,


emergency phone numbers,
etc.
-Your disaster Kit should also
include, first aid supplies, por-
table battery powered radio,
flashlights, batteries, candles,
matches, ready to eat meals,
bottled water, fruits, vegeta-
bles, etc.
-If you do not have a credit
card, check card, or debit card,
utilizing a prepaid card from
your local bank can make trav-
eling easier so that you are
not carrying large amounts of
cash.
Remember that most plac-
es do not except out of state
checks and that an ATM is not
always available. Make a pre-
paid card part of your disaster
plan/kit.
If you have any further ques-
tions, contact the NMCRS at
573-3928. or www.nmcrs.org.


A special online community
for families of babies in
neonatal intensive care


Find help and hope at
shareyourstory.org
_____J 3


2008 FEP BlueVision Rates Bi-Weekly Premiums (26 Pay Periods)

Standard Option High Option
Self Only $3.97 $5.01

Self + One $7.95 $10.02


Self + Family


$11.93


$15.03


*These rates are for federal employees only and reflect the employee portion of the total cost of their health care coverage.
These rates do not apply to all enrollees. If you are in a special enrollment category, please refer to your FEHB Guide or contact
the agency which maintains your health benefits enrollment.


If there's one thing a health care plan should inspire, it's
security. And that's exactly what federal employees get
when they join Blue Cross Blue Shield, the most trusted
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Find out more at fepblue.org or call 1-800-411-BLUE.


___ l) BlueCross.
BlueShield.
Federal Employee Program














THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 19


PIRATES COVE MENU


Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Cottage Fried Potatoes
French Toast
Lunch
Regular Line
Texas Tortilla Soup
Beef Fajitas
Chicken Fajitas
Spanish Rice
Mexican Corn
Refried Beans
Broccoli Combo
Hot Cornbread
Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage
Sandwich w/ Peppers &
Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Beef Barley Soup
Roast Pork Loin
Herbed Baked Fish
Noodles Jefferson
Paprika Buttered Potatoes
Simmered Mixed Vegetables
Steamed Green Beans
Chilled Applesauce
Dinner Rolls

Friday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Pancakes W/ Strawberry
Topping
Oven Fried Bacon
Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit
Oatmeal
Grits
Hash Browns Potatoes
Lunch
Regular Line
Beef Vegetable Soup
Southern Fried Chicken
Parmesan Fish
Mashed Potatoes
Steamed Rice
Carrots Julienne
Southern Style Greens
Corn Bread
Speed Line
Cheeseburgers
Hamburgers























Girls and Boys Town...

Provides treatment and care
to more than 47,000 severely
at-risk, abused, abandoned and
neglected girls and boys across
the country each year.

Provides assistance to nearly
one million children each year
by training parents, teachers
and child-care professionals
how to meet the needs of
children in the 21st century.
Has 19 sites located in
15 states and the District
of Columbia.

Assists nearly 450,000 callers
annually through the Girls and
Boys Town National Hotline
(800-448-3000).

Cares for children regardless
of race, color, creed, gender,
national origin, or ability to
pay. On average, girls make
up nearly 50 percent of the
youth cared for each year.
For more information,
call 1-800-217-3700,
write to P.O. Box 8000,


Boys Town, NE 68010 or visit
www.girlsandboystown.org




Girls

'Ibwn"

A CFC participant -
provided as a public service


BBQ Chicken
Baked Beans
Potato Chips
Dinner
French Onion Soup
Seasoned Green Peas
Creole Spaghetti
Rice Pilaf
Fishwich w/ Cheese
Succotash
Dinner Rolls

Saturday
Brunch
Chicken Noodle Soup
Cold Cut Sandwich Bar
Chicken Nuggets
Potato Chips
Seasoned Broccoli
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Cream of Potato Soup
Swedish Meatballs
Roast Turkey
Cornbread Dressing
Mashed Potatoes
Cauliflower Combo
Lima Beans
Dinner Rolls
Sunday
Brunch
Knickerbockers Soup
BBQ Pork Sandwich
Chili Con Carne
Onion Rings
Mixed Vegetable
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Beef Noodle Soup
Savory Baked Chicken
Country Style Steak
Mashed Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Broccoli Parmesan
Corn
Hot French Bread

Monday
Breakfast
Oven Fried Bacon
Breakfast Burritos
Oatmeal
Grits
Grilled Eggs to Order
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Hash Browns Potatoes
Hard Boiled Eggs
French Toast


Lunch
Regular Line
Chicken Gumbo
Baked Chicken
Jambalaya
Rissole Potatoes
Red Beans & Rice
Calico Corn
Collard Greens
Corn Muffins
Speed Line
Chicken Wings
Pizza
French Fries
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Hungarian Goulash
Honey Glazed Cornish
Hens
Long Grain Wild Rice
Au GratinPotatoes
Club Spinach
Italian Style Baked Beans
Texas Toast

Tuesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Waffles
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Coked Eggs
Home Fries
Lunch
Regular Line
Tomato Soup
New England Boiled Dinner
Chicken W/ Mushrooms
Simmered Potatoes
Egg Noodles
Simmered Carrots
Simmered Cabbage
Dinner Rolls
Speed Line
Grilled Ham & Cheese
Sandwich
Tacos
Rice
Refried Beans
Potato Chips
Potato Bar
Dinner
Chicken Rice Soup
BBQ Pork
Turkey Pot Pie
Snowflake Potatoes
Steamed Rice
Simmered Peas
Chilled Cranberry Sauce
Dinner Rolls


gateway for cancer research
formerly Cancer Treatment Research Foundation

888.221.2873 www.GatewayForCancerResearch.org
A CFC Participant Provided as a public service.


Wednesday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Corned Beef Hash
Pancakes
Lunch
Regular Line
Doubly Good Chicken Soup
Meatloaf
Stuffed Baked Fish
Mac & Cheese
Rice Pilaf
Mixed Vegetables
Simmered Lima Beans
Chilled Apple Sauce
Dinner Rolls
Speed Line
Corn Dogs
Cheeseburgers
Hamburgers
French Fries
Baked Beans
Dinner
Asian Stir Fry Soup
Oriental Marinated Fish
Teriyaki Chicken and Pancit
Filipino Fried Rice
Stir Fried Vegetables
Steamed Asparagus
Fried Lumpia Twist

Thursday
Breakfast
Grilled Eggs To Order
Oven Fried Bacon
Oatmeal
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Grilled Turkey Sausage
Home Fries


I

French Toast Puffs
Lunch
Regular Line
Chicken Parmesan
Meat Lasagna
Steamed Rice
Paprika Potatoes
Fried Okra
Italian Kidney Beans
Hot Dinner Rolls
Speed Line
Chicken Fillet Sandwich
Hot Italian Sausage
Sandwich w/ Peppers &
Onions
Potato Chips
Cold Cut Bar
Baked Beans
Dinner
Cream of Mushroom Soup
Jagerschnitzel
Tomato Vegetable Gravy
Braised Pork Chops


Mashed Potatoes
Tossed Green Rice
Steamed Peas
Simmered Carrots
Hot Biscuits

All meals served for lunch
and dinner also feature the
Healthy Choice Salad Bar and
various dessert items.
Menu items are subject to
change.

Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15a.m.
to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No Breakfast Served!
Brunch 10:45 a.m.
to 12:15p.m.


* BIG savings on new homes ready now for quick move-in
* FREE Drees dollars to use for a variety of designer | ree s
selections to personalize your new home or reduce
your interest rate and monthly payment HOM ES.c m
* FREE closing costs Famiy owned. Nationally recognized.'
Hurry, this promotion is for a limited time. Stop by one of our 10 conveniently located communities
throughout Northeast Florida and see our Parade of Homes award-winning designs.
Offers apply to new firm non-contingent Purchase Agreements written and accepted when financed through First Equity Mortgage. Equal Housing Lender.
Offers not valid with other promotions or discounts and may be withdrawn at any time. See a Drees Market Manager for details. CBCsOr7118


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1I* ---0 p













20 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


(C (O) M M UN [ TY (C A L E N D) 1E]R


Comcast Price Adjustment
Comcast Cable will adjust
the prices of pay-per-view
movies on Dec. 3. The price
for "New Releases" avail-
able as pay-per-view movies
on Video On Demand (VOD)
and /or digital channels will
increase by $1. These changes
affect current and new digi-
tal subscribers serviced by
Comcast's broadband service
in Jacksonville and surround-
ing areas. Comcast Cable is
providing customers with
30 days notice of these price
adjustments with their billing
statement. For more informa-
tion, call Ann Carter Murphy
at (904) 374-7505.

Wounded Warriors Day
The City of St. Marys and
the American Legion Post 312
invite you to attend the First
Annual Wounded Warriors
Day Nov. 10. The event will
begin at 10 a.m. at the Howard
Gilman Waterfront Park in St.
Marys, and from there, will
proceed with a short walk to
Oak Grove Cemetery.
Wounded Warriors Day is
a day set aside to recognize
the warriors of the United
Sates Armed Forces who have
returned from battle with
wounds, both physically and
psychologically. For more
information, call 510-4033.

Toys For Tots
Toys For Tots will sponsor
a motorcycle ride to honor
Congressional Medal of Honor
Recipient Everitt P. Pope in St.
Marys Nov. 25. Pope has given
Toys For Tots permission to
strike a coin in his honor and
all riders will receive a coin
and a patch.
All funds will go to the
Amelia Island and St. Marys
Toys For Tots. The cost per
rider will be $30 and co-rider
$20. Send early registration
with check or money orders
to: St. Marys Toys For Tots,
P.O. Box 1896, Kingsland, Ga.
31548. For more information,
call Bill at 882-1216.

Woodbine Woman's Club
A conservation and arts
project is currently underway
in Woodbine to establish the
town as a bird sanctuary.
The Woodbine Woman's
Club is partnering with the
City of Woodbine, Gateway
Camden Industries, Camden
County High School Skills
USA, and the Lion's Club to
build and place bluebird nest-


ing boxes establishing trails
throughout neighborhoods
around the city and from Liza
Rudolph Road north along
the old rail bed onto the River
Walk.
The path from the city one
mile south to Liza Rudolph
Road is significant histori-
cally as Woodbine's African-
American school children
walked the rail track to the
school house at Gethsemane
Church Association grounds.
Currently in great need of sta-
bilization and rehabilitation,
this school is still standing
and could be saved by citizens
organizing to recover this his-
toric building.
For more information, call
576-6991.

Kingsland Lions Club
The Kingsland Lions Club
meets on the second and
fourth Tuesday of the month
at 7 p.m. at 112 West Williams
Street across from the
Municipal Building in down-
town Kingsland.
The Lions Club is a group of
men and women who iden-
tify needs within the com-
munity and work together to
fulfill those needs. For more
information or to get involved
with the Kingsland Lions
Club, please contact Club
Vice President Jim McCain at
673-1300 or email him at hip-
postorage@tds.net.

Naval Submarine League
The Naval Submarine
League is an organization that
allows submarine advocates in
all walks of life to demonstrate
their strong and continuous
support of the goals and issues
confronting the United States
Submarine Force.
The aim of the league is to
represent the greater subma-
rine community of builders,
designers, support people,
operators, and that portion
of the public who give their
support and encouragement.
The local Chapter of the Naval
Submarine League, theAtlantic
Southeast Chapter, supports
the Dolphin Scholarship
Fund, the Camden County
High School NJROTC pro-
gram, and the annual SubVets
of WWII Memorial event every
November. The chapter nor-
mally meets quarterly, at the
Clubs of Kings Bay, Naval
Submarine Base, Kings Bay.

Georgia Initiative for
Community Housing
The Georgia Initiative for


Community Housing Team,
(GICH) consists of city and the
county representatives and
individuals from the commu-
nity who are interested in pro-
viding affordable housing in
our community.
The team is currently work-
ing on a homeownership
training classes and potential
projects for providing a range
of housing options for our
community.
"Right now there is a big gap
in housing from subsidized
housing to what is currently
available on the market and
most people don't qualify for
the high prices of housing in
our community right now. We
hope that by offering classes
and working with local build-
ers and developers that we will
be able to provide housing in
the $100,000 $160,000 range
that will allow more individu-
als in our community the
opportunity of homeowner-
ship," said Pat Clink, local real-
tor and member of the GICH
Team.
Anyone interested in learn-
ing more about the GICH
Team can attend their month-
ly meeting the last Tuesday of
each month at noon at Borrell
Creek, or contact Darren
Harper, Chairperson at 729-
5613.

Coast Guard Auxiliary
The Coast Guard Auxiliary
is now conducting a 13-ses-
sion Boating Skills and
Seamanship Course at the
University of Georgia Marine
Extension building, 715 Bay
St. in Brunswick. Classes take
place Tuesday and Thursday
evenings from 7 to 9 p.m.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary's
Boating Skills and Seamanship
program is a comprehensive
course designed for people
14 years and older and pro-
vides up-to-date knowledge
for handling boats in all con-
ditions. The course covers
the basics of piloting, aids to
navigation, rules of the road,
boat handling, weather, navi-
gation electronics, radio use,
and other topics related to safe
and enjoyable boating outings.
Many insurance companies
provide discounts to gradu-
ates of the course.
Individuals are required to
pre-register. Space is limited.
The enrollment fee for the
class is $65. Textbook materi-
als will be provided.For more
information, or to register for
this course, contact Bill Hastie
at 912-437-3408.


PICNIC IN THE PRRK!

H SRTURDIRY.

NOVEMBER 17
S11 A.M. 2 P.M. AT UNDER THE PINES PARK
FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
FAMILY BBQ ONLY $1 PER PLATE MUSIC
FREE FAMILY PHOTO TAKEN TABLES & CHAIRS PROVIDED!


THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!


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BBQ sponsored by Sonny's

/ Professional Face Painters,

l- R Rock Wall Bouncing Castles

F ,ML Hay Rides/Train Games

ETRIMEENE NMENT. Trivia Contests Cotton Candy
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SKidz! Check out our Fit Factor Bo

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The Navy nor any other part of the federal government
officially endorses any company, sponsor, or their
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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 21



MlW INES


Military Family
Appreciation Day
The 5th Annual Military
FamilyAppreciation Dayis fast
approaching. Markyour calen-
dar for Nov. 17 from 11 a.m. 2
p.m. outside the tennis courts
area at Under the Pines Park.
We will have BBQ plates for
$1 provided by Sonny's BBQ,
professional facepainters, the
Rock Wall, Bouncing Castles,
a hay ride, train, trivia con-
tests, cotton candy, popcorn,
and a very special appearance
by Team Rootberry at noon.
There is something for every-
one this year. For more infor-
mation about this event, call
573-8976/4564

Parents Night Out
Just imagine an evening with
no kids. Here's your chance for
that to happen. MWR's CYP is
holding a Parent's Night Out
Nov. 9 from 6 to 11 p.m. at the
Youth Center and CDC. The
cost is only $10 for the first
child and $5 for each addition-
al child. Register early to claim
your spot at 573-2380 or 573-
3888. Cost covers pizza, chips,
drinks activities and games.

Sandwich Specials
Take a bite out of high
prices with a great sandwich
special at Rocky Colletti and
KB Finnegan's. During the
month of November, pick up
a French Dip with chips and a
fountain drink for only $6.50.
December's special will be a
chicken Parmesan sub with
chippers and a fountain drink.
These specials are good dur-
ing normal business hours.
Call ahead for an easy lunch
pick-up at 573-4029.


KB Finnegan's
K.B Finnegan's has some
great specials during the
month of November. On
Tuesdays, its All-U-Can Eat
Wing Night from 4 6 p.m. for
only $7. Plus Scott Thibodeau
from DATM will put in a spe-
cial appearance in the month
of November with dates to be
announced, and play music
for the crowd. On Wednesday
are $1 domestic drafts, $2.50
imported drafts and $2 nachos
and cheese from 5 8 p.m. then
happy hours on Thursday from
4 -6 p.m. including discounts
on all beverages, 10 percent
pub food items and hot dogs
for only 50 cents. Finishing
off the week with Margarita
Dollar Night on Fridays from
4 6 p.m. and a Finnegan's
Fish & Chips basket for only
$5.50. If that isn't enough then
Saturdays have some fun with
mixed drinks for $1 off from 4
- 7 p.m.

Youth Basketball
Registration
Registration for Basketball
for youth ages 5-10 years will


be held thru Dec. 3 at the youth
center from 8:00 a.m. 5:30
p.m., Monday thru Friday. All


new players must bring birth
certificate and proof of eli-
gibility to register. Practices
begin in December and games
are played in Jan & Feb. Child
must turn 5 years of age by
Jan. 1, 2008. Fees are $45 per
child for active duty, reserv-
ist & retired military and $50
for DoD Civilian & Kings Bay
Contractors. For more infor-
mation, call 573-8202.

Kings Bay on the Go
New Walking Group will
be held on Monday and
Wednesday mornings starting
at 8:30 a.m. and will meet in
the lobby of the fitness com-
plex. No fee will be charged.
Use of pedometer is highly
encouraged. Don't have one?
Pedometers are sold at the
Fitness Complex for only $5.
Register at the customer ser-
vice counter or for informa-
tion call 573-3990. Children
must be in strollers to partici-
pate. Walks will be approx. 60
minutes and trails will vary
ever week.

Informal Volleyball
Love Volleyball? Bring a
group or your family and play
some pick up games at the fit-
ness complex every Friday at 6
p.m. Call the fitness complex
at 573-3990 for more info.

Free Kids Movie Shows
The "Movie Zone" is show-
ing kid movies every Saturday
at noon and Sunday at 1 p.m.
in October. The shows are as
follows: Oct. 27 & 28, "Zathura'
All youth, less than 18 years of
age must be accompanied by
a parent or adult. Snack foods
and beverages are available
for purchase. Call for the latest
information at 912-573-4548.


Rocky Colletti Special
It's the month of ghoulish
plans during the week. Why
not make it easy on yourself
and your family by ordering
some Rocky Colletti's Pizza in
the month of October. Buy one
14" three topping pizza, for
only $9 (saving more than $5).
Offer is good thru Oct. 31. Call
Rocky Colletti's Pizza at 573-
4029 for a quick pick-up on
your way home this evening or
stay and enjoy some bowling
with friends and family.

MWR Fantasy Football is
Back
Navy MWR is sponsoring a
fantasy football league where
the winner could win up to
$30,000 and the top Navy
score will win a trip for two
to Hawaii. Each region's best
score winner will receive a
Brian Urlacher autographed


football and a championship
ring. Register now at www.
navyff.com. For complete
details go to http://mwrgl.
cnic.navy.mil or call 847-688-
2110x484

Are You Ready for Some
Football?
It's a new Jaguar season and


another great year. Single tick-
ets are on sale now and are
limited to four per purchaser,
per game. There are a limited
number of tickets available
and they may be purchased
for $45 per ticket. There will
be no phone sales for Jaguar
tickets during this time. Please
call ITT for more information
at 573-2289.

Georgia Aquarium Tickets
Available
ITT is now selling tickets


to the Georgia Aquarium in
Atlanta. Adult tickets are only
$19.60, while children 3 12
years of age are only $16.75.
Senior tickets are also sold at
only $14.75. These tickets are
discounted off the regular gate
prices by $10. Reservations for
the date you wish to go need to
be made by the patron by call-
ing (404) 581-4000. Visit the
website at www.georgiaaquar-
ium.org for more information.

Youth & Teen Nights at Big
EZ
Now everyone can get in
the action over at the Big EZ's
"Sport Zone" The doors open


special hours for youth and
teens. Every Saturday from
12 4 p.m., all youth ages
10 13 years will be autho-
rized patrons with an adult
or legal guardian inside the
Sports Zone only. Then from
6 10 p.m. every Saturday,
teens from the ages of 14 -
17 will be authorized for use
of the facility only. No other
patrons will be authorized use
in "Sports Zone during these
special times. There will be
snacks and soda available for
purchase. For more informa-
tion, call 573-4548

Sports Zone Karaoke
Sing the night away every
other Friday inside the Sports
Zone at the Big EZ. The music
starts playing at 8 p.m. and
it's free for all patrons. So put
your best vocals forward and
step on over. We look forward
to seeing you there. For more
information, call 573-4548.

The Big EZ is Now Open
The Big EZ is now com-
plete and we want to show it
off. Stop by anytime and get
in a game of foosball, pool,
darts, Texas Hold'em and
more. Interaction is the word
for the Big EZ. If you haven't
heard, the Big EZ is the old
Clubs building 1039 and its
home to the Billiard Zone, The
Movie Zone and the Sports
Zone; in addition to Oscar's
Liberty Center and Kings Bay
Conference Center.
The Zones are open to all
patrons, 18 years and older.
Hours of operation are Sunday
- Thursday 11 a.m. 11 p.m.
and Friday Saturday noon 2
a.m. Holiday hours are noon
- 8 p.m. For more information,
call 573-4548.


Arrange your move online

Any place, anytime

www.smartwebmove.navsup.navy.mil



Access to SMARTWebMove available at:



NAS JACKSONVILLE FL

Liberty Center, Building 816


NS MAYPORT FL

planet Mayport, Building 46

Beachside Community Center, Building 245

Library, Building 460


NSB KINGS BAY GA

Liberty Center, Building 1039



A onmtawhd vicee prwided by the










NAVAL SUPPLY SYTiEM COMMAND



mnm~unrmue*


Pregnant? Scared?
You have options
1-800-395-HELP
Free test Caring Confidential

CAREIbNET.
Pregnancy Center of Coastal Georgia
-, 130 N. Gross Road Suite 107, Kingsland, GA
912-729-8842
3548 Community Road, Brunswick, GA
912-267-1100
147 NW Broad Street, Jesup, GA
f 912-588-0010
www.cpccoastalga.org R161320


LOCATION
A RAZORS EDGE
ACE HARDWARE
ACE HARDWARE
AFFORDABLE INSURANCE
AIRWAVES
AMOCOGAS
ARMY SURPLUS STORE
BENNETT CHEVEROLET
BENNETT CHRYSLER JEEP
BIG DADDY'S BBQ
BP GAS
CAMDEN COUNTY LIBRARY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CHARLTON COUNTY
CHEVRON
CITY HALL
COLERAIN OAKS
COMFORT SHOWCASE BY LANE
CUMBERLAND INN & SUITES
DICKS WINGS
DIVERS DEN
DOLLAR GENERAL STORE
DRY CLEANERS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
FLASH FOODS
HALL'S BEACH STORE
HARDEE'S RES.
HESS FOODS
HILLIARD PHARMACY
KING FOOD STORE
KMART
LIL CHAMP FOOD STORE
MAIL AND MORE
MAIL OR MORE
MAIL PLUS
MARKET ON THE SQUARE
MOM AND POP #1
MOM AND POP #2
MOM AND POP #3
MOM AND POP #5
MOM AND POP #7
MOM AND POP #8
MOM AND POP #9
NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


F-BASE PICKUP LOCATIONS
ADDRESS
4515 HWY40 E SUITE C
SR 40
1282 SR 40
2803-K OSBORNE RD
1000 E KING AVE UNIT 2
US HWY 301
HWY 17
HWY40
HWY40
SR 200 & CR 107
US HWY 17&A1A
1410SR40E
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
JOEY OR HAMP WILL DELIVER
1330 E BOONE AVE
OSBORNE RD
2716 OSBORNE RD
HWY40
HWY40
139 CITY SMITTY DR
MARINER'S VILLAGE
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD &A1A.
A1A @ PKWY
S. 8TH ST & SADLER RD.
ATLANTIC AVE. & S FLETCHER AVE.
SADLER RD.& WILL HARDEE RD.
195 & SR 200
SADLER RD & S. FLETCHER AVE.
S. KINGS RD.
A1A @ PKWY
N. KINGS RD.
S. KINGS RD..
1601 SR 40 E
ATLANTIC AVE. & S. 10TH ST.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #8
994 E KINGS BAY RD
K-BAY CROSSING
100 OSBORNE RD
3380 SR 40 (BROWNTOWN)
946 POINT PETER RD
915 DILWORTH
1875 SPUR 40 (CROOKED RIVER)
100 ALEX DR (SHADOWLAWN)
2800 COLERAIN (SUGARMILL)
1371 SR 40 E(THE LAKES)
569 SPUR 40


I nfnATir


CITY
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
WOODBINE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
YULEE
YULEE
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
CHARLTON
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
KINGSLAND
FERNANDINA BEACH
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S


PATRICIA ANN'S RES.
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
PIONEER MILITARY SERVICES
QUALITY AUTOS
QUALITY AUTOS
RAMADA INN
RAMADA INN
SALVATION ARMY
SALVATION ARMY
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEER DELIGHT
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHEILA'S HALLMARK
SHELL
SHELL
SHELL GAS
SMILE GAS
SONNY'S BBQ
SONNY'S BBQ
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SOUTHEAST GA FURNITURE
SPRINT STORE
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
ST MARY'S LIBRARY
STEAMBOAT LILLY'S
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUBMARINE MUSEUM
SUPER TEST GAS
SUPER TEST GAS
THE PIG BBQ
TNT LANES
TNT LANES
UPS STORE
UPS STORE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
VIDEO WHEREHOUSE
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WALMART/FRIEDMANS
WATSON REALTY
WATSON REALTY
WAYFARA RES
WHISTLE STOP
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE
WINN DIXIE #168
WINN DIXIE #168
WOODBINE LIBRARY
WOODBINE LIBRARY
Undated: FEBRUARY 1.2007


Annnefl


PITY


S. KINGS RD.
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
555 SPUR 40 SUITE #2
9 QUALITY RD
9 QUALITY RD
1215 SR 40 E
1215 SR 40 E
1901 OSBORNE RD
1901 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
1921 OSBORNE RD
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
KINGS BAY VILLAGE
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
1136 HWY 40 E SUITE B
N. KINGS RD. A1A & N KINGS RD.
SADLER RD.
1380 E BOONE AVE
1380 E BOONE AVE
KENNETH GAY DR
KENNETH GAY DR
JONAS RD. LEM TURNER RD.
101 HERB BAUER DR
101 HERB BAUER DR
S. KINGS RD.
102 ST MARY'S ST W
102 ST MARY'S ST W
N KINGS RD.
S.8TH ST.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
2210 OSBORNE
2210 OSBORNE
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
WALMART SHOPPING PLAZA
SR40E
SR40E
6588 SR 40
6588 SR 40
2015 OSBORNE RD
2015 OSBORNE RD
195 & SR 200
N. KINGS RD.
A1A STATE ROAD 200
S.8TH ST.IN WALMART PLAZA
SR 200 --A1A
CAMDEN CORNERS
CAMDEN CORNERS
311 CAMDEN AVENUE
311 CAMDEN AVENUE


HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
HILLIARD
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
CALLAHAN
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
ST. MARY'S
YULEE
HILLIARD
CALLAHAN
FERNANDINA BEACH
YULEE
KINGSLAND
KINGSLAND
WOODBINE
WOODBINE


PICK UP YOUR PERISCOPETANOAT


01Q4


Girlk
and



HHPr-HMAUNG-HOPE

www.girlsandboystown.org
A CFC participant- provided as a public service


L ATi N ADDRE


Please Visit Our Website
Or Call For Showtimes

www.Ge :o]rg!ia "heatre~[ Oompany Oomi


r




22 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


riscope
BAY GEOREIA


ssi


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE 366-6300
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30a.m.-6:00p.m.
Fri. 7:30a.m.-5:30p.m.
Toll Free 800-258-4637
BY FAX 904-359-4180
IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classifieds in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines


Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction and
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number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about payments
or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all advertise-
ments under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of publication.
Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was
incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for
any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbrevia-
tions are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


, The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


CLASSIFIED INDEX

Ainnouncements Instructionr~


Auctions


Real Estate for Rent


Financial


Employment


Rel sttefr al Sfice


IMerchandise


I~*


ITransportation


SE 904-366-6300


ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com

FREE online advertising!

Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears online at

no additional charge.


I I


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and
Organizations
Rides/Ravel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment


NEED A LAWYER?
Accident? Arrest? Divorce?
AAA Attorney Referral Svc
1-800-733-5342, 24 HRS.



AMELIA ISLAND
4BR/2BA, dining rm,
S/living rm, Lg. kitchen,
split, tile, berber,
plantation blinds, owner.com
APP1412O, brick, 4yrs. new.
Call 904-491-7996








lMed arin
BY OWNER -3/2, $183,000,
1366sf, new kit, new
roof, newly painted, fncd
yd. w/deck 838-1408



ORDERS FOR NPTU
BALLSTON SPA,
NEW YORK?
Call Banita Elkins
(360)286-4246
As a Navy-wife,
I understand your
limited house-hunting
time frame. As a Realtor
with Pinnacle Realty, I
can preview homes for
rent or for sale & find
what you're looking for.




97% Financing
Florida Finance Corp.
Mark 904-233- 4231

ORANGE
PARK
COUNTRY
CLUB

Pool Home
Very nice stucco 4
bedroom, 2.5 bath
home with formal liv-
ing room, dining
room, family room
with fireplace,
UPGRADES
GALORE including
teak and marble
floors, 3 car garage.
Screened pool over-
looks secluded,
wooded yard. 2000+
sq.ft. Appraisal done.
$360,000
Quick Close; will
work with buyer.
Easy drive to NAS.
Realtor chosen.
Call Owner
Cell 904-349-6706




97% Financing
Florida Finance Corp.
Mark 904-233- 4231 0



SPECIAL GOVERNMENT
PROGRAM, Zero Down,
NO MONEY OUT OF
YOUR POCKET!!! If you
own land or Family will give
you land. Bad Credit OK.
LUV HOMES
904-772-8031
FLE ETWOOD'0. NO
Credit 3. 28x65. Stove frig
c/air dshwshr, washer &
dryer, fireplace $3500 eq.
$487.23mo. Call 730-8606
FLEETWOOD 1994 3/2
24x60, stove frig dishw-
shr c/air deck $7800 shngi
roof, good cond. 730-8606

HURRY! Only a few left!
Get into a new
3/2 MH only $1500 down.
No credit needed.
Call Sandy 0 695-2255
KIMBERLY 24x44 3/2,
stove/trig dishwasher
c/air fplc shngi roof, vinyl
sid, X cnd. $8500. 730-8606
REDMAN 2000 16x80
stove refrig dishwasher
fplc,shngi roof, vin siding
Exc cond. $13,900. 730-8606
IIYOUR JOB IS YOUR
CREDIT!!
New, Used, & Repo's
$1500 down *
Call Rebecca 246-7684
Atlantic Beach YOU CAN
OWN A HOME!
We own the finance com-
pany! New,Used, and
Repo homes as low as
$1000.00 down. Call
246-7684


BEACH LIVING HUGE
Sbr/2ba, $860 / mo. Sales
tax down 249-9546
*$825mo @ the BEACH*
Brand new 3bd/2bth
$1500dn. Call 249-9546
SELLING YOUR
MOBILE HOME?
TOP CASH!! Old or New
or Assume Loan.7308606



BAKER COUNTY
1-3 acres HIGH & DRY!
Fish pond, ready for
homes or MH's. Owner
finance call 904-259-8256
BAKER COUNTY
1-3 acres HIGH & DRY!
Fish pond, ready for
homes or MH's. Owner
finance call 904-259-8256
HONEYBRANCH
ESTATES wooded
equest lots. Nr World
Golf Vil. 545-2068
INTERLACHEN, FL
11 builder's lots, $6K,
50% assessed value.
Call 239-593-1200
PUTNAM COUNTY
4 LOTS in Reo De St.
Johns Subdivision, $50K
850-261-3642
BEAUTIFUL lac lot !
SMITH LAKE! HUGE
OAKS Mobile hms ok,
$19,900 352-485-1818




GA, NC, SC, VA
LAND SALE
17,756 ACRES!
31 Counties,
Prices start $1,157/AC
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Co.
www.stregispaper.com
Glynn County 820 Acres
20 Yr. Old Pine Timber
High Ground, Close to 95
Development Close By
Great Investment
$2,850/Acre. 478-477-1000




TEXAS LAND
LIQUIDATION
ing El Paso. Good
Rood Access, ONLY
$14,900 $200 down $145
per/mo Money Back
Guarantee.
NO Credit checks
1-800-755-5983
www.sunscgranches.com





APARTMENT
ALTERNATIVE!
NO LEASE -
NO CREDIT CHECK!
Full Kitchen, all
utilities paid,
free local calls,
cable TV/HBO, free
weekly housekeeping.
InTown Suites
FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET!
From $189.99 Weekly
Jacksonville East
11451 Beach Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32246
(904) 996-7686
From $199.99 Weekly
Jacksonville South
442 Blanding Blvd.
Orange Pk, FL 32065
(904) 272-7299
From $199.99 Weekly
St. John's Bluff
31625t. Johns Bluff Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32246
(904) 928-9145

From $209.99 Weekly
Atlantic Blvd.
210 St. Johns Bluff Rd.
Jacksonv lle, FL 32225
(904) 928-9005
ww.intownsuites.com

ORANGE PARK 2/2, fpl,
wet bar, WD hkup, new
paint, new carpet, no
pets $650mo 386-235-6667
SAN MARCO
1 & 2 BR Special!
CALL 398 -9492
www.SanMarcoVillage.org



BEACHES
We Are Rolling
Back The Prices!
Call for Details
904-642-3504
Monterey Condos
DOWNTOWN- 17th fir,
Luxury Condo,
River/City view 1/1, fully
upgraded, $1300/mo.
Terri 904-261-47430


Kasondra Crist
NAIOfU PRUMMuw 904.246-2655 x 100
.Ime. I- .., kasondratnationalpremium.com

Advertising Specialties for All your Needs!
Custom Medallions & Pins, Hats, T', Stickers, Mugs,
Pens, Tools, Gifts, and thousands of items!
Call or email me for free catalogs, samples etc!


Buying a Home?
Contact your VA
Home Loan Expert-
Laurie M. Potter
YNCM (USN Ret)
S Buying, Selling or
refinancing? Contact
904) 256-2051 Laurie for any of your
Cell (904) 463-2065 financing needs, including
Email: auriepotter VA, FHA, home equity or
@counirywide.com conventional loans.
Website:

homecu" n Councywide
4601 ToucMhon Rd E #3190
Jacksonville, FL 32246 HOME LOANS


INTRACOASTAL WEST
Great location,3/2, The
Grand Reserve. Beauti-
ful community Avail-
able 01/01/08 $1400, get
the 13th mo free. Sec.
dep. req 630-707-2345

r SOUTHSIDE
SCharming 2 BD/2.5
BA townhome, 1220
sqft. Just minutes
from downtown or the
beach! Scrnd Back
Porch overlooking
water and golf course;
peaceful coy pond in
front. All appl,.W/D
incl., ceiling fans,
wood-burning FPL,
wet bar with built-in
wine rack, and plenty
of storage space.
Located in a quiet
neighborhood with
community pool,
tennis courts and
walking paths. $1200
month, available
December 1st.
315-243-2923

YULEE- sell/rent like
new downstairs 0
Amelia Lakes 1/1,ameni-
ties 912-550-3409



EAGLE HARBOR rent/
sale, by owner, $1300mo.
3/2, great loc. culdesac,
near pigrnd 240-222-3480
INTERCOASTAL WEST
921 Mineral crk in Water-
leaf. new 4/2 GR w/fplc,
.$1395 635-6489 280-7433
S KINGS BAY
3BR/2BA home. New
appliances. See views
of river from back.
$895/mo $600/dep 912-673-7978
KINGSLAND,
GEORGIA
3br/2ba, large fncd
yrd, Laural Island
Country Club $1350+
dep. New home all new
appliances. Call
912-674-1281


MAYPORT Kendall
Town 2/2.5 Condo w/free
Cable & Internet! $995mo
No Pets; Ashley Woods
4/3 $1450; Ashton Park 2/2
$900. Call 904-249-7676
press 2. Realty Execu-
tives, Ponte Vedra

ORANGE PARK
COLLINS RD. New
3/2.5 TH w/gar, all apple
incl. Chatham Woods
954673-7354 or 954-309-5638

SOUTHSIDE- 3 BR, 2 BA,
new carpet & paint, tiled
kitchen, inside laundry
room. $1,100 mo.
904-465-3962

SOUTHSIDE 9A/Bay
Meadows Twn house,
1700SF, 3/2, gar, gated
comm., pool $1350mo.
904-612-2484

ST. MARY'S GA, Sugar
Mill 3/2, ch/a, fen bkyd, 2
car gar, access to pool
+tennis $900 912-729-1538

Westside Quite 3/1, wood
fir, fen bkyd. scrn porch
$750+ $700dep. 3305
Fitzgerald St. 318-0191




WESTSIDE -TIMUQUANA
MOVE IN SPECIAL. $50 off
2 & 3br's $425 $550
+ dep. 904-771-3811


LEASE TO OWN NICE
2 & 3 BR Call 695-2255




KINGS BAY
Share nice quiet 3/2
hm. single male
non-smoker. Total
$400/mo. dog, pool, park,
lake, cable. 912-882-1676


LUXURY ROOMS
w/Microwave & Refrig!
Low Daily/Wkly Rates!
10% Off for Wkly Room!
KINGS INN (904) 725-3343
QUALITY INN (904) 264-1211





JACKSONVILLE
BEACH
Duplex- Available
Nov. 1st. Make my
charming old Florida
Beach House your new
command Headquarters!
Hrdwd firs, pine walls,
1 block from ocean.
Ocean view from the
deck. 2BR/1BA upstairs,
$1,100 monthly.
Apt. Home- 1BR/1BA
downstairs. Kitchen &
bath, $800 monthly.
Call for Details.
904-910-8386/ 904-827-9494






CR210 4000SF, 4/5, lake,
ofc bonus rm $2750/mo
or RENT TO OWN
904-687-0496


FINANCE AL

Business Opportunities
Distributorships/
Franchises
Fictitious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold





A-1 Business Opportunity
$150K $360K potential
Call 1-888-623-1227

Home Base Business
(financial freedom) for
more Info 904-554-4222 or
www.travel-biz.info


RESTAURANT -Turnkey
CR210 4/3, 3000SF on Busy Southside area
South Hampton Golf fully equipped,
course, $1995/mo, Call Call Jonathan 866-6937
904-635-6861


WESTSIDE
Warehouses 3300sf,
8700sf, 11,350sf and
27,000sf. Dock & Grade.
Just remodeled.
$2/sf & $3/sf. nnn
2710 W. Beaver Street
Easton, Sanderson & Co.
356-2228 Realtor


Historic Avondale

RIVIERA PARKWAY

APARTMENTS
Call Now!

389-3179
2798 St. Johns Ave.






AFFORDABLE

LARGE

1,2,3 BEDROOM

HOMES


10 EatodR -HIll i I'
Ill -5 29 2C03-


WHOLESALE DISTRI-
BUTION Industrial
product. 904-465-1304






MTG. RATE ADJUSTING?
Behind on payments?
PHASecure FHA Cert.
Florida Finance Corp I
Mark 904- 233- 4231


EDUCATION
AND
TRAINING


Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events







REAL ESTATE
1 Week Day Class Nov 12
8 Week Eve Class Jan 9
Superior Instruction
www.myfrei.com
(904) 269-2555
Florida Real Estate Institute






MOVIE EXTRAS-Earn
up to $150/day. Exp not
req. People needed to
work in TV & film pro-
duction. Call 877-234-8172


NOW HIRING
Large National
Organization Avg.
Pay $20 hr. over $55K
annually. Including
full benefits and OT
Paid Training,
Vacations. FT/PT
866-519-9026


Currency Tellers,
Drivers, Messengers,
Coin Processors
BRINKS, INC.
HIRING!
OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2007
8:00 am -4:00 pm
33 West 2nd Street
Jacksonville, FL 32206
Brink's Inc. is the pre-
mier provider of armored
car transportation. The
customer-focused indi-
vidual we hire will have
exceptional ethics, integ-
rity and will be self-
motivated. The com-
pany also has a full ben-
efits package including:
'Full Medical/Dental Pkg
'Company Partial
Matching 401k
'Quarterly Profit Sharing
'Tuition Reimbursement
Paid Vacation
STime & half for 40+ hrs
Qualified candidates will
complete a:
*Successful Polygraph
examination
'Successful background
Investigation
SDrug test/DOT physical
For directions or more
information please call
(904)353-4331. Brink's is
an equal opportunity
employer m/f/h/v.




GENERAL LABOR,
ROOFERS AND ROOF
MECHANICS experi-
enced in all types of
roofing systems.
NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY All work will be
done at Naval Base.
Excellent Pay, Benefits
and opportunity for
advancement. Bilingual
is a plus. Please call
904.693.9293 or complete
application at 5470
Highway Ave. Jackson-
ville, FL 32254
MASONS & LABORERS
FT, steady work,
transportation and exp
nec. 545-7195


Insurance


Clinical Research
Coordinator -
Psychiatry/Neurology
CNS Healthcare, a clini-
cal research company
working with the world's
largest pharmaceutical
companies, is accepting
resumes from seasoned
Psychiatric Nurses and
Therapists to ioin our
team in Jacksonville
Florida. Candidates
must have the following
experience:
-Enjoys working in a
fast-paced environment
-Experience working in
medication research a
plus
-Excellent computer
skills and writing skills
-Highly organized and
able to multi-task
-Minimum of 5 years of
experience In psychia-
try or neurology
Ideal candidates will pos-
sess a degree in nursing
or a graduate degree in
Counseling, Social Work
or a related field. Highly
competitive compensa-
tion package including
medical, dental and
401K. For consideration,
email resume to
cmckay@cnshealthcare.com
or fax to 904-281-5758
attn: Jacksonville CRC
Position


Classifieds work! 359-4321


St. Marys Convalescent
Center & Southeast
Georgia Health System
in Camden have the
following positions
available:
* Certified Nursing
Assistant
* Deportment Support
Assistant
* LPN
Medical Office
Assistant
Medical Technologist
Nurse Manager
Registered Respiratory
Therapist
Registrar
RN
Surgical Technologist
RN positions also
available at Summit
Orthopedic Group-
Camden


MEDICAL ASSISTANT
A rapidly growing health-
care company is cur-
rently accepting
resumes from experi-
enced Medical Assis-
tants with the following
strengths for an open
position in Jacksonville:
-Excellent phlebotomy
skills
-Highly organized and
able to multi-task
-Excellent computer
skills
-Lab/specimen process-
ing and shipping
-High energy level for our
fast-paced office
For consideration, please
fax your resume to
281-5758 or email to
cmckay@cnshealthcare.com






DANCERS.DOORSTAFF,
& BARTENDERS
NEEDED
CALL 757-7370
DANCERS DANCERS
$$1,000$$
HIRING BONUS
No Mandatory Tip Outs
Wackos 399-1110


DANCERS NEEDED
$$100$$
PAID DAILY
Passion 641-5033


DJ, DOORMAN,
BARTENDERS,
WAITSTAFF
Call Passion
641-5033


Waitstaff,
Bartenders, Doorstaff
Call 399-1110





Drivers Wanted
Cash very first day Il
Up to $600 $1,000 or more
weekly!!! !I! Company car
for business and personal
use!!! Our Busy season is
here!!! High Call
Volume!!!
Join Jacksonville's largest &
best transportation co.
Apply in person at
5320 Springfield Blvd
between 9am and 12 pm.
Call 493-5200 for directions.


Technology changes.
Integrity and professionalism remain steadfast.





Clarty
S SClary & Asaocates, Inc.


09 FRE9 RE RE RE, rE oFE


Navy

Classified

Ads



THE FLEET

MARKET

ADVERTISING
RULES

Please fill out
this form in
black or blue ink.


DEADLINES


THE

PERISCOPE


Noon

Monday


Rank/Grade:

Name (please print):


Work Phone #


1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military
personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to Naval
Submarine Base, Kings Bay.
2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to help
qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads such as
sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
ANIMAL OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED
FREE. CHILD CARE PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL
BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED
INDMDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION (PCS) OR "OFFICIALLY
REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN ONE OF THOSE STATE-
MENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be written
independent of other information contained on this form.
4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue.
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, The Periscope,
Public Affairs Office, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, GA 31547, or to The Periscope,
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202


urganizarnon:
Signature:


Date Submitted:


6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the above
requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any or all ads.
7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by calling
366-6300 or 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-359-4180, however, they must be completed on an
original form.
Select the number of weeks ad is to run: U 1 wk 2 wks U 3wks U 4wks
To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Periscope.
NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No more than
one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free ads per family, per
week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the Classified Index.

Pate tnrv


POne Riverinscope
O .ne "vrieAe. Jgog..
One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


i ii i i I


m 1!


I I I I I I


9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 mEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 rnEE 9 roEE 9


EXPERIENCE THE SPLENDOR OF FALL
at e deoea4r/
dwq 4~aftewne to tac gfI


Law
Enforcement/
Security/Safety
MECHANIC -
FULL-TIME]


I Legal


I Mecani^




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007 23


20 out of a 100
The military community makes up 20 percent
of the total population for Northeast Florida
and Southeast Georgia. That means that 20
out of every 100 people you meet are some-
how connected with the military.


Get your message to them by advertising
one or all of the publications distributed
the local bases in the area.
For advertising information,
call 904-3594336,
Fax 904-366-6230.


in
at


THEAYPRT FLR THPerisc pe
Itws M rror Periscope
JA yI It FL ] KIN AY E


s


Heat Sale


SSe fetions are Huge
Ftces are at their Lowest
0.0% Financing for up to 36 mo.


on Select 07 and 08


Vehicles


Huge Factory Rebates
Simply Put
We beat big City Prices W


ennett


Chrysler


41


2


A


New
6.7 Liter
Diesels
are here


(912) 729-7100


/1


--


C;


1,9 F




24 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


SFRIGIDAIRE
SI COMPACT
Vl frig./frzr., 3.9 cu/ft.,
1yr. old $90.00.
Emerson microwave,
rotating center, 1yr. old
$50.00. Both stainless
steel. 729-1225
S KENMORE
400 SERIES
WASHER/DRYER
Barely used for 6 mo.
Like new $550. Call James
912-322-6300
WHIRLPOOL
WASHER/DRYER
3 yrs. old, great
cond., needs good
home. Like new $350.
912-227-2491


& WEDDING DRESS
worn once, great cond,
Said $1,200 asking $200.
Call anytime. Nicole
882-2339


BED A Baa Baa Sleep w/
No Sheep.Qn Pillow $135
top, NEW 674-0405
BED A Bargain $
New Queen Matt $
Still in Plastic 307-1765
BED A Beauti Cherry
Sleigh Bed w/Matt $350
All New 674-0405
SCherry Brazil Wood
Laminate Flooring
Switch foam padding
525sqft. MUST GO!
asking $525.00 OBO Call
(912)729-4547
4. DINING ROOM
STABLE
4 193x44" medium oak,
6 chairs w/brwn
leather centers, custom
glass top for protection.
Exc. cond. $850.00
729-1225
MATTRESS A Queen Set.
Brand New in plastic
$125 Must sell 904-674-0405
MATTRESS FULL Size
Brand New Must Sell eso
Call Darren 307-1765 $'
MATTRESS King Size
Still in Plastic $150
Must sell 307-1765
WHIRLPOOL SUPER
CAPACITY Washer/
cond, moving must sell
immediately! $400 OBO
Call 912-673-8617



KINGSLAND, GA
316 Hillside Court
Sat 17 Nov. 8-noon.
Tools, car parts,
vintage records, furn,
electronics, housewares.
BARGAIN HUNTERS
GALORE
This Sat & Sun Have
Your Garage Sale at
The Market Place!
7059 Ramona, 786-FLEA


PIANO/LOWEST PRICE USA
YAMAHA/FREE PRICE LIST
WHOLESALE. 7140141


GOLF CART EZ-GO '05
6 pass, exc. cond. $3500
904-537-0404







Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted



Bostons, Boxer, Chow,
Chihuahua, Maltese,
Yorkies, Pom/Papi,
Shep/ Husky, Pekingese,
others $200 up 699-8836
BOSTON TERRIERS-
AKC registered shots
$450 cash 904-757-7596
ENGLISH BULLDOG
-AKC, 4 M, 4 F, avail
12/08/07, UGA, $3000
912-285-4634
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPS CKC 3Males,
$375 Blonde 1st shots ;
912-510-8385
GREAT DANES- $500,
Harlequin & blk/wht,
904-838-3977 born 9/11
RAT TERRIER PUPS
UKC 6 M. $200 Call
904-645-8535 Kim or Rob


Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage &
Rentals
Marine Equipment
and Supplies
RV Rentals
RVs and Supplies
Motorcycles/Mini
Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/lailers/SU's
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Tucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease


14' ULTRAGLASS
BOAT 28hp, motor
LAWN TRACTOR trailer, Bimini Top,
46" bed 19.5 H P, center console, fish
lust second., finder $2,700.00 912-576-4949
mastercut/ MTD w/ -
Briggs & Stratton U UHEARWATERRI
engine, many newarts. SHEARWATER
A steal at $700/OBO. 22CC 2007 *
729-1977 1 YAMAHA 150
Mi 4 stroke,
56 gallons,
Only 30 hour on
the motor.
PAGAN &WCAN I GPS 498 foat on
MB-s-Supies I trailer,
5 months old,
EARTH GIFTS allelectronics I
Trolling motor
l951 StisonSt (904)38 $42,500
a so.n L 904 282-6548

L^"g

I- I aD1e


Clary"
Clary & Associates, Inc
Professional Surveyors &
Mappers since 1983
3830 Crown Point Road,
Jacksonville FL 32257
904-260-2703
www.claryassoc.com


& lting
Conomnim urey

Welnd ndr
ToorphclSrveys


AIRSTREAM & TRAIL
MANOR TRAVEL TRLRS
ALLEGRO MOTOR HOMES
Sales, Service, Parts
J.D. Sanders R.V. Sales
Alachua (386) 46223039
1-800-541-6439
ATV -Honda Foreman ES
'06, 4x4, exc cond, low
hrs/ mi, call 237-4663


Come See Our New Offices &
Our New Full Line of Parts
& Accessories. Free Giftl
25' 5th Wheel. Perfect
Hunters Cabin. $3,200
2008 21' Gulfstream TT,
$11,999
9 '07's Left in Stock. Best
Prices We've Ever Offered
Open 7 Days a Week
(904) 714-9939







4-WHEELER.
EXCELLENT CON-
DITION AND RUNS
GREAT. CALL FOR
MORE INFO
$1000(904) 219-7149
BMW '02
1150 RT, exc cond,
$6800 OBO 904-537-0404
SHD SOFTTAIL '95
16,800 mi., red gear,
helmet, etxras.
$8,500. 912-882-7095
&KAWASAKI KX125 '03
Pro circuit totally
re-built zero hours.
Excellent condition.
Call (904)321-1386 $2,2.00.
SPOLARIS
PHOENIX ATV '05
S 200cc, exc cond,
great for kids &
adults. Test ride $1500
912-576-3002
YAMAHA V STAR
L'0
l metallic grey,
many upgrades
over year, factory
warranty. Call now
912-673-8271

S YZ85 '03
Race ready
FMF exhaust
Pro taper bars GPS
suspension exc cond $1700
912-576-3002


4 ACURA LEGEND '92
Adr, runs great.
$2,800 cash.
Call RJ 912-467-3348
ACURA RL '05
Nav, CD, like new
$32,680 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
7 ACURA RL'04.
Nav, CD, sunroof,
like new $19,980
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
ACURA RSX'05 World
Champion Sumo Wrestler
Was Going to Make Show
Car, Too Small For Me.
Just Right For You. Call
Sumo Suzuki 253-6581
ACURA TL'06 Blk/
tan, fully equipped.
$27,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE


ACURA TSX'05
Black Beauty!
$17,990 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
( BMW 3251C Conv
'04. Lthr, power top
$23,680 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
BBMW 3251 '02
Lthr, CD, sunroof,
low miles. $15,890
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CADILLAC DEV-
ILLE '02 $11,990,
$199/mo. 797-8800
Lighthouse Toyota
CADILLAC DEV-
ILLE '03. Low miles.
clean in & out.
$15,991 1-800-709-6185
CADILLAC DTS '06
Only 15,000 miles,
like new $28,990
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CADILLAC XLR '06
17,065 mi, like new
$57,980 $998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CADILLAC CTS '03 No
Chandeliers No Cadillac
Loaners But I Sell
Cadi's Cheaper Than
They Do! Call Sumo
Suzuki 253-6581
CHEVY COR-
VETTE '06 Z06
Red/blk, Nav, fully
equp. $63,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CHEVY IMPALA '03
$9990, $159/mo.
797-8800
Lighthouse Toyota
CHEVY IMPALA '06. 40K
miles, LT, all pwr,
cruise, stereo/CD. Call
Mike at 238-7584
CHEVY IMPALA LS '02
19K Miles Formerly
Used By Head of Secu-
rity for Sumo Suzuki.
Great Car. Like New.
Call Sumo 253-6581
CHRYSLER
SEBRING '04 $10,990
$179/mo 797-8800
Lighthouse Toyota
SCHRYSLER 300
Touring '07. Like
new, save thou-
sands $23,980 998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
CHRYSLER SEBRING
TOURING '06. Awe-
some car, blue, black
leather, automatic. Call
Sal at 434-3212
FORD 500 LTD
Leather, CD, fully
equipped. $15,890
998-0012
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
FORD MUSTANG GT
'94 108,000 miles,
5.0 engine, 5spd,
dent in roof, easy fix,
aftermarket parts $3,000
OBO 912-729-7171
FORD MUSTANG
'05. $12,990, $209/ma
797-8800
Lighthouse Toyota
FORD MUSTANG GT '06
Low Miles, Extra Clean
$19,993 904-370-1300
FORD TAURUS '98
tan, 69,251k, ps/pw/pd,
t cassette, am/fm stereo,
duel front air bags, tilt
steering wheel, cruise
control. Runs good & looks
good. Call 912-882-8288 or
912-674-9539 $2,500


KEN CHANCEY

LUl=I :


SUMO SUZUKI Needs
Room to Remodel!!
Current Inventory
in The Way!!
1285 Cassat Avenue
ar's nLC


;lary & Associates, inc. Professionai surveyors & Mappers since 1983
Competitive Salaries Vacation and Paid Holidays
Medical & Dental Benefits Training & Education Available
401(K) Paid Short-term Disability & Life Insurance
Apply online at www.claryassoc.com or call 904-260-2703 Toll free 866-271-3274
coo545s 3830 Crown Point Road, Jacksonville FL 32257

in i iu oi r i*i


FAIL


November 15,2007

9 AM to 2 PM


Prime F. Osborn III

Convention Center

1000 Water Street
Jacksonville, FL


FREE Admission!


Pre-register your resume online
at www.CivilianJobs.com for our
exclusive Matching Process.
The CivilianJobs.com
Matching Process will
put your resume in the
hands of employers
with positions in your
field of interest
and geographic
location preference.


EXL '03. 33K ml. 9 48Kmiles. $5990 Military and Non Military
$13,990, $229/mo. 797-8800 i i DODGE DAKOTA FORD F250 XLT '02 LEXUS RX330 '04
797-800 Lighthouse Toyota Bettervice, 02 crewcab, 7.3L, 36k miles. $26,990,
Lighthouse Toyota Better Service, Quad cab sport, powerstroke, white, $449/mo. 797-8800
ighouse Toya 1Better Warranty, 4x4, loaded, pwr tow pkg., new Lighthouse Toyota
TOYOTA AVALON Better Vehicles everything, pristine, Yokahama tires, new bed
HONDA ACCORD EX4 26K m. 182,990 Equals many extras. 16K mi., liner. Call now
HNDA ACR '04. 26K mi. $182,990, Equals asking $15K 912-674-2362. 912-673-8271 OOT
Factory Certiied. $15,890 309mo 797-800 Better Prices TOYOTA
904-370-1300 Lighthouse Toyota DODGE DURANGO '02 4RUNNER'06
HONDA ACCORD EX'05 _angeloautowholesale.com Loaded. Sumo Suzuki FORD RANGER 4x4 Wht/gray, fully
Certified. Sedan. Like new (904) 662-0726 Doesn't Have to Pay '99. $9990, $159/mo. equip $23,890. 998-0012
$16,489 94-37-130 TOYOTAAVALONj Blonde Bathing Suit 797-8800 LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
'D00. 49K ml. $12,990, Lighthouse Toyota
HONDA CIVIC LXS $209mo 797-00 Model. My Price is Bet-
Certified, Sedan, Low Mi, Lighthouse Toyota er. Call Sume and Make TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
$15,189. 904-370-1300 Appointment to Be FORD RANGER XLT '03 Sumo Suzuki Crushes
Thrilled. 253-6581 '03 Great work truck Fearsome Twins' Prices
TOYOTA AVALON $7991 1-800-709-618 Everyday MyDaddy
S lii XLSO Lt, B DODGE RAM 1500 FORD RANGERExtCab Doesn't Tl Me What to
7.8 Bille economic sunroof $23,980CD, BMW X 04. Excel- '05.Hem 4dr, like 04 -Great Condition. Do. Call Sumo 253-6581
Is the economic sunroof $23,980 lent ond. $28,991 new$17,480998-0012 Used to Transport
imact fB998-0012 1-800-709-6185 new $17,480 8 0012 Used to Tran sport
impactof ie LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE Equipment to and F TOYOA R 4 97
military in Northeast ( CADILLAC FORD EXPEDITION Events for World Famous 1 80
Florida and E TO MSCALADE '04 06 Eddie Bauer, Sumo Wrestler. Suma Lighthouse Toyota
S"loiA L '04 $13,990, $229/mo. Leather, CD, only Certified. $25,991 Suzuki, Call Quick
outheast Georgia. 797-8800 30,000 miles. $27,890 1-800-709-6185 253-6581 Ask for Sumo
Advertise in the Lighthouse Toyota 998-0012 FOD RAN3 TOYOTA SEQUOIA
miE ti aons LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE FORD EXPEDI- FORD RANGER -'98,133 02. 56K ml. $17,990
publications TION '05 XLT. mile, $2000, good cond, 299mo 797-8800
distributed at th TOYOTA CAMRY LE'03 CHEVY L 3 C Y SIL- Lthr, CD, 3rd row 904-262-0961 Lighthouse Toyota
local bases in the Clean clean clean, VERADO'04 SLT seat$20,980 998-0012 GMC ENVOY Denali
local bases in e leather, pwr seat, pwr only 30,000 miles, LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE '06. Fully loaded
area. windows, loaded. Call 4x4, tonneau cover $24,991 1-800-709-6185 TOYOTA TUNDRA ;06
o 99 John 389-4561 ext 127 $23,980 $998-0012 FORD EXPLORER Dbl Cab. All pwr in c
To advertise T -OT LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE limited24k m GMC YUKON 05ped rear window, tow pkg.
PleUal 6sekcalJALICKSONVILtaLE2 Cr,( Fully equipped Call Gene today at
Please call TOYOTA CELICA GT '05 pearl w/blk Ithr, 2290 998-0012 Gene today at
Silver/gray cloth, auto- Chevy Suburban '90 loaded complete w/DVD, $22,890 998?0012 389-4561 ext 127
904-359-4336 mic extra clean ll 44, 650HP EFI, seats six, 20500 LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE O
n L very clean, iton 904-225-2057 HONDA CRV-03. TOYOTA TUNDRA '06
Fax 366-6230. Sal at 434-3212 monster lifted high,
real head turner- $8.000 Looks runs great Sumo Suzuki Fell in Love
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '07. OBO-Trode912-227-0276 FORD F150 '05 XLT $15,991 1-800-709-6185 With Chevy. Selling
n'. S ergraew, must see. Call CHEVY SUBURBAN Z-71 $24991 1-800-709-6185 CertifiedSV.OneOwner! Sumo253-6581
'07. Silv er/gray cloth,e1-800M O09-6185e Certifie d CHEROKE
18K miles. Call Martin Johnnie at 389-4561 x127 '06- Loaded With Luxury 1948. -3700
18Kmiles. 1 0 A Priced Thousands Below FORD F150 '05. 5.4L Tri- VOLVO XC90'04
389-4561 ext. 129 TOYOTA CAMRY LE '03 the Competition. Sumo ton, leather, all power, ( HONDA RIDGEL- Lhr, CDunr
(7 JAGUAR S TYPE Silver, loaded, all power Suzuki Beats Everybody's towing pkg. Call John INENRTL, lthr, sun- silver/beige, only
4.0 '00. Like new, Take over payments Price. Call Sumo 253-6581 389-4561 ext 127 roof, CD. $25,890 45,000 miles $24,890
Ithr, surf, ex low Call Milton 207-9797L 993-0012 99-0012
thr, surf, x lCHEY TAHOE 00 FORD F15005 Sum LEXUSOF JACKSONVILLE LEXUSOF JACKSONVILLE
mi. $10,990 998-0012 $10,990, $179mo Suzuki is Staking His x CKSONVIL
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE TOYOTA CAMRY LE '03 v 797-8800 Claim on Cassat Avenue. HONDA RIDGELINE '06
Green, very clean, all Lighthouse Toyota Take a Swing Ford I Sit No Fancy Palm Trees -
JAGUARS TYPE pwr. Take over pymts on You. Call Sumo for That Means You Buy
03. Only26,00 Call Milton 207-9797HEVYTAHOE4 KNOCKOUT Price Cheaper!- Call Sumo
miles, Nov., CD,LTAHEr '04
comiles, Nav., CD,@ -- (Z LT, leather, CD, 253-6581 Suzuki for the Palm Tree CHEVY VAN -'92, sports
chrome 20" wheels. TOYOTA MATRIX Free Price253-6581 van, handicap lift,
$26,480 998-0012 '04. $14,888, $249/mo sunroof, like new FORD F550 '06 West- handicap steering, TV,
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE 797-800 $19,980 998-0012 Hulerr 5Sth Wheel HYUNDAI SANTA CB, ph, Ig elec whlchr.
Lighthouse Toyota LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE $43,991 1-800-709-6185 FE'05. Exc cond. $6000912-2883744
JAGUAR S-TYPE 3.0 '01 $12,991 1-800-709-6185 A
Semi-Retired Sumo Wres- HYUNDAI SANTA FE '04 HONDA ODYSSEY
tlerMustSellQuik, Food TOYOTASOLARA C Korean DealersSlash EX'05. Lthr, CD,
is Expensive Here in the '99. $7990, $119/mo.ice uo Suzuki sunroof. $23,890
US. Call 253-6581, Ask For Lighthouse Toyota Crush Price. Call Sumo 9980012
Sumo Suzuki Today 253-6581 LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
JAGUAR S-TYPE "06 HYUNDAI SANTE FE OLS HONDA ODYSSEY EX '04
Low miles. $26,790 TOYOTA SOLARA '05. 19K wiles. $14,897 Certified, Minivan, Low
904-370-1300 '3. $13,9 90, $229/mo 904-37-1300 Miles $15,988. 904-370-1300
904-3701300 797-8800
t JAGUAR XJ8 '04 Lighthouse Toyota /d- JEEP GRAND NSSAN E
Like new, only l CHEROKEE NlSSAN QUEST '97
30,000 miles. $27,990 TOYOTA YARIS '07 LARADO 00' Cold air & Runs great.
OOiA 100K worr. $14,888, 4$6000.00. Wll \ 3,000
998-0012 $249/mo. 797-8800 consider Trade for van of Call RJ 912-467-3348
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE Lighthouse Toyota same value. Call
912-729-7240
LEXUS ES300-'01 exc
cond, White, 64k mi, new LKSWAGEN \ JEEP GRAND
brakes, new tires $14,000 VOLKSWACHEROKEE
Call Mike 904T77573 1 i8@1GOLF "04. $15,990, CH R
l Mike 2-4-57 L 0 00 Overland '04. Fully MERCURY SABLE 94,
Lexus ES 300 '98 exc cond Lighthouse Toyota __equip s20,890 998-0012 runs $800 534- 4469
135K miles fully loaded Sh LEXUSOF JACKSONVILLE
freshly serviced runs SUMO SUZUKI Crushes LEXUS OF JACKS LE
great" aftermket EVOLKSWAGEN EP GRAND CHEROKEE TO advertise
Great 18" aftermket I Vr Credit Problems!! LAREDO'3. Only $12,790 tm
wheels moon roof. IBETTLE GLS1 01E in the military
aba call for online pics 44cylinder0 5spd, coupe, 130n
904-651-7145 2dr, yellow, blk Ithr I SIV Yes A SORRENTO '05 I'm publications
seats, ac/heat, AM/FM/CD's. Say Yes ... K12 SORRENTO B05 I'm
( LINCOLN LS '04 Excellent cond. Warrant Japanese Suo Wrestler distributed at the
Leather, CD, fully private wner all904-491-7996 TO EVERYONE!! Make Korean Car Go local bases in
equipped. $17,480 Away. LOW PRIC. Call
998-0012 VW BEETLE .07 1285 Cassat Avenue *Sumo uzuki 253-6581 the area,
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE Conv. Leather, CD 253-6581 O NAV GA- 904-35l9-36
$22,980 998-0012 TOR '04. Clean in/out Fax 904-366-6230.
LINCOLN TOWN CAR'00 LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE $17,991 1-800-709-6185 904 6
Used to Belong to Sumo
Wrestler, Lost my Spon-
sor When I Lost My Title,
Can't Afford My Driver,
Car MUST Go Too! Call
Sumo Suzuki 253-6581
MAZDA MIATA LS '04 AUTOMOTIVE DIRECTORY
Silver, blue leather,
automatic. Call Martin
389-4561 ext. 129
MAZDA PRO--L ..LLLLLL.U
TEGE S '03. Lthr, AIDA f
CD, sunrof3 $10,980 ACURA OF ORANGE PARK BOZARD FORD LAMBORGHINI ORLANDO SATURN OF AVENUES
998-0012 720 Blanding Blvd. 777-5600 St. Augusine 353-6797 895 N. Ronald Reagan Bhld. 106 hilips Hwy 262714
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLERegn63 Philip Hwy. 262.7145
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE RFlorida's Super Duty Headquarters LongwoodOdando FI 407-339-3443
MERCEDES C 320 SATRN OF RANGE PARK
WAGON '02 Nice Car. PAUL CLARK
TOO Sma for 6801b AUDIJACKSONV5LE sloA Sl 1Blanding Blvd. 779G071
Sumo Wrestler Not TOO 8105 Bln FORJ7MERCURY
Small for You. Call Sumo 4660-100 Southside Bd. 5 5-4001AD R R JA ILE EE
Suzuki 253-6581 1-95 N. Exit 129(Yulee) 225-3673 SATURN OF REGENCY
g MERCURY 0 Il ,d GARBER FORD-MERCURY 11211 Alantic Blvd. 642-1500 AtlanticBlvd. 725-8200
GRAND MARQUIS
'05. Lthr, CD, only BENTLEY IOR AND Green Cove Springs 264-4502
30,000 miles. $13,980 IB T Y ORLANDO T
998-0012 895 N. Ronald Reagan Blvd. MIKE SHAD FORD
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE Longwood/lrando Fl 407-339-3443 LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE
MERCURY At The AvenuesO SUBARU OF JACKSONVILLE
V8, auto. pwr, fl 10720 Philips Hwy. 904-292-3325
everything leather,ntic B. 641-64
83.000 mi.. maint.MIE DAVIDSON FORD
r916s7957 TOM BUSH BMW MIKE DAVIDSON FORD .10800 Atantic Blvd 841-6455
records. $3500 OBO TOM BUSH BMW
912-674-9257 9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911 AT REGENCY NORI FUllIAUNCOLU NERCURY

NISSAN ALTIMA SL- 05. 6914 Blanding Blvd 777-2500 9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060 420 Southside Blvd. 6424100
Lthr, sunrf, all the good- 4620 SHutFORD ENlCHARC42SUZUK
ies. Call Mike 238-7584 MIKE SHAD FORD GRIFFIN LINCOLN MERCURY KEN CHANCEY SUZUKI
SNISSAN MAXIMA OF ORANGE PARK 7447 Blanding Blvd. 77-3000 1285 Cassat Ave. 389-7700
,7. 3. fuy 7ARBER BUICK 700 Blanding Blvd 777-3673 CITY SUZUKI
equipped. $22,890
998-0012 Green Cove Springs 264-4502 l
LEXUS OF JACKSONVILLE En LOTUS 10585 Atlantic Blvd. 998-7111
NISSNA SENTRA'97 KEY BUICK f JC KS IL www.c1yautomoti ve.com
silver, 4dr., runs great. 4660 Southside BM. 642-6060 im JAK& IUE ^ ^ ^ ^
Gas Sver! $, 460,00 460 hsde Blvd 42-0 NIMNICHT PONTIAC-GMC www.lotusofacksonville.com
Call RJ 912-467-3348 11503 Phillips Hwy 854-4826 11650 BEACH BLVD. 998-9992
SOLDS INTRIGUE
'98. 68Kmiles. $5990
hth797-.8.o8 o0 CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC COGGIN GMC TRUCKS fl ARLINGTON TOYOTA
Lighthouse Toyota 4700 Southside Blvd. 642-5111 9201 Atlantic Blvd. 724-2310
PONTIAC GR PRIX NIMNICHT CADILLAC GARBER GMC TRUCKS TOM BUSH MAZDA 10939 Atantic Blvd. 302-7
$8991 1-800-709-6185 7999 Blanding Blvd. 778-7700 Green Cove Springs 264-4502 9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911 COGGIN TOYOTA AVENUES
PONTIAC GRAND PIRX 10564 Philip Hwy. 262-0338
GT '05. Must see to PARKER CADILLAC lMAA CITY 0564 Philips y. 2620338
appreciate. 27K mi. 283 San Marco, St Aug (904)824-9181 6916Blanding Blvd. 779-0600 KEITH PIERSON TOYTA
Hurry. Call Gene at 88 B d 7AI A1 KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
389-4561 ext 127M CGGI HON!DA OR ALANI NIi iZ 65801YoungennanCirde.771-9100
3 1E I IA ;{ ]1 i 11003 Atlantic Blvd. 565-8800 6501Youngerman Cirle. 771-9100
COGGIN HONDA ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
COGGIN CHEVY AVENUES BRUMOS MOTOR CARS INC. 1310 Cassat Ave. 389-4561
10880 Philips Hwy. 260-7777 OF ST. AUGUSTINE 10231 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080
CREST CHEVROLET 2898U .s. Hwy 1 S. 1-80456se-18 89 f
8281 Merrill Rd. 721-1880 DUVAL HODA
GARNER CHEVY 1325 Cassat Ave 899-1900 TOM BUSH MINI VW OF ORANGE PARK
Green Cove Springs 264-4502 LOU SOBH HONDA At1481 Wells Road 269-2603
GORDON CHEV OF THE AVENUES TOM BUSH VW
1166 Blanding Blvd. 272-2200 11333 Phillip Hwy 370-1300 CITY MITSUBISHI 9850 Atlantic Blvd. 725-0911
JERRY HAMM CHEV LUCAS HONDA OF JAX 10585 Atlantic Blvd. 5652489 f
2600 Philips Hwy. 398-3036 7801 Blanding Blvd. 269-2277 www.dtyautomotlve.com rnJ
PINEVIEW CHEVROLET f CITY MITSUBISHI
Macdenny 259-6117 I PROFESSIONAL

GEORGE M RE CHEV 7505 Blanding Blvhd. 779-8100 AUTO LEASING
711 Beach Bd. 249-8282 of ORANGE PARK www.dtyautomotlve.com 10231 Atantic Blvd. 722-1694
711 Beach Blvd 248-8282 7600 Blanding Blvd. 899-0900
NIMNICHT CHEV f lE HYUNDI --- e I
1550 Cassat Ave. 387-4041 KEY HYUNBAI
4660 Southside Blvd 6426060 COGGIN NISSAN-ATLANTIC
f flI Il I H I k 10600 Atlantic Blvd 642-7900 f

V ATiLANTIC CHRYSLER COGGIN NISSAN-AVENUES
2330 US1 South 354-4421 ATLANTIC INFINITI 10859 Philips Hwy. 880-3000 AT TIE
CARUSO CHRYSLER 10980 Atlantic Blvd. 642-0200 MKE SiAD NISSAN OF JAX BEACH BLVD. AUTOMOTIVE
1750 Southside Blvd. 725-7300 l 1810 Cset Ave 389-3 6833 Beach Bhlvdtroi. 724ve.c511o
FRANK GRIFFI PARKER NISSAN 8 Beach Blvd. 724-511
hlFRAK ORaFFIng CITY ISUZU 0 U.S. 1 South, StAug. s07949990 BRUMOS MOTOR CARS
Chrysler of Orange Pak 10585 Atlantic Blvd 998.7111 MIKE SHAD NISSAN OF OP PRE-OWNED AUTO CENTER
1515 Wells Rd. 269-1033 www.cityautormotive.com 1565 Wells Rd. 269-9400 10211 Atlantic Blvd. 724-1080
GARBER CHRYSLER nII M:-s of Jacksnville
Green Cove Springs 264-2416 Lxus f Jacksonville
MIKE SHAD JAGUAR JACKSONVILLE COGGIN PONTIAC-GMC Pre-Owned Center
CHRYSLER JEEP 11211 Atlantic Blvd. 642-1500 9201 Atlantic Blvd. 724-2310 10384 Atlantic Blvd. 998-0012
1736 Cassat Ave. 389-7792 f Jl l" GARBER PONTIAC Tom Bush BMW


JOB


npATLANTIC JEEP oveprgs 9910 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4381
RICK KEFFER ATLANTIC JEEP NIMNICHT PONTIAC- GMC
1-95 Exit 129, Fern Bch. 2330 US 1 South 34-4421 NIM IC PONTIAC GMC Bush Autoplex
1-800-228-7454 2330 US 1 South 34-4421 11503 Phillips Hwy. 854-4826 Tom Bush Autoplex
flr.?T 1 CCARUSO JEEP 9875 Atlantic Blvd. 371-4877
1750 Southside Blvd. 725-7300 WARREN MOTORS, INC.
ATLANTIC DODGE FRANK GRIFFIN BRUMOS MOTOR 233 East State St. 356-8491
2330 US1 South 3544421 Jeep of Orange Park CARS INC.
JACK CARUSO 1515welrs Rd. 269-1033 1010 AtlanticBlvd. 725-9155
REGENCY DODGE MIKE SHAD CHRYS-JEEP
10979 Atlanc Blvd. 642-5600 ON
GARBER DODGE 1RUCK 13 Cs9017 CASSATe
Green Cove Sn 1736 Cassat Ave 3 792 ROLLS ROYCE ORLANDO JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
ORANGE PARK DODGE RICK KEFFER 895 N. Ronald Reagan Blvd. JEEP DODGE
7233 BlandingBlvd. 777-5500 1-95 Exit 129, Fen Bch 1-800228-7454 LongwoodOdando F 407-339-3443 9ABAYM OWS. 4300
RICK KEFFER WORLDI-:MPR
1-95 Ext 129, Fern Bch.1-800-228-7454 WORLD IMPORTS
WESTSIDE DODGE RAY CARTER KIA NIMNICHT SAAB www.wordimportsusa.com
1672 Cassat Ave. 384-6561 6373 Blanding Blvd. 771-6078 7999 Blanding Blvd, Jax
904-778-7700 www.nimnicht.com 11650 BEACH BLVD. 998-9992


I




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


TAr MMOW UB


50


ON NEW


'O6,


'07


&


'O8


CHRYSLER & JEEP VEHICLES
*0% Financing is available for November 2007. See dealer for details.


S A e O P e 269 1033
AB B 6 0


NEW
2 i, h- m6 eur b*


CHEVROLET-BUICK
VS.


LT, Leather, Sunroof, DVD, Navigation turn
by turn, Remote Start, And More...
Waa +Cd .BSAA
_ ,.38 907

LT, Leather, Remote Start, Power Lift Gate
And Much More... -Wa S. Adln


AT, Short Bed, Vortec, Cruise Control,
Tinted Glass... I., .,4,


V8, Short Bed, OnStar Navigation Turn
By Turn... Was $27,280


r 3poller VU V, Lla U...
Was $21,565
*19,407


USED VEHICLE CHEVROLET-BUICK
/0191 790Q-I'RRC Qnn-7QQ-


PRE-OWNED
7 Passenger, Rear Air, CD, Loaded...


Leather, AT, Certified Power Pack And More...


Hard Top Convertible, AT, CD, Power Pack
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4 Door, AT, AC, Loaded With Power Pack
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LT, Leather, OnStar, Low Miles And More...


AN AIERCANM
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216


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26 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


HONORING OUR

I VE S




Sunday


ovember lh,1 2007


HONDA
on Atlantic


11003 Atlantic Blvd.
866-672-0000
www.cogginhondajacksonville.co


r NISSAN
ON ATLANTIC
"Where There Is Service After The Sale"
10600 Atlantic Blvd.
877-264-4462


'Y a;


9201 Atlantk Blvd
86S-568-5000
PONTIAC-GMC
on Atlantic


* PONTIAC
of Orange Park
7245 Blanding Blvd 1-800-558-6409


Lou Sobh's

HONDA
J '


TOYOTA
at the Avenues
10564 Philips Highway
1-800-431-3952.


=


1310 Cassat Ave.
389-4561
www.erniepalmerscion.com


Saluting America's Heroes!


P WE SALUTE
MILITARY EXCELLENCE!


1515 WELLS ROAD, ORANGE PARK
269-1033


City Mitsubishi on Atlantic
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
City Mitsubishi at the Avenues
10857 Philips Highway
260-9222
City Mitsubishi of Orange Park
7505 Blanding Blvd
779-8100
City Isuzu on Atlantic
10575 Atlantic Blvd.
998-7111
City Suzuki on Atlantic
10585 Atlantic Blvd.
OOR-71 11I


Saluting The Men & Women
Of Our Armed Forces


Remembering Those Who Ser
r5602 Colony Pine N. 3/2, 1408sf. $107,500
5654 Bryner Dr. 3/2 TH, 1564sf. $129,750
r2035 Rivergate Dr. 4/3, 2582sf. $425,000
2387 Dumfries Ct. 3/2, 1217sf. $162,900
r480 Sherwood Oaks Dr. 3/2 TH, 1512sf. $170K
r3729 Mill View Ct. 4/2, 2234sf. $274,900 4
Folsom Rd. 10.2 AC in Baker Co. $125K


S.W.A.T. TEAI
^id t A 3 nay Fantas
S I For The Advent
lInl M [l ]Individualr
In Recognition ofyour serice to your country, SWA. TFAM OPS
.W.A.T TEAM OPS would like to extenda S.WA.T. AM OPS
l offer to active duty military personnel. invites you to live
O AAA g&'llthelifeofaS.W.A.T.
.,000 OR TEAM MEMBER
Intelmj yielM .1I DontJust Dre!am it..
Minimum of 20 paant s. . .


SAVE 30%


1 ;M!1I


We Saiuste Youa

PALMER
TOYVTYA


Brumos
Porsche
OMM 'F& 3F4




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


HONORING OUR

R VE i/E/LS





Sunday


qfovemer 11thi, 2007


Customer Service


connect
I .................................With Convergys


LAKEVIEW HEALTH SYSTEMS
Specializing in the field of addiction
is currently recruiting for the
following positions:
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v p


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0
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Fri, Nov 9th 1:30PM 6:00PM
& Sat, Nov 17th, 10:00AM 3:00PM
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Inbound Customer Service
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Generous scholarships & commitment bonuses are available
For more information, please email
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E SALUTE OUR


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28 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 8, 2007


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