<%BANNER%>
Guantánamo Bay gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098616/00251
 Material Information
Title: Guantánamo Bay gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication: Guantánamo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 3/302012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
General Note: Current issue plus archived issues covering the most recent 12 months.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 60, no. 40 (Oct. 3, 2003); title from title screen (viewed Dec. 10, 2004).
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 64, no. 33 (Aug. 31, 2007).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57204860
System ID: UF00098616:00251
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guantánamo gazette

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

U SS Elrod (FFG 55) Visits Naval Station Guantanamo Bay MC(SW/AW) Justin Ailes Gazette Editor A U.S. Naval ship, currently supporting Joint Inter agency Task Force South (JITF) counter narcotics operations in the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility visited Naval Station (NS) Guanta namo Bay, Mar. 27-30. The USS Elrod (FFG 55), an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, was in port for fuel, water and re-supply services. The crew was also provided opportunities to enjoy Mo rale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) activities and shop at the Navy Exchange. Elrod is deployed to the Fourth Fleet area in support Callaway. Visiting Guantanamo Bay is a great oppor tunity for crew rest and logistics in a port with superb MWR facilities. We appreciate the hospitality and tre mendous support available here. USS Elrod (FFG 55) visits Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for water, fuel and re-supply services. The Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate is conducting counter narcotics operations, supporting Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF) in the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility. Operation Martillo (Spanish for Hammer) is a U.S., the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by JIATF South, a component of SOUTHCOM. Operation Martillo is a component of the U.S. governments coordinated interagency regional security strategy in sup port of the White House Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime and the U.S. Central America Regional Security Initiative. Fourteen countries are participating: Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Pana ma, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States. JIATF is a multiservice, multiagency national task force telligence fusion and multi-sensor correlation to detect, promotes security cooperation and coordinates country team and partner nation initiatives in order to defeat the

PAGE 2

Job/department: Age: Home State: Hero: Quote: Favorite sports team: Favorite hobby: Favorite book: Favorite movie: Favorite GTMO restaurant: Favorite musician: Favorite TV show: Greatest passion: Currently working on: How the NAVY has improved her life: Sailor of the Week because: SEAMAN PERSONNEL SPECIALIST NYOME ALGARIN MC2(SW/AW) Justin Ailes Gazette Editor G TMOs Red Cross Host Ridgeline Hike A merican Red Cross station person nel and volunteers at Naval Station Guantanmo Bay Cuba, in coordination with Joint Task Force GTMOs 170th Mili hike, Mar. 24. The three mile hiking event, held at the three miles, provided community mem bers an opportunity to show their support for Red Cross services and to recognize March as American Red Cross Month. The hike also introduced many of the secondary trails, in the Ridgeline trail sys tem to members of the community, said event co-organizer Army Sgt. Dora Brock. The 170th formed a group called the Trail Blazers and took the lead in clearing and cleaning the trail. The group has collectively contributed approximately 300 volunteer hours cleaning and maintaining the trails, Brock said. More than 70 base residents participated in the hike, with approximately 50 volun teers providing water throughout the course and serving as trail safeties. We wouldnt have been able to host this event without the volunteer and commu nity support, and the assistance of event cosaid Brock. The feedback weve received from the hike was that the participants en joyed the course and had a great time hiking through some challenging trails. Community members participate in GTMOs JTF 170th Military Police Battalion and American Red Cross Ridgeline Trail hike, Mar. 24. The over three mile hike supported Red Cross services and invited participants to recognize March as American Red Cross Month. T Kirk R. Hibbert signed a Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) proclamation, Mar. 26. Every year during April, activities are held na tionwide to bring awareness and promote the prevention of sexual violence through the use of special events and public education. Preventing Sexual Assault is Everyones Duty. During April, the Fleet and Family Service Cen ter will be sponsoring a number of activities to help bring awareness to preventing sexual assaults. One of the scheduled activities is a play Terence Peck G TMO CO Signs Sexual Assault Awareness P roclamation called Sex Signals. S ex Signals is a sexual assault prevention presenta tion that incorporates improvisational comedy, educa tion, and audience interaction. During the play, au dience members will be asked to provide solutions for creating safer and healthier interpersonal sexual relationships and how they could positively intervene when they witness vulnerable situations that could lead to sexual assault. The play is scheduled at the Windjammer on April 1 at 2:30 p.m. and April 2 at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. In addition to the three sex Signals shows in April, some of the SAPR Victim Advocates and I will be manning an informational table at the NEX atrium, said Susan K. Perez, Sexual Assault Response Coordi nator, Fleet and Family Support Center, GTMO. The booth will be manned by Perez and two Victim Advocates (VA) over three separate days to answer GTMO residents questions related to sexual assault and the SAPR Program. On April 6, the booth will be manned from 2:30 p.m. April 23 from 10:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.

PAGE 3

C haplains Corner N avy Concludes Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2012 U.S. Fleet Forces Public Affairs T he Navy wrapped up its largest annual security exer services ability to respond to nation-wide threats to its instal lations, units, personnel and families. The exercise, known as Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC-CS) 2012, was led by Com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) and Commander, Navy In Our intent was to accurately simulate real-world conditions, and to assess how our forces operate in that environment, said Adm. John C. Harvey Jr., commander of USFF. Overall, it was to the lessons weve learned from previous years. One of the takeaways from last years exercise was that sud caused by personnel entering and exiting local bases under in creased scrutiny. Whenever you have Sailors and other citizens in a grid locked situation outside of a Navy base, theyre in an envi ronment where theyre vulnerable, said Rear Adm. Phil Da vidson, USFFs director for operations and intelligence. We opened up our lines of communication and worked with state and local residents understood how base access could be af T here once was a tailor who was old and dying and called his brothers to his bed Chaplain Tung Tran NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Chapel Services The Key to Happiness side. They talked and prayed together. At last the dying man said, I want my key to heaven. He was brought a prayer book entitled The Key to Heaven, but the dying man shook his head. They brought wanted. They all tried in vain to guess what the man had in his mind. What could his key to heaven be? Perhaps such an unusual request was the result of his delirium. Suddenly one of the brothers, guessing what the dying man was thinking about, went to get the needle with which he worked with for so many years. How his eyes gleamed and and murmured almost inaudibly: The two of us have worked hard together old friend, but I devoted my work to Gods glory. With my you will be for me, blessed needle, my key to the gates of Heaven. If its hard to understand heaven or if one does not believe in heaven, how about happiness? Work hard, stay focused on whats important. That may be the key to happiness and good health if not heaven itself. GTMO good health and happiness to all. fected and the potential for delays on adjacent highways and roads near naval installations. We also took many important steps to reduce the likelihood of gridlock. I am very impressed with the professionalism and support our Navy received from our civil partners around the country during this exercise, said Adm. Harvey. We began reaching our intentions and make them aware of how we could work together to avoid problems. They really came through and did a superb job! The two exercises, each with a distinct focus, occurred si multaneously and trained and tested security force person nel throughout a number of force-protection scenarios. These scenarios ranged from identifying surveillance to large-scale, multifaceted threats originating from the sea and air. Secu rity forces were assessed on their response to the emerging threats. Information was collected throughout this years exercises and will be assessed to identify tactics, techniques and procedures that can be improved going forward. threat, but is a regularly scheduled exercise.

PAGE 4

Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/NSGuantanamoBay T he Multi-Cultural Observance (NS) Guantanamo Bay hosted the Womens History celebration at the installations chapel, Mar. 27. The Womens History celebration was held to remember and honor generations of women who pio neered advances in civilian and mili tary life, while responding to gender During Womens History Month, we recognize that the pioneering legacy of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers is revealed not only in our history books but also in our lives at Guantanamo Bay and the free choices we make every day, said Carol Leaphart, NS Guantana mo Bay Multi-Cultural Observance termination and limitless potential of our daughters and granddaughters. In our generation we must stand and defend the dream of freedom and justice for all genders. The event featured educational skits and performances from the installations W.T. Sampson school students, readings from female ci vilian and service members in the community, and a speech from keynote speaker Charlotte GeorgeForeman, outlining the important roles women have served through out history. George-Foreman worked full time for the Department of Defense (DoD) in various billets, but mostly as an educator with DoD schools for is a full time secondary teacher at W.T. Sampson and has taught at the installation for the past 13 years. Womens History Month is about celebrating women who taught us how to move and make progress in the midst of adversity and diffi borders, said Leaphart. We are celebrating women who taught us how to walk fearlessly, beyond the limitation, beyond the restrictions and beyond the boundaries imposed by the traditions of society. In the face of perilous times, courageous women of history like Susan B. An thony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sou joror Truth, Eleanor Roosevelt, Con doleezza Rice, and Michelle Obama, stood up against the storm winds of glass ceilings and open doorways of opportunities for all women, of ev ery color and every creed, to be edu cated and develop to become all that they dream to be. Proclamation 8780, signed Mar. 1 by President Barack Obama rec ognizes March as Womens History Month and states, As Americans, ours is a legacy of bold independence and passionate belief in fairness and justice for all. For generations, this intrepid spirit has driven women pioneers to challenge injustices and enduring equality. During Womens History Month, we commemorate their struggles, celebrate centuries of commitment to the rights, security, and dignity of women in America and around the world. Guantanamo Bays M MC2(SW/AW) Justin Ailes Gazette Editor

PAGE 5

Multi-Cultural Observance Committee Commemorating Achievement And Equality

PAGE 6

Stacey Byington I Corpsmen detailers and a member of the placement team traveled from Millington, Tenn., to visit U.S. Naval Hospital Guantanamo Bay (USNH GTMO), March 20-21. The visit was of the command, as well as give Sailors an opportunity to talk to their detailers face-to-face. L eading the team was HMCM (SW/AW/FMF) Lucas Van Emelen, lead detailer for Navy Corpsmen. He was accompanied by HMC(SW/FMF) Vincent Soto, the HM A and C schools detailer, and HM1(FMF/SW) John Kitchen, a member of the en listed placement team. Watson, USNH GTMOs Command Master Chief. To have them come here and actually experience GTMO helps them understand W atson said that the hospitals Corpsmen had an opportunity cess for selecting people for those billets. orders received them, added Watson. H M2 Latoya Hooper works in the hospitals Pharmacy and C orpsmen Detailers Visit U .S. Naval Hospital G uantanamo Bay My visit with the detailer was great, said Hooper. I was very impressed by Chief Soto, and the level of knowledge he possessed with regards to the submission o f my IDC School (Independent Duty Corpsman) request package. I was pointed in the right di rection very quickly, and by the time my session was over, I knew exactly what I needed to do. T he three Millington visitors were impressed with the quality of GTMO Corpsmen and the professionalism everyone displayed. We are working diligently to understand the needs here, said Van Emelen. It has been an eye-opening experience. Its a beauti ful place. O ne of the issues currently challenging the command is the fact that Fed/Fire does not currently operate ambulance services for the community. Corpsmen who work in the hospitals Emer (EMT), and must qualify to drive the hospitals ambulances. We do it all, said CAPT Barth Merrill, USNH GTMO Execu men can get training in areas that they might not get in other as signments. A good percentage of the commands enlisted Sailors are junior many Corpsmen who come to Guantanamo Bay are single or ar rive unaccompanied without their families, which means shorter I n a brief to hospital leadership, the detailers said that public wise consider orders to the hospital. One of the things we need to do is change the mindset of how Guantanamo Bay is perceived, said Soto. When I mention GTMO to Corpsmen, they tend to react negatively. We need to change that image. W hat many Corpsmen and other enlisted personnel who could get orders to GTMO dont realize is that there is much more to the base than the mainstream media portrays. The base has almost 6,000 residents, and hospital personnel interact with almost all of them. The detention center is several miles away from where most a DoDDS school system for kindergarten through 12th grades. GTMO is a great place to come for those with families, said Merrill. If Corpsmen want leadership and education opportuni ties, then they should consider orders to GTMO. Naval Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., who visited Guantanamo Bay to get a feel for some of the unique challenges and opportunities for Corpsmen assigned to the hospital here. U.S. Navy Photo by Stacey Byington

PAGE 7

The SCOOP GTMO JOB HUNT VEHICLES ELECTRONICS PAO-CLASSIFIEDADS@ USNBGTMO.NAVY.MIL. If sent to any other e-mail, it may not be pub that weeks Gazette. Ads are removed after two weeks. Re-submit the ad to re-publish. The Ga zette staff and NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, page. tion on all content. Call MC2 Justin Ailes at 4520 with your questions or concerns. HOUSEHOLD GOODS JTFS SAFE RIDE HOME. BASE PHONE DIRECTORY WINDJAMMER WEEKEND LUNCH LIBERTY GTMO HISTORY HIKE CAR BUYING STRATEGIES EASTER EGG HUNT EASTER DAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH COOKING CLUB LEEWARD AIR TERMINAL UPDATE FLAG FOOTBALL LEAGUE REGGAE/HIP HOP SHOW MWR ELECTRICIAN COMPUTER TECH CHILD AND YOUTH PROGRAMS ASSISTANT To apply for a job, call the Human Resources Of GTMO SHOPPER FRIDAY MAR. 30 Hunger Games (new) The Grey SATURDAY MAR. 31 Hunger Games (new) Safe House SUNDAY APR. 01 Red Tails (last) MONDAY APR 02 Extrmly Loud & Incrdbly Close (last) TUESDAY APR. 03 Underworld Awakening (last) WEDNESDAY APR. 04 Man On A Ledge THURSDAY APR.05 Journey 2 CALL THE MOVIE HOTLINE @ 4880 MOVIES DOWNTOWN LYCEUM IOM SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT The Interna SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT FOR FISHING RECREATION OUTDOOR REC YARD SALES MISC CYP FLEX CDC CLERK TRAINING AND CURRICULUM SPECIALIST HRO TELECOMMUNICATIONS MECHANIC SUPERVISOR MANAGEMENT ANALYST LAKESHORE TOLTEST ADMIN ASSISTANT/BOOKKEEPER

PAGE 8

MC2(SW/AW) Justin Ailes Gazette Editor G uantanamos CYP Host Fourth Annual Fashion Show T he Child and Youth Programs (CYP) at Naval Station (NS) Guantanamo Bay, hosted their fourth annual fashion show at the installations Windjammer ballroom, Mar. 24. T he event was held to showcase the talents of the installations youth performers, exhibit clothing from numerous cultures, and offer an entertaining venue for community members and their families. This was a great approach in getting the com munity to work and have fun together, said Regina Peck, NS Guantanamo Bays CYP Program Lead. It really showed that if we put our hands and heart to gether we can accomplish great things. This event al lowed the children an opportunity to showcase many of their talents and creativity. C ommunity members ranging from infants to adults displayed casual, sport, cultural, and formal wear as they walked the run-way modeling todays fash ions. Several of the children have participated in the CYP fashion show before and were looking forward to doing it again this year, said Peck. They turned it up a notch this year. They all appeared to enjoy performing in the show and they didnt seem to be nervous at all. The CYP displayed some of their many talents and ex periences during the show, a ccording to Peck. The CYP staff played as role models and mentors for the children in our community, said Peck. The child and youth program is designed to reach out to the community with all types of activities and events. N S Guantanamo Bays W.T. Sampson elementary/high school National Honor Society, Youth Sponsorship Pro gram Committee, Navy Exchange, Naval Station Hospi tal, Marine Corps Security Force Company (MCSFCO) Marines and Windjammer staff were among the many supporters of the fashion show.