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Guantánamo Bay gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098616/00164
 Material Information
Title: Guantánamo Bay gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: U.S. Naval Base
Place of Publication: Guantánamo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 6/13/2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
General Note: Current issue plus archived issues covering the most recent 12 months.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 60, no. 40 (Oct. 3, 2003); title from title screen (viewed Dec. 10, 2004).
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 64, no. 33 (Aug. 31, 2007).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 57204860
System ID: UF00098616:00164
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Vol. 65 No. 24 Friday, June 13, 2008 Terminal Annex opens to the public Just moments after the Windward Passenger Terminal Annex opened, Intelligence Specialist Chief Mark Deleon, was first in-line to drop off his luggage and receive his boarding pass for Saturdays flight. Story by MC1 Robert Lamb NAVSTA PAO Photo by MC1 Robert LambThe grand opening for the Naval Station Guantanamo Bay Windward Passenger Terminal Annex took place last Friday, across from the Downtown Lyceum. Travelers will spend less time waiting for their flights on the Leeward side. The brand new Windward Annex serves outbound passengers on the day prior to all AMC charter flights. "We checked in 39 people on Friday, and we expect that number to increase as time goes by," said Mark Veditz, AMC Terminal Manager. "Passengers must have confirmed reservations to use the annex." For trouble free travel, you’ll need to have the following items. Orders, leave papers, command sponsorship letter, sufficient funds, and travel documents such as passport and/ or Military ID card. To expedite the check in process, make an extra copy of your orders, leave papers and EML paperwork. The check-in counters at the Windward Annex are open from 3:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. every Tuesday, Friday and alternating Mondays. (Space Available Passengers will be processed at the Leeward Passenger Terminal.) Passengers are authorized to check two pieces of baggage not to exceed 70 pounds each (140 pounds total) and 62 linear inches (the sum of the length plus the width plus the height). Space required passengers may purchase space for personal excess baggage. Pets will be processed at Leeward Passenger Terminal on the day of departure. Ensure all prohibited items are removed from checked baggage prior to checkingin. As far as carry on baggage, travelers will still have to ensure there are no prohibited items in their carry-on baggage. Liquid or gel more than 3 ounces maybe permitted in checked baggage only. “Once you’ve checked-in at Windward Annex, you’ll not be able to have access to your bag," said Veditz. "This is the first of many initiatives to improve the number one quality of life issue, air travel." According to Veditz, some other initiatives that NAVSTA Commanding Officer 08:00 AM 08:00 AM Kingston, Jamaica Kingston, JamaicaWednesdays11:00 AM 12:00 Noon Pre Pre Checked Checked Pax Pax Showtime Showtime 10:00 AM Baltimore, MD via Jacksonville, FL Baltimore, MD via Jacksonville, FLSaturdays11:00 AM Norfolk, VA via Jacksonville, FL Norfolk, VA via Jacksonville, FLAlternating TuesdaysDuty Standby / Space Duty Standby / Space A A Showtime Showtime Destinations Destinations 08:00 AM 08:00 AM Kingston, Jamaica Kingston, JamaicaWednesdays11:00 AM 12:00 Noon Pre Pre Checked Checked Pax Pax Showtime Showtime 10:00 AM Baltimore, MD via Jacksonville, FL Baltimore, MD via Jacksonville, FLSaturdays11:00 AM Norfolk, VA via Jacksonville, FL Norfolk, VA via Jacksonville, FLAlternating TuesdaysDuty Standby / Space Duty Standby / Space A A Showtime Showtime Destinations Destinations is trying to improve are: Increased air travel opportunities, reduced ticket prices, other locations for rotator to travel and he's addressing the unaccompanied minors rule that is in place at this time. (Minors flying in and out of the continental United States unaccompanied.)

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2 Friday, June 13, 2008Commanding Officer.....................................................................................Capt. Mark M. Leary Executive Officer..........................................................................................Cmdr. Sylvester Moor e Command Master Chief...............................................................CMDCM(SW/AW) Keith Carlson Public Affairs Officer......................................................................................................Bru ce Lloyd Mass Communication Specialist/LPO...........................................................MC1 Robert lamb Mass Communication Specialist/Editor................................................MC2 Kimberly WilliamsThe Guantanamo Bay Gazette is an authorized publication for members of the military services and their families stationed at U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, and do not imply endorsement thereof. The editorial content is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs Office of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Questions or comments can be directed to the PAO. The Gazette staff can be reached by phone at ext. 4520; fax 4819; by email at pao@usnbgtmo.navy.mil Get the Gazette online at www.cnic.navy.mil/ guantanamo G G G G G aze aze aze aze aze t t t t t te te te te te Guantanamo BayVol. 65 No. 24Easier Traveling NAVSTA Commanding Officer, Capt. Mark Leary(Right Center),Lt. Cmdr. Eileen D'Andrea, Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (Far Left), Mark Veditz, AMC Terminal Manager(Left Center) and Jonathan Slaton, Burns and Roe and Dick Corp.(Far Right), cut the ribbon on the new Windward Passenger Terminal Annex on Friday, June 6. Photo by MC1 Robert Lamb NEX employee earns top award Story by MC1 Robert Lamb NAVSTA PAO Michael Crooks, Navy Exchange Guantanamo Bay (GTMO) Employee of the year was selected NEX Employee of the Year Worldwide. Each year, the Navy Exchange Service Command, headquarters for the Navy Exchange System, selects one associate as its Worldwide Associate of the Year. Crooks, who has been with the GTMO Navy Exchange for the past 13 years also works at the School lunch program at the W.T. Sampson Elementary School. This award recognizes individuals at the installation level who distinguish themselves by providing superior customer service to both internal and external customers, and demonstrate keen initiative and dedication in exceeding customer expectations. On Monday, June 16 at 8:30 a.m. at the NEX Atrium officials are planning to have an Award Ceremony and Naval Station Commanding Officer, Capt. Mark Leary will be the guest speaker. Everyone is welcome to attend this ceremony for Michael Crooks, Navy Exchange Worldwide Associate of the Year. Michael Crooks, NEX Worldwide Associate of the Year

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3 Friday, June 13, 2008Catholic Daily Catholic Mass Mon. Fri. 5:30 p.m. (Main Chapel) Vigil Mass, Sat. 5 p.m. (Main Chapel) Sun. Mass, 7:30 a.m. (JTF-Troopers Chapel) Sun. 9 a.m. Mass (Main Chapel) Protestant (GTMO Chapel) Sat. 11 a.m. Seventh Day Adventist Service (Room B) Sun. 5:30 a.m. Iglesia Ni Christo (Room A) 8 a.m. Pentecostal Gospel Temple (Room D) 9 a.m. LDS Service (Room A) 10 a.m. Liturgical Service (Room B) 11 a.m. General Prot. Service 11 a.m. United Jamaican Fellowship (Bldg 1036) 1 p.m. Gospel Service 1 p.m. LORIMI Gospel Service (Room D) 7 p.m. GTMO Bay Christian Fellowship (Fellowship Hall) Friday Religious Services 1:15 p.m. Islamic Service (Room C) 7 p.m. Jewish Service (FMI call 2628)Religious Services/ JTF Troopers ChapelCatholic Services Wed. 11 a.m. Spanish Mass (New) Sat. 6:30 p.m. Vigil Mass (PPI Chapel) Sun. 7:30 a.m. Sunday Mass (New) Religious Services/ Base Chapel Sailor of the Week "I would like to thank my chain of command for selecting me as the Sailor of the Week and I would like to thank the command for acknowledging my hard work."SKSN Chris Naugle NAVSTA Base OPSBoating, fishing and other water sports are some of the biggest advantages of being stationed in the Caribbean. Alcohol can turn a great day on Guantanamo Bay into a tragedy of a life time. Consider these alternatives to using alcohol while afloat. Take along a variety of cool drinks, such as sodas, water, iced tea, lemonade or nonalcoholic beer. Bring plenty of food and snacks. Wear clothes that will help keep you cool. Plan to limit your trip to a reasonable time to avoid fatigue. Remember that it’s common to become tired more quickly on the water. If you want to make alcohol part of your day’s entertainment, plan to have a party ashore at the dock, in a picnic area, at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Marina, or in a backyard. Choose a location where you’ll have time between the fun and getting back into your car or boat. If you dock somewhere like Hospital Cay for lunch or dinner and drink alcohol with your meal, wait a reasonable time (estimated at a minimum of an hour per Boating safety note drink) before operating your boat. Having no alcohol while aboard is the safest way to enjoy the water. Intoxicated passengers are also at risk of injury and falls overboard. Spread the word on the dangers of Boating Under the Influence (BUI). “Using a designated driver for boats is just as important as a designated driver for cars," said Joe Perfetto, NAVSTA Safety Office. Sailors shouldn’t forget that a boat is a type of vehicle and the safe operation is a legal and personal responsibility. Story by MC1 Robert Lamb NAVSTA PAO NAVSTA Ombudsman Steve Doherty (Retired Steve) 84882/77239 gtmoombudsman@aol.com Connie Schiltz 84792/78519 US Naval Hospital Ombudsman Michael Amenson Pager 72090 #073 Ombudsman Corner

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4 Friday, June 13, 2008 June 14 is anniversary of Battle of Cuzco Well Angered at his Marines being picked off piecemeal by snipers, Lt. Col. Robert Huntington, near a state of collapse because of his age, desperately sought to reverse the situation. His opportunity came with the arrival of Cuban guides and about 70 insurrectionists. The Marines and Cubans estimated that while thousands of imperial Spain’s troops were around Guantanamo City, they were facing between 500 to 800 troops in the immediate vicinity. A Cuban colonel, sweat soaked and sipping from his canteen, reminded those at officers’ call that water was a problem for all combatants on Cuba. Why not, he suggested, mount an expedition and destroy the Spaniards’ only drinking water located in their Cuzco Well camp some two miles away? Why not indeed. Although it was only a few miles to Cuzco Well, the actual route of march was closer to six through breezeless, rugged terrain. Companies C and D (some 150 Marines), commanded by Capt W. F. Spicer, with approximately 50 Cubans set out on a painstaking hike. The Cubans, dressed in whites given to them by the Navy, moved out along a path through the bush and the Marines followed. It was an arduous and thirsty trek up a chalky cliff and over steep ridges. The sun’s rays pounded them until some of their numbers, including Capt Spicer, became red-faced, cramped and disoriented. Command then fell to Co C’s George Elliott, the junior captain, who at age 52 and with 28 years of service, was also nearing the end of his own physical limitations. Elliott realized that the high ground, a large razorback hill which dominated the Cuzco Well camp, had been left unoccupied. Elliott and his expedition scrambled up the steep incline coated in brush and cactus, in a foot race for the summit. It was a three-minute sprint that saw them strung out over the face of the rugged slope, grunting, panting and gasping, too pained to swear as they forced their legs to pump and carry them upward. Meanwhile, in the camp below, six companies of enemy riflemen from the Sixth Barcelona Regiment manned the gun ports of the camp, adjusted their sights and prepared to rely on the longrange accuracy of 500 Mausers to stop the Marines. The first leathernecks and Cubans no sooner reached the crest when they became targets of bullets which even at more than 1,000 yards still “sang in the air until one thought that a good hand with a lacrosse stick could have bagged many,” wrote Stephen Crane, author of the ‘Red Badge of Courage,’ who was a war corres-pondent covering the Marines.. Leathernecks calmly chambered rounds into their Lee rifles. A thousand yards was not impossible for men in a Corps that stressed marksmanship. The battle became a long-range shooting match that could be heard all the way back to Camp McCalla. The battle continued for almost another hour before the Spanish decided they’d had enough and started looking for a way to exit Cuzco Well. From their vantage points the Marines watched as the Spanish started to withdraw and gave chase. Back in Guantanamo City, the survivors of Cuzco Well told Gen Pareja they’d been attacked by 10,000 Americans. Whatever, it was enough to discourage the Spanish from attacking leatherneck positions again for the rest of the war.U.S. Marines raise the American flag on June 14, 1898, at the site of the Cuzco Well, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Official U.S. Navy PhotoCuzco Well Tour Saturday, June 14, 9 a.m. Sign Up at Marine Hill by June 13. For this event free buses will leave Marine Hill at 9:15 a.m. FMI call 2002Story by R.R. Keene Reprinted with permission of Leatherneck Magazine Editor’s note: The following article is part of a three-part series about the service of U.S. Marines in the SpanishAmerican War. It details the service of the Marine battalion of Lt.Col. Robert W. Huntington which was sent to Cuba to face the Spanish. It was Lt.Col. Huntington’s Marines who turned the tide and secured Cuzco Well, leading to the U.S. landing at and later establishment of Naval Base Guantanamo Bay. The date is June 14, 1898, and Huntington’s Marines have been fighting off Spanish snipers for three days.

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5 Friday, June 13, 2008 Editor's note: The national flag we see flying from our flagpoles today has been effective since July 4, 1960, when the states of Hawaii and Alaska were added to the Union. The original flag of our country was created within a year of American Independence. Its birthday is regarded as the day it was given official recognition by the Continental Congress as the national flag o f the United States of America, in June 14, 1777. In honor of Flag Day, people were asked what they felt about the flag. These are t heir answers: What does the flag mean to you? "The U.S. flag symbolizes peace, honor, truth, justice, freedom, and strength. To me it stands for all those lost but not forgotten, all those who serve now and served previously without thanks, and all those who hold the American spirit in their hearts." EO2(SCW) Mario V. Perez "I immigrated to the United States in 1970 and it was 20 years later and 8 years of service before I finally achieved citizenship. Though I didn’t come from a country that was as down trodden as some, the opportunities this country has given me make me eternally grateful to the men and women who fought for our flag and the freedoms it represents. Whether I see the flag waving in a summer breeze, draped over a coffin of a fallen comrade or a child waving the flag at a parade…I’m instilled with a sense of pride, awe and appreciation." CDR Toby Swain, Supply Officer "When living in the United States I was always proud when I saw the flag but it has taken on an ever greater significance living in GTMO. Colors is a part of daily life for everyone here in GTMO. It is amazing to see the flag go up at Bulkeley Hall while looking across the water at communist Cuba. The flag stands as a shining beacon of everything that is great and free about our country." AT1(SW/AW) Matt Murcin "Our national ensign is a representation of history, pride, and perseverance. It’s a dynamic symbol that has changed with the country throughout our history, proof that our forefathers stood their ground for what they believed in, giving us all a benchmark to gauge our own accomplishments. The stars and stripes remind me not only of where I come from and what I stand for, but reminds me of the sacrifices that others have made for me, and to do my duty so that their efforts may not have been in vain." ENS Ian Underwood “ To me the flag symbolizes the many layers of pride we share as Americans. Pride in our past and present Pride in our heroes, forefathers, leaders, and children Pride in the battles won and lost, and not for the sake of war, but for the sacrifice Americans will make whilst defending our way of life. And finally pride in our triumph over those who would burn the flag, for in doing so they too have enjoyed freedom from gulag and partook of The American Way." NDC(DSW) Jose Castilla "The U.S. flag gives me a sense of 'PRIDE' for those that have come before me to build this country!!! It also tells me to give 'RESPECT' to those same individuals that fought for my right to serve my country!" MAC(SW/AW) Tom Blitch "The flag is a symbol of reverence to me. Growing up in a safe environment in which the flag was always flown gives me the sense of freedom, tradition, and security. It makes the statement, 'we belong' to something bigger then ourselves." Lt. Nicole Hoffman, MSC, USN

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W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School Alisha DeSaulniers Alisha was born in Georgia and has lived in GTMO since June of 2005. Her plans after graduation are to be free and to have fun. "My best memory of GTMO was when I met Jerry."Nichole Lamb Nichole was born in Florida and has lived in GTMO since February of 2005. She will attend Penn. State University this fall and pursue a degree in Biology. "My best memory of GTMO will be of the beach and my friends."Patty Hammett Patty was born in Scotland and has lived in GTMO since August of 2006. She's now living in Japan and plans to attend college. "My best memory of GTMO was when I had Thanksgiving with Kaylee and her family."Morgan Keener Morgan was born in Virginia and has lived in GTMO since November of 2003. She will attend Virginia Tech this fall and pursue a degree in Chemistry. "My best memory of GTMO will be the beach, friends and family." Eryn McCarthy Zack Wortmann Zach was born in Japan and has lived in GTMO since June of 2006. He will attend the Army ROTC program at Campbell University this fall. "My best memory of GTMO will be the parties and friends." Eryn was born in Florida and has lived in GTMO since September of 2006. She's moving to Italy and will take online classes with the University of Maryland. "My best memory of GTMO was the first day of junior year." "One of the most interesting things you'll find about living and attending school in such a unique setting such as we did, is that you are part of history. Always remember you are part of a selct group and you will be so proud when you can talk and share your experiences about your time in Cuba." Pam Johnson, Class of 1963. "These alumni are people who lived in GTMO a long time ago and who still keep in contact via e-mail and in person, by attending reunions and enjoying the special connection that only people who lived there can understand. "I know now that my life was forever changed because of the experiences in GTMO. Living in Cuba affected my life in a positive way and I wish you the very best, as you move forward into your own "life after GTMO." Frances Matlock, Class of 1963Notes from previous W.T. Sampson alumni, Dea r Brittany Bro w Brittany B GTMO in A p W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School W.T. Sampson High School Alisha DeSaulniers Alisha was born in Georgia and has lived in GTMO since June of 2005. Her plans after graduation are to be free and to have fun. "My best memory of GTMO was when I met Jerry."Nichole Lamb Nichole was born in Florida and has lived in GTMO since February of 2005. She will attend Penn. State University this fall and pursue a degree in Biology. "My best memory of GTMO will be of the beach and my friends."Patty Hammett Patty was born in Scotland and has lived in GTMO since August of 2006. She's now living in Japan and plans to attend college. "My best memory of GTMO was when I had Thanksgiving with Kaylee and her family."Morgan Keener Morgan was born in Virginia and has lived in GTMO since November of 2003. She will attend Virginia Tech this fall and pursue a degree in Chemistry. "My best memory of GTMO will be the beach, friends and family." Eryn McCarthy Zack Wortmann Zach was born in Japan and has lived in GTMO since June of 2006. He will attend the Army ROTC program at Campbell University this fall. "My best memory of GTMO will be the parties and friends." Eryn was born in Florida and has lived in GTMO since September of 2006. She's moving to Italy and will take online classes with the University of Maryland. "My best memory of GTMO was the first day of junior year." "One of the most interesting things you'll find about living and attending school in such a unique setting such as we did, is that you are part of history. Always remember you are part of a select group and you will be so proud when you can talk and share your experiences about your time in Cuba." Pam Johnson, Class of 1963. "These alumni are people who lived in GTMO a long time ago and who still keep in contact via e-mail and in person, by attending reunions and enjoying the special connection that only people who lived there can understand. "I know now that my life was forever changed because of the experiences in GTMO. Living in Cuba affected my life in a positive way and I wish you the very best, as you move forward into your own "life after GTMO." Frances Matlock, Class of 1963Notes from previous W.T. Sampson alumni, Dea r Brittany Bro Brittany B GTMO in A p

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"I still keep in touch with many of the friends I made in GTMO and when we get together at reunions, we talk about what made GTMO special. It's hard to define: the necessity of relying on each other, the adventure of living in a confined space on a foreign island, the actual beauty of the landscape. I hope you can benefit from your time in GTMO, you'll never experience anything like it again." JoAnn DiBella Hawkins, Class of 1963 "I've run the same beaches as you, sailed the same waters, and done the same teenage pranks. We all took the experiences we had in GTMO with us in our lives, we took coral dust in our hearts as we ventured forward into whatever life had in store for us. You are part of history now and it's your turn to make your mark. Go forward with pride. We applaud you, on this most special day." Joyce Hughes Mathews, Class of 1964 Graduation Class of 2008 Graduation Class of 2008 Graduation Class of 2008 Graduation Class of 2008 Graduation Class of 2008 Jason PerezKaylee Williams Kaylee was born in Virginia and has lived in GTMO since November of 2002. She plans to join the Air Force and go to college. "My best memory of GTMO will be hanging out with my friends." Jason was born in Iceland and has lived in GTMO since September of 2005. He will attend Radford University in Virginia this fall. "My best memory of GTMO will be graduating High School with only 12 people." Mujahid AbdullahMujahid was born in Florida and has lived in GTMO since October of 2003. He will leave GTMO and go to college. "My best memory of GTMO will be that everything was free and life was care free." Tyler Robarge Tyler was born in California and has lived in GTMO since August of 2004. He hopes to get into college this fall and pursue a degree plan. "My best memory of GTMO has to be the summer of 2007." r W.T. Sampson High School Senior Class of 2008, w n B rown left p ril of 2008.Photos by Harriot JohnstonKaitlin Whitaker Kaitlin was born in Virginia and has lived in GTMO since May of 2003. She plans to move to Maryland, attend college and pursue a degree in Psychology. "My best memory of GTMO will be diving and meeting new people." Joshua Blood Joshua was born in Pennsylvania and has lived in GTMO since September of 2006. He will go to college and prepare for a military career. "My best memory of GTMO will be the friends I've made."

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8 Friday, June 13, 2008 MilitaryHomefront – Relocation MilitaryHomefront is the official Department of Defense website for reliable Quality of Life information designed to help troops and their families. MilitaryHomefront provides a link to relocation information with detailed information on the major military installations for use by service members, their families and Department of Defense (DOD) civilian employees during a permanent change of station (PCS) move. That’s the official line put out by the Department of Defense (DOD).Let’s take a look at some that might appeal to you. We’ll start with the official view. When you get orders or accept a job at a new duty station, you generally have lots of questions you’d like answered and MILTARYHOME-FRONT has many answers for you with links to a wealth of information. But this is after the fact. You can use MILITARYHOME-FRONT prior to going in to your detailer or monitor and check out places you think you might want to go for your next assignment. If you are married, you can logon at home and you and your family can all explore various installations in many locations worldwide. Obviously, you will want to do this with plenty of lead time so that when you call your detailer or monitor, you can give them a heads up about places that appeal to you. You want to be able to give them plenty of time to scan all the up-coming openings that they have to fill. Most of the installations within MILITARYHOME-FRONT have maps of the base showing the barracks and military housing for families. Usually some areas off base are shown too, but not always. But you will always find information about services available on the installation, the local community, education, employment, medical & dental, Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) events and doings, relocation services, support services, child and teen services, survival tips for those new to the military, special events that happen on the station or in the community, and all the nuts and bolts of operations. It can be a fun time for the family to explore various places in the United States that they might want to consider as well as overseas.It’s best to select two or three potential installations and rank order them as to where you would prefer to go first. Having the ability to investigate a potential assignment can make the actual going there much more pleasant. Granted, your detailer or monitor will not always be able to accommodate your choices but if you work together with enough leadtime, chances definitely improve that you will get one of your choices.If you do not have access to the Internet in your home, your installation Fleet & Family Support Center (FFSC) or Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS) has computers you may use that do connect to MILITARYHOMEFRONT.Story by Research Staff LIFELines When you get orders or accept a job at a new duty station, you generally have lots of questions you’d like answered and MILTARYHOME-FRONT has many answers for you with links to a wealth of information. Jamaican Independence Day Committee AnnouncementsTalent Search Fund-raiser : Saturday, June 21, 8 p.m., Sunken Garden (behind Gold Hill Towers). Looking for all Jamaican Hidden Talent. FMI call 79342. Bicycle Fund-raising Ride: Sunday, June 22, 6 a.m. at Downtown Lyceum to Fenceline back to Downtown Lyceum. Entry fee $12, with a t-shirt. Bikes available at MWR Marine. FMI call Everton at 75846 or 2285. Jamaican Cookoff and Food Sale Saturday, June 28, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Windjammer Recreation Park. FMI call Everton at 75846 or 2285 The JIDC is looking for volunteers for this years celebration in August. FMI call Everton at 75846/2285 or Benford at 75041. Vacation Bible SchoolBASE CHAPEL VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL Protestant VBS: June 16 20 from 8:45 a.m. – noon. Catholic VBS: June 23-27 from 8:45 a.m. noon Please come by the chapel office to register your child for this great event. FMI call 2323 or 2248.

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9 Friday, June 13, 2008President Truman is credited with the phrase, “If you can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen.” Heat is a very real threat in GTMO. The daily temperature here ranges between the mid-80s and 90s, the addition of humidity makes if feel much hotter. Combine that with our outdoor lifestyle and you have a situation where heat injuries are not just likely, they’re inevitable. The best way to reduce your risk of heat injury is to know how they happen and take some simple measures. The human body is a complex machine that uses chemical reactions to perform its work. These reactions can only occur between certain temperatures. If the body temperature falls outside that range then the chemical reactions don’t happen and the machine breaks down. Fortunately, we have ways to control our body temperature. The body has several ways to prevent heat from building up, but none of them are as important as sweat. When you sweat, the evaporation of the water on your skin cools the body. The amount of sweat produced depends on hydration. Sometimes, even proper hydration isn’t enough. On a humid day, the air is already packed with water, so the water on your skin really doesn’t have anywhere to go, making cooling off harder. Heat injuries are a dangerous part of life A heat injury can occur when the body either cannot produce enough sweat or the sweat it produces cannot evaporate due to high humidity. Mild symptoms include muscle cramps, headache, dizziness, nausea, and simply feeling hot. More serious signs are confusion, convulsions, unresponsiveness, and death. Unfortunately, these signs can go unrecognized by the victim and that is how most deaths occur. Prevention — There are several easy ways to prevent heat injury. First and most importantly is hydration. It is crucial to drink before, during, and after physical training. The best source of hydration is water. Simply put, there is no substitute. It’s true that sports drinks are an important source of carbohydrates and electrolytes, but since the typical diet is already high is sodium chloride (salt) electrolyte replacement is not as important as water replacement. Avoid dehydrating fluids such as caffeine and alcohol prior to your workout. Remember that the color of your urine is the best gauge of your hydration status and that proper hydration prevents injury and enhances performance. Another important prevention of heat injury is situational awareness. Avoid working-out when it is too hot. Times to avoid are the midday sun and when the humidity is high. Plan on having water available while working out. Be mindful of your clothing. For example, when wearing body-armor add 10 degrees to the outside temperature. If you are new to GTMO, allow yourself several weeks to acclimatize. Finally, have a workout buddy who can identify the signs of heat injury that you may be unable to recognize in yourself. If a buddy is not available at least notify someone of your plans so that if you don’t return in time someone will go looking for you. Treatment — If you identify the sign of heat injury in yourself or a buddy, quick treatment can save lives. First, remove the victim from the hot environment. Next loosen clothing and cool the body with cool water. If ice is available, place ice packs around the head, armpits, and groin; these areas of the body lose heat the quickest. Finally, seek medical attention. If you call 911, remember to stay in place so that the ambulance can find you quickly. Recently, there have been several 911 calls where the ambulance was unable to find the victim because wellmeaning people moved them to another location. Heat injuries are a dangerous part of life in GTMO, but manageable. By taking precautions, you will be better able to stand the heat. The most important precaution comes from President Truman, “If you can’t stand the heat,” then stay out of it. Story by Lt. Ed Melendez, MC, USN Former Medical Officer, JTF Congratulations to Information Systems Technician 1st Class Carlos Barnes and his wife Shemika on the birth of their baby boy Carlos Donte Barnes Jr. Born May 27, 2008. Weight 6 lb., 8 oz., 51 inches.The Guantanamo Bay Gazette would like to announce the birth of your baby!

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Friday, June 13, 2008 10 MWR HappeningsDo Do Do Do Do wnto wnto wnto wnto wnto wn L wn L wn L wn L wn L y y y y y ceum ceum ceum ceum ceum Friday June 13 Kung Fu Panda 8 p.m., PG, 90 min. You Don't Mess With Zohan 10 p.m., PG-13, 120 min. Sunday June 15 Smart People 8 p.m., R, 94 min. Monday June 16 21 8 p.m., PG-13, 188 min. T uesday June 17 The Incredible Hulk 8 p.m., PG-13, 114 min. W ednesday June 18 88 Minutes 8 p.m., R, 108 min. Thursday June 19 The Forbidden Kingdom 8 p.m., PG-13, 113 min.LIBERTY JUNE EVENTS June 14th Day Fishing 0800 Marina June 14th Midnight Movie 2400 Bulkeley Lyceum Movie Premiering “The Incredible Hulk” June 15th Dinner & A Movie 1930 Tiki Bar June 18th Liberty at the Lanes 1800 Bowling Center June 20th Pirate Cruise 1900 GTMO Queen. FMI Call 2010 FATHER’S DAY BRUNCH AT THE BAYVIEW June 15th 1000 to 1400 Dad’s Price $11.50; Full House $15.95; Children 6 & Under $7.50 Breakfast Only $8.50 Every Dad gets a free gift and a special beverage. For groups of 10 or more reservations are required. FMI Call 75604 MWR and Boys & Girls Club of America Present: OPERATION PURPLE 2008 SKATEBOARDING DAY CAMP AND CLINIC June 16th 20th 0900 to 1300 at Denich Gym Skateboard Park Camp is being offered for beginner to advanced skateboarders between the ages of 9 to 24 years old. Maximum number of participants is 30. Camp is free. Lunch is provided everyday. Pre-register at Denich Gym. All participants should have their own equipment and whatever safety gear required at the skateboard park. Instructor is professional skateboarder Falco Baltys FMI Call 4490 SUMMER KICK-OFF 5K RUN/ WALK June 21st 0700 at the Denich Gym Sign up by June 20th at the Gym FMI Call Audrey at 75576 or email at chapmanaj@usnbgtmo.navy.mil 110th Philippine Independence Day Celebration 2008 Cultural Presentation Downtown Lyceum (In case of inclement weather venue will be at Windjammer) Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Cultural show starts at 8 p.m. $12 Ticket are still available FMI call 77479 or 3126 No Movies on Saturday, June 14, 2008 You Don’t Mess with the Zohan is a 2008 comedy film. The story was written by Adam Sandler, Judd Apatow and Robert Smigel, and was directed by Dennis Dugan. Sandler’s production company Happy Madison produced the film, and Sony Pictures Entertainment distributed it. The movie stars Adam Sandler as Zohan Dvir, an Israeli anti-terrorism commando who fakes his own death in order to pursue his dream: becoming a hairstylist in New York. It was released on June 6, 2008. Directed by Dennis Dugan Produced by Adam Sandler, Robert Smigel Written by Adam Sandler, Judd Apatow and Robert Smigel. Starring: Adam Sandler, John Turturro Emmanuelle Chriqui, Nick Swardson and Rob Schneider.PG-13, 120 min.

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11 Friday, June 13, 2008 GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO ShopperFor Sale GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper GTMO Shopper Editor's note: Gazette will not be published on June 27. GTMO Shopper inputs can be submitted early, or ads will wait until the July 4th edition. Submit in writing by email to pao@ usnbgtmo.navy.mil. For Sale Yard Sales Employment Announcements (2) 2 BCD’s & 1 regulator $200 a piece, 1 pr men’s sz8 dive boots $10, men’s XL wetsuit $25, lg entertainment ctr, $30. FMI 79534. (2) Table and 4 chairs $30 OBO, large TV stand $30 OBO, Outdoor Table $20, Oceanic VDrive Scuba Diving Fins $45 OBO Mares Plana Avanti Quattro Scuba Diving Fins $70 OBO Speargun $70. FMI call 77395. (2) Dell inspiron 1520 2-gig 160 hard drive, Pentium 2.0 Vista premium $850. FMI call 77689/ 8153. (2) GE washer and dryer $80, toshiba labtop 15.4 screen $600, diabetes monitor, appliances, computer items. FMI call 77116. (2) Men's leather Lugz boots 3 pairs Size 7, excellent condition $20/each, Nike cleats size 8$10, Reebok cleats size 9$10, Black military work boots-$5. FMI call 77113. (1) Plants for sale, 12X15 beige rug $40. FMI call 77056. (1) Patio & Indoor plants, orchids, plumeria and bamboo vines for sale. FMI call 74909. (1) Scopapro diving gears size medium man and a regulator $500. FMI call 78446. (1) 1.5 qt. Porcelain baker with serving racknew never used $30; 4 slice Toaster Oven5 years old, seldom used $15; Evenflo infant car seat, new, never used, tan $50; Kodak Easy Share printer 60002 years old, seldom used $50; Sharp Electric Organizer model YO-290, never used $20 and Royal Electric Organizer model RG135ex, never used $20. FMI call 77264. (1) Timex alarm clock radio with CD player and nature sounds. $20. FMI call 78173 or 9834. (1) FUJIFILM PINEFIX S1 Pro DSLR, w/ 28-70mm sigma lens, along with 2GB kingston compact flash. FMI call 6767 or 76538. (1) 18 speed Mans bicycle $110; SCSI cable box-$45; Tailor made golf drivers, $30 and $50. Fishing poles and tackle, good poles and reels with 80 t0 100 pound braded line. FMI call 2080 or 77977. (1) Car Seat for sale: Century, for ages 1-4, 20-45 pounds. From nonsmoking house. Only $20, never in an accident. Available 22/23 June. FMI call 77644. (1) Sony 13 in TV for sale with remote and box $200; Belkin USB wireless card. FMI e-mail 414@yahoo.com (1) King size mattress and box spring $50.; surf board $100; kneeboard $20; body board $10; entertainment center $10; Table with 4 chairs $25. FMI call 79448 or 2345 or 90117. (1) Nordic Trak $75. FMI call 84221. Vehicles & Boats (2) 97 Honda Civic DX Coupe Black, single Owner, Californiabased, 120,000+ miles. All scheduled maintenance at Honda new transmission at 85,000 miles excellent condition, Powerful AC, KBB $4370. Asking $4000. FMI call 78416. (2) Harley Davidson 100th Aniversary Road King, $13,950. FMI call 79492. (2) 1997 Honda Accord 4Dr. Great Condition. Asking $6,000 OBO. FMI call 7269. (2) 24’ Sunclipper pontoon Boat. Fiberglass pontoons with manual and automatic bilge pumps in each. 90HP Mercury engine, recently rebuilt. Garmin color fishfinder. Ratheon radio. Solar battery charger. Live well. Various fishing tackle. 3 anchors, one oversized. $8,000 OBO, FMI call 79527. (1) Double Decker pontoon boat. Great for the family or fishing. Runs great, private bathroom, top deck for sunning or jumping into the water. Very reliable. $4500. FMI call 77216. (1) 1995 Chrysler Concorde. CD, AC needs minor work. $500. FMI call 4330. (1) 2005 Suzuki GS500F. Under 5k Miles, clean title. Black&silver maintained. No test rides, $4500. FMI call 4330. (1) Honda Civic EX, 1994 with new engine. 115 thousand miles, new tires, radiator, brake, 6 CD exchanger, sunroof, and a lot of other new parts $4000. FMI call 78446. (1) 22ft immaculately maintained Tackle Box certified 1995 Century 2100 Dual Console fishing/dive/ ski boat w/1995 Yamaha Salt Water Series OB. New combo depth sounder/fish finder/GPS, new VHF, new bait well pump, new bilge pump, 4 anchors (including sea anchor) with line and chain, all required safety equipment, tandem axel trailer, too many extras to list. An outstanding value at $12,500. FMI call 77729. (1) 2004 Bajaj Cheetak Scooter, 150 CC, manual transmission. Excellent running condition, comes with helmet, goggles, spare tire and tools. $1400, OBO. FMI call 77911 or 5195. (1) 20ft center console fishing/ diving boat w/90hp Johnson OB. VHF radio, depth sounder w/fish finder, dive ladder, am/fm/cd radio w/2 speakers, dual batteries, dual anchors, and fwd seat cushions. All gauges, helm/cable and radio just over 1 year old. Trailer included. $5000/OBO. FMI call 77485. (1) 2001 GSX-R 1000: $4,000 – Power Commander/Chrome Rims. FMI call 84261 or 74844. (1) 1995 Honda Civic: $3,900 – Alpine System/Audiobahn Amp. FMI call 84261 or 74844. (1) 1998 Ford Escort SE, 4dr. automatic transmission, Power Doors, Power Windows, Good A/C. Cruise Control, Power Steering, Rear Window Defroster, AM//FM Cassette Stereo Radio, 4 cylinder, Dark Blue, Great GTMO Transportation. Available end of June. $2900. FMI call 2080 or 77977. (1) 2007 BMS Moped only 190 miles, $1500. FMI call 77265. (1) 1998 Ford Contour, V6, 84k miles, cold a/c, great interior, new battery. Great family car. Located at NEX parking lot. $4000. FMI call 72073 or 77898. (1) 1997 Honda Accord 4DR. Great Condition. Asking $5,500, OBO. FMI call 77269. (2) Medical Records Technician, LGS-0675-05, Summer Employee (Dependent Youth), AD-3501-00, Supervisory Facility Mgmt and Facility Services Product Line Program Mgr., YC-1101-02. FMI contact CNRSE forward Deployed Detachment Office at 4441 or 4822. (2) Paperclips Etc has a Store Managers position available. FMI call 74603/74621. (1) NEX needs a full-time Barber and Beautician. Must have a current licence. FMI call 74115. (1) Hazardous Waste Handler (Motor Vehicle Operator). Naval Facilities Engineering CMD-SE, NAVFAC, U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Announcement No: FN08-012. Apply to : CNRSE Forward Deployed Detachment, (HRO) Bulkeley Hall Building 2144. FMI call 4441 to 4822. (2) Wanted: Coffee table and Household Bar. FMI call 78204. (1) Wanted: Looking for an A frame ladder' and wheel barrel. FMI call 77022. (1) 10yr old Black Lab mix w/ character, content to lay around all day. Super housebroken & intelligent; comes with two beds, all supplies, and meds. Free to good home. FMI call 75622 or 4444. (1) Lordy, Lordy looks who's forty! Melissa Belleman! Navy College Office would like to thank Melissa Belleman, Guy Belleman, and Lori Hickey for providing higher education to the adult learners of the GTMO community. Best of luck to you at your new duty station! “Fair Winds and Following Seas” to ISC Joey Alsonso…we’ll miss your smiling face!", Candice & Shelby. (1) The US Naval Sea Cadet Corps would like to thank the CPOA for all of their support and the GoKart & Pizza Fun Night. The US Naval Sea Cadet Corps would also like to extend their gratitude to the GTMO Spouse’s Club for their sponsorship. We appreciate all that you have done for us. June 14: Mobile Point #398, 7:30 11 a.m. June 14: Caribbean Circle, 6 Cul De Sac, 7 a.m. noon. June 14L Villamar, #732, 7 9:30 a.m.

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12 Friday, June 13, 2008 W.T. Sampson Happenings Dr. Kathy Einhorn, W.T. Sampson Principal, congratulates Morgan Keener on being Valedictorian for the 2008 school year. Morgan received scholarship's from the Officers Spouses' Club and the Booster’s Club. Army Capt. Patrick Ross presented a full Army ROTC Scholarship to Zach Wortmann. PSC Ramon Arana and MAC Alissa Chumley present Nichole Lamb with the Chief Petty Officers' Association scholarship worth $1100. Nichole also received $2500 from the Officers Spouses' Club. Social Studies Teacher, Andrea White presents Phoenix Castilla with the Emily Dickinson Award for Best Writer. Academic Awards CeremonyWesley Belleman, The Einstein Award for the Best Mathematician; Matthew Devine, The Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Award for Best Middle School Science Technician; Stacey McGill, Benjamin Franklin Award for Outstanding Effort and Determination in Integrated History and Literature; Ohmeko Ocampo, The Karl Schwartzchild Award for the Best W.T. Sampson High School Mathematician; Caroline Belleman, The Pythagoras Award for Excellence in Geometry; Thomas Blitch, Edgar Allen Poe Award; Colton Davis and Kyle Robarge, Morco Polo Award; Alexis Leal, Ashely McGill, Diana Ploica and Makayla Linger, Emily Dickinson Award; Katy Basel, The Gauss Award for Outstanding Achievement in Algebra; Robert Armbruster, W.T. Sampson Principal's Award; Kyle French, Diana Polica, Nerilu Colon and Gabriel Montalvo, W.T. Sampson Citizen Award; Wesley Belleman, Makayla Linger, Sam LeVault, Katy Basel and Jackson LeVault, W.T. Sampson Leadership Award; Reiner Perez-Sosa, Most Improved Music Award; Celina Kropushek, Betsy Ross Award for Top History Grades; Felicia Motes, Super Reader Award; Marcus Pegram, High Achiever, Persistent Achiever; Caroline Belleman, Art Award; Robert Armbruster, Excellence in Biology; Courtney Davis, Excellence in Geometry; Travis Paquette, Excellence in Algebra 2 and Major Torley, W.T. Sampson Spirit Award. There were many other outstanding awards given but due to space the Gazette can not publish them all.