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Guantánamo Bay gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098616/00241
 Material Information
Title: Guantánamo Bay gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication: Guantánamo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 1/13/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
General Note: Current issue plus archived issues covering the most recent 12 months.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 60, no. 40 (Oct. 3, 2003); title from title screen (viewed Dec. 10, 2004).
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 64, no. 33 (Aug. 31, 2007).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57204860
System ID: UF00098616:00241
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Preceded by: Guantánamo gazette

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JAN. 13, 2012 uantanamo ay Terence Peck G uantanamo Bay R C Day T he Cuban Community Assistance Program (CCAP) held its 2nd annual Three Kings Day Celebration on Jan. 8 at the Cuban Community Center. The Hispanic celebration, traditionally held on Jan. 6, commemorates the story of the three kings who present ed presents to baby Jesus. The ideal to hold the first commemoration last year came from a Special Category Resident. Cuban specialcategory residents are current or former employees of the base who decided to live on-station after the U.S. and Cuba broke diplomatic ties in the early 1960s. In Nov. 2010, one of the Cuban residents spent some time reminiscing about the long forgotten tradition of celebrating Three Kings Day, said Melanie Resto, CCAP manager. This sparked my interest to revive the tradi tion in January 2011. This years event was bigger and was combined with the annual Cuban American Friend ship Association day celebration. Resto said that the SCRs remember that in many towns in Cuba, the day is celebrated with a formal procession. Men dressed as the Kings would lead the parade, toss ing candy and treats to the children, she said. Similar to American tradition, children would leave food and water, not for the reindeer and Santa, but for the three kings and their camels. Before the start of the event, Chaplain Douglas THREE KINGS DAY

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Job/department: Age: Hometown: Quote: Favorite sports team: Favorite hobby: Favorite book: Favorite movie: Favorite GTMO restaurant: Favorite musician: Favorite TV show: Greatest passion: Ambition: Currently working on: How the Navy has improved his life: Sailor of the Week because: I ing spiny lobsters has spread throughout the Caribbean, two researchers visited the Naval Sta tion from Jan. 10-13 to prepare for a long-term study. Dr. Donald Behringer, assistant professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. and Dr. Mark Butler IV, professor at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Va. worked with the Public duct the research. The virus known as Panulirus argus Virus 1 scribed from any lobster species in the world, ac cording to Behringer. In 2000, we discovered a virus infecting juve nile spiny lobsters in the Florida Keys, said Beh eries through its impact on juvenile populations. When the juvenile lobsters become infected by the virus they become sedentary, stop feeding, rus also alters their normal ecology. Lobsters are normally social, but healthy lobsters avoid resid ing with diseased lobsters to reduce their risk of infection. The U.S. National Science Foundation is fund ing their research. The Foundations mission in ence and engineering. The purpose of the study is to understand the dispersal of planktonic lobster larvae throughout the Caribbean along with a viral disease that the larvae sometimes carry, said Michael McCord, NAVSTA GTMOs Environmental Director. This information is crucial for the sustainable manage ment of lobster populations in the Caribbean and the GTMO site is a key component of the study. ers selected GTMO to carry out their research because it is a good location to test if their larval dispersal model is giving them good information, according to Behringer. We have determined that PaV1 is wide spread throughout the Caribbean and hypoth esize that the adults pass the virus to their lar vae and the larvae acts as vectors for the virus, distributing it around the Caribbean as they R V F or L S A isturb R S circulate in the ocean currents , he said. We sampled adult lobsters from locations through out the Caribbean to determine the prevalence of PaV1 and hence estimate the number of larvae produced in an area that might be vectors for the disease Based on this and output from a complex bio-physical oceanographic model, we can predict the number of infected larvae that should be arriv ing to a location such as GTMO. lectors were deployed at Caracoles Point and near the Windward Ferry Landing. The collectors will be deployed in those areas for six to nine months and will be checked monthly. Behringer said the collectors should not be dis turbed by GTMO residents during this period be cause it would cause the lobster post-larvae that nating the data from that month. Mike McCord is a strong and reliable collabo rator, GTMO has excellent knowledge of those using Guantanamo Bay, and folks at GTMO are knowledgeable and honorable, said Behringer. In many locations throughout the Caribbean, the security of the collectors is very much in doubt as they get stolen repeatedly, not allowing us to col lect the data. We do not envision this will be an issue at GTMO. According to Behringer, the post-larval lob Guantanamo Bay, during the new moon each month. We need several months of data because we can only sample our collectors once per month when the post-larvae arrive, Behring er said. We also need to account for monthly variability so several months of data are need ed to get a good estimate of the average per centage of infected larvae arriving. Behringer said that he appreciates the as sistance and access the U.S. Navy and Joint Forces at GTMO have given him. Its good to know that they recognize the importance of our natural resources and do and encourage conservation, he said. The research we are conducing at GTMO stands to greatly improve our understanding of how diseases operate in the marine environment.

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PAGE 3 A s tion of various government leasders during the U.S. presidental election, Americans working and serv ing overseas can begin preparations now to ensure their votes are counted. In an effort to make the registration and voting process simpler for Americans working and serving overseas, Congress passed the Uniformed Services and Overseas Citizens Absentee Act (UOCAVA) in 1986. The Act covers voting by members of the seven uni formed services and their eligible dependents; members of the U.S. Merchant Marine and their eligible depen dents; Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad ministration; and U.S. citizens residing outside the Unit ed States. To collect data from the states on the number of ballots sent and received by voters covered under the UOCA VA, Congress passed The Help America Vote Act of 2002 each regularly scheduled general election for Federal Of fice to the United States Election Assistance Commission (EAC). In October 2011, the EAC released its fourth report to Congress regarding UOCAVA voting. The report high E arly F or A V Terence Peck lighted that there were more than 611,000 UOCAVA bal lots to overseas civilian and uniformed services voters in 2010. According to the report, more than 211,000 of those ballots were returned and submitted for counting by vot ers. However, there were approximately 400,000 ballots that were difficult to discern; unless ballots are re turned as undeliverable or spoiled, which accounted for nearly an additional 47,000 ballots, States often lack the ability or resources to track them. U.S. citizens who live overseas can ensure that their votes are accounted for by taking steps today to register if they havent already, said Lt. Cmdr. Dave Smith, Na val Station GTMOs voting officer. Qualified service members and overseas citizens can by visiting the FVAP.gov website and submitting the Fed eral Post Card Application (FPCA). For U.S. citizens who Military personnel and DoD civilians in APO/FPO lo cations and Americans abroad can use the U.S. Post Of fices Express Mail once they receive their ballots, using Label 11-DOD. The label permits voters to send their ballots back to the States at no cost and also can be tracked online. For more information on Absentee Voting visit www. fvap.gov or contact Lt. Cmdr. Smith at 6157 or ET1 Ro lando Robles at 4721. T and retired military personnel the opportunity to participant in two contests during its 2012 ASYMCA Essay and Art Contest. Children who wish to participate in the Art contest have until Feb. 17 to submit a 6x8-inch drawing of their military family. The contest is opened to children in grades kindergarten to sixth. Savings Bonds respectively. One top winner from each military service will be highlighted on the Armed Service YMCA annual Military Family Month poster. The essay contest seeks high school students from 9th 12th grade who can write about their military hero in at least 100 words, but less than 300. ure from U.S. military history. in two high school categories, ninth and tenth, and eleventh and for second place. Winners of both the art and essay contests will have their winning A A A rt C S ubmission D A Terence Peck entries displayed in a number of locations in the Washington, D.C., area, including in the Russell Rotunda, and are recognized at an an nual luncheon on Capitol Hill. For entry forms and more information, visit the ASYMCA website at www.asymca.org.

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J an. 9 mark ed a major mile stone in the history of U.S. Naval Hospital Guantanamo renovated Primary Care Clinic. David Woods, USN, Com mander, Joint Task Force Guan USA, Deputy Commander, Joint Task Force Guantanamo; Capt. Kirk Hibbert, USN, Com Station Guantanamo Bay; and Capt. Richard Stoltz, Com Hospital Guantanamo Bay. izes what we are trying to ac complish with the entire refur bishing of the hospital, said Capt. Stoltz. With our reno vated Primary Care Clinic we of primary care services to ev eryone who resides at GTMO nationals, and contractors. The new clinic has more space al lowing us to provide more ser vices. It also allows us to move further along toward the Medi cal Homeport model of care. Rear Adm. Woods added that care of the troops and their fam ilies is one of the priorities of the Navys strategic plan for the de fense of the 21st century, and the care provided at USNH GTMO is second to none. U R Stacey Byington This (care of our troops and their families) is important, and it is an important part of our mis sion, said Woods, addressing Capt. Hibbert echoed the same sentiments. I always bring visi tors to the hospital, and every time I come here, there is a sense of customer service. The newly renovated Primary Care Clinic is located in the same area of the hospital as the previ million renovation which began in October 2009, and continues. The Primary Care Clinic is one of look. ences is the space, says nursing worked at the hospital for more than six years. There is a lot more room, she said. The front desk has been moved, and it has more space to move around in. There are more treatment rooms, an extra exam room, more storage space, and the doctors now have their ment for the clinic which includes new patient exam tables, a cardiac ultrasound scanner, new workstations for IV stands, to name just a few. the clinic and hospital (built in 1954) in more than 20 years. RENOVATED

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Chaplain L. Jones T he Martin Luther King Jr. holiday continues with its national theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A day on not a day off. In keeping with the theme I would like to encourage us to take time to remember the cause for which Dr. King was assassinated 44 years people. It is also important that we take this time to reflect upon how his works and life teachings have made an impact upon our world and our individual lives as well. Today, the King holiday is celebrated at U.S. mili tary installations and is observed by local groups in C haplains Corner R ecreational boaters on the Naval Station are fail ing to follow base instructions by taking their vessels within the boundaries at Philips Dive Park. According to LT. Shawn Ware, Naval Station Guan tanamo Bays Port Operations Officer, boaters are vio lating Naval Station GTMO Instruction 1710.10B which closes all vessel traffic within Philips Dive Park. O ff L imits o B Terence Peck Hol mes provided the opening prayer. Music entertain ment included Spanish songs sung by David and Marta Melendez, an opera song sung by Liana Merrill and a flute solo performance by Melissa Voshell. Diovany Gonzalez and her daughter, Melanie performed a tra ditional Panamanian folklore dance. Resto read a poem called Los Tres Reyes Magos, which is about the three kings. king, said Resto. The Hispanic American Heritage Associa their musical talents to make this event one to be remembered. T HREE KINGS DAY In the interest of safety, Philips Dive Park has been set aside as a dedicated location for SCUBA diving and snorkeling, said Ware. Due to that designation and the wealth of underwater structure s in the park, there is typically a higher density of personnel in the water than is found in other locations. Ware said that the location is also an area where be ginning dive classes are taught. Many of the divers there have minimal experience, he said. All of these factors combined led to the des ignation of Philips Dive Park as off limits to all motor ized boat traffic. Boaters violating the instruction are issued citations appear before the Harbor Magistrate at Harbor Court. Penalties for violating the Instruction range from sus pension of their MWR Captains License and boating privileges to UCMJ proceedings, according to Ware. In an recent email to base residents, Ware wrote that vessel traffic through Philips Dive Park presents a sig nificant safety hazard and that the buoy line is not to be crossed for any reason. nations around the world. We will celebrate the leg acy of the Dream here in GTMO on 16 Jan with a ceremony beginning at 1700 at the Windjammer and continue with a commemorative march leading to the chapel. Our MLK observance will culminate with a celebration service at the chapel. However, in keeping that legacy alive it is impor tant that we all find ways to live out the Dream by taking action in whatever way that results in a posi tive change in the lives of individuals who in turn will make an impact on our communities and the world. More importantly, as military personnel we act everyday through our sacrifice to preserve the se curity and freedom that so many have paid the ul timate sacrifice. You should take pride in knowing that you join the line of legacy makers such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.!

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PAGE 7 The SCOOP IOM GTMO JOB HUNT VEHICLES ELECTRONICS not removed HOUSEHOLD GOODS MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL SPECIAL JTFS SAFE RIDE HOME. TUESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA AND PASTA UFC FIGHTS LEATHER CRAFT CLASSES MLK 1 MILE WALK/5K RUN JIDC KICK-OFF MEETING GBSC HOLIDAY SOCIAL MLK BOWLING TOURNAMENT 2012 MLK COMMEMORATION FFSC ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASS NAVIGATING FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT SEABEE LIONFISH DERBY CHALLENGE CRAFT FAIR REGISTRATION MWR HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT (2) FITNESS INSTRUCTOR COOK (BAYVIEW) (2) REC ASSISTANT COMPUTER TECH WAITER/WAITRESS (3) BOWLING MANAGER FOOD SERVICE (4) I.D. CHECKER (BAYVIEW) (2) CHILD AND YOUTH PROGRAMS ASSISTANT LIBRARY AID 74121 or stop by NAF HR in Bldg. 760. GTMO SHOPPER FRIDAY JAN. 13 AATC: Chipwrecked Immortals SATURDAY JAN. 14 In Time (last) J. Edgar (new) SUNDAY JAN. 15 Puss In Boots (last) Girl With The Dragon Tattoo MONDAY JAN. 16 Tower Heist TUESDAY JAN. 17 Twilight: Breaking Dawn WEDNESDAY JAN. 18 The Rum Diary THURSDAY JAN.19 Jack And Jill CALL THE MOVIE HOTLINE @ 4880 MOVIES DOWNTOWN LYCEUM DON SUPERVISORY MEDICAL RECORDS TECH COMMAND PERSONNEL LIAISON FMI Call 4441, or stop at Bulkley Hall Rm. 211. Posi OUTDOOR REC LOST AND FOUND NAVY FEDERAL PART-TIME MEMBER SERVICE REPRE SENTATIVE Available immediately, apply at www.navyfederal. org. For questions contact Sara at 74333 or sara_presley@ navyfederal.org SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANTS (OYFT) ESL (ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE) TEACHER (OYFT) CARPENTRY TEACHER FMI, call International Organization For Migration (IOM) at 74788. YARD SALE MLK JANUARY 16

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T will be holding its Mail Orderly Class from 9-10 a.m. on Jan. 19 at Bulke ley Hall. C personnel to be mail orderlies. D epartment of Defense Postal Manual 4525.6 and OPNAVINST 5112/1 govern mail handling rules and regulations. Commands are responsible to en sure Orderlies are in compliance with DoD 4525.6 and OPNAVINST 5112/1 with regards to Mail Orderly designa tions, said Richard Vargas, GTMOs Terence Peck C lass E P ail Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/NSGuantanamoBay ered in the Mail Orderly class. P current mail handling rules and regula tions and receive recent, updated changes to the mail orderly program, according to Vargas. V argas hopes that the class will help im prove some of the mail orderlies timeli ness in retrieving the mail for their fellow command and unit members. Recent problems with mail orderlies is the timely pick up and turnaround of command mail, said Vargas. The ma jority of command orderlies pick up mail without incident, but a few are neglect ing their duties with picking up mail or returning mail for personnel who are no T inspections of all mail rooms and will commence random inspections this year to ensure compliance with rules and reg ulation, said Vargas. Remember, mail is the lifeline for folks when communicating with friends, family and institutions and should be safeguarded along with respecting the individuals privacy, said Vargas. It is important that commands provide per the mail is handled properly. F or more information on the Mail Or derly Class, contact Richard Vargas or LSSN Izac Jackson at 2156 or 2369.

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