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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098615/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Gosport
Uniform Title: Gosport (Pensacola, Fla.)
Running title: Gosport of the Naval Air Station
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Naval Air Station Pensacola (Fla.) -- Public Affairs Office
Naval Air Station Pensacola (Fla.) -- Public Affairs Office
Publisher: Public Affairs Office of NAS Pensacola
Place of Publication: Pensacola Fla
Pensacola Fla
Manufacturer: Pensacola Engraving Co.
Publication Date: October 2, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Escambia -- Pensacola -- Pensacola Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.354167 x -87.305556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began: 1937.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 30, 1937); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 56, no. 15 (Apr. 17, 1992).
General Note: Has annual supplement: Year in review.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 30575998
Classification:
System ID: UF00098615:00001
 Related Items
Preceded by: Air Station news

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Full Text




















VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: GOSPORTPENSACOLANEWSJOURNAL.COM


NASC holds

change of

command,

retirement

ceremony

By Ens. Dan White
NASC PAO

In a ceremony held at
10 a.m. today (Oct. 2) at
the National Naval
Aviation Museum
onboard Naval Air Station
Pensacola, Capt. Patrick J.
Dougherty, commander of
Naval Aviation Schools
Command (NASC) will
be relieved by Capt.
William P Cuilik.


Capt. William P. Culik

Rear Adm. Gary R.
Jones, former
Commander, Naval
Education and Training
Command (NETC),
attended as the guest
speaker. This ceremony
will mark the end of a
successful naval career
for Capt. Dougherty as
he retires after 27 years
of dedicated and honor-
able service.
Capt. Cuilik graduat-
ed from Virginia Tech in
June 1981 and entered
the Navy through
Aviation Officer
Candidate School. He
was commissioned in
October 1981 and was
designated a naval avia-
tor in January 1983.


Capt. Patrick J.
Dougherty


Cuilik's career
includes tours withVC-8,
HSL-41, HSL-45 and
HSL-49. In 1995, Capt.
Cuilik was assigned to the
Office of the Chief of
Naval Operations as a
force structure and pro-
grams analyst. In 1998 he
returned to HSL-49 to
serve as the executive offi-
cer. He reported to the
USS Bonhomme Richard
as air boss in 2001.
Following his tour as air
boss, he reported to U.S.
Joint Forces Command,

See NASC on page 2


'Spirit of Pensacola' coming with 479th FTG ... Jim Seagraves, a sign
painter assigned to the 12th Flying Training Wing Maintenance Directorate at
Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, puts the "Spirit of Pensacola" nose art on the
479th Flying Training Group flagship T-1A Jayhawk Sept. 28. The aircraft will
eventually be used to train combat systems officers (CSOs) at Naval Air
Station Pensacola, when the 479th FTG begins operations there following an
Oct. 2, 3 p.m. activation ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum.
The stand-up of the group also includes activation of three subordinate
squadrons: the 479th Operations Support Squadron and the 451st and 455th
Flying Training Squadrons. The first class will begin in May; the school is
expected to train about 360 students per year when fully operational. CSO
training was directed to NAS Pensacola by virtue of a Base Realignment and
Closure decision in 2005. Photo by Steve Thurow


NAVFAC Southeast


celebrates energy


accomplishments

From Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast
Public Affairs

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) Naval Facilities
Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast applauds the
accomplishments of installations in the region that were
honored with Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Energy
and Water Management Awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009
announced recently.
NAS Pensacola won at the Gold level of the awards.
"Congratulations to all of the FY 2009 SECNAV Energy
and Water Management Awards winners," said Lee Merrill,
NAVFAC Southeast utilities and energy management prod-
uct line coordinator. "I commend the Public Works officers
and staff at these installations that have helped lead the
installations through new technologies and energy efficien-
cy programs. They are all headed in the right direction,
meeting the Navy's goals and the president's goal of energy
independence."
FY 2009 SECNAV Energy and Water Management
Award winners based on FY 2008 accomplishments went
to Navy Submarine Base (SUBASE) Kings Bay, Ga. for
Overall Navy Small Shore and Marine Corps Recruit
Depot (MCRD) Parris Island, S.C., for Overall Marine
Corps Small Shore.
The awards program has been expanded to recognize the
accomplishments of commands who achieved Platinum,
Gold, or Blue levels.
Platinum level of achievement indicates an outstanding
energy program and an exceptional year for energy project
execution. Awards at this level went to SUBASE Kings Bay
and MCRD Parris Island.
Gold level of achievement indicates a very good to out-
standing energy program. Other awards at this level went to

See NAVFAC on page 2


Center for Information Dominance (CID) dominates area CFC goals


By Trista Swauger
CFC Assistant

As the 2009 EscaRosa Combined Federal
Campaign (CFC) kicked off this year's pro-
gram, military and civilian employees of
Center for Information Dominance (CID)
Corry Station dominated the campaign when
they walked in to the local EscaRosa CFC
Office in the first two days of campaigning
surpassing their goal of $38,000.
On Sept. 24, CID Corry Station CFC
Activity Chairperson Chief Cryptologic
Technician (Technical) Michael D. Miller
and his key people turned in another report.
"This is big, very big," stated CID Corry
Station Commanding Officer Capt. Gary
Edwards With CID's new total exceeding
$78,000.00, they have officially exceeded
Corry's all-time record high of $68,000,
which was seen in 2001, as all area cam-
paigns saw a huge increase due to a response
of 9/11.
"Most of our people who give are not mil-
lionaires and yet they give freely of what they
have," Capt. Edwards said. "Our sailors may
never see the recipients of their donations
and that speaks to the heart and spirit of

Seasonal flu shots availa

to eligible, enrolled veter

From Jerron K. Barnett
VA Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System Public Affairs

BILOXI, Miss. The Department of Veterans
Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System has
administering the seasonal flu vaccine to all eligi
enrolled veterans at all of its medical facilities.
Veterans seeking a seasonal flu shot shou
one of the VAGCVHCS facilities along th
Coast in Biloxi, Miss., Mobile, Ala., Eglin AF
and Panama City, Fla.
However, the current seasonal flu vaccine will 1
tect against the H1N1 virus. The H1N1 vaccine is
available. According to the Centers for Disease
and Prevention, the 2009 H1N1 vaccine is expects
available later this year. More specific dates ca
provided at this time. Veterans who have not yet e
to receive VA health care should bring their DD Fc
or other proof of honorable military service.
For more, visit: http.:www.biloxi.va.gov.


Center for Information Dominance (CID) Corry
Station staffers turn in their pledge cards. (Left
to right) CTT1 Cassandra Foote, DC2
Shundrea Richardson, CTTC Michael D.
Miller, CTT2 Scott Recher, CTR1 Jacob Word
and IT1 Matthew Fowler.
which they are giving. I am very proud of
them all."
When Chief Miller was asked what he felt
was the reason they are seeing such a
response this year over past years programs,


he said, "We planned for success from top
down. We selected the right key people (KP)
and ensured they believed in and understood
the campaign. We educated everyone within
the command daily and demonstrated our
support in everything we did. Through com-
mand support, our people saw that CFC was
not just another ask, it was a passionate
responsibility."
CID Corry started talking about CFC
before the campaign kicked off when they
scheduled several speaker opportunities to
educate their people about what CFC's mis-
sion is and how contributions really do make
a difference. Chief Miller said that they are
not done by far; CID has scheduled a few
additional awareness events during the
month of October.
The area campaign has been focusing on
educating the thousands of federal employees
this year about the true purpose of the pro-
gram. Guest speakers of many of the partici-
pating agencies have been asked to visit com-
mands and offices throughout our communi-
ty and senior leadership have been provided
additional information as to the program's


See CFC on page 2


Published by the Pensacola News Journal, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements
constitute Department of the Navy or NAS Pensacola endorsement of products or services advertised.


Vol. 73, No. 39


October 2, 2009










GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Permanent change

of station obligation

policy change


From U.S. Navy Rhumb
Lines

The Department of
Defense directed a
change to how the mil-
itary services fund per-
manent change of sta-
tion (PCS) orders in
fiscal year 2009 and
beyond.
In an effort to best
manage government
funds, the services now
obligate all PCS costs
when orders are issued,
rather than when
orders are executed.
Prior to this fiscal year,
the services were
authorized to issue
PCS orders on credit,
which potentially
allowed for writing
more sets of orders
than were funded. The
previous policy also
allowed PCS orders to
be written, but funded
with next fiscal year's
dollars, permitting
Sailors to set-up
household goods ship-
ments, arrange for
family member travel,
and receive dislocation
allowances in advance
of their actual detach-
ment date. That flexi-
bility has been
removed with the new
policy change.
"Think of this policy
change as the differ-
ence between a credit
card and a debit card.
Prior to 2009, PCS
orders were written as
if on a credit card,"
said Rear Adm. Donald
P. Quinn, deputy chief
of Navy Personnel
"The Navy would
pay the bill once the
service member exe-
cuted the move. Today,
orders are written as if
on a debit card. Once
the orders are released,
the Navy is charged."
Transitioning from
the PCS system of the
past: To best provide
for Sailors and manage
government funds, the
Navy has worked to
implement the perma-
nent change-of-station
obligation policy
change while minimiz-
ing the impact to the
force.
Current funding lev-
els support all PCS
moves through the
remainder of this fiscal
year, and for a portion
of fiscal year 2010.
However, many Sailors
scheduled to detach


during the first quarter
of fiscal year 2010 will
not receive orders until
after Oct. 1.
The Navy is working
to minimize impacts on
Sailors in future years.
Initiatives include
funding and issuing
orders in the current
year for moves occur-
ring early in the fol-
lowing fiscal year.
To best support mis-
sion accomplishment,
fleet sustainability and
training pipeline
mobility, PCS orders
will continue to be
issued with the follow-
ing priorities: Global
War on Terror Support
Assignment rotations,
career milestone billets
such as joint duty, crit-
ical readiness fills,
fills that minimize
gaps at sea for
deployed units and for
Sailors preparing to
deploy.
To avoid the finan-
cial obligation of per-
sonally funding a PCS
move and forfeiting
certain PCS
allowances and entitle-
ments, Sailors and
their families are
advised not to move
before receipt of PCS
orders.
Navy leadership and
detailers will continue
to directly provide PCS
move information to
affected Sailors.
PCS of the future:
Orders are now being
issued on a pay-as-you-
go system, as if using a
debit card. The Navy is
working to balance the
needs of the service
with the need of
Sailors.
As the Navy moves
into the second fiscal
year under this new
policy, most Sailors
will receive adequate
notice and issuance of
orders to properly exe-
cute their move.
Because the Navy is
funding orders as they
are written, we will
operate under tighter
fiscal constraints, in
order to uphold our
charge as stewards of
tax-payer dollars.
To adhere to the
Department of Defense
policy, letters of intent
that include accounting
data are not authorized
as they also obligate
funds in advance of
actual PCS orders.


NA VFAC from page 1


Naval Support Activity (NSA)
Panama City, Fla.; Naval Weapons
Station Charleston, S.C.; and
Trident Training Facility Kings Bay,
Ga.
Blue level of achievement indi-
cates a well-rounded energy pro-
gram. Awards at this level went to
Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort,
S.C.; Marine Corps Logistics Base
Albany, Ga.; NAS Jacksonville,
Fla.; NAS Kingsville, Texas; NAS
Whiting Field, Fla.; NSA Orlando,
Fla.; Naval Station Mayport, Fla.;
and Strategic Weapons Facility,


Atlantic Kings Bay, Ga.
These commands executed com-
prehensive conservation programs
with senior-level command involve-
ment, well-staffed and trained ener-
gy teams, aggressive awareness
campaigns, innovative energy con-
servation measures, and consistent
reduction in energy consumption.
"It was two years ago that Public
Works Department Kings Bay com-
mitted to achieving Platinum and
not only did they do that, they were
the Overall Navy Small Shore win-
ner," said Merrill.
All Navy and Marine Corps
installations and personnel are


NASC from page 1

Joint C41SR Battle Center, where he served as Director
of operations and project development.
Cuilik's most recent assignment was in August 2006
when he reported to Commander, U.S. Naval Forces,
Japan, as deputy commander and chief of staff.
Capt. Cuilik is the recipient of the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (three
awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation
Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal
and several unit awards and commendations.
As Naval Aviation Schools Command new command-
ing officer, Capt. Cuilik is looking forward to the oppor-
tunity to continue NASC's long-standing tradition of
developing and delivering the highest quality training to
meet fleet operational needs.
Capt. Dougherty is a native of Pittsburgh, Pa., and
graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1982
though the NROTC program. He was designated a naval
aviator in June 1984 and was assigned to HSL-34
"Greencheckers" of Norfolk Va., flying the SH-2F Sea
Sprite.
Dougherty's career included tours with HT-18, HSL-40
and HSL-46 Training Air Wing Five. Dougherty was the


CFC from page 1

federal responsibilities.
"To date, my staff and I have been in
front of thousands of federal employ-
ees," said Ron Denson, director of the
EscaRosa CFC. "There are so many
misunderstood beliefs and it's my pas-
sion to talk to as many as we can so the
federal employee can make an
informed decision whether or not to
participate. Almost every military com-
mand and federal offices that has
allowed us to talk has seen a response in
their employee giving, all it takes is a lit-
tle bit of time.
"I remind everyone that CFC is not a
non-profit organization but a federal
program regulated by the Office of
Personnel Management (OPM),
Washington, DC., and its only purpose
is to provide this once-a-year solicita-
tion, in which each federal employee
decides where the money goes.
"CID's passion and commitment to
support this program is a great demon-


encouraged to continue their efforts
to be good stewards of energy and
water by reducing consumption and
implementing energy cost-savings
measures.
In observance of October being
Energy Awareness Month, Gosport
is looking for NAS Pensacolians
who ride bicycles to and from work
If you ride a bike to work and would
like to be included in an article in the
base newspaper, contact Roger
Dozier at 452-3131, ext. 3118; or
email roger.dozier.ctr@navy.mil
For more news from Naval
Facilities Engineering Command,
visit www.navy.mil/local/navfachq.


commanding officer of HT-8, and later joined the USS
Essex (CV 9) as air boss. He then returned to Pensacola
to serve as midshipman training officer at the Naval
Service Training Command (NSTC). In June 2004,
Dougherty assumed the duties of executive officer, Naval
Air Technical Training Center (NATTC). In 2006 he
served as commanding officer, U.S. Navy Support
Facility, Diego Garcia. Dougherty's most recent assign-
ment was as commanding officer, Naval Aviation Schools
Command.
"I am so proud of my staff, both military and civilian,
who have worked tirelessly over the course of my tenure
to train and educate motivated, ready Sailors and officers
who are prepared to complete their preparations so they
can join the fleet," Dougherty said. "Learning today, lead-
ing tomorrow is not just our, motto it's a way of life. I am
grateful I have had the opportunity to serve our country
and the Navy and for the love and support of my family."
Capt. Doughtery is the recipient of the Legion of Merit,
the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), the Navy
and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards),
the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two
awards), and several unit awards and commendations.
Capt. Dougherty resides in Pace with his wife, the for-
mer Catherine Di Maria, and his two sons Jacob and Tyler.


stration of the strength of our federal
employees. It is hoped that every com-
mand, office and employee will under-
stand the value of this program and will
respond in the same manor which CID
Corry is demonstrating."
In the first weeks of starting the cam-
paign, 11 other commands began turn-
ing in their reports: Navy Recruiting
Orientation Unit (NORU), Naval
Aviation Schools Command, NEX-SE
Distribution Center, Training Wing
Five/CNATRA Detachment and NAS
Whiting Field have surpassed their goal
and reported they are not done.
"We hope this is an indicator of
things to come and that employees of
Escambia and Santa Rosa counties can
show the thousands of non-profits who
support so many of our needs locally,
nationally, and internationally that we
are compassionate and understanding
of their needs. As federal employees
clearly understand the commitment to
service and country, we can also under-
stand the commitment of the non-prof-


its to help during times of need," said
Denson.
Materials are out, command activity
chairs (AC) are visiting every employee
asking them to consider making a dona-
tion to the agency of their choice.
Donors contributing more than $240 in
an annual contribution either through
cash, check, or payroll are eligible to
receive a gift of their choice via the local
CFC Web site (http://www.esca
rosacfc.org).
'Through the support of the ink
toner and inkjet recycling program
managed by our local CFC office, give-
a-ways and all printed materials are
being provided this year at no cost,"
Denson added. The area CFC plans to
wrap up the solicitation drive Oct. 30.
Any federal employee who has not been
solicited during this time should either
seek out their command representative
or contact the local CFC office at NASP
headquarters, Bldg. 624, Room 120;
call 452-2029 or visit the local Web site
for further options.


Vol. 73, No. 39 October 2, 2009
Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community
Commanding Officer Capt. William Reavey Jr.
Public Affairs Officer Harry C. White


The Gosport nameplate features the T-6A
Texan II aircraft, the newest joint services
trainer. The T-6 has replaced the Navy's T-
34C aircraft that for more than 40 years has
served to provide primary flight training for
student pilots, NFOs and navigators
attached to the Naval Air Training Command.
It will also replace the Air Force T-37.
Maintained by the United States Coast
Guard since 1939, the Pensacola
Lighthouse, aboard NAS Pensacola, original-
ly began as the lightship Aurora Borealis in
June 1823. Evolving through structural and


location changes, the current facility was built
in 1856 and at night still shines for Sailors 27
miles out at sea.
Established in 1921 as the Air Station
News, the name Gosport was adopted in
1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by
flight instructors in the early days of naval
aviation to give instructions and directions to
their students. The name "Gosport" was
derived from Gosport, England (originally
God's Port), where the voice tube was invent-
ed.
Gosport is an authorized newspaper pub-


lished every Friday in the interest of military
and civilian personnel and their families
aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola,
Saufley Field and Corry Station.
Editorial and news material is compiled by
the Public Affairs Office, 190 Radford Blvd.,
NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-5217. All news
releases and related materials should be
mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hall-
ford@navy.mil or faxed to (850) 452-5977.
National news sources are American
Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News
Service (NNS), Air Force News Service
(AFNS), News USA and North American
Precis Syndicate (NAPS).
Opinions expressed herein do not neces-
sarily represent those of the Department of
Defense, United States Navy, nor officials of
the Naval Air Station Pensacola.
All advertising, including classified ads, is
arranged through Ballinger Publishing.
Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000.
Everything advertised in this publication
must be made available for purchase, use or
patronage without regard to rank, rate, race,
creed, color, national origin or sex of the pur-
chaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection
of this policy of equal opportunities by an
advertiser will result in the refusal of future
advertising from that source.


For classified ads, call:
(850) 433-1166


For commercial advertising:
Simone Sands 433-1166, ext. 21
simone @ballingerpublishing.com

Mail to: Ballinger Publishing, The Rhodes
Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite
402, Pensacola, FL 32504


Gosport Editor
SCOTT HALLFORD
452-3100, ext. 1543
scott.hallford@navy.mil
Gosport Staff Writers
MIKE O'CONNOR
452-3100, ext. 1244
michael. f.o'connor.ctr@navy.mil
ANNE THROWER
452-3100, ext. 1491
anne.thrower.ctr@navy.mil


Editorials and commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as offi-
cial government, Navy, or command policy statements. Reader editorials and commentaries
are welcome but should not exceed 500 words. Articles should be typed, double-spaced on
one side of the paper only. Submissions must be bylined and contain a phone number where


the writer can be reached during working hours. All submissions are subject to editing to com-
ply with established policy and standards. Address editorials and commentaries to: Gosport
Editor, NAS Pensacola, 190 Radford Blvd., Pensacola, FL 32508-5217. E-mail: scott.hall-
ford@navy.mil.


PAG E 2









GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Homefront in Focus: My husband's got orders


By Beth Wilson
Military Spouse Contributor

Got Orders? We do.
Have you noticed that
Navy spousedom seems
to be lived in cycles -
sea duty, shore duty and
repeat.
I love shore duty; sea
duty, not so much.
May I ramble about
orders? There will be a
point at the end, I
promise.
As the window for
orders approaches "it"
starts that wrestling
with the unknown that
impacts our life.
I start anticipating
and assessing the possi-
ble options.
Will we be able to
stay here? Will it be a
good opportunity for
my husband? Will it be
a career enhancer or
career killer? Will he
love his next billet or
one that he endures,
counting down the days
till our next "window?"
Will we be moving? I
love my house, will I
find a house I enjoy as
much as this one.
Where will these
orders send us, down
the road or across coun-
try?
What about my job,
my career? What about


the kids, what about
family, what about
friends?
Arghhh! The mental
gyrations can be dizzy-
ing, yet I put myself


through it every time.
"Hello, my name is
Beth and I'm a control
freak."
So we have orders.
My husband just
informed me that he
was ordered to HoA,
otherwise referred to as
Horn of Africa.
He has GSA orders
for a year in Djibouti,
Africa. One year. Boots
on the ground. Africa.
Many of you may
know that my husband
just battled kidney can-
cer and won.
He is home recuper-
ating from surgery to


remove the cancerous
tumor from his kidney.
We are so blessed.
They got it all.
Can I tell you that
during this time I
prayed? I prayed fer-
vently. I prayed danger-
ously. "Lord, thank you
for revealing this cancer
so early that it has the
best possible prognosis.
Please let them get it
all.
"Lord, please let him
be approved to re-enlist.
Lord, you decide where
his next orders should
take him, you know his
career desires, put him
in the best place for
Scott just let him be
able to re-enlist."
Did I really pray that?
OK, Lord, when I said
you decide what I
meant was you decide
the orders that I would
want ... while still
being the best place for
him. I misspoke God.
Can we have a re-do?
So, we have orders.
After my initial pity
party, I found my big
girl panties, changed
my attitude and set
about the task of ready-
ing myself for GSA
orders.
I loved let me
repeat that I really
loved shore duty, so


much so that I forgot
much about deployment
readiness.
Orders in hand
means I need to get my
ducks lined up so my
Sailor can deploy
assured that I'm good
to go.
Where are those birth
certificates? My power
of attorney expired
when? Not another hor-
rid photo ID, valid for
another three years?
I know I have a
checklist somewhere ...
or did I throw it away in
the bliss of shore duty?
Got orders? Are you
heading back to sea
duty?


Perhaps your hubby
is like my man, heading
out on GSA orders (by
the way I understand
IA/GSA training at Fort
Jackson is known for
developing skilled
IA/GSAs and some
great Abs I'm just
saying... ).
The point is orders
change everything. Will
you join me on my jour-
ney from shore duty to
sea duty/deployment ...
walking with friends
always makes the jour-
ney so much easier.
E-mail Beth with
comments and ques-
tions at beth@home-
frontinfocus.com.


Navy

Legal:

Will return

next week


PAGE 3









GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Defense Department at forefront of energy conservation, official says


By SN William Selby
Special to American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, D.C. The Defense Department
is constantly looking for ways to proactively conserve
and reuse energy, a department official said.
"We're really leading the nation in looking at energy
and considering energy" Mindy Montgomery, deputy
director for investment, Office of the Director for
Defense Research and
Engineering, said during a
teleconference with blog-
gers recently.
Montgomery said that
every $10 increase in the
price of a barrel of oil rais-
es the DoD's fuel spending
by $1.3 billion per year.
The department has spent
$3 billion to $5 billion
extra each year due to the
price increase over the last
couple years, she said.
But energy conserva-
tion does more than help
to compensate for rising
prices, Montgomery said.
It makes operational sense,
too, she noted.
"Seventy percent of the
convoys in Iraq and
Afghanistan are for fuel Public service announce
and water," she said. "So if from www.energysavers.g
we can reduce those, we about renewable energy
can reduce all the security
assets that go along with all these convoys."
While DoD has made progress in energy conserva-
tion, Montgomery said, it still has a long way to go.
"Since 2005 we've reduced our total energy con-
sumption by 6 percent," Montgomery said. "On the
installation side, since 2003, we've reduced our
demand by 10 percent."
Unfortunately, reduced energy consumption doesn't
automatically translate to money saved, Montgomery
said. DoD has spent $13 billion in total energy costs
since 2005 due to rising fuel costs, she said.
"I'd like to say we've saved, but unfortunately, ener-
gy costs have gone way up," Montgomery said. "Even
though we've reduced consumption, it still costs us
more in the long run."
Montgomery said that some electricity costs have


I.
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ar


stabilized, which should lead to savings in the near
future. Installation-specific improvements also should
lead to savings, she said.
To reduce energy consumption at installations, the
department created the Power Surety Task Force to
focus on combatant commanders' energy needs,
Montgomery said. For instance, in Iraq and
Afghanistan, soldiers were using tents that were worn
out and were not energy efficient, Montgomery said.
The task force recently
found a substance called
installation foam to spray
on the tents, which is
reducing energy consump-
tion by about 30 percent.
"Now, we're keeping
the air inside,"
Montgomery said. "By
the way, the tents are actu-
ally about 20 percent cool-
er than they ever got with
the air conditioning," she
added.
Montgomery estimated
that the DoD will save
about $400,000 a day and
take about 13 fuel trucks
N ,1 sh off the roads a day as a
)EPENDS ON US. result of using the insula-
S, IIrH, mn A H tion foam.
The Department also is
nents, such as this one looking at more efficient
ov, are raising awareness turbine engines for aircraft,
nd energy efficiency. more fuel-efficient engines
for the next generation
Humvee, and other alternatives that may decrease ener-
gy and fuel costs, Montgomery added.
"That program is run by the Army tank and automo-
tive command," she said. "They're looking at different
drivetrains, different kinds of engines, [and] different
power systems on the vehicle."
Montgomery said the task force also has been focus-
ing on modifying technologies and looking for new
methods of power generation.
"We actually just opened a solar farm (that pro-
duces) over 14 megawatts in Nellis Air Force Base in
Nevada'" she said. "We've also, for the last 20 years,
had a geothermal plant at China Lake (Naval Air
Weapons Station, Calif.)," she added. "I want to say it
produces somewhere between 180 and 200
megawatts."


Incentivized energy conservation program


realizes record $99 million


From Naval Sea Systems Command
Office of Corporate Communications

WASHINGTON (NNS) -Naval
Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA)
announced recently that Navy ships
achieved more than $99 million in
fuel cost avoidance during fiscal
year (FY) 2009 as part of the Navy's
Incentivized Energy Conservation
(i-ENCON) Program.
The i-ENCON program is a "Meet
the Fleet" initiative spearheaded by
NAVSEA to reduce ships' energy
consumption. Program sponsors con-
duct routine meetings with ship oper-
ators to review specific fuel-saving
procedures and recommend quarterly
awards for ships with the most fuel-
efficient operations.
"These efforts increase fleet readi-
ness by enabling Sailors at sea to train
or deploy longer while spending the
same amount of money on fuel," said
Hasan Pehilvan, i-ENCON program
manager.
One of the ways NAVSEA's i-


ENCON measures fuel and cost
avoidance is through underburn, the
reported fuel rate for the quarter that's
below the ship class' average bum
rate. One hundred twenty Pacific and
Atlantic Fleet ships reported an
underbum for the third quarter fiscal
year 2009.
"The cumulative underbum was
14.96 percent of fuel consumption for
the past three quarters, which exceed-
ed the ENCON goal of 10 percent by
a wide margin," said Pehlivan. "This
14.96 percent underbum translates to
a cost avoidance of 1,043,000 barrels
of oil or $99 million."
This accomplishment increases
fleet readiness by saving enough fuel
to support 21 Arleigh Burke-class
destroyers (at an average of 2,500
underway hours) per year.
This performance may be attrib-
utable to ships receiving $2 million
in cash awards distributed in the
fourth quarter of each fiscal year by
Commander, Naval Surface Forces,
according to Pehlivan.


fuel savings
i-ENCON rewards leading fuel
conservers among underway sur-
face ships with special recognition
and cash incentives up to $67,000.
In FY 2008, 148 ships received
incentive cash awards. Award
money is routed to each command-
ing officer's discretionary funds,
which are often used to buy items
like damage control gear or to aug-
ment the ship's welfare and recre-
ation programs according to
Pehilvan.
"The incentives are very impor-
tant to i-ENCON's success,"
Pehlivan added. "It's a voluntary
program that requires real commit-
ment from ships' commanding offi-
cers, chief engineers and main
propulsion assistants. I receive calls
and emails from ships every day
wanting to know how they can par-
ticipate and improve their fuel per-
formance."
For more news from Naval Sea
Systems Command, visit www.
navy. mil/local/navsea.


Officials also are looking at expanding its use of
geothermal power generation, which uses heat from
the Earth.

Home energy check

The following is a simple checklist of energy conserva-
tion/efficiency measures to use at home.

Today
*Turn down the temperature of your water heater to the
warm setting (1200F). You'll not only save energy, you'll
avoid scalding your hands.
Check if your water heater has an insulating blanket.
An insulating blanket will pay for itself in one year or
less.
If you have one of those silent guzzlers, a waterbed,
make your bed today. The covers will insulate it, and
save up to one-third of the energy it uses.
Start using energy-saving settings on refrigerators,
dishwashers, washing machines, and clothes dryers.
Survey your incandescent lights for opportunities to
replace them with compact fluorescents. These new
lamps can save three-quarters of the electricity used by
incandescents. The best targets are 60-100 Watt bulbs
used several hours a day. Measure the clearance in the
fixtures to make sure they will accommodate compact
fluorescents, which are slightly bigger than incandes-
cents.
Check the age and condition of your major appliances,
especially the refrigerator. You may want to replace it
with a more energy-efficient model before it dies.
Clean or replace furnace, air-conditioner, and heat-
pump filters.

This week
Visit the hardware store. Buy a water-heater blanket,
low-flow showerheads, faucet aerators, and compact
fluorescents, as needed.
Rope caulk leaky windows.
Assess your heating and cooling systems. Determine
if replacements are justified, or whether you should
retrofit them to make them work more efficiently to pro-
vide the same comfort (or better) for less energy.

This month
Collect your utility bills. Separate electricity and fuel
bills. Target the biggest bill for energy conservation
remedies.
Crawl into your attic or crawlspace and inspect for
insulation. Is there any? How much?
Insulate hot water pipes and ducts wherever they run
through unheated areas.
Seal up the largest air leaks in your house -the ones
that whistle on windy days, or feel drafty. The worst cul-
prits are usually not windows and doors, but utility cut-
throughs for pipes ("plumping penetrations"), gaps
around chimneys and recessed lights in insulated ceil-
ings, and unfinished spaces behind cupboards and
closets. Better yet, hire an energy auditor with a blower
door to point out where the worst cracks are. All the lit-
tle, invisible cracks and holes may add up to as much
as an open window or door, without you being aware.
Install a clock thermostat to set your thermostat back
automatically at night.
Schedule an energy audit (ask your utility company or
state energy office) for more expert advice on your
home as a whole.

This year
Insulate. If your walls aren't insulated have an insula-
tion contractor blow cellulose into the walls. Bring your
attic insulation level up to snuff.
Replace aging, inefficient appliances. Even if the appli-
ance has a few useful years left, replacing it with a top-
efficiency model is generally a good investment.
Upgrade leaky windows. It may be time to replace
them with energy-efficient models or to boost their effi-
ciency with weather-stripping and storm windows.
Reduce your air conditioning costs by planting shade
trees and shrubs around your house-especially on the
west side.


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PAGE 4









GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Fuels team plans Super Hornet biofuels flight test


By Robert Kaper
Naval Air Systems
Command Public Affairs

PATUXENT RIVER,
Md. (NNS) The Naval
Air Systems Command
fuels team is gearing up for
biofuels flight tests in an
F/A-18 Super Hornet at
Patuxent River, by next
spring or summer, accord-
ing to NAVAIR's fuel
expert.
Rick Kamin, Navy fuels
lead, explained that before
"biofueling" the plane, the
team will first conduct lab-
oratory and rig tests at Pax
River, followed by static
engine tests with the Super
Hornet's F414 engine on a
test stand at the Lynn,
Mass., facility of manufac-
turer General Electric. The
static tests will take place
"probably in the
December-January time
frame," Kamin said.
The NAVAIR fuels team
is also getting ready to kick
off a similar effort to test
and certify biofuels for use
on ships.
The upcoming tests are
part of a larger effort to test
and certify promising bio-
fuels in support of the
Navy's energy strategy to
enhance energy security
and environmental stew-
ardship, including reducing
greenhouse gas emissions.
"Our major goal is a
drop-in replacement" for
the Navy's petroleum-
based fuels, Kamin said.
"The field won't know the
difference."
Fuels derived from
plants are considered car-
bon neutral. Burning them
doesn't increase the net
amount of carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere because
the carbon they contain
was originally absorbed
from the air as the plants
grew.


NAVAIR has asked for
40,000 gallons of JP-5 jet
fuel from bio-based feed-
stocks in a request for pro-
posal (RFP) issued by the
Defense Energy Support
Center. Initial laboratory
analyses and rig testing
will consume 1,500 gal-
lons; the static engine tests,
16,500 gallons; and the
flight tests, 22,000 gallons.
The feedstocks targeted are
not used for food.
Kamin said fuels
received from the JP-5
RFP may include those
made from oils produced
by plants such as camelina,
jatropha and algae.
"We won't know for
sure what we're going to
get until the procurement
process is completed," he
said. The contract signing
is expected to take place
this month.
Camelina, also known
as gold-of-pleasure or false
flax, is in the same family
as rapeseed, the source of
canola oil. Often consid-
ered a weed, camelina is
cultivated today for the
high quality oil its seeds
produce, both for human
consumption and conver-
sion to biodiesel.
Jatropha is a tough woody
plant that can grow in arid
conditions unsuitable for
most food crops. Its seeds
produce oil that's unfit for
human consumption but can
be converted to fuel.
Algae can be grown in
vats or ponds under con-
trolled conditions that
maximize output and har-
vesting efficiency. Algae's
oil is produced within indi-
vidual cells.
Oils harvested from the
plants are refined into fuel
with conventional petrole-
um refinery processes.
Two commercial biofu-
els that will not be tested
are ethanol, now blended


Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fuels) Airman Joseph Rios takes a sample of JP-5 in a JP-5 pump room aboard
the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 are conducting a Composite
Training Unit Exercise off the coast of Southern California in preparation of a scheduled deployment to the
western Pacific Ocean. Photo by MCSN Amara R. Timberlake


with gasoline, and
biodiesel. Ethanol is unsafe
for shipboard use because
it ignites too easily, and its
lower energy content
would significantly reduce
aircraft range.
The biodiesel sold com-
mercially today consists of
oxygen-containing com-
pounds called esters.
Although they bum well,
esters absorb water too
readily to be suitable for the
Navy's maritime environ-
ment.
For the upcoming static
and flight tests, the biofuels
will be mixed in a 50-50
blend with conventional
petroleum-derived jet fuel
to provide the necessary
specification properties.
Biofuels are not as dense as
conventional jet fuel, have
less lubricating ability and
contain no aromatic com-
pounds, a group of chemi-


cal compounds able to pen-
etrate the rubberlike mate-
rials that make up gaskets
and seals.
"Aromatics are critical
for seal swelling," Kamin
noted. "The easiest way to
get these properties back in
is with a blend with petrole-
um-based fuels."
Kamin emphasized that
the Navy will not be pro-
ducing any biofuels itself.
Fuel for all military services
is purchased by the Defense
Energy Support Center.
"We're responsible for
fuel specification require-
ments. Our main responsi-
bility is to test and certify
the alternative fuels for
inclusion in our specifica-
tions," he said.
The fuels team will ini-
tially apply three categories
of standard tests to the fuels
received in response to the
RFP: analytical chemistry


- using instruments such
as a mass spectrometer to
determine chemical com-
position and structure, "wet
chemistry" determining
the fuels' response in specif-
ic chemical reactions and
rig test properties such as
water separability, to deter-
mine how the fuels will
react in aircraft and in con-
ditions typical of Navy
operating conditions, which
include long-term storage.
"Storage stability is a
unique military and Navy
requirement not required in
the commercial world,"
Kamin noted.
"We're trying to certify
by families, to come up
with a spec for an approved
class of feedstocks, such as
oil shale, petroleum,
hydrotreated renewable or
coal," he said. The specifi-
cations of each family will
be determined initially


through the full battery of
chemical analysis, physical
properties, static engine
tests and flight tests.
The Navy plans to have
test and certification com-
pleted on the most promis-
ing alternative fuel candi-
dates no later than 2013,
Kamin said. As each candi-
date is approved for use, it
will be added to the Navy's
JP-5 (aircraft) and F-76
(ship propulsion fuel) spec-
ifications. Once in the spec-
ification, the Defense
Energy Support Center can
buy the fuel to meet Navy
requirements from the low-
est-cost provider. Actual
usage in the fleet will
depend on industry produc-
tion capability.
For more news from
Naval Air Warfare Center
Aircraft Division, Patuxent
River, visit wwwnavy.mil
local/nawcadpr/


Iraq energy efficiency helps environment, saves money


By Christen N. McCluney
Special to American Forces Press Service

Multinational Security Transition Command Iraq
officials are working to boost energy efficiency in
the Iraqi infrastructure to help the environment and
boost cost savings, command officials said.
Energy efficiency affects the environment by
reducing air pollution and the economy by reduc-
ing fuel costs.
"Since energy impacts the environment and the
economy, it makes sense to ensure that the con-
struction of the Iraqi security infrastructure is done
in the most energy-efficient manner. This will
properly set the conditions needed to encourage
cost savings and employ sound environmental
practices," Air Force Lt. Col. Thomas N. Williams
Jr., chief of planning for the command's engineer-
ing directorate, said yesterday during a "DoDLive"


bloggers roundtable from Baghdad.
The initiatives include training Iraqi forces to
boost their environmental efficiency by perform-
ing proper maintenance on vehicles and power
generators, Williams said. By doing so, he
explained, they will burn less oil, which will
increase cost efficiency and decrease pollutants in
the environment. Other training includes fuel con-
sumption reduction, load balancing, preventive
maintenance, leak detection, proper collection and
disposal of used oil and hazardous material han-
dling procedures.
"Trying to manage resources and use them care-
fully has a positive impact on the economy and the
environment," Williams said.
Iraqis are seeing the effects of drought on their
agriculture, Williams said, and need to be attentive
to irrigation. They also are beginning to realize the
impact of dumping oil and waste products in water


instead of recycling or properly disposing of them.
"Energy is a nonrenewable resource, so you do
want to manage it as carefully as possible," he said.
"The better we manage it now and the more ener-
gy efficient we are now, the longer we have it to set
up more secure infrastructures."
Williams added command officials are working
to train Iraqis to maintain facilities so their efforts
continue long after U.S. forces depart the country.
By keeping the focus on energy efficiency, he said,
the work will have a long-lasting impact.
"When you look at the three E's energy, envi-
ronment and economy they are very interactive
and complementary to each other," he said. "We
think that concentrating on the energy aspect will
have a bigger impact on the other two."
Along with helping to build Iraqi infrastructure,
Williams said, energy efficiency also will help to
keep the gains already made with Iraqi security.


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PAGE 5


-Wan-%~fl~l









GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Greenhut awarded $10.6 million renovation project


From Sue Brink
NAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs Officer

JACKSONVILLE Naval
Facilities Engineering Command
(NAVFAC) Southeast awarded
Greenhut Construction Co. Inc. of
Pensacola a $10.6 million American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act
(ARRA) contract Sept. 18 to repair
and modernize administrative Bldg.
1500 at Naval Air Station (NAS)
Pensacola.
"NAS Pensacola's headquarters
building requires major repairs and
renovations. Due to budgetary short-
falls these repairs have long been
deferred so the facilities housing ten-
ant commands with critical missions


could accomplish those missions," said
Capt. William Reavey, NAS Pensacola
commanding officer.
"This project provides us the oppor-
tunity to not only restore one of our
historic buildings, but also provide a
modern facility from which to execute
the NAS Pensacola mission," Reavey
said. "We are looking forward to the
completion of this very important pro-
ject."
Work to be performed provides for
design, repair and modernization of
administrative Bldg. 1500 to a safe and
usable condition to house NAS
Pensacola command section and sup-
port staff.
The project will replace the heating,
ventilation and air conditioning


(HVAC) system, repair plumbing sys-
tems by replacing fixtures, water sup-
ply pipes and drain pipes and replacing
the electrical distribution system.
Work on this contract will also
replace the interior doors, frames and
partitions; refinish wood doors on the
south side of the building and replace
the steel double doors on the north
side; refinish existing floors; install
suspended ceilings; and replace exist-
ing windows with antiterrorism/force
protection (AT/FP) compliant double-
paned insulating glass units.
Safety and accessibility issues will
be addressed with replacement of the
fire alarm and fire suppression sys-
tems as well as the installation of an
elevator and a handicap ramp to meet


the American Disabilities Act require-
ments.
Included in the contract are site
improvements for the replacement of
sidewalks and repairing of parking
lots.
The expected completion date for
work under this contract is April 2011.
ARRA projects are intended to
modernize Department of Defense
shore infrastructure, enhance
America's energy independence and
sustain a steady and robust military
force for decades.
For information on other ARRA
projects or presolicitation notices, go
online and visit the Federal Business
Opportunities (FedBizOpps) Web site
at www.fbo.gov.


National Weather Service: Whiting Field is 'storm ready'


By Jay Cope
NAS Whiting Field Public Affairs

Hurricane season is still in
full swing, and Naval Air
Station Whiting Field has the
National Weather Service's
vote of confidence that the
base is prepared if a major
storm should occur.
NWS assigned their
"storm ready" designation to
the base during a short pre-
sentation Sept. 23.
NAS Whiting Field is the
first military installation in
Northwest Florida and only
the ninth nationwide to
receive "storm ready"
approval.
Representatives from the
regional NWS office in
Mobile traveled to Milton to
present the plaque and the
signs recognizing the base's
new status to the base com-
manding officer Capt.
Enrique Sadsad.


"This is a great accom-
plishment for Whiting Field,"
Sadsad said. "We have been
training and preparing, and if
something were to hit us, we
know we would be as pre-
pared as we can be."
The "storm ready" desig-
nation began in 1999 with
the intent to help ensure
communities had the com-
munication procedures and
storm preparedness structure
in place to respond to a
weather-related emergency.
According to NWS statis-
tics, 90 percent of all presi-
dentially declared disasters
are weather related leading to
nearly $14 billion in dam-
ages annually.
Military bases are qualify-
ing communities, and
Whiting Field's Emergency
Manager Jim Walsh worked
for more than six months to
ensure the program require-
ments.


Guidelines include having
a 24-hour warning point and
emergency operations center,

"This designa-

tion recognizes the

commitment we

have made to our

populace that we

are doing every-

thing possible to be

prepared for any
storm that may

arise,"

Jim Walsh


providing multiple methods
for informing the community
of potential weather prob-


lems, having a system for
monitoring local weather
conditions, promoting
weather preparedness
through community seminars
and developing and training
a formal severe weather plan.
"It was a pleasure working
with Jim (Walsh), and from
the moment we walked on
the base there was no doubt
that everything was in order,"
John Purdy, senior meteorol-
ogist with the Mobile office
of the NWS said.
"The base exceeded quali-
fications in every area, and
you can be justifiably proud
of your program."
NAS Whiting Field's home
county, Santa Rosa County,
is also a "storm ready" com-
munity, and seeing the signs
for the designation along the
road was the impetus for
Walsh's effort.
A little research indicated
military bases qualified, and


he followed up by complet-
ing the application process.
According to Walsh, Navy
bases already have much of
the structure in place.
It is mostly a matter of
documenting the programs
and activities which the
bases perform as a part of
their normal routines, Walsh
said.
However, having just
passed the anniversary of
Hurricanes Ivan and Dennis,
Walsh sees the added empha-
sis of the "storm ready" des-
ignation as being valuable.
"I believe this is a good
time to reflect on the turmoil
those storms caused and to
ensure we are prepared for
the next one," he said.
"This designation recog-
nizes the commitment we
have made to our populace
that we are doing everything
possible to be prepared for
any storm that may arise."


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October, 2 2009G RPARTY INE


GOSPORTPARTYLINE


Partyline e-mail submissions
Submissions for Partyline should be e-mailed
to: anne.thrower.ctr @navy. mil.
Submissions should include the organization's
name, the event, what the event is for, who bene-
fits from the event, time, date, location and point
of contact.

Retired military seminar Oct. 17 at NASP
The 37th annual Gulf Coast Area Retired Military
Seminar, sponsored by NASP's Fleet and Family
Support Center, will be held Oct. 17 in the base the-
ater, Bldg. 633, from 9 a.m. noon.
Representatives from the Veteran's
Administration, Naval Hospital Pensacola, TRI-
CARE, Social Security Administration, Internal
Revenue Service, Naval Legal Service Office, TRI-
CARE Dental, Retired Activities Office and
Survivor Benefits will conduct workshops.
Personnel Support Detachment will be open from 9
a.m.-noon for ID cards and DEER enrollment.
Door prizes and refreshments provided by the
Naval Exchange and Commissary. For more infor-
mation, call Glen Colbert at the Fleet and Family
Support Center at 452-5990.

Charlie Pier open for fishing Friday and Sunday
The Charlie Pier will be open for fishing Oct. 2
from 6 p.m.-midnight and Oct. 4 from 6 a.m.-6 p.m.
The pier is open to active/retired military and
DoD/contractor personnel.

Pet blessing at NASP Oct. 3
Everyone is invited to the "blessing of the pets" at
NASP at 2 p.m., Oct. 3, in front of Our Lady of
Loreto Chapel. For information, contact the Rev.
Jack Gray, the Catholic chaplain on base, who will
conduct the blessing.

Ballinger Golf Tournament and dinner
The Andrew J. Ballinger Golf Tournament will
take place 1 p.m., Oct. 17, at the Tiger Point Country
Club in Gulf Breeze.


Ballinger, 29 was diagnosed with acute ALL
leukemia earlier this summer. He is the father of a 3-
year-old Grace and son of Glenys and Malcolm
Ballinger.
The tournament's format will be a four-person
scramble, 50 percent handicap.
The $100 registration fee per golfer includes
lunch, golf, cart and dinner. A dinner-only fee is
available for $50.
In addition to playing or sponsoring a team, tee or
green, prize donations for the golfers will be accept-
ed.
Checks, payable to "Andrew J. Ballinger Medical
Fund" should be mailed to Jake Jacobelly, 3726
Bengal Road, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563
For information, contact Rene or Jake Jacobelly at
jakenrene@aol.com.

Lighthouse full-moon ghost tour Sunday
Pensacola Lighthouse at NASP will be conducting
ghost tours by light of the full moon Sunday (Oct. 4)
and Nov. 2 at 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10:30 p.m.
For reservations or additional information call
457-7095 or e-mail tours@pensacolalight
house.org. The cost is $10 for adults, $5 for children
7 to 11. Children must be 48 inches tall to climb the
tower.

Red Dress Extravaganza set for today
The Red Dress Extravaganza will take place today
(Oct. 2), 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at the Radford Fitness
Center at NASP
There will be exhibits and screenings. Models will
present what's available in active wear at the NEX.
Fitness classes will be ongoing. Screenings for
osteoporosis and blood pressure will be conducted
For information, call: 452-6326, ext. 4100.

Base fire department to host awareness night
Fire & Emergency Services Gulf Coast will be
hosting ia Fire Prevention and Safety Awareness
Night at the Corry Sport Complex Oct. 13 from
4:45-7 p.m.


The event is open to all military personnel and
their families. Come out and see fire trucks, ambu-
lances, police cars, SW Panhandle K-9 Search and
Rescue, Sparky the Fire Dog and Pluggie the Talking
Fire Hydrant.
There will be a car seat inspection and installation
station set up. People are urged to bring cars and car
seats to have them checked by certified technicians
for the safest installation possible.
The event starts with a parade of emergency vehi-
cles that will make their way though the Balfour
Beatty Communities Housing area to the Corry
Sports Complex.

Retired officers group meets Oct. 8
The Retired Officers' Wives and Widows
Association's October fashion show luncheon and
meeting will be held at the Pensacola Country Club
Oct. 8. Social time will begin at 11 a.m.
Reservations are required, and the cost of the lun-
cheon is $15. A mailed check will be considered the
reservation. Checks should be received by Oct. 3.
For information, call Evelyn Busch, 476-8949.

All-Navy wrestling tryouts
The 2009 All-Navy wrestling tryouts will take
place at 6 p.m., Oct. 9, at Portside gym, Bldg. 627, at
NASP Navy wrestling Coach Rob Hermann will be
looking for Sailors to represent the Navy in the 2010
military games. Come early to fill out a wrestling
resume application. For information, contact
Hermann at wrerob@bellsouth.net. or call 434-8172.

Youth wrestling clinic Oct. 10 at NASP
A youth wrestling clinic for all ages will take
place Oct. 10 at NASP Participants will check in
between 8-9 a.m. The clinic ends with open mat
matches between 2:45-3:30 p.m. at Portside gym.
All aspects of folkstyle wrestling will be covered
with former U.S. Olympic head coach Rob
Hermann. The cost of the clinic is $40.
For information call Hermann at 434-8172 or
through e-mail at wrerob@bellsouth.net.


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GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


Service members can

weather financial storm


By Samantha Quigley
American Forces Press Service
Servicemembers and their
families can weather the
"perfect storm" of credit, sav-
ings and banking crises;
bailouts; market instability;
and foreclosures, if they stay
financially prepared the
Pentagon's personal finance
director said here recently.
Dave Julian urged those
attending the Defense
Department Joint Family
Readiness Conference here
earlier this month to save
more than the average
American.
"Back before (the reces-
sion), the average American
spent $1.22 for every dollar
they made," Julian said. "If
you put that in real dollars,
you make $30,000 a year,
you're spending close to
$37,000.
"The bottom line is, that's
the average American and we
can't have our servicemem-
bers and families ... afford to
be average," he added.
A recent report published
in the American
Psychological Association
said money is a "top source
of stress for adults," he said.
Many people don't under-
stand how credit affects their
lives, and lead to unhealthy
coping behaviors, a loss of
sleep, strained personal and
professional relationships
and other long- and short-
term health effects, Julian
said.
Studies also have linked
financial stress as a factor in
suicides, he said.
"The Army did say in
2006, (in) 11 percent of the
suicides they had, finances
were a known stressor,"
Julian said.
Being financially ready,
which includes having good
credit, can save a person at
least $250,000 in interest over
the course of a lifetime,
Julian said.
While that kind of savings
should be a good incentive,
servicemembers have a
greater motivator: mission
readiness. Financial readiness
begets mission readiness,
Julian said.
If a service member has
bad credit or a bankruptcy or
glaring signs of financial
unpreparedness, they also
jeopardize any security clear-
ance they may have and con-
sequently, mission readiness.
Service members aren't
immune to economic trends,
but unlike much of the gener-
al population, servicemem-
bers have some resources and
protections, Julian said.
"If you take a look at what
we provide or what service-
members and their families
have access to, it really can
help them avoid some of those
pitfalls that are out there," he
added.
"We have counselors in our
family readiness center ... we
have command financial spe-
cialists embedded in the units.
"We've got online
resources like Military
OneSource ... if they don't
feel comfortable walking into


the family center or they don't
live near a base," he said.
Other resources include
Military Saves, Military
Homefront's "Personal
Financial Readiness" section.
The department also works
with other financial readiness
partners like In Charge
Institute, FINRA Investor
Education Program, the
Better Business Bureau
Military Line and the Federal
Trade Commission, among
others.
Through these resources,
servicemembers can learn
how to start down the road to
financial success and what
tools are available to help
them along the way.
The Thrift Savings Plan is
one of those tools. It's the gov-
ernment's 401k-style plan,
which allows pre-tax contri-
butions up $16,500 and a
combat zone tax exclusion up
to $49,000, including bonuses
and combat pay this year.
Any tax-exempt contribu-
tions made to Thrift Savings
Plan accounts are not taxable,
even after withdrawal, Julian
said.
The Family Smoking
Prevention and Tobacco
Control Act, signed into law
June 22, beefed up TSP,
adding a Roth 401k contribu-
tion option, auto enrollment
for civilian employees, sur-
vivor benefits for TSP
accounts and a mutual fund
investment option.
Another savings option for
service members is the
Savings Deposit Program. It's
available to those serving in a
designated combat zone. The
account guarantees an auto-
matic 10 percent return up to
10,000, but the interest is tax-
able.
Service members also are
able to take advantage of
some protections against a
bad economy, Julian said.
These include the Nelson-
Talent Amendment, part of
the Defense Reauthorization
Bill of 2007, which caps inter-
est rates for all loans to service
members and their depen-
dents at 36 percent. It was an
attempt to curb the practice of
payday lenders targeting mili-
tary personnel.
A 2008 report to Congress
said the amendment was hav-
ing the desired effect, Julian
said.
Military Sentinel is another
way service members can
protect their financial security.
It's a partnership between the
Defense Department and the
Federal Trade Commission
where servicemembers can
report scams and register
complaints.
Like civilians, service-
members also can "freeze"
their credit by calling one of
the three consumer credit
agencies. It's good for at least
a year unless the decision is
reversed and unlike civilians,
it doesn't cost military mem-
bers anything.
With all the resources and
opportunities available to
them, the bottom line is any
service member can achieve
or maintain a state of financial
readiness, Julian said.


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PAGE 8









SECTIONB




October 2, 2009


GOSPORT. FE


NATTC's Lt. Cmdr.
Ricky W. Lee Jr.
receives the Defense
Meritorious Service
Medal; see page B2
Spotlight


Fire Prevention Week kicks off Oct. 4-10


Submitted by Inspector Steven Bulke


Fire Prevention Week was
established to commemorate

the Great Chicago Fire, the

tragic 1871 conflagration that killed

more than 250 people, left 100,000

homeless, destroyed more than

17,400 structures and burned more

than 2,000 acres.

The fire began on Oct. 8, but continued into and did
most of its damage on Oct. 9, 1871.
According to popular legend, the fire broke out
after a cow belonging to Catherine O'Leary -
kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the
whole city on fire. Chances are you've heard some
version of this story yourself; people have been blam-
ing the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and O'Leary,
for more than 130 years. But recent research by
Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to
debunk this version of events.
The "Moo" myth: Like any good story, the "case
of the cow" has some truth to it. The great fire almost
certainly started near the barn where O'Leary kept her
five milking cows. But there is no proof that O'Leary
was in the barn when the fire broke out or that a
jumpy cow sparked the blaze. O'Leary herself swore


that she'd been in bed early that night, and that the
cows were also tucked in for the evening.
But if a cow wasn't to blame for the huge fire, what
was? Over the years, journalists and historians have
offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on
a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the
barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neigh-
bor of the O'Leary's may have started the fire. Some
people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may
have fallen to earth on Oct. 8, starting several fires that
day in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in
Chicago.
The biggest blaze that week: While the Great
Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during
this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn't the biggest. That
distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devas-
tating forest fire in American history. The fire, which
also occurred Oct. 8, 1871, and roared through
Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing
1,152 people and scorching 1.2 million acres before it
ended.
Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze
began when several railroad workers clearing land for
tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before
long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through
the area "like a tornado," some survivors said. It was
the small town of Peshtigo, Wis., that suffered the


worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had
been destroyed.
Eight decades of fire prevention: Those who sur-
vived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot
what they'd been through; both blazes produced count-
less tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also
changed the way that firefighters and public officials
thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of
the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association
of North America (today known as the International
Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniver-
sary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be
observed not with festivities, but in a way that would
keep the public informed about the importance of fire
prevention. The commemoration grew incrementally
official over the years.
In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first
National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since
1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the
Sunday through Saturday period in which Oct. 9 falls.
According to the National Archives and Records
Administration's Library Information Center, Fire
Prevention Week is the longest running public health
and safety observance on record. The president of the
United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a
national observance during that week every year since
1925.


Take precautions

to prevent burns


When we think of things in our
homes that might cause burs, there
are some obvious culprits. Curling
irons. Stoves. Radiators. Tap water?
As surprising as it sounds, it's
true. Each year thousands of emer-
gency room visits are attributed to
scalds injuries caused by hot liq-
uid or steam. Adults often experi-
ence mild scalds, perhaps when
washing dishes, and quickly adjust
the temperature without a second
thought. But older adults and chil-
dren's skin is much more sensitive
and can sustain a bum in a matter of
seconds.
Simple acts such as setting your
water heater's thermostat to no high-
er than 120 degrees Fahrenheit, and
installing "anti-scald" devices on tub
faucets and shower heads can help
protect you and your family from
scalds. But these measures alone are
not enough. Test your water at the
faucet using a cooking thermometer
to make sure it is no higher than 100
degrees Fahrenheit. Even if your
water heater is set no higher than 120
degrees Fahrenheit, use your wrist,
elbow, or the back of your hand as
your main guide.
Vigilance is key in bum preven-
tion. Always test the water before
placing a child or yourself into the
tub. The water should feel warm, not
hot. Before you put your child in the
tub, test the temperature with your
wrist, elbow, or the back of your


hand. If you're using a thermometer
with a read-out, remember that bath
water should be no more than 100
degrees.
Of course, tap water isn't the only
liquid that can cause bur injuries.
Other precautions you can take to
keep your family safe from bums
include:
Keep hot foods and liquids away
from tables and counter edges so they
cannot be pulled or knocked over.
Never hold a child in your arms
while preparing hot food or drinking
a hot beverage.
Teach children that hot things
hurt.
Wear short or closefitting
sleeves when cooking.
All the vigilance in the world may
not be sufficient to prevent every sin-
gle scald or bum. That is why it is
also important to know how to treat
a bum. Run the burned area under
cool water right away for three-five
minutes and then cover with a clean,
dry cloth. If the bum is bigger than
your fist or if you have questions, get
medical help.
While Fire Prevention Week is an
opportune time to practice fire safe-
ty in your home, we hope that you
will keep these lessons with you year
round and "Stay Fire Smart."
Reproduced from NFPA's Fire
Prevention Week Web site,
wwwfirepreventionweek.org. @2009
NFPA.


According to the latest statistics from the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA),
there were an estimated 399,000 reported home structure fires in 2007.

NASP personnel urged to

"Stay Fire Smart! Don't Get Burned"


Fire & Emergency
Services Gulf Coast is team-
ing up with the National
Fire Protection Association
(NFPA) for Fire Prevention
Week 2009 Oct. 4-10 -
to urge NAS Pensacola resi-
dents to "Stay Fire Smart!
Don't Get Burned." This
year's campaign focuses on
ways to keep homes fire
safe and prevent painful
burns.
The statistics are stagger-
ing. Each year roughly
3,000 people die as a result
of home fires and burns, and
more than 200,000 individu-
als are seen in the nation's
emergency rooms for burn


injuries.
By following simple safe-
ty rules, you can stay safe.
Stay in the kitchen when
you are frying, grilling, or
broiling food. If you leave
the kitchen for even a short
period time, turn off the
stove.
Keep all things that can
burn, such as paper, bedding
or furniture, at least three
feet away from heating
equipment.
Replace cracked and
damaged electrical cords;
use extension cords for tem-
porary wiring only.
Consider having additional
circuits or receptacles added


by a qualified electrician.
If you smoke, smoke
outside; wherever you
smoke, use deep, sturdy ash-
trays.
Have a three-foot "kid-
free" zone around the stove.
Be careful when using
things that get hot such as
curling irons, oven, irons,
lamps, heaters.
Install tamper-resistant
receptacles to prevent a
child from sticking an object
in the outlet.
Never leave a child alone
in a room with a lit candle,
portable heater, lit fireplace or
stove, or where a hot appliance
might be in use.


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Jokes & Groaners

Doggone smart dachshund vs. leopard
aving I' A wealthy man decided to go on a safari in Africa. He took his faith-
av g I ful pet dachshund along for company. One day, the dachshund starts
chasing butterflies and before long the dachshund discovers that he
is lost. So, while wandering about, he noticed a leopard heading
rapidly in his direction with the obvious intention of having him for
lunch. The dachshund noticed some bones on the ground close by,
and immediately settled down to chew on the bones with his back to
the approaching cat. Just as the leopard is about to leap, the dachs-
hund exclaimed loudly, "Boy, that was one delicious leopard. I won-
der if there are any more around here." Hearing this, the leopard halt-
ed his attack in mid-stride, as a look of terror overcame him, and
Sslunk away into the trees. "Whew," the leopard said. "That was close.
That dachshund nearly had me."
Meanwhile, a monkey, who had been watching the whole scene
from a nearby tree, figured he could put this knowledge to good use
and trade it for protection from the leopard. So, off he went. But the
dachshund saw him heading after the leopard with great speed, and
figured that something must be up.
The monkey soon caught up with the leopard, spilled the beans and
struck a deal for himself with the leopard. The leopard was furious at
being made a fool of and said, "Here, monkey, hop on my back and
see what's going to happen to that conniving canine."
So the dachshund saw the leopard coming with the monkey on his
back. But instead of running, the dog sat down with his back to his
attackers, pretending he hadn't seen them yet ... and just when they
got close enough to hear, the dachshund said, "Where's that dang
i elected. monkey? Sent him off half an hour ago to bring me another leopard."


ANTHONY
BARTON
GOODALL
KELLER
KING


I









PAGE B2


GOSPORT SOTLIGHT


October 2, 2009


BIRTH
ANNOINC'EMENTS

Naval Hospital Pensacola
Aug. 15-Sept. 1, 2009
Sara Adelina Miles, was
born to Lt. Tyler and Nicole
Miles, Aug. 15 .
Kylee Jahree Hewitt, was
born to Staff Sgt. Joshua
and Cheree Hewitt, Aug.
15.
Nkomo Marven Kamaley
Willie Jr., was born to BM2
Nkomo and IT1 Tewaner
Willie, Aug. 17.
Noah Joseph Rodriguez,
was born to Lt. Cmdr.
Benjamin and Maritere
Rodriguez, Aug. 17.
Chiriscel Dana Dizon, was
born to retiredYNC Cecilio
and Dinna Dizon, Aug. 17.
Jaelyn Marie Sorenson,
was born to ABE2 Jeffrey
and Heather Sorenson,
Aug. 17.
Asia Elise Walters, was
born to CTT1 Patrick and
Shuquan Walters, Aug. 18.
Rhett Myles Crabb, was
born to SRA Robert and
Andrea Crabb, Aug. 18.
Jeremiah Alexander
Crawford, was born to
AEAA Gerald Jr. and
Briana Crawford, Aug. 18.
Sean Michael Richardson,
was bom to retired 1st Sgt.
Michael and Maria
Richardson, Aug. 19.
Brynn Fay Formosa, was
born to ABH3 Christopher
and Lori Formosa, Aug. 21.
Julia Grace Hayes, was
born to Capt. John and
Jennifer Hayes, Aug. 21.
Jocelyn McKanzie Shea,
was born to Ens. Scott and
Gretchen Shea, Aug. 23.
Harrison Frost Niemann,
was born to Lt. Stephen and
Sarah Niemann, Aug. 23.
Lliam Christopher Roling
Jones, was bom to AO2
Christopher and Desiree
Jones, Aug. 23.
Izabella Maire Cesaro, was
born to 1st Lt. Anthony and
Bethany Cesaro, Aug. 25.
Kira Lily Giddens, was born
to ETSN Alexander
Giddens and AA Brinn
Hefron, Aug. 26.
Hayden Marie Harrier, was
born to Jayson and AN
Christine Harrier, Aug. 26.
Christopher Michael Gay,
was bom to Michael and
CTM2 Elizabeth Gay Aug.
26.
Darine Michael DeGraff, was
born to HM1 Jules Jr. and
Kristina DeGraff, Aug. 27.
Laila Malia White, was
born to SN Gary White and
Charlotte Prusak, Aug. 28.
Aiden Norman James
Rogers, was born to ABE2
Branden and Rachel
Rogers, Aug. 28.
Adelyn Paige Dacpano,
was bom to Lt. Lionel and
Zheide Dacpano, Aug. 29.
Victory Anne-Marye
Luthye, was born to IT1
Walter II and Jennifer
Luthye, Sept. 1.


NATTC IA awarded Defense Meritorious Service Medal


Story, photo
by AZC (AW/SW) Owen M. Brown
NATTC PAO

Lt. Cmdr. Ricky W. Lee Jr. was recently

presented with the Defense Meritorious

Service Medal for his exceptional service

during Operation Iraqi Freedom.


Lee displayed superior
meritorious service during
an individual augmentee
(IA) tour in Besmaya, Iraq
between March 1, 2008,
and Feb. 20, 2009. Serving
as logistics officer and
senior adviser, Logistics
Military Advisory Team,
Coalition Security
Transition Command -
Iraq, Lee continuously pro-
jected a dedication to pro-
fessionalism.
After training his team
of Sailors, Soldiers and
Marines on various tech-
niques of logistics manage-
ment, as well as procedures
on stock control, his team
then trained 60 Iraqi Army
officers and soldiers.
Lee's team also worked
with these Iraqi Army offi-
cers and soldiers on the
handling and issuance of
more than 2,000 vehicles,
19,000 weapon systems,
more than 7.2 million
rounds of ammunition,
575,000 liters of petroleum


products and operational,
medical and communica-
tion equipment valued at
more than $61 million. The
supplies went to 24
brigades, regiments and
battalions, as well as two
engineer battalions and the
Bayji National
Ammunition Depot.
Following the issuance
of these weapons, vehicles
and supplies, Lee assigned
specialists of various rat-
ings to work closely with
their Iraqi counterparts to
develop an efficient inven-
tory control system, ensur-
ing not only accurate
accountability of all items,
but also that all materials
and equipment where
turned over in optimal con-
dition. By doing this, Lee
and his team helped guar-
antee that the Iraqi units
would be able to become
self-reliant in maintaining
organization over these
assets.
Even though he assigned


various specialists to men-
tor members of the Iraqi
Army units, Lee himself
offered his expertise to the
Iraqi Army while aiding in
the turnover of 19,000
weapons systems to multi-
ple units.
While Lt. Cmdr. Lee
helped Iraqi officers take
control of the biometrics
and issue process, 100 per-
cent accountability was
achieved due to Lee's extra-
ordinary attention to detail.
In order to sustain the
operational needs of the
new Iraqi Army force, Lee
also fielded more than
1,400 rounds of 73 mm
high explosive ammuni-
tion, as well as dispersed
more than 200 armored
vehicles among six Iraqi
brigades.
All vehicles were kept at
98 percent complete mis-
sion capable status due to
the aid and expertise of Lee
and his team of skilled
experts. He and his team


NATTC CO Capt. Kent L. Miller (left) presents the
Defense Meritorious Service Medal to Lt. Cmdr.
Ricky W. Lee


were also able to organize
the installation of commu-
nications and weapons sys-
tems of all training centers
in Iraq. Besmaya was the
only center to stay opera-
tional and continue teach-
ing classes successfully and
efficiently without hiatus in
their schedule during the
course of the year.
During Lt. Cmdr. Lee's
time in Besmaya, his
exceptional meritorious
service and his meticulous
attention to detail have fur-
ther ensured the success of
a self-sufficient Iraqi Army
force. He completed his
mission at the Besmaya
Combat Training Center


above and beyond expecta-
tions and because of that,
he has been presented with
this medal.
Throughout his year-
long tour, Lee was in con-
stant contact with NATTC
Pensacola. "The support
for my family and me dur-
ing my IA from command-
ing officer, Capt. Kent L.
Miller and staff was
immeasurable," said Lee.
NATTC Pensacola cur-
rently has three personnel
deployed to individual aug-
mentee billets worldwide
in support of Operation
Iraqi Freedom and
Operation Enduring
Freedom.


From Dan Slowikowski

William L. (Lynn) Coleman is retiring today
(Oct. 2) after 43 years and 15,000 hours of mili-
tary and military contract flying. Since March
2004, Lynn has been manager L-3 Vertex
Aerospace Flight Operations at NAS Pensacola.
L-3 Vertex Aerospace conducts T-39 training
flights for Training Wing Six's Training Squadron
Four (VT-4) and Training Squadron Eighty-Six
(VT-86).
Lynn was an Air Force brat, born in Nebraska
in 1943 and lived in Colorado, California,
Alabama, Tennessee and Guam as his father
moved with the Air Force. Upon graduation from
high school in Oak Ridge, Tenn., he was appoint-
ed to the U. S. Air Force Academy. After gradua-
tion and commissioning as a second lieutenant, he
completed flight training and received pilot's sil-
ver wings at Reese AFB, Texas. Lynn continued to
Davis Monthan AFB, for advanced tactical train-
ing in the F-4 Phantom. Lynn's first duty assign-
ment was to the 92nd Tactical Fighter Squadron
(TFS) at RAF Bentwaters, United Kingdom.
While there, his squadron's primary mission was
nuclear strike alert, with a secondary air to air/air
to ground attack role. Lynn's squadron was one of
the last to use Wheelus AFB, Libya, as their pri-
mary training location.
In 1970, Lynn received orders to Vietnam as an
0-2 forward air controller (FAC), assigned to the
19th Tactical Air Support Squadron near Saigon.
He spent the next year living with, providing visu-
al reconnaissance, and controlling close air sup-
port (CAS) attack missions for U S. Army combat
units in action across Vietnam and Cambodia.
Lynn flew more than 800 combat hours, was
twice hit by ground fire and earned 12 Air
Medals. He also received the Distinguished
Flying Cross for a secret mission, controlling


Lynn Coleman


night CAS in support of a trapped river convoy
along the Mekong River in Cambodia.
From 1972 through 1973, Lynn was a jump-
qualified air and ground FAC at Shaw AFB, S.C.
supporting the 82nd Airborne at Fort Bragg, N.C.
At the end of this assignment he had flown 1,500
combat and tactical training hours in the 0-2 air-
craft.
In 1973, Lynn returned to flying the F-4s at
Eglin AFB. While there he became the initial
operations officer of the newly formed 59th TFS,
suffered through lots of simulator time and limit-
ed flight time due to post war constraints and
helped deliver new F-4Es to Israel.
Lynn's next assignment was chief, range oper-
ations, Gila Bend Bombing and Gunnery Range.
During this tour he was singularly recognized by
the Tactical Air Command general for accom-
plishing major tactical range upgrades and host-
ing the annual NATO Chiefs of Staff Firepower
Demonstration previously held at Nellis ranges.
From 1977-1979, Lynn was an instructor pilot
(IP) at the 425 Tactical Fighter Training Squadron
(Foreign Military Assistance) at Williams AFB,


Ariz., where he trained international pilots from
numerous countries and USAF pilots enroute
worldwide as instructors and military assistance
group commanders. Lynn also augmented Air
Force aggressor unit operations.
From 1979-1982, Lynn had his final F-4
assignment as 52nd TFW chief of safety,
Spangdahlem AB, Germany, with a final total of
more than 2,500 hours in aircraft.
Lynn's final Air Force tour was as executive
officer, 436th TFTS (AT-38), Holloman AFB,
N.M., which he most remembers for the team he
led being unbeaten in monthly "Turkey Shoots"
and defeating teams in far more capable F-4, F-
111 and A-lOs in TAC's bi-annual "Gunsmoke"
competition. After 1,000 hours in the AT-38 and
5,000 hours in all Air Force aircraft, Lynn retired
in 1986 and moved immediately to Pensacola and
began flying T-47s as a contract pilot in what was
at the time the US.Navy's undergraduate naval
flight officer training program.
Lynn flew 3,000 hours in the T-47, transitioned
to the T-39 in 1991, and has flown more than
7,000 hours in the T-39. He moved from contract
pilot, to supervisor, training and safety chief and
finally to manager, flight operations. Lynn noted
that he has flown with many students who came
back as instructors, some more than once, some
instructors who came back as squadron comman-
ders, and at least one returned as Training Wing
Six Commodore, Capt. Lee Little, with whom he
flew her last flight in the T-39.
Lynn is married to the former Chrys
Suntheimer. They have one son, Matt, who lives
in Gainesville. Lynn has two sons by a previous
marriage, Glen and Greg, who live in Tennessee.
Lynn's hobbies are sailing, backgammon and golf,
which he expects to spend much more time prac-
ticing when he and Chrys move to East Tennessee
following their retirement.


Lynn Coleman, flight operations manager,

T-39 joint navigator training program, retires


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October 2, 2009


GOSPORTM( IES


PAGE B3


Movies and show times for Portside Cinema
FRIDAY Shorts (PG) 5; 500 Days of Summer (PG13) 5:15; Halloween 2 (R) 7; The Final Destination (R) 7:15, 9:30; District 9
(R) 9:15


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


Shorts (PG) noon; Post Grad (PG13) 12:15; The Time Traveler's Wife (PG13) 2; 500 Days of Summer (PG13) 2:30;
Halloween 2 (R) 4:30; G.I. Joe: Rise of Cobra (PG13) 4:45; District 9 (R) 7; The Final Destination (R) 7:15; The Hurt
Locker (R) 9:15; The Goods (R) 9:30
500 Days of Summer (PG13) noon; Shorts (PG) 12:15; G.I. Joe: Rise of Cobra (PG13) 2:15; The Time Traveler's
Wife (PG13) 2:30; A Perfect Getaway (R) 4:45; District 9 (R) 5; Halloween 2 (R) 7:15; The Final Destination (R) 7:30


MONDAY Closed
TUESDAY Post Grad (PG13) 5; 500 Days of Summer (PG13) 5:15; District 9 (R) 7; The Final Destination (R) 7:15
WEDNESDAY The Time Traveler's Wife (PG13) 5; Shorts (PG) 5:15; Halloween 2 (R) 7:15; The Goods (R) 7:30
THURSDAY Post Grad (PG13) 5; 500 Days of Summer (PG13) 5:15; District 9 (R) 7; The Final Destination (R) 7:15
TICKETS Children ages 6-11 $1.50, children younger than 6


New releases playing at the theater


'The Final Destination'
On what should have been a
fun-filled day at the races,
Nick O'Bannon has a horrific
premonition in which a
bizarre sequence of events
causes multiple race cars to
crash, sending flaming debris
into the stands, brutally
killing his friends and causing
the upper deck of the stands to
collapse on him.
When he comes out of this
grisly nightmare Nick panics,
persuading his girlfriend,
Lori, and their friends, Janet
and Hunt, to leave... escaping
seconds before Nick's fright-
ening vision becomes a terri-
ble reality.
Thinking they've cheated
death, the group has a new
lease on life, but unfortunate-
ly for Nick and Lori, it is only
the beginning. As his premo-
nitions continue and the crash
survivors begin to die one-by-
one in increasingly grue-
some ways Nick must fig-
ure out how to cheat death
once and for all before he,


too, reaches his final destina-
tion.

'Halloween 2'
Picks up at the exact
moment the first movie
stopped and follows the after-
math of Michael Myers' mur-
derous rampage through the
eyes of heroine Laurie Strode.

'500 Days of Summer'
Tom believes, even in this
cynical modern world, in the
notion of a transforming, cos-
mically destined, lightning-
strikes-once kind of love.
Summer doesn't. Not at all.
But that doesn't stop Tom
from going after her, again
and again, like a modem Don
Quixote, with all his might
and courage.
Suddenly, Tom is in love not
just with a lovely, witty, intel-
ligent woman but with the
very idea of Summer, the very
idea of a love that still has the
power to shock the heart and
stop the world.
The fuse is lit on Day One


when Tom, a would-be archi-
tect turned sappy greeting
card writer, encounters
Summer, his boss's breezy,
beautiful new secretary, fresh
off the plane from Michigan.
Though seemingly out of
his league, Tom soon discov-
ers he shares plenty in com-
mon with Summer.
By Day 31, things are mov-
ing ahead, albeit "casually."
By Day 32, Tom is irrepara-
bly smitten, living in a giddy,
fantastical world of Summer
on his mind.
By Day 185, things are in
serious limbo but not with-
out hope.
And as the story winds
backward and forward
through Tom and Summer's
on-again, off-again, some-
times blissful, often tumul-
tuous dalliance all of
which adds up to a kaleido-
scopic portrait of why, and
how, we still struggle so
laughably, cringingly hard to
make sense of love and to
hopefully make it real.


IMAX
at the National Naval Aviation
Museum

The following movies are now playing at the
IMAX Theater at the National Naval Aviation
Museum aboard NAS Pensacola. Tickets cost
$8 for general admission and $4.75 for active
duty in uniform. For information, call 453-
2024.


Grand
Canyon
Adventure
Travel deep into
the Grand
Canyon on a
thrilling expedi-
tion down the
Colorado River.
Showing: 11
a.m., 1 p.m. and
3 p.m.




The Magic of
Flight
The museum's
flagship film will
take you soaring
through the his-
tory of flight, from
Kitty Hawk to the
cockpit of an
F / A 1 8.


Showing:
a.m. 4 p.m.


Straight Up
Helicopters in
Action
Experience a
heart-pounding
aerial adventure
by flying with the
crews of 12
extraordinary
machines on
eight remarkable
missions.
Showing: noon



Fighter Pilot
Operation Red Flag

The international
training exercise
for the air forces
of allied coun-
tries, is the final
training for pilots
and their crews
before being sent
into combat.
Showing: 2 p.m.


Attention Incoming
Flight Students to:
NAS PENSACOLA and
NAS WHITING FIELD


Privatized Base Housing is available to all active duty service members! Move
into housing with a roommate, split the rent and keep the rest of your BAH!
For example: 2 bedroom lease for $1000/month split between 2 students
(0-1 $1081 BAH each) You each save $581 per month.
2, 3 and 4 bedroom homes available for immediate occupancy. Call to obtain information
regarding current specials and to schedule an appointment.
NAS PENSACOLA 850.456.3120
NAS WHITING FIELD 850.626.6202


ATTENTION: NAVY VETERANS
If you or a family member has been diagnosed with
MESOTHELIOMA, the disease may have been caused by
exposure to asbestos products while serving in the Navy, and you
may be entitled to compensation from the manufacturers of those
asbestos products
And you may have considered hiring an out of state lawyer
whose ads you've seen on cable TV. But before hiring them, con-
sider these issues:
out of state lawyers often are not involved in the handling
of your case because they refer all aspects of the case to
other out of state lawyers;
communication problems can be compounded with out of
state lawyers, which could adversely affect your case and
cause you more stress during a difficult time.
Before answering one of those out of state TV ads, why
not discuss your case with a local lawyer?
CALL LOCAL ATTORNEY
A. EDWARD CANGELOSI

(850) 637-8650
310 E. Government Street Pensacola
If your case must be filed out of state, we will associate local counsel there to file suit in that state,
but remain your local counsel here.
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based upon advertisements. Before you decide,
39 ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


k


~u~uo~BR~I








October 2, 2009


PAGEB4


GOSPORTOFF


DUTY


WORSHIP

NAS Pensacola

Protestant
All Faiths Chapel,
Bldg. 634:
Sundays, Holy
Communion, 8 a.m.;
Contemporary service,
6p.m.

Naval Aviation Memorial
Chapel (NAMC) Bldg.
1982: Sundays,
Contemporary Worship,
10:15 a.m.

J.B. McKamey Center,
Bldg. 634: Sunday School
Classes, 9 a.m.

Roman Catholic
NAMC, Bldg. 1982:
Saturday Mass, 4:30 p.m.,
preceded by confessions
from 3:45-4:15 p.m.
Sunday Mass, 8:30 a.m.
J.B. McKamey Center
Bldg. 634: Religious
Education Classes,
Sundays (September-
May), 10 a.m.
Our Lady of Loreto Chapel
Bldg. 1982: Daily Mass
(Monday, Thursday and
Friday), noon..


Corry Station

Protestant
Sundays, Bible Study
(conference room), 9
a.m.; Worship Service, 10
a.m.; Fellowship,
11:30 a.m.; and Praise
and Worship, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday Bible study (fel-
lowship hall), 5:30 p.m.

Roman Catholic
Sunday Mass "Catholic
Life," noon.
Tuesday Mass (small
chapel), 11 a.m.

Jewish
Friday, van leaves Corry
Chapel at 5:30 p.m. for
services on the first and
third Friday of the month.

Latter Day Saints
All Faiths Chapel:
Sundays, Sacrament,
10:30-11:25 a.m.
J.B. McKamey Center
Sunday school classes,
11:35 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Priesthood/relief society
2:25-1:10 p.m.
Family home evening
Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, 7 p.m., at
Corry fellowship hall.

Islamic Services
Bldg. 1504: Fridays, 12:15
p.m. Call Command
Chaplain.


Pensacola

Interstate Fair

runs Oct. 22-Nov. 1


From Lindsay Pieler
E.W. Bullock Associates

Pensacola's biggest
annual agricultural and
entertainment attraction
- the 2009 Pensacola
Interstate Fair- returns
Oct. 22-Nov. 1 for 11
days of food, rides and
musical performances.
The fair's entertain-
ment series, located on
the Pepsi Open Air
Stage, presents a
diverse, star-studded
lineup for music lovers
of all types.
Acts include the rock
band Saliva starting at 9
p.m. Oct. 23.
Country music star
Josh Gracin takes the
stage at 8 p.m. on Oct.
24.
Gracin, an active-duty
U.S. Marine, first
entered America's
homes on the second
season of American
Idol.
Cowboy Troy brings
"hick-hop" to the fair
for two shows at 7:30
p.m. and 9 p.m. on Oct.
26.
The LoCash Cowboys
will perform synchro-
nized dance steps, audi-
ence participation, com-
edy and country music
at 8 p.m., Oct. 27.
The Bar-Kays will
light up the stage for two
shows at 6:30 p.m. and 8
p.m., Oct. 28.
Stephen Cochran
brings his down-home
country style to the fair
at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on
Oct. 29.
Lady Antebellum will
entertain the crowd with


a blend of classic coun-
try, 1960s R&B soulful-
ness 1970s music at 8
p.m. Oct. 30.
Country star Joe
Nichols rounds out the
fair's entertainment
series at 8 p.m., Oct. 31.
"The Pensacola
Interstate Fair is striving
to make the 75th the
best fair yet to be pre-
sented," said Don
Frenkel, Pensacola
Interstate Fair general
manager.
"We have a very
strong and popular line-
up of stars which light
up our stage with excite-
ment, and it is the best
presentation of top stars
that we have ever had."
Frenkel said the
"entertainment series
offers fairgoers the
opportunity to see
nationally renowned
performers for free
while enjoying a
Midway packed full of
fun and excitement for
the whole family."
Shows at the
Pensacola Interstate Fair
are free with the price of
admission.
Admission is $10 for
everyone 12 years and
older and $5 for children
4 through 11. Children 3
or younger are admitted
free.
Advance discounted
tickets are available
online at www.pensaco-
lafair.con, Regions
Bank and Circle K.
Parking is $4 with a
ticket and $5 without.
For more information,
call 944-4500 or visit
www.pensacolafair com.


Lonestar to appear at Whiting Field ... Lonestar
will give a free concert during Naval Air Station
Whiting Field's 66 anniversary celebration Oct. 24.
The concert begins at 4 p.m. However, the anniver-
sary celebration on base will take place from 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Activities include military aircraft static
displays, aviation demonstrations, military para-
chutists, unmanned aerial system flights, crash
and salvage team demonstrations and air traffic
control tower tours. There will be a children's play
area and food vendors. Gates open at 8:30 a.m.
Visitors can bring folding chairs, blankets and
handheld umbrellas. But backpacks, coolers, alco-
hol and pets are not allowed. For information, call
665-6011.

Offering military discounts?

We want to know about them


Gosport would like
to know about the mili-
tary discounts your
business or non-profit
group is offering
active-duty or retired
military members.
Starting in October,
Gosport will publish a
column on the Off
Duty page highlighting
some of the discounts
that are offered to mili-
tary members.


Whether it's a com-
plimentary appetizer, a
discount or free admis-
sion, we would like to
know about it.
A brief description
will be mentioned on a
space-available basis.
Send your informa-
tion to Anne Thrower at
anne.thrower.ctr@
navy.mil. Include
phone number and e-
mail information.


Port City Market opens Saturday

Port City Market, located on the Southeast corner
of Palafox and Main Street, will be open every
Saturday, starting Oct. 3 through the end of April.
The market is open from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Farmers,
artists, bakers, musicians, performers and gardeners
will all be present to share what they make and what
they grow.
Check out PensacolaMarkets. com for more infor-
mation about this and other local farmers markets.
Contact Natalie Tredway at 380-4237 for more
information.


October
Liberty
Activities

The Liberty Program
events target young, unac-
companied active-duty
military. For a monthly
calendar of activities at the
main Liberty Center in the
Portside Entertainment
Complex or onboard Corry
Station, call 452-2372 or
visit their Web site at
www.naspensacola.navy.m
il/m wr/singsail/
liberty. h.

2
Liberty Free
movie on Portside
law, "Transformers
2," dusk. Movie pre-
mier "Land of the
Lost," noon and 7
p.m., at Corry.

3
Liberty Paintball
Wars, $15, leaves
NASP at 8:30 a.m.
and Corry at 8:45
p.m.

4
Liberty New
Orleans football,
Saints vs. Jets, $35
includes tickets and
transportation.
Leaves NASP at 9
a.m. and Corry at
9:15 a.m.

5
Liberty NASP -
Ladies pick movie
night.

Liberty -Corry -
Blood drive, 11
a.m.-6 p.m., IT quar-
terdeck, register to
win a KIA

NAS Live"- Airs
Mondays at 6:30
p.m. on Cox Cable's
Channel 6 or
Mediacom's
Channel 38.

6
Liberty Free mall
shuttle, 5:30 p.m.

7
Liberty NASP -
Madden 2010
Tourney, 7 p.m., free
prizes.

Liberty -Corry -
Air Force pick movie
night.

8
Liberty NASP -
Free movie "The
Proposal," 7 p.m.,
free


Episcopal Church of the Advent




A great time to meet old and new friends, enjoy
fantastic BAR-B-Q and listen to some of the best BIG
BAND sounds by the "LILLIAN CONNECTION".
Enjoy Arts and Crafts Booths, Silent &
Live Auctions and CHILDRENS ACTIVITIES.
Make plans to attend: October 17, 9:00am to 3:00pm
12099 Co Rd 99 Lillian, AL
Located 0.3 miles south of Hwy 98 on Hwy 99 in Lillian.
Bring your chair or blanket and enjoy the fun and activities.



Auctions include:
HDTV, waterfront vacation cottage, cruises, golf outings,
2 Tickets with lodging to the Iron Bowl
plus many more exciting items.
$10.00 donations per person includes Bar-B-Q, drink & slaw.
Snnonsr tnhle may he neirchaer1 aheorl nf time fnr R1 00 00


PRIOR MILITARY ATTY & STAFF


Classical guitarist at PJC ... Pensacola Junior College
presents classical guitarist Lynn McGrath as part of the
2009-2010 Lyceum Series.
The concert will take place 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10, at the
Ashmore Fine Arts Auditorium, Bldg. 8, on the Pensacola
campus.
Concert tickets are $10, reserved admission; $8, seniors,
children, non-PJC students; $6, Senior Club members,
PJC staff/faculty/retirees; and free for PJC students.
Purchase tickets at the Lyceum Box Office in the
Ashmore Fine Arts Center, 1000 College Blvd.
McGrath will hold a free master class 1-4 p.m. Oct. 10, in
the Sydney Kennedy Rehearsal Hall, Bldg. 8, Room 884,
on the Pensacola campus. For information, call 484-
1847.


Todd M. Lalouceur, P A.


WE HANDLE ALL FAMILY LAW

Military Divorces
No Court Appearances with Marital
Settlement Agreement

Contested Divorces
Child Custody Visitation
Child Support Modification
Dependency Cases
Domestic Violence Cases

www.tml-lawfirm.com
Call us at 377-2720


Mercy Ships Celebrates

30 Years of Providing
Free Health Care


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PAGE 6B


GOSPORT


October 2, 2009


SPo mOR LT:
ii.E .11.1.


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RESIDENT ADVISOR
2 F/T positions w/ apt. communities
Must be self motivated & well organized
Ability to work in mixed social economic environment.
Prev. social services, Public relations,
Typing, filing & computer skills required. Landlord ten -
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Visit www.CareerBuilder.com and reference job ID#
1425459 for application instructions
Applications accepted 9/28-10/27 DFWP/ EOE


FT SLP

TIRED OF WORKING FOR THE BIG
CORPORATE COMPANY?
Panhandle owned therapy company is seeking to fill
the following position in a skilled rehab setting: FT
SLP, FL license req'd. We offer competitive salaries,
benefits, and sign-on/relocation bonuses. Forward
resume to: Fax 850-474-9795, email
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at Health Center of Pensacola, 8475 University
Parkway, Pensacola, FL. 850-474-1252.


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Social Service Counselor -
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DOH Escambia County Health
Department
Closing date: 10/9/2009
Annual Salary range:
29,344.38 48,241.70
Full-time Social Service Counselor posi-
tion Seeking applicants with previous
counseling experience with individuals
and groups with an emphasis on behav-
ior change to reduce risk. Experience
working with maternal-child population a
plus. This position will also provide gen-
eral care coordination services to at risk
maternal/child population to improve
pregnancy and birth outcomes. Masters
degree in social work and/or licensure
as a counselor/psychotherapist with the
FDOH/DMQA required. Experience in
MS Office a plus. Background/drug
screening and fingerprinting required.
Use of personal vehicle and a valid
driver's license is required. Mandatory
disaster duties as needed. Please apply
on- line at: https://jobs.myflorida.com
Refer to requisition number 64068322.
Only online State of Florida Applications
will be accepted no resumes.
EO/AA/VP Employer.


Assistant Apt Mgr
Wild Oak Farm,
Cantonment, 25 hrsv/k,
afternoons Resume:
727-447-5516 or obs@
flynnmanagemen.com


PLS is looking for
FREIGHT
HANDLERS
to unload trucks at
our warehouse in
Pensacola Heavy lift
ing, pallet jack/forklift
exp. pref. Good pay/
benefits. Apply at
www .plsunloadcom.
Must pass back
ground check Drug
ree Workplace EOT.


TEAM Sania Rosa seek
inMilitry Affairs
Consultant visit
www.TeamSantaRosa.com
for job description, mini-
mum qua iicaions and ap-
plication process guide-
lines.





Associate
Attorneys
Lyons, Pipes & Cook
a 100 + year law firm,
headquartered in Mo-
bile, Alabama, is seek
ing associates with
three to five years of
strong civil litigation
expenenceo Must be
licensed to practice
law in Alabama, and
be in good standing
with the Alabama
State Bar. Submit re
sumes in confidence
managingp armter@
Ipdaw.com
or to PO Box 2727
Mobile, AL 36652.


Litigation
Secretaries
Lyons, Pipes & Cook,
a 100 + year law
firm, headquartered
in Mobile, Alabama,
is seeking litigation
secretaries with three
to five years of expert
ence Submit re
sumes in confidence
to HR@Ipclaw.com.
Visit our website,
www.lpclawcom, for
more details.





INSURANCE
BILLER
verify benefits, bill, file,
follow-up, and collect.
2 years experience re-
quired. Gilg Prosthetics.
Email resume to Gilg@
GilgPro.gccoxmail.com
or fax to 850-474-0409


Optometric Tech
Needed
Experience preferred,
but will train. Serious
only need apply.
Please fax resume to
850-471-9230






Subway
Now hiring,
all positions.
Multiple locations.
Apply in person
Tues. 9/29, /=om 9-4,
1711 E Nine Mile
Rd (Next to Target)
850 232-601



WE'LL HELP you
write an ad that
will sell your stuff
fast in GOSPORT.
Call 435-8585.


l~Rii


Saunders
Yachtworks, a fll
service boatyard
with locations in
Gulf Shores and
Orange Beach, Al,
is seeking a
Field Sales Rep.
Qualifications include:
Proven experience,
demonstrated success
in direct field sales.
Demonstrated inter
est and personal in
volvement in the yacht
industry.
Knowledge of / in
volvement in / capabil
ities associated with
yacht sales, brokerage,
service, repair, mainte
nance, management,
or operation of
yachts.
Neat in appearance
and professional in
manner.
Conversant with
computer software for
collecting and tracking
customer andvessel in
formation.
saundersyacht.com
Please send your
resume to
hr@saundersyachtcom





ENGINEERED
COOLING
SERVICES
A growing HVAC
Controls Company in
the Pensacola, Area
is seeking to fill the fol-
lowing positions:
Controls Service Tech
eControls Inside
Specialist
ECS offers an out
standing benefits pkg
to ind,401K & retire-
ment plan, medical
dental insurance.
Submit Resume to:
mgrant@
engineeredcooling.com



MECHANIC:
3+yrs experience,
good drivingrecord,
iag skills, own tools,
diesel and gas. Good
pay and benefits. Fax
resume 850 438
0256, or email to
jsgcfm@hotmail.com



Now Hiring for Wa
ter Mitigation Tech
niclan
for Restoration Compa -
ny. Experience in wa-
ter mitigation and car-
pet cleaning preferred.
Benefits package, com-
petitive salary. Send re-
sume to
humanresourcefl@
gmail.com





for local general con-
tractor, experienced car-
penters with tools and
transportation. Must
pass background
check. Prefer Hubzone
applicants. Fax resume
to 850-429-0145 or
e-mail administration@
green-simmons.com
only. EOE-Drug Free
Workplace


REACH 150,000
readers every week-
day with the
Pensacola News
Journal Classified
Marketplace. For
just a little more,
you can reach an
estimated 40,250
readers with
GOSPORT. Call
435-8585 to get
your News Journal
Classified
Marketplace ad in
GOSPORT.


l~Rii


5000
Search Stuff & Pets
online at
pnj.com/classifieds
lietplceo
Ia 1


MINI Schnauzer
AKC $200 without
papers $ 300 with
paper 3 males, 1
emale. Ready now
850-439-2737
850-450-4514


M I N I
SCHNAUZERS-
CKC, ready. $250.
251-455-8110 see
pups at www.
schnauzerman.com


SHIH TZU- AKC,
www.shihtzupup.
com $500+ Call
850-994-2971



WESTERN HIGHLAND
White Terrier! AKC
greatest family pet!
avail. 11/03$700
each. Taking dep
251-391-8677
*


2 YORKIE PUPS-
$200. SHIH-TZU
PUPS-$200. 850-
255-8724

AKC maltese m. 8wkl
$400 f $500 Yorkies
f. 4 mo. $650.00
(251)765-2726


ALL SMALL BREEDS:
Morkies, Yorkie Poos,
Schnauzers, Shih
Tzus, Dachshunds,
Boston Terriers, &
many more!
Starting @ $375
Daphne, AL
www.thepuppyden.com
251-626-5248


BICHON FRISE
Puppies AKC-Visit
www.kerrysbichon
s.webs.com for
details.$500
(850)380-9335




Boxers-
AKC Boxer pup-
pies black & brindle
parents on prem-
ises, ready to go.


$300.00
(251)538-6129
kgafford@escambia
k12.net

CHIHUAHUA
PUPPIES-cream &
white, 12wks, $25 0,
850-327-4889



CKC- Golden Retv.
male pups, 4
mos.$200.00
(251)765-2726

DOBERMAN-
Pincher puppies. 5
males, 3 females,
all black and tan.
Ready to go.Lg.
boned. Parents on
premises. AKC reg-
istered. $400.00
(850)994-6254
jwdyerl@gmail.com

FREE To Good
Home, Playful
Mixed Breed Dog,
Male, lyr old,
Housebroken,
neutered, all shots,
850-932-4297

GERMAN
SHEPHERD
PUP-AKC, male,
12wks, vet
checked, shots,
$175. 850-791-6851

LOVEBIRD, Cocka-
tiel, 2 guinea pigs,
& 3 pet rats, all
with cages & free
to good homes,
850-565-4197

MINIATURE
CHIHUAHUA Pup
Female $400. Call
850-723-8519

Yorkie Poo and -
Maltipoos 8wks
s/w $250.00
(251)978-0971


YORKIE PUPS-CKC,
$350. SHNORKIES-
$150. Various Toy
Breed Puppies-All
vet checked &
shots. 850-437-
0064, 850-341-8157


FEMALE- OLD
E n g l i s h
Sheepdog,1-1/2 yo,
champion blood-
line, all breeding
rights, shots up to
date. $350
(850)637-1077
joellagalvan@cox.n
et







Pump Organ- 100
yr od Chapel size
350 850-377-6180



RollTop Desk Oak,
4 drawers $350
850-377-6180





LIQUIDATION of
executive bank
office furniture
and conference
table. Like new!
4 complete offi-
ces. $3000.
850-476-7504
850-393-8565
850-572-5351


WASHER &
DRYER- $250 set.
REFRIGERATOR
$250. 850-438-5139
or 850-438-5932

WASHER/DRYER
Heavy duty,
$99 each & up.
Delivery.
850-476-0474


Washer &
Dryer Set heavy du-
ty $200. Frost Free
Refrigerator:$225
850-479-8644




$175 BRAND NEW
Queen Pillowtop
w/Box & warranty,
Delivery available
850-471-0330

A Brand Name King
Pillowtop Mattress
Set in plastic, MFR
warr, Can deliver.
$245, 850-255-3050

GLASS TOP DINING
ROOM TABLE-
Twin Pedestal, with
6 chairs, excellent
condition. Moving
$295. 850-341-1725


BED-queen size
Tempurpedic, with
foundation, frame
& queen size
tempurpedic pil-
low, like new!
$1700 retail! asking
$1200/obo.
850-292-1653



BRAND NEW FULL
SIZE MATTRESS
& box. Factory warr
$125 850-471-0330



DUNCAN PHYFE-
solid wood dinning
table chairs, buffet.
$800/OBO. 850-
696-2216



New Mattress Sets
w/3" Pillow Tops
Twin-$239 Full-$269
Queen $299 King-$429
Price indudes foundation
*lfyou haul it-receive a
FREE bed frame!!!
Top Shelf Disc Mattress
3535 N. Palafox St
(850)291-6177


PLUSH Microfiber
Sofa & Loveseat-
new, still in crate.
Retails $1299, Sacri-
fice $525. Can sepa-
rate 850-255-3050


SALE- 5 PIECE
bedroom set, Calif
King sleigh bed, 2
night stands,
armoire, dresser
with mirror and tall
boy dresser 500$
Ethan Allen paprika
red couch 350$
$500 (251)232-0632




CEMETERY LOT
Bayview Memorial
1 space with volt,
some pre needs,
$5100 value
$4200 make offer
850-982-6514




COMMERCIAL
Yard Vac, Paid
$1200. Now $800/
obo. 850-450-6987


SELL IT FAST! Call
435-8585.


pnj.com/jobs


I i ii1111111
OuWomrialH o The BiGae Cwil riv e R


















pij n con caeeruildr..
***I U I^ ^^


a-% _Home Services
SFranchise Opportunity!
We are looking for entrepreneurs who desires to own
their own franchised home services business under the
Sears name in the Pensacola Metro area. Three franchise
business opportunities are available:
1. Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
2. Air Dud Cleaning & Indoor Air Quality.
3. Garage Doors & Openers- Sales & Service
For garage door business, we prefer persons who have a con-
tractors license, but will consider all applicants. Exclusive ter-
ritory, complete training and ongoing support are just a few
of the Sears advantages. Some financing is available for
qualified candidates. Let the Sears name work for you.
Call us toll free for details 888-537-3569 or visit us at
www.0wnasearsfranchise.com


Medical/
Healthcare


Meicl












October 2, 2009


DISCOUNTED
Steel Buildings
Big & Small. Get the
Deal of Deals!
Placement to Site
www.scg-grp.com
Source#1DL Phone:
850-391-0204

Lefty Frizzel box
of CD's mint
condition $100.
850-944-9656


SLOT MACHINE-
stand & tokens,
$400. Black large
desk chair- $50.
Total Gym 1000-
$50. 850-944-6261





Beretta 92FS 9mm
Pistol- New with
case and both
mags. Never Fired.
Pensacola $500 I
(251)533-0291






WANTED
MILITARY ITEMS- Cash
paid, Uniforms, hats, med-
als, Flight jackets & hel-
mets, knives, etc.
Local 850-221-8276




Used Stereo Equi ment:
Receives plifers,
Speakers, Tube
E uipment, Etc.
WorIng or Not

Will pick up
850-291-0781

FREE! You don't
have to have
money to make
money. Sell it for
free in the News
J o u r n a l s
M a r k e t place!
Make some quick
cash by getting rid
of your old stuff.
If your stuff is
priced at $100 or
ess, the Pensacola
News Journal will
give you a FREE
Cheap Stuff" ad.
Your three-line ad
will appear on a
special "Cheap
Stuff" page along
with other inexpen-
sive items for three
days, absolutely
free! Have lots of
stuff? Place up to
three of these ads at
one time. To place
your ad, visit
pnj.com today!


PAGEB7


BELLVIEW-
2BR,2BA,tile.
H20/sew/gar incl.
Safe,no thru traf.
Sidewalk to school
$625 748-5288




Pensacola & Pace
Centre Group Properties
850-484-2684
centregroupproperties.com


NE PENSACOLA-
3BR, 2BA, close
to public trans
schools shopping
centers universi-
ties $700
(850)712-3989
krcphoto@cox.net


PENSACOLA-
2br/1.5ba town-
house, off Olive
Road. New carpet
& paint, $600/600
deposit, 850-232-
4334


PENSACOLA-
2BR/1BA, ?,round
floor, no pets $600,
cable included,
850-944-3750


PENSACOLA- East
Hill, large 1BR/1BA,
central heat & air
$575 850-748-2923

WE'LL HELP write
your ad 435-8585.


PENSACOLA BEACH
-2br/2ba Baywatch,
furn condo. $875+
dep. Sept-May, incl
cable, water & sew -
age 850-476-4414
850-572-1660

PORTOFINO-
lon term, 3BR/
3.5BATerrace or
2BR/2.5BAunit
314-581-7049


SNUG HARBOR
CONDO-3br, back
gate to NAS, $1600,
850-221-4846


VALUE PLACE




$499 monthly
No lease! May pay by
the week at Value
Place. Stay less than
a month & weekly rate
applies. Newly built,
furnished studios, full
kitchens Free utilities
w/ cable!
2310 W. Detroit Blvd
850-476-6612
12050 Scenic Hwy
850-471-0203
Must present this ad
Hurry! Only a few
rooms left!
Offer expires 9/30/09




PENSACOLA-1st
month free nice,
Windchase Bay.
2BR/2BA, Irg unit
w/FP, updated Aug
09. W/D hookup,
pool, no pets,
smoke free. $750.
770-966-9771

PENSACOLA-
2br/2.5ba, W/D, mi-
crowave, garage,
$825. No pets.
850-855-3537

* PENSACOLA *-
2BR/2BA condo w/
Bay view! Excellent
condition $800
850-698-9696

PENSACOLA- 2BR/
2BA, W/D hookup,
$700 850-291-4929

PENSACOLA- 2br/
2ba, W/D, Immacu-
late condition! All
tiile, $700mo. Avail
Oct1, 850-293-
5343 Sam Sparks

PENSACOLA-
Scenic Highway, pool
Windchase 2BR/2BA
$775 850-748-2923


7238 Hillier Dr.
3BR/2BA $875 mo
Sun Stone Property
850-341-4457


MILTON-economical
3br/lba, $650 / mo,
850-626-2764


MINUTES FROM
NAS-3bdrm/2ba,
excellent schools,
large fenced back
yard. $880 month
+ deposit. Call 850-
944 2033 or 859-
327 2115


NEAR Downtown-
1BR. 1600 1/2 W.
Chase St. faces
N. "I" St. $450mo+
dep. some utilities
paid, 850-476-0346



3082 Flintlock Dr.
2BR/2BA $850 mo
Sun Stone Property
850-341-4457


PENSACOLA-
3BR, 1BA,
ceramic tile, dining
room, family
room, sun room,
$695, (907)952-
3220 in Molino
live2game@gmail.c
om


PENSACOLA
BEACH-4BR/3BA
Gulf View TH w/ Ga-
rage Small Pets w/De-
posit $1800 Monthly
Paradise Beach
Homes 850-916-0777


PENSACOLA-
Cordova Park. 3br/
1.5ba, no pets,
Nice! $900Mo
850-438-2117


PENSACOLA-NE.
3BR/2BA, well main-
tained. $1150Mo
850-380-7781


PENSACOLA West
side3BR, 1.5BA,
enced Nopets
$800mo/500 dep
[ 850-516-1603 J


WATERFRONT-
1BR/1BA, W/D hkup
$700 850-291-4929




MICHIGAN AVE- 2br/
2ba, newer, HUD ok
$650 850-712-3937


SEMINOLE, AL-
2BR/1BA, Great
Location. Private
Lot, Convenient
to shopping.
$300mo+ dep
251-946-3344


WEST SIDE- Large
2BR/1BA, $450mo,
850-382-7607




CORDOVA AREA-
2BR, 1.5BA, $695
nice 850-554-0818


PENSACOLA- 2br/
1.5ba Northside
W/D $650 mo/
$650 dep 850-
206-1142


PENSACOLA-
2BR/2.5BA off Scenic
Hwy, 2 car garage,
$775Mo Great Cond.
850-494-6612




Find a Home online at

















PENSACOLA-
Spacious 1BR 1BA
Waterfront condo
on beautiful
Pensacola Bay.
Great view!
$110,000
(850)324-3520




3 BR / 1 B A
Recently updated.
ANY Offer Consid-
ered. $70,000 OBO
4785 Oakland Dr
(850)261-9042


3 BR/2 BA
Recently updated.
ANY Offer Consid-
ered. $190,000
OBO 673 Connell
Dr (850)261-9042

WE'LL HELP write
your ad 435-8585.


PENSACOLA- East Shore
Drive, 4BR/2BA,
completely remodeled,
approx 2000 SF,
$105,900 obo. Ready
to sell!! 850-501-8273


PENSACOLA-
House w/3 lots,
2br/lba at 2417
North "L" St.
32501. Will negoti-
ate. 334-636-0043
or 334-830-1995




NE PENSACOLA-
Executive River Gar-
dens lot for sale by
owner, new section,
130X140. .37 acre,
high, dry, level treed
lot, located be-
tween 2 +/- acre
corner lots, $142,500
850-857-4227 or
850-712-4876





SUNBELT
Business Brokers
Buying or Selling
Call the best. Sunbelt
Discrete&Professional


BETTY MAJORS Brok-
er. Please visit us at:
6706 Plantation Rd.
(Near University
Mall) See our Website
SunbeltFL.Com
850-473-2221





MARCUS POINTE
waterfront lot
w / d o c k
75'x114'x145'dp.30
00 Lake Pointe Cir,
Pensaco la
(850)456-4589


PACE-18 acres.
zoned R1. all utilit-
ies, $35,000 per
acre. Call 443-
610-5025




600' ON PERDIDO
RIVER-4 Beautiful
acres, 1/2hr from
Pensacola, 850-
982-3180


-8o00
Find a Car or Truck
online at pnj.com/cars


AIRFORCE AERO
CLUB AIRCRAFT-
4 Cessna 172P, 1
Beechcraft C-24R,
For bid information:
http://www.eglinfor
cesupport.com



BMW 3281-2007,
Sport Pkg, BMW Certi-
fied $28,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

BUICK RENDEVOUS
C X 2006, Clean
$13,890
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

Chevrolet Avalan-
che 1500 LS 2007
Blk/leather$20,000/
OBO 850-995-2514

CHEVY COBALT-
2008 #6541A LT,
coupe, sporty, like
new Gulf Chrys-
ler Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

CHEVY SILVERADO
1500-2006 #6530A
Reg cab, V8, good
work truck Gulf
Chrysler Dodge
Jeep 800-380-7572

CHRYSLER 300M-
2007, $16,500
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837


DODGE RAM 1500-
2006 #E354 Laramie,
uad cab, V8, sharp
Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep 800-
380-7572

HONDA ACCORD-
2005 #41040 LX, 5
speed, 4dr, well
kept Gulf Chrys-
ler Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

HONDA CMCVI-2008,
$17,498
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

JEEP LIBERTY
RENEGADE 2002
SILVER LOADED
4WD $9,000 850-
492-9932

LINCOLN LS-2006,
Sunroof, Loaded
$18,980
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

MAZDA MAZDA3-
2008 #285 good
miles, sporty, hur-
ry! Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

MAZDA TRIBUTE
2008 $17,990
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

MITSUBISHI
ECLIPSE-2008 #376
GS, coupe, very
sporty Gulf Chrys-
ler Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

NISSAN ALTIMA-
2007 #7866A V6,
well kept, like new
Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

PONTIAC G6-2009,
GT $17,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837


PONTIAC VIBE-2009,
sunroof, 7k miles,
$16,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

TOYOTA CAMRY-
2006 #L329 Solara
CVT, V6, sporty
Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep
800-380-7572

TOYOTA COROLLA-
2008 $13,990
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

SELL IT FAST! Call
435-8585.


TOYOTA TUNDRA-
2006 #343 V8,
short dble cab, nice
Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep 800-
380-7572



HAR LE Y
DAVIDSON- 2008
Softtail Deluxe An-
niversary Edition.
Vance & Hines ex-
haust, extras, 1100
miles, $16,000. Call
850-572-0325


HARLEY Davidson
2009 Super Glide $
10,000 FIRM! Call
850-375-3536




CHEVY 2008, crew
cab ;TZ. Z71, 4X4, V-
Max $32,990
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

DODGE RAM-2007,
Sport, Quad Cab 4x4,
$24,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

FORD F-150-2007,
Super cab, XLT,
Clean!! $18,985
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

FORD F-250-2003,
crew cab, Lariat FX4,
Diesel! $21,990
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

GMC SIERRA-
2006, Crew Cab
SLE, $19,995
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

TOYOTA TACOMA-
2008, double cab,
Pre-Runner $25,900
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

TOYO TA
TACOMA-2009,
Reg Cab, 4K mi,
$16,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837




CHEVY SUBURBAN
LT-2003, leather,
$12,990
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

CHEVY TAHOE- 2005
#L345AV8, good
miles, very nice offer
Gulf Chrysler
Dodge Jeep 800-
380-7572


F O R D
EXPEDITION-
2006 Eddie Bauer,
$22,800
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

FORD EXPLORE
LXT- 2008 REAR
A/C $21,900
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837


GMC YUKON-2007
SLT, Heated Quad
Seats $32,980
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837

HUMMER H3-2006,
sunroof $24,900
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837


MERCURY GR
MARQUIS-1995,
Clean $4,995
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837


N I S S A N
PATHFINDER-SE
2008, $21,980
MckenzieMotors
850-665-2837




13' FLEETWOOD
POPUP CAMPER
-'05, sleeps 6,
stove, refrig port-
o-potty AC & heat-
er awning $6000,
Kim 850-456-0294




26ft to 30ft with
slip at santa rosa
marine $1$
(225)978-3939
bob.alford@awc-
inc.com

WITH MORE than
150,000 readers
every weekday, the
Pensacola News
Journal Classified
Marketplace is the
#1 local place to
buy and sell your
stuff. Reach even
MORE PEOPLE
when you place
your ad in the
GOSPORT market-
place! Your mes-
sage will be deliv-
ered to an exclu-
sive military mar-
ket, reaching an
estimated 40,250
readers every
Friday when your
ad runs in the
G O S P O RT
Marketplace. Call
435-8585 today to
find out how to get
your News Journal
Classified
Marketplace ad in
GOSPORT.


fi com




service finder'

Your guide to service specialists along the Gulf Coast


435-8585

Call today to place your
service or business ad.


M




Avail 7 days
Emergency & Af-
ter Hours Avail
For same day
service Cell#
850-380-0274





Robs Refinishing Inc
BBB Member
STOP!!!
Don't Replace it!
Refinish Your:
Bathtub Fiberglass
Tubs (Crack repair)
Counters Tile
Clawfoot Tubs Available
850.458.9289
850-261.8243 ,









SAdditions/Remodeling
SKitchens & Baths
SCustom Cabinets
Flooring/Drywall/Trim
All Types Siding
LiC .#CR1328889
850-393-4701
Superior
Craftsmanship
with Meticulous
Attention to Detail

A JOB Well Done
JERRY MOREY
CONSTRUCTION INC. &
HOME INSPECTIONS
ADDITIONS -
KITCHENS & BATH
SUNROOMS -
IN-LAW SUITES
REMODELING
4 31 Years Exp. -
State Lic#RB0067033/ Ins.
850-438-0828


Onderdonk
Construction Inc
State Certified
Residential Contractor
Est. Since 1987
Rennovations
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Window Replacement
New Construction
Lic.& Ins.
FL Cert. CRC1327448
850-982-7679


CONSTRUCTION
HOME REPAIR, LLC
CARPENTRY
REPAIRS /INSTALLATIONS
Siding, Interior/Exterior
Doors, Interior Trim,
CrownmoldingCeramic
Tile, Sheetrock, Privacy
Fence. Lic#DWS0022 &
Ins. *NO JOB TOO SMALL*
Office 850-475-0782


Ever Wish You Had
a Friend in the
Construction Business?
Reside ntiaCo mmercial
Design Ugrades
Kitchens/Baths
Sun Rooms/Additions
Siding/Windows/Doors
Carpentry & More...
Commercial & Res.
SRoofing
BRADY & Co.,11C
GC License# CGC1511077
License# CCC1326631
850-429-8222


















CARPET
40 Years Exaned
Lic# RG0029159
Home Repairs
Additions
Remodeling
h Carages ui
SWoodDecks
Painting
DrywallRepairs
SDoor Chan es0etc






CARPET
CLEANING
Truck-Mounted
Steamn Cleaned
$10pe room!!!
Room minimum

COOKE'S CLEANING
850-41 7-6410

FIND A NEW JOB
with CareerBuilder
Weekly, FREE at
more than 200
area locations.


Professional Truck
Mounted Service
15 yrs. exp. Lic/Ins
Free Estimate by Phone
-4 Room Minimum ~
Spot Treated &
Steam Cleaned
* Sofa,Carpet, Upholstery
Cleaning/Protection
* Pet Odors Removed
work 850-941-4400
cell 850-206-3038




Tile, & Grout
Carp U hoostry,
IICRC Certified
Truck Mounted


3 ROOMS
$69

I o i






Drywall
AND OPCORN
REMOVAL

Han, Tape, Finish,
& Textures! Trim,
Base, Crown,
Doors, Painting &
Remodeling

*Free Estimates*
850-291-4591


GREG STEELE
DRYWALL
LLC#LO05000081077
*Han'in *
Sinisning
Textures
20 Yrs. Exp
Commercial/Residential
CALL FOR REFERENCES
FREE ESTIMATES *
850-292-8832
After Hrs.850-332-5783

WRITE AN AD
THAT SELLS:
Include size,
age, model,
color, condi-
tion, etc. of the
item. GOSPORT
will help you
write an ad that
sells. Call 435-
8585.


After Hours
Weekends,
No Extra Charge
FREE Wiring Inspections
Commercial & Residential
16 Years Experience
Customer Service
is our #1 Goal!
850-937-0218
850-232-8315
Lic#ERO015372




BARNES
FENCING
*Privacy Fences
New Or Repair
*Chain Link
Gate Repairs
*Quick Response
Owner/Operator
850.607.8119
850.221.3727





General
Handyman
Services
From remodeling to
lawn to hauling. We
do everything. Just
Call George
850-291-7175
850-484-8115
Lic# 612598






Handyman Service
Repairs, Painting,
Minor Remodes
Licensed & Insured
For a free 850ote c261101all


























850-261-1011


GOT CLUTTER?
Small Or Large
Hauling Jobs
All Types Of Clutter
From Storm, Storage,
House Or Just Plain
Old Clutter! Call the
Clutter Cleaners &
We'll Haul It Away!
www.gotclutter.com
850-477-4321





Cell
850-485-4478
Rental Clean-Outs
Small Demolition









CLOSESS10R SPACE
ORGANIZERS ALSO
BOOKSHELVES
SWINDOWSEATS
TRIM, PAINT
DRYWALL REPAIR
L.OCKS
36YRSEXP
CHUCK MENEFEE









"Mildew Removal"
Homes, Concrete
Driveways, Pool Areas,
Pool Enclosures, Deck
& Fence Restoration,
& Concrete Staining,
850-501-3568
Commercial/Residential
Lic. & Ins. / 22 Yrs. Ex.


RILEY'S
HOUSEWASHING
Low pressure washing,
including bricks,
windows, porches etc.
$45 & up Mobile Homes
$65 & up 1 Story
$90 & up 2 Story
Also Pool Decks
Roofs & Driveways
res/corn & lic/ins.
Senior citizen disc.
850-626-3649
17 YRS EXP

REACH 150,000
readers every week-
day with the
Pensacola News
Journal Classified
Marketplace. For
just a little more,
you can reach an
estimated 40,250
readers when your
ad runs in
GOSPORT. Call
435-8585.


WHITE'S

HOUSE

WASHING

Mildew Removal
is Our Specialty
HOMES
PATIOS
DRIVEWAYS
ROOFS

29 Years *
Serving
Pensacola

850-944-5393





Asian Women's
Cleaning, LLC
-A Step Above the Rest
-Hard Workin Fast
Reliable & Afordable
-Lic., Ins. & Bonded
-Free Estimate
-Military/Senior Discount
-HOME, CONDO, OFFICE
-Wkly, Biwkly, 1 Time
& Move-Outs
Call Us to Serve You
850-207-1993



HOUSEKEEPING
"Focused On
Providing You
The Best Service"
SLow Rates
One time,
Weekly, or
Biweekly
Free Estimates
Call Penny
850-417-2962








Dethatching
Tractor Work
Pavers
RetainingWall
Sodding
ALWAYS ON TIME!
Lic. & Ins.
0g .0






*BEST PRICES*
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
We deliver & install
ALLIED FARMS
Pensacola
850-479-4599
Milton
850-626-8578


GRHede Trimming
Tree Service












* Lawn Maintenance
* Landscaping
* Clean, Remulch
* Sodding, Hedging
* Clean dps
Licensed & Insured
Call Dan At:
850-501-3201


Jeff's Lawn Care
Friendly
Professional
Affordable
Serving Pensacola/Pace
Mowing Edging
*Trimming
Clean-up
We Also Remove
Small Low Limbs.
850-418-4623/4624




Price On Cypress

&FRediulch
*All types available








Porter
Landscape
& Fence
Lawn
Maintenance
Fencing,
Pressure
Washing & More!
affordable prices
dependable
850-698-5659





Cenipee, ysia,
St. Augustine,

WE DELIVER
& INSTALL
Callus &SAVE!



WE'LL HELP you
write an ad that
will sell your stuff
fast in GOSPORT.
Call 435-8585.


DIVORCE

$149
1 DAY SERVICE
*Free: Typing
Notarization &
Processing
CALL IDA'S
850-434-7524






STUMP MAMA &
BOBCATOE, INC

D Lot Clearing
SStump Grinding
0 Debris removal
Demolition
N Dirt Work & Concrete

Go Ocean Ups uts

850-390-2841







Drywall Repair
Popcorn InstalVRemoval
Orange Peel
Knock Down, etc.
Trim Carpentry
Pressure Washing












c 2 I I
Carpet Cleaning


FREE ESTIMATES







lumb Honest
.

Devoted to:
Handicapped, Seniors,
Widows, Single
Parents Fixed Inconme

Lic./Ins.
ALL CALLS
RETURNED
Escambia/Santa Rosa
850-525-0023





"
Atlantis Pool
& Spa
POOL& HOT
TUB REPAIRS

ooliiners, solar heating
tate Certified Contractor
Lic & Ins/Comm&Res.
850-477-8889
I-------


HAIL
in the Panhandle
on 8/5/09. For your
free inspection give
us a call today!












ROOFING,
LLC, 24/7
Locally Owned Operated
Re-Roof/All Types
Roof Inspections
Repairs/Any Leaks
Gerard Certified
Lic & Ins. Free Est
850-912-4863
8504587.5976
850-291-0213





S & K Vinyl
Siding, Inc.
Licensed / Insured
Specializing in
Older Homes
*FREE ESTIMATES*
850-390-6606
850-390-6605
S i I

REACH 150,000
readers every week
day with the
Pensacola News
Journal Classified
Marketplace. For
just a little more,
you can reach an
estimated 40,250
readers with
GOSPORT. Call
435-8585 to get
your News Journal
Classified
Marketplace ad in
GOSPORT.


A+ by: JACK
ROBERTSON
STUMP
GRINDING

* Reasonable Rates
Large/Small Machines
* No Truck in Yard
* Free Estimates
* Locally Owned/Insured
850-450-9355
Licensed


& Care for Your
Property As if it
Were Our Own!

Guaranteed
Response to Your
Call Within 2 Hours!
We're On the Job
Within 48 Hours!
We Specialize in
Preparing Your
HazardousTrees for
Hurricane Weather.

850-572-7823



LEWIS
BROTHERS
TREE SERVICE
Bucket Truck &
Stump Grinding
40 Years Experience
Lic#104763 & Insured
850-968-2430
850-453-7080


850.207.2775
National City Mortgage
Closing Your Loans
in UNDER 30 DAYS

REACH 150,000
readers every week-
day with the
Pensacola News
Journal Classified
Marketplace. For
just a little more,
you can reach an
estimated 40,250
readers when your
ad runs in
GOSPORT. Call
435-8585.


YOUR HOMETOWN REFINISHING EXPERTS!
Tubs Sinks, Tile Refinishing
Cheaper Than Replacement or Liners!
STANDARD TUB REFINISHING $225!
FREE ESTIMATES Weekend1 Aointjats
1 8Yrs. ExDILc. & Ins. l
850-26-607


Real
Estatel