Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00347


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CHINFO Award Winner How Secure Are You?Social Media Pitfalls For OpSec Page 8 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Help Protect Sea TurtlesFrom NS Mayport SecurityNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered species of sea turtles. It is just a little tough er to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as bright ness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shin ing from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, streetlights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people disorientate female turtles coming ashore to nest. If one is sighted com ing ashore, contact the base Wildlife officer and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beaches as dark and quiet as possible throughout the nesting period. Consider the following suggestions: sary lights and do not use flashlights without a red lenses. source of any light fix ture so it is not visible from the beach. tors on outside lights for security purposes. lights so they are off by 10 p.m. Lodge, BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nesting season must be cleared through the Wildlife officer first. large holes and rutting on the beach area. beach must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerg ing hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only permit hold ers are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. mental Office, Mayport you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indicating it has already been checked by the appropriate author ity and is waiting for burial by beach sanita tion units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered spe cies list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatch ling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS immediately at 2705101 for the base beach Call the Beaches Sea beaches or the Florida 2500. -Photo by Trish LoopTurtle patrol volunteers stand beside Naval Station Mayports first sea turtle nest of the season. The new nest is located at Boardwalk No. 4, just north of Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Sea turtles are consid ered endangered and are protected by federal law. Nesting season will last through Oct. 31. Beachgoers are reminded not to disturb the nests or touch a sea turtle or hatchling. Pictured from left is Michelle Tabor, Enyr Hoth, kneeling, Mark Conte and Michelle French. BBC Kicks Off 2014 Housing Survey With Party From BBCIn a few weeks, resi dents will be invited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations Survey. The annual survey is an important part of our continuous improvement program that helps us analyze performance and make any necessary changes and enhance ments to ensure we consistently deliver quality service across all aspects of our community opera tions. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community manage ment, maintenance and quality of the homes. All surveys are completely confidential and anony mous and residents are encouraged to pro vide open and honest insights. Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we are excelling operation ally and where there is room for improvement, said Heather Sanders, Community Manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be avail able at the kick-off event: Spring Beautification, See Survey, Page 12 -Photo by MC2 Salt Cebe

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer .................................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Shipmates, Its wonderful to have the officers and crew of USS Carney (DDG 64) home! The ship returned Sunday to Naval Station Mayport with excited tigers onboard and a full pier of friends and family welcoming them home from their seven month deployment to the U.S. Fifth and Sixth Fleet areas of responsibility. Im certain your families were glad to have you home in time for Memorial Day. I was privileged to spend my Memorial Day downtown at the Memorial Day Commemoration at the Veterans Memorial Wall. The city of Jacksonville sponsored this moving ceremony, during which, the names of four local heroes were added to the wall. For a lot of people, Memorial Day is just another federal holiday spent with family and friends. It is that of course, but I hope everyone remem bers the true meaning. It is the one day of the year that we as a nation recognize and honor U.S. Service Members who gave their life in service to their nation. I hope that you took the time to pause and remember all those who have sacrificed and served. Last week, we held our own memori al service to remember 37 Sailors who perished when Iraqi missiles tore into the side of USS Stark on May 17, 1987. I want to thank Mayports Second Class Petty Officer Association for their hard work in preparation for and exe cution of this wonderful ceremony. I have heard nothing but compliments from all that attended this years event. I also want to thank the Naval Station Mayport Diversity Committee for their work recognizing May as Asian American Pacific Islander month. The committee hosted a cel ebration last week, which includ ed words from key note speaker Lieutenant Maili Neverosky from COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet. We are constantly reminded of the rich and diverse cultures and backgrounds of the men and women who make up the U.S. Navy. It is one of the things that make us strong as a military and as a country. With summer quickly approaching and temperatures rapidly rising, please be aware of the need for caution when participating in physical activities outdoors. Mayport has a heat index flag sys tem to help assist you in your decision making process. It is as follows: white flag-80 degrees and under-unrestricted physical activity may be carried out; green flag-80-84.9 degrees-unrestrict ed physical activity may be carried out; yellow flag-85-87.9 degrees-physical activity is advised only for personnel who have been working out in similar weather for a minimum of 10 days; red flag-88-88.9 degrees-physical activ ity is advised for personnel who have been working out in similar heat for 12 weeks or more; black flag-90 plus degrees-vigorous outdoor activity is prohibited. The flags are flown at the flagpole in front of the Fitness Center, Building #1391, with updates provided three to four times a day. You can also call the Fitness Center at 270-5451 to find out the current heat flag index. Speaking of summer, school will be out for Duval County on June 6 and that means the streets and neighbor hoods of Naval Station Mayport will be full of kids enjoying their summer break. Please make sure to keep your speed at the posted limit and keep an extra eye out for children walking and playing onboard our installation. Finally, Saturday starts the first day of sea turtle nesting season and I am excited to announce that Naval Station Mayport has it first nest. Volunteers from the Sea Turtle Patrol found the nest on Thursday near Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Perfect timing to announce the season and a perfect way for me to remind you that sea turtles and their nests are federally protected. Turtle nesting can last through Oct. 31 and each of us need to do our part to ensure as many of these endangered species survive as possible. The first way to do that is leave them alone. Never touch a nesting female or emerg ing hatchlings. If you see or find a nest, call the NS Mayport Beach Patrol at 270-5101. Also, if you live near the beach, please turn off all unnecessary lights facing the beach by 10 p.m. Lights distract hatchlings from returning to the water and drive them inland where they become vulnerable to predators. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERD.R.E.A.M. Project Available at Area SchoolsUp until recently little was known about how children were affected by long absences from par ents who were deployed and the reintegration after their return home. The National Military Family Association com missioned a study by the RAND Corporation, which addressed this issue. The research was among the first to explore the effects of deployment academical ly, socially, and emotionally on military children during an extended peri od of wartime. Results showed that children in the study were expe riencing above average levels of emotional and behavioral difficulties. The major points from the research included the following: families experienced emotional and behav ioral difficulties at rates above national averages. children reported symp toms of anxiety, which is somewhat higher than the percentage reported in other studies of chil dren. lems varied by age and gender: Older youths and boys reported more dif ficulties with school and more problem behaviors, such as fighting; great er numbers of younger children (compared with older children) and girls reported anxiety symptoms. The results also revealed challenges posed specifically by deployment: parental deployment (within the past three years) were linked to greater difficulties in childrens social and Judy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerWhat Memorial Day Means to MeMemorial Day has always held a spe cial place in my heart. Growing up in Wisconsin, my earliest memory of Memorial Day Weekend is ris ing before dawn on Friday, meeting at the local armory to load American Flags and place them along Janesvilles Memorial Day Parade route. Those flags would fly all week end long in anticipa tion of the Memorial Day Parade. On that Monday hundreds of people, local marching bands, Scouts, Shriners and Veterans would gather at the armory to begin the parade. The year was 1974 and I was an impression able 10 year-old. Even after these forty years, I remember the veterans gathering in groups that included World War One Doughboys, WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Vets marching together, many proudly wearing the uniforms that had been issued, if they could. The parade route began and ended at the City Armory and wound its way downtown past a large statue of a World War One soldier with four large bronze plates on each side of a roughly hewed gran ite base. Each of these plaques was inscribed with the names of local men and women who had answered the call to serve their Country in World War One, World War Two, Korea, and Vietnam. Military service was a recurrent theme in my own family. My grand father served in the Navy after World War One in the Carpenter rat ing. His eldest son, my uncle, served with the Marines in the Pacific in World War Two and my step-father served in the Army. I enlisted in the Navys delayed entry program during my senior year of High School when I was sev enteen years old. A decade after that first visit to a Veterans Memorial, I was sta tioned in Bethesda, Maryland and decid ed to visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall in Washington D.C. There was something deeply moving about the silent reverence that pol ished black marble wall invokes. Looking beyond the flowers that lay at the memorials base, occa sional notes that were wedged into the crevices of the inter-locking seg ments of the wall, and seeing ones own reflec tion through the sea of names etched into the gleaming, polished stone invoked several emo tions for me and I won dered how that black wall stretching across the landscape was interpreted by others who saw it? For some, did the wall represent the concrete reality of Vietnam as a war and not a conflict? Perhaps to others, the metaphor of the wall symbolized the reality of sacrifice of the lost American lives in what had been called a for gotten war. For those who approached this wall they could not sim ply pass by, they must move along the wall and the names that it bears. Some Vietnam Veterans might even suggest that the wall is an appropriate metaphor to the barriers which they experienced in their own re-entry and re-integration into society after their home coming from Viet Nam. Some may have felt emo tional walls or barriers had kept them isolated from loved ones and oth ers. Today, I think of dozens of monuments and memorials that I have visited over the years that have touched my heart in various ways. But one of the simplest and best examples that I can share is a collec tion of memorial statues that grace the landscape around Jacksonville. Although they are not as towering as that first statue I marched to forty years ago, nor is it as famous as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial they are equally signifi cant to me. In 2008, I was introduced to David Seamans and the Florida Fallen Heroes Foundation. David began the founda tion as a way to honor the service of his son, Timothy J. Seamans. Their goal has been to place a simple Boots and Rifle bronze statue at the hometown high schools of fallen ser vice members from Florida during the Iraq/ Afghanistan Conflict. For me, Memorial Day is more than statues, monuments, flags fly ing at half mast, or the somber notes of taps echoing over a cemetery. Memorial Day is keep ing the remembrance of those who have served and those who had died in Military Service alive in our hearts. Whether this comes through a focused time of medi tation, a conversation with a fellow vet, stand ing along a parade route with unfurled flags as Veterans march by, or traveling to a place of Holy ground like wit nessing the changing of the Guard at Arlington National Cemetery, I wish each of you bless ings on your Memorial Day observance. Chaplain Thomas Bingol CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNERemotional functioning, at least based on caregiver reports. challenges varied by age and gender: Older youths experienced greater schooland peer-relat ed difficulties during deployment; girls experi enced greater difficulties than boys did during the period of reintegration. givers had better selfreported mental health were better able to cope with the deployment experience both during and after. linked with reduced dif ficulties both during and after deployment. The results represent ed an important first step in understanding the link between paren tal deployment and military child and fam ily well-being. The find ings suggest the need for more research and also highlight several avenues for possible intervention. For example, families may benefit from target KNOWINGTHE ROPESSee DREAM, Page 3

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William Sy Is Navy Lodge Associate Of YearBy Kristine M. SturkieNEXCOM Public Affairs Special ist William Sy, room attendant/houseman, Navy Lodge Mayport, Fla., has been named the Navy Lodge Programs Associate of the Year for 2013. Sy has worked at the Navy Lodge since 2011. From the start, William has shown a full commitment to improv ing, enhancing and pro viding quality service at Navy Lodge Mayport, said Gwen Ellis-Smith, General Manager, Navy Lodge Mayport. William has been the forerunner in planning and execut ing renovations at the Navy Lodge. While he was hired as our house man, his skill levels as a landscaper, carpenter, draftsman, plumber and artist make him so much more. During 2013, Sy designed and upgraded Navy Lodge Mayports lobby, saving the lodge money. Sy took imme diate ownership of the project, using his drafts mens skills to design a complete lobby reset set around the existing front desk located in the center of the lobby. The renovation included new ceiling fans, furniture and paint. He completed an allinclusive upgrade on the existing front desk, creating an atmosphere of newness and unique ness, said Ellis-Smith. He designed and built a souvenir display case in the lobby to display NEX souvenirs, saving NEX overhead expenses and at the same time vastly improving the appear ance and showcase of the merchandise. We have received praise from returning guest as well as first time visitors who are in awe that the work was done in house by one of our own associ ates. During the holidays, Sy built a holiday won derland for the base as well as guests spending the holidays at the Navy Lodge. He drafted and built giant stars, sleighs and signage. The dis play was included in the bases annual ship light ing contest because of all the chatter around base praising Sys work. William is a true shining star to all guests that he comes in contact with on a daily basis, said Ellis-Smith. He is The customer service exam ple for all NEX and Navy Lodge associates to emu late. ed support to deal with stressors from multiple months of deployment, rather than only during initial months. Further, families in which care givers face mental health issues may need more support for both caregiver and child. Communities in Schools is providing tar geted support suggested by the study through the D.R.E.A.M. Project. Led by Justin Warren, D.R.E.A.M. stands for Duval Reads Engaging Americas Military and is designed to help stu dents focus on improv ing their grades, behav ior, and self-confidence. Support will be provided to children of active duty parents/guardians by caring adult volunteers. The Project engages active duty, reserve or retired/separated mili tary personnel, as well as civilians, as volunteers. The project is divided into three components: Literacy Events/ Programs: Mayport Middle School host ed a Literacy Career Day on February 27th. Seventy-three profes sional and military per sonnel shared with stu dents school-wide how they use reading in their careers. Community Engagement: Dads Do Duty encourages male participation in elemen tary schools. Dads who volunteer for this pro gram at either Finegan or Mayport Elementary encourage students just by their presence in the lunch room. The program is now in its pilot stage but will go full-out this fall. Military Education: A military drill team has been formed via Team Up at Mayport Middle School. The group meets during Team Up on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and is led by Retired Chief Donald Coop Cooper. Drill times focus on military history, ranks, and lead ership roles in the vari ous services. Special Memorial Celebrations are tak ing place the week of May 26th to educate students on the impor tance of those who have served in the military. Celebrations will occur on May 28th at Mayport Elementary from 8:40 9:30 am and Mayport Middle from 1:30 2:20 pm in each schools gym. On May 30th the celebration will occur at Finegan Elementary at 8:45 am. Each cele bration will begin with a Presentation of the Colors and Pledge of Allegiance. Selected Sailors from NS Mayport will then deliver the cel ebratory address. For more information about these programs or to volunteer, contact Justin Warren by phone at (904) 534-2643 or by email at jwarren@ CISJax.org. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Read the full report from the study Longer Parental Deployment Linked to More Emotional Challenges for Military Children at http:// www.rand,org/news/ press/2009//12/07. html.From Page 2DREAMWilliam Sy Navy Lodge Associate of the Year Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy of BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to con gratulate Mrs. Donaher who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Donaher Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS 13 MILLION ACRES AND COUNTING Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Carney Nation Returns To MayportBy Ensign Marina Nanartowich and Ensign Michael BalistreriUSS Carney Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) returned home to Naval Station Mayport May 25 after almost eight months in the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf. The first Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) 4.0 ship to deploy in support of Commander, Fifth Fleet, Carney sup ported Maritime Security and BMD Operations in Europe and the Middle East. Carney worked in part nership with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 as well as USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and CSG 2 while for ward deployed to the 5th Fleet area of opera tions (AOR) and sup ported a variety of joint operations, promoting interoperability in the region and across the services. The Arabian Gulf has changed over the last few -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeLt. Mack Elliot holds his son and his new born daughter alongside his wife Erin upon the return of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, from a regular scheduled deployment.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeElectronics Technician 1st Class Jason James hugs his mom upon the return of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment. Carney deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theatre security cooperation efforts.-Photo by Paige GnannSiena Mejia, 8, waves at her father, Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Salomon Mejia, as she waits with her family for him pierside May 25.-Photo by Paige GnannSisters Lily, 7, Charlotte, 4, and Grace, 5, hold up signs to welcome home their father, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Chris Loy, from deployment with USS Carney. -Photo by Paige GnannKingston Loring, 2, waves flags and smiles big dur ing the homecoming celebration for USS Carney. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe crew of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) mans the rails as the ship returns to Naval Station Mayport.See Carney, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeAbigail Brown awaits the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeAshley Erickson awaits the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64).-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeJasmine and Ronnie Reynolds await the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannNew moms, Stacey Mesecher, Stefanee McFarlane and Charlotte Herrera, watch as USS Carney pulls into the Naval Station Mayport basin. -Photo by Paige GnannCulinary Specialist Seaman Igor Panjkovic is welcomed home by his father, Vlavo Panjkovic, along with his mother, Bajra, left and wife, Cindy, right. years. It is no longer just a Navy environment, said Cmdr. Edward Crossman, commanding officer USS Carney. We have to seamlessly inte grate our training and operations out here to ensure success in keep ing the Gulf stable. These visits and joint exercises are necessary to make the joint environment possible. Carney was integral to the implementation of the Combined Defense of the Arabian Gulf (CDAG) Concept. She supported integrated training with more than 30 U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps units. It was a great oppor tunity to meet and talk with my counterparts from my sister services in theater, said Lt. Cmdr. Erik Graham, Carneys combat systems officer. It will make future operations smoother and more suc cessful, Carney was selected to provide air coverage in support of the first ever Griffin Missile test launch in the Arabian Gulf. Carney served as the CTF-55 Flag Ship, embarking Capt. Joseph Naman, Commodore Destroyer Squadron 50 and his staff, as well as a Program Executive OfficeIntegrated Warfare Systems (PEOIWS) team for the shoot. As a result of Carneys coordination, the launches were success ful, safely executed, and provided important data to the U.S. Cyclone Class Patrol Crafts from which the missiles were fired, as well as squadron staff, Task Force Commander, and the Griffin Missile testing community. Carney supported international partnerships in the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf through port visits to Rota, Spain; El Ferrol, Spain; Palermo, Sicily; Bodrum, Turkey; Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Jubail, Saudi Arabia, and Manama, Bahrain. Each port visit provided the crew with an opportuni ty to experience the rich culture and history of the host nation. As Carney heads into maintenance and train ing phase, her crew will prepare for the scheduled homeport shift to Rota, Spain in September 2015.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) returns to NS Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment.From Page 4Carney -Photo by Paige GnannSeaman Jonathan McFarlane holds his four-month-old daughter, Aubrey, for the first time after completing a seven-month deployment aboard USS Carney.

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Free Marriage Retreats For Military CouplesBy MC2 Marcus StanleyNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment, Southeast Public Affairs At one time or anoth er, the everyday life in the military can be very stressful. You factor in the long duty hours and watch standing, which at times can be overwhelming. Couple this with the stress of taking care of your spouse and kids at home; sometimes you need a break for a few days. But who can afford to go to a retreat for a couple of days? For Servicemembers in the Southeast Region, the Chaplains office will pick up the tab for a much needed break. The Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) assists service members and retirees in the Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and their spous es by offering retreats and workshops to help with marital, family, and deployment issues. CREDO covers topics such as marriage enrichment, self-confidence, and relaxation, combat ing personal affliction, suicide prevention and how to better communi cate with others. The main goal with these retreats is to get personnel away from the work environment and help them address their issues in a peaceful sur rounding, said Naval Station Mayport CREDO Facilitator Atticus Taylor. Instead of send ing a person to three or four different programs, the retreat can be one place where the person can get away to relax, and understand them selves better and get to the root of their prob lems. The military lifestyle can and does take a toll on even the best of mar riages. However, help is available for those cou ples seeking to enhance and improve their rela tionship. Being married one year is just as hard as 30, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Sharon Berg. During the first year, youre still get ting used to your mom not cooking and hav ing to get used to living together, then you throw in a baby and its chaos. So its good that there are other people out there acting as a support team. During the retreats, couples are provided ample free time to relax, reconnect and enjoy moments alone without the demands and inter ruptions that often occur in daily life. In the marriage enrichment retreat (MER), the first thing we focus on is how the cou ple develops their communication skills to be more effective, Taylor said. We talk to them about ways to resolve conflict. Marriage is very important to a sta ble society, and a very valuable resource to cre ate strong family bonds. The marriage retreat is designed to encourage healthy marriages and to help couples grow. Even though I have been married for over 20 years, I had no idea that there was a name for what I have been doing and what has been working for me and my wife as it relates to for exam ple Languages of Love amongst other top ics that gave me a bet ter understanding of our relationship, said Navy Counselor 1st Class Victor Enriquez. It also proved that you are never too experienced to learn. Its important to note that the CREDO marriage retreats are designed to enrich a marriage and are not a substitute for marital counseling. I would highly rec ommend any couple to attend the retreat. No matter where they are in their relationship, new lyweds, middle of the pack, or over 20 years married, its geared for any couple that wants to learn something new about each other and who truly wants their relationship to last, said Chief Religious Program Specialist Hector Feliciano. MERs may not save marriages but its meant to be a tool to strengthen already strong marriages or to lead marriages that are in troubled waters into the right path. All retreats are 48 hours long, and are held at the Epworth by The Sea in St. Simons Island Ga., which is about 80 minute north of Mayport. All retreats begin at 5 p.m. and last until around noon on Sunday. The activity is open to all active duty, reservists and their fam ily members. All work shops and retreats are at no cost to participants and transportation is provided. The CREDO marriage retreats are designed to help couples strengthen and deepen their commitment to each other as well as gain a better of understanding of themselves and their spouse. Feliciano went on to say, Besides MERs, CREDO offers Personal Growth Retreats for the individual, and Family Enrichment Retreats for families. For more information on upcoming retreats contact the Naval Station Mayport Base Chapel at (904) 270-5212. -U.S. Navy PhotosAbove, through the Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation program (CREDO), service members in the Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and their spouses are offered free enrichment retreats to help them reconnect. The retreat offers a safe environment to help build better communication skills, trust and strengthen ties. Below, Chief Religious Program Specialist Hector Feliciano participates in an excerise dur ring the CREDO program. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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NS Mayport Celebrates Navys DiversityBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastI Am Beyond was the underlying theme dur ing the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) celebration at the Naval Station Mayport chapel May 21. Directed by Congress in 1978 and estab lished by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week was first observed the week of May 4, 1979. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush expanded the observance to encompass the entire month, and in 1992, Congress passed a law permanently designat ing May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. AAPI Heritage Month recognizes the chal lenges faced by Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians and their vital contributions to the American story. According to Naval Station Mayport Diversity Program President Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Leonard Collins, this celebration, along with other ethnic celebrations throughout the year rec ognizes important con tributions from many diverse groups that make up the U.S. Navy force. The diverse commit tee recognizes and cel ebrates the many con tributions that different cultures provide that people probably dont know about, he said. The bigger picture is we want to strengthen relationships and set the example of a culture of tolerance and promote diversity within the Navy. This years national theme is I Am Beyond, capturing the aspirations of the American spirit and how Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander descent have sought to excel beyond the challenges they have faced over the years. Asians and Pacific Islanders of various nationalities and ances try have been serving in the Navy since the early 19th century. Asians and Pacific Islanders have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every aspect of American life, including Adm. Harry B. Harris, Jr., the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Born in Japan and raised in Tennessee and Florida, Adm. Harris graduated the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978 and became a P-3 Orion navigator. In addition to U.S. Pacific Fleet, he commanded Patrol Squadron 46, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 1, Joint Task ForceGuantanamo, U.S. 6th Fleet and Striking and Support Forces NATO. Another Sailor of Asian American decent is Capt. and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, of Asian Indian parent age. She served as the flight engineer for the Expedition-14 crew and science officer at the International Space Station in 2007. Her four space walks and six months in orbit set records for women at the time. According to Key Note Speaker of the ceremony U.S. Navy Force 4th Fleet Surface Planner Lt. Maili Neverosky, it is an honor to help promote and rec ognize the AAPI contri bution to todays Navy. Asian and Pacific Islanders have a big presence in the military she said. The Navy is very diverse and I think everyone should learn about the different tradi tions and cultures of all ethnic groups. In 2014, Sailors of Asian and Pacific Islander heritage com prise 6.43 percent of our active duty naval force. More than 20,500 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employ ees identify as Asian American or Pacific Islander, including 10 flag officers, 9 members of the Senior Executive Service (SES), and 176 master chief petty offi cers. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and historical roots. A main goal of the diversity committee is to make people aware of the contributions of other cultures in the Navy, Collins said. We hope people learn some thing about the different groups of people that makes this a great Navy community. Sailors aboard Naval Station Mayport watch a video commemorating the accomplishments of Asians and Pacific Islanders throughout American history during the Asian American Pacific Islander heritage ceremony held at the base chapel.-Photos by MC2 Marcus StanleyKeynote speaker, Lt. Maili Neverosky, speaks about her family history during the Asian American Pacific Islander heritage ceremony at the chapel aboard Naval Station Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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Do You Know The Risks Of Social Media And OPSEC?By MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastSailors and Marines deployed around the world, and their families at home dont go a day without a reminder of the benefits and risks of the communication environment of today. While social networking can be useful and fun, service members and their families should consider the risks and vulnerabilities in both personal and command activities by practicing opera tion security (OPSEC). Representatives from the Navy Information Operations Command (NOIC) in Norfolk VA, held an All Hands Brief at Naval Station Mayport, May 12, to discuss the operation security dangers for Sailors of friending or liking on Facebook, following and tweeting on Twitter, shar ing photo stream on Flickr or virtually hanging out with a circle of friends on Google+. According to Operations Security Specialist Lee Case, all military members should think about OPSEC before posting any information. Social media is a big prob lem with regards to operational security, she said. Most peo ple dont understand the value of their information or the audience they are broadcast ing to. Many dont realize how valuable or harmful that piece of information can be. Military and family mem bers all know some bits of critical information. It may not be classified, and it may even seem insignificant. But, to the potential adversary, it is a piece of the puzzle. The power of emerging media tools is a two-edged sword: It makes information exception ally accessible when posted for anyone who is interested, including potential adversar ies. When communicating on social media sites do not post the following information: Exact deployment dates or return dates. This applies to ships, subs, squadrons and individual augmentees. Dates or location of a ships upcoming ports of call. Detailed information about a mission. References to trends in crews morale or an individu als personal problems. Details concerning security procedures, response times or tactics. Information about equip ment readiness. Speculations about future operations. My main goal is to teach people to control their signa ture management, Case said. Simply saying you are going on vacation, could announce to people where you are going to be and your possible finan cial situation. Understand that information knowledge is power. If people could be a little more tight lipped, my goal will be accomplished. Bring Them In Safely Aviation Boatswains Mate Handling 3rd Class Benjamin Kimbrough directs an MH-60S helicopter attached to Dragon Whale Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC-28) aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during flight operations. New York was under way earlier this month conducting training and exercises for a future deployment.-Photos by MC2 Cyrus Roson 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Intramural Sports June 2: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends July 24. 270-5451 June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim/ Run.) 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. Sign up by May 30. 270-5452 June 10: Moonlight 5K Run/3K Walk. 6:10 p.m. in front of the Fitness Center. June 10: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. Season begins June 23; ends Aug. 21. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 14 & 15, 8:30 a.m. shot gun start. Open to any player with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $40; includes awards ceremony. Liberty Call The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. June 1: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 29. June 3: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline June 2. June 6: The Catty Shack Night Feeding. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Cost $15; sign up by June 5. June 7: Fort Clinch Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline June 5. June 8: Billiards Tournament. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! June 13: Movie Trip: 22 Jump Street. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. June 15: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by June 12. June 17: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:30 p.m. Sign up deadline June 16. June 19: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:45 p.m. FREE. June 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation only. June 21: Wet n Wild Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $37. Sign up by May 19. June 22: Fort George Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; sign up by June 19. June 26: Bowling. 6-8 p.m. FREE; sign up until 5 p.m. June 27: Movie Trip: Transformers 4. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. June 29: Fort Castillo De San Marcos Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; Sign up by June 26. May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 June 13: One Sweet Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 2705680 June 14: Family Pool Party. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Outdoor Pool. FREE. Children under the age of 10 must be accompanied by an adult for the entire event. 2705680 Auto Skills Center May Special: Free tire rotation with paid alignment. Transmission flush, coolant flush and fuel injection cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long and free brake inspections. 2705392 Aquatics Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 2705101/5425 June 8: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open Full Time. Tuesdays-Fridays12-6 p.m. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Beachside Bingo Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 May 31: All Request Saturday Night. All night long at Castaways. DJ Adam will be playing your song requests all night! 270-7205 June 12-July 13: Watch the World Cup at Castaways Lounge Come and watch the international excitement of the World Cup. Wear your best patriotic gear and come cheer on Team USA on June 16 and 22 at 6pm. Free for all adults.. 270-7205 June 20: XBOX 360 FIFA World Cup Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 June 14: UFC 174Johnson vs. Bagautinov. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 June 6: NBA 2K14 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 Community Activities May 30: Outdoor MoviesFrozen (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 6: Outdoor MoviesIron Man 3 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Freedom Fest 2014 4-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, caricature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 50-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $8.00. 270-5431 June 11: All-Hands Brisket Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by CDS-14/ Crudes CPOA. For tick ets, (904) 270-5801 x148 June 18: Family Day. Noon-6 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Open to all active and retired Chiefs and their families. Free food, fun and games for all! 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 2705145 Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 Coasties The Champions-Photo by Rita HammerstadMens softball league champion Coasties held an undefeated season. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Scam Artists Posing As Debt CollectorsBy Lt. Daniel R. McGinleyNLSOServicemembers are often the target of a number of scams designed to scare the member into paying money they never owed. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), debt collection scams rank second only to identity theft. Servicemembers are easy targets since they know that their credit history can affect their ability to maintain their security clearance. This article is designed to alert you to a fresh scam that appears to be rearing its head in North Florida as well as pro vide you information on how to detect a debt collection scam and protect yourself The new scam goes like this: first, the service member gets an auto mated call from some one identifying himself as Richard Jeffers attempting to collect on a debt and informing the servicemember to call a 1-866 telephone num ber to settle the alleged debt. When the service member calls the num ber, an automated voice states that the company is named Green, Daley, and Associates. A live operator then comes on the line demanding that the servicemember pay more than $1,000.00 by credit card or debit card. At this point, the scam mer reads off the service members social security number and then ties the debt to a location where the servicemember legit imately lived. For example, the scammer states the debt is from a bank in New York from 2008 when the servicemem ber did in fact live in New York in 2008 and also used that particu lar bank. Next, the ser vicemember is told that the company is working with the Duval County Sheriffs office to file a warrant and that the servicemember will be served, and potentially arrested, if he does not pay immediately. If the servicemember does not agree to pay, addi tional calls are made to threaten a warrant/ arrest, and sometimes another member of the scam operation calls and impersonates a police officer. If the service member asks for the mailing address or addi tional information on the company or debt, then they are threatened with more severe action, and may get to talk to the attorney. (spoiler alert: not likely a real attor ney). Being the target of the above scam or one like it can be stressful and even scary, however, if you familiarize yourself with the warning signs and know what resources are available to you, you can protect yourself. Here are some warning signs to look for when you are contacted by blocked or random 1-800 numbers: received any written communication from the debt collector give you a physical address identify the business for whom they are collecting the debt criminal action (which is not allowed to collect a civil debt) contact your command about the debt (which is also not allowed except under limited circum stances) fane, obscene or harass ing language You should remem ber that the scammers goal is to scare you into paying the debt on the phone. First, you should never pay a purported debt over the phone using a credit card or debit card. You should also know that according to a federal law known as the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), you have the right to demand validation of the debt in writing. What should you do? (1) Calmly gather as much information as possible. Do they have personally identifiable information (PII) about you (e.g., social security number)? CAREFUL, do not verify that the information the scam mer has is accurate. Also, you should ask for (and write down) as much information about the debt collector as possible, including: the name of the collector, the name of the company attempting to collect the debt, the mailing address of the company, and any additional contact infor mation you can gather. (2) Take action! Visit or call the closest legal assistance office ASAP! In the meantime, get to work protecting yourself. Any legwork you do will also help your attorney. review your credit report through www. annual creditreport.com. Does anything look fishy? Dispute it! While you are at it, create an iden tity theft report with the 3 major credit reporting agencies (i.e., Equifax, TransUnion, Experian). credit card companies that you are being tar geted. Attorney Generals office to file a complaint. Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Fair Trade Commission (FTC) websites to submit complaints. At the end of the day, you cannot always avoid being the target of a scam, but you can protect yourself once you are being targeted. If you have would like assistance in taking any action recommended above, or believe you have been the victim of a scam, please contact a military legal assistance office. The Navy legal assistance offices in the southeast region are: Jacksonville, Florida at (904) 542-2565 ext. 3006; Mayport, Florida at (904) 270-5445 ext. 3017; Kings Bay, Georgia at (912) 573-3959. This article is not intended to substitute for the per sonal advice of a licensed attorney. A CFC participant provided as a public service. Practing Tactics -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertAbove, Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Todd McElvene practices tactics during a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team training exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and the atre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. Below, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Justin Betz, from Jacksonville, Fla. practices tactics during a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team training exercise. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 11

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From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.May 28, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effec tive independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. May 28-29, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., Resume Writing, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Create an effective resume or improve the one you already have. This workshop will out line the essential infor mation you need to develop a great resume in a competitive job environment. May 29, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. May 29, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. May 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., FRG Basic Training, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Training custom ized to fit your FRG, whether the command is starting a group or re-energizing an exist ing group. Discuss the FRG Instruction/policy, leadership structure, communication tech niques, team-building ideas, fundraising guidelines, and ideas for fun activities. May 31, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are applying for. FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, Families VCNO Howard To Speak At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speak er is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable pro gram. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below din ner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or busi ness attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, din ner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory. Make checks pay able to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. Friday, May 30 The UF/IFAS Extension Duval County Office will offer a class on Food Preservation from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. The program will focus mainly on the proper techniques in canning foods safely, however freezing and drying will also be covered. Come and learn the newest rules and techniques for keeping your family safe while preserving your favorite foods all year long. All participants will receive the newest food preservation information and will have the oppor tunity to make their own homemade jelly. Cost is $10 per person. Space is limited, pre-registration and pre-payment are required. Please contact Sarah or Melanie at 904255-7450 to register. Tuesday June 3 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be presented by Damon Young of Florida UAV on Photography and Video with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles aka drones. Come out and see why drones are becoming so popular in photography! This is a free event with people at all levels of photography welcomed. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Sunday, June 8 Bring the family and learn tricks to care for our trails. Enjoy a rang er-led hike along with Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers along the Dune Ridge Trail, one of Floridas premier nature trails at Talbot Island State Park. Learn about the diverse plants and wildlife while dis covering techniques to keep this habitat pris tine. The trail meanders for two miles atop an ancient dune ridge under a canopy of live oaks, cedars and sable palms in a lush maritime ham mock and concludes with a two mile walk along Little Talbot Islands picturesque beach. Meet at Pavilion One on Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive, at 10 a.m. Water, snacks, insect repellant, layered clothing and a camera are recommended. For more informa tion, please visit www. floridastateparks.org or www.LNT.org http:// www.americasstate parks.org/. Saturday, June 21 Bring the family and your handheld GPSenabled device for a funfilled day of geocaching at Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve State Park, 13802 Pumpkin Hill Road. This is a realworld, outdoors trea sure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices. Most smart phones are now GPS-enabled devic es making this game accessible to many. Players navigate to a spe cific set of coordinates to find hidden caches, enjoying the fresh air and the thrill of the hunt. This pristine park offers over 4,000 acres of natural Florida uplands with miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails and canoe/kayak access to the salt marsh. Meet at the Main Parking lot of Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve State Park at 9 a.m. for a breakfast and meet and greet. Then, gather at 9:30 a.m. to learn the basics of this activity from an expert in Geocaching 101. Afterwards, try your new skills out searching for 30 new caches along the trails. Learn about the parks plant and animal species as you explore and collect clues to find the super secret Pumpkin Hill Final cache. For information, visit www.floridastate parks.org or www.geo caching.com; www. americasstateparks.org/. Outin Townscheduled for May 31 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. Balfour Beatty Communities has events planned throughout the month of June if you cannot attend the annual Beautification. An event schedule can be found at www.facebook.com/ mayporthomes Completed sur veys should be sealed in the postage paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the autho rized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office. Residents that hand in a survey on or before June 20th will qualify for a special Early Bird prize drawing. The final day for resi dents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Thank you in advance to all residents for their participation in the sur vey processwe look forward to receiving your feedback. If you have any questions about the Resident Satisfaction Survey, please contact the main office at 904270-8870.From Page 1SurveyRetirement Chief Fire Controlman (SW) John M. Broughton retired recently after 20 years of honorable ser vice. Broughton enlisted in the Navy in June of 1994. His sea tours include Maintenance Supervisor from 19962001 in USS Doyle (FFG-39), Leading Petty Officer in USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) from November 2004 to December 2009. Shore Duty assignments included Testing NonCommissioning Officer in Charge Military Entrance Processing Command Miami, Fla., Air Warfare Instructor, Ships Team Lead and Training Liaison Officer for all Frigates attached to Afloat Training Group Mayport, Fla., from December 2009 to May 2014. In his 20 years of faithful and honorable service, Broughton has had a positive impact. His years of mentorship and training in the Fleet have and will continue to have a lasting and posi tive impact on the Sailors with whom he served. His awards include a Joint Service Achievement Medal and six Navy Achievement Medals. During the cer emony, he received the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. On hand to celebrate and honor his service were his father and mother, various friends and his Shipmates at ATG Mayport. Also recognized for their selfless dedica tion to the Navy and the Nation were his wife Elizabeth and daughter Samantha. MilestonesAt NS Mayport 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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CHINFO Award Winner How Secure Are You?Social Media Pitfalls For OpSec Page 8 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Help Protect Sea TurtlesFrom NS Mayport SecurityNaval Station Mayport beaches are a great place to live and visit for both people and endangered species of sea turtles. It is just a little tougher to find a good place to nest if you are an endangered sea turtle. Turtle nesting takes place May 31 through Oct. 31. However, their safety depends on you. Hatchlings find their way to the sea by light clues, such as bright ness. They instinctively crawl towards the brightest light and become disoriented if artificial lights are shining from behind. Artificial light from beachfront homes, streetlights or even flashlights can attract the hatchlings away from the safety of the water and lead them to their deaths. Lights and people disorientate female turtles coming ashore to nest. If one is sighted com ing ashore, contact the base Wildlife officer and remain clear, stay quiet, do not use a light source and dont allow anyone near her to disturb her nesting. How can you help? By simply keeping our beaches as dark and quiet as possible throughout the nesting period. Consider the following suggestions: sary lights and do not use flashlights without a red lenses. source of any light fix ture so it is not visible from the beach. tors on outside lights for security purposes. lights so they are off by 10 p.m. Lodge, BOQ and house curtains at sunset that face the beach. conducted on Naval Station Mayport beach areas during nesting season must be cleared through the Wildlife officer first. large holes and rutting on the beach area. beach must be on a leash at all times. ing female or emerg ing hatchlings. These actions are a violation of federal and state laws. Only permit holders are allowed to touch or move a sea turtle. Never try to push a live sea turtle back into the water. If the turtle is out of the water and on the beach, keep the shell wet with a damp towel or sprinkle water over it. mental Office, Mayport you find a live or dead sea turtle unless the turtle has a red X on its shell indicating it has already been checked by the appropriate author ity and is waiting for burial by beach sanita tion units. The turtles have been here for more than 150 million years and are on the endangered spe cies list. Lets all do our part to help protect them and ensure that they remain part of life in Florida. For more information, or if you sight an unmarked nest, hatch ling or stranded sea turtles, contact the NS immediately at 2705101 for the base beach Call the Beaches Sea beaches or the Florida 2500. -Photo by Trish LoopTurtle patrol volunteers stand beside Naval Station Mayports first sea turtle nest of the season. The new nest is located at Boardwalk No. 4, just north of Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Sea turtles are considered endangered and are protected by federal law. Nesting season will last through Oct. 31. Beachgoers are reminded not to disturb the nests or touch a sea turtle or hatchling. Pictured from left is Michelle Tabor, Enyr Hoth, kneeling, Mark Conte and Michelle French. BBC Kicks Off 2014 Housing Survey With Party From BBCIn a few weeks, resi dents will be invited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations Survey. The annual survey is an important part of our continuous improvement program that helps us analyze performance and make any necessary changes and enhance ments to ensure we consistently deliver quality service across all aspects of our community operations. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of the homes. All surveys are completely confidential and anony mous and residents are encouraged to pro vide open and honest insights. Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we are excelling operation ally and where there is room for improvement, said Heather Sanders, Community Manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be avail able at the kick-off event: Spring Beautification, See Survey, Page 12 -Photo by MC2 Salt Cebe

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer ....................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Shipmates, Its wonderful to have the officers and crew of USS Carney (DDG 64) home! The ship returned Sunday to Naval Station Mayport with excited tigers onboard and a full pier of friends and family welcoming them home from their seven month deployment to the U.S. Fifth and Sixth Fleet areas of responsibility. Im certain your families were glad to have you home in time for Memorial Day. I was privileged to spend my Memorial Day downtown at the Memorial Day Commemoration at the Veterans Memorial Wall. The city of Jacksonville sponsored this moving ceremony, during which, the names of four local heroes were added to the wall. For a lot of people, Memorial Day is just another federal holiday spent with family and friends. It is that of course, but I hope everyone remem bers the true meaning. It is the one day of the year that we as a nation recognize and honor U.S. Service Members who gave their life in service to their nation. I hope that you took the time to pause and remember all those who have sacrificed and served. Last week, we held our own memorial service to remember 37 Sailors who perished when Iraqi missiles tore into the side of USS Stark on May 17, 1987. I want to thank Mayports Second Class Petty Officer Association for their hard work in preparation for and exe cution of this wonderful ceremony. I have heard nothing but compliments from all that attended this years event. I also want to thank the Naval Station Mayport Diversity Committee for their work recognizing May as Asian American Pacific Islander month. The committee hosted a cel ebration last week, which included words from key note speaker Lieutenant Maili Neverosky from COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet. We are constantly reminded of the rich and diverse cultures and backgrounds of the men and women who make up the U.S. Navy. It is one of the things that make us strong as a military and as a country. With summer quickly approaching and temperatures rapidly rising, please be aware of the need for caution when participating in physical activities outdoors. Mayport has a heat index flag sys tem to help assist you in your decision making process. It is as follows: white flag-80 degrees and under-unrestricted physical activity may be carried out; green flag-80-84.9 degrees-unrestrict ed physical activity may be carried out; yellow flag-85-87.9 degrees-physical activity is advised only for personnel who have been working out in similar weather for a minimum of 10 days; red flag-88-88.9 degrees-physical activ ity is advised for personnel who have been working out in similar heat for 12 weeks or more; black flag-90 plus degrees-vigorous outdoor activity is prohibited. The flags are flown at the flagpole in front of the Fitness Center, Building #1391, with updates provided three to four times a day. You can also call the Fitness Center at 270-5451 to find out the current heat flag index. Speaking of summer, school will be out for Duval County on June 6 and that means the streets and neighbor hoods of Naval Station Mayport will be full of kids enjoying their summer break. Please make sure to keep your speed at the posted limit and keep an extra eye out for children walking and playing onboard our installation. Finally, Saturday starts the first day of sea turtle nesting season and I am excited to announce that Naval Station Mayport has it first nest. Volunteers from the Sea Turtle Patrol found the nest on Thursday near Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Perfect timing to announce the season and a perfect way for me to remind you that sea turtles and their nests are federally protected. Turtle nesting can last through Oct. 31 and each of us need to do our part to ensure as many of these endangered species survive as possible. The first way to do that is leave them alone. Never touch a nesting female or emerging hatchlings. If you see or find a nest, call the NS Mayport Beach Patrol at 270-5101. Also, if you live near the beach, please turn off all unnecessary lights facing the beach by 10 p.m. Lights distract hatchlings from returning to the water and drive them inland where they become vulnerable to predators. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERD.R.E.A.M. Project Available at Area SchoolsUp until recently little was known about how children were affected by long absences from par ents who were deployed and the reintegration after their return home. The National Military Family Association com missioned a study by the RAND Corporation, which addressed this issue. The research was among the first to explore the effects of deployment academical ly, socially, and emotionally on military children during an extended period of wartime. Results showed that children in the study were expe riencing above average levels of emotional and behavioral difficulties. The major points from the research included the following: families experienced emotional and behav ioral difficulties at rates above national averages. children reported symp toms of anxiety, which is somewhat higher than the percentage reported in other studies of chil dren. lems varied by age and gender: Older youths and boys reported more dif ficulties with school and more problem behaviors, such as fighting; great er numbers of younger children (compared with older children) and girls reported anxiety symptoms. The results also revealed challenges posed specifically by deployment: parental deployment (within the past three years) were linked to greater difficulties in childrens social and Judy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerWhat Memorial Day Means to MeMemorial Day has always held a spe cial place in my heart. Growing up in Wisconsin, my earliest memory of Memorial Day Weekend is ris ing before dawn on Friday, meeting at the local armory to load American Flags and place them along Janesvilles Memorial Day Parade route. Those flags would fly all week end long in anticipa tion of the Memorial Day Parade. On that Monday hundreds of people, local marching bands, Scouts, Shriners and Veterans would gather at the armory to begin the parade. The year was 1974 and I was an impression able 10 year-old. Even after these forty years, I remember the veterans gathering in groups that included World War One Doughboys, WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Vets marching together, many proudly wearing the uniforms that had been issued, if they could. The parade route began and ended at the City Armory and wound its way downtown past a large statue of a World War One soldier with four large bronze plates on each side of a roughly hewed granite base. Each of these plaques was inscribed with the names of local men and women who had answered the call to serve their Country in World War One, World War Two, Korea, and Vietnam. Military service was a recurrent theme in my own family. My grand father served in the Navy after World War One in the Carpenter rat ing. His eldest son, my uncle, served with the Marines in the Pacific in World War Two and my step-father served in the Army. I enlisted in the Navys delayed entry program during my senior year of High School when I was sev enteen years old. A decade after that first visit to a Veterans Memorial, I was sta tioned in Bethesda, Maryland and decid ed to visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall in Washington D.C. There was something deeply moving about the silent reverence that pol ished black marble wall invokes. Looking beyond the flowers that lay at the memorials base, occa sional notes that were wedged into the crevices of the inter-locking seg ments of the wall, and seeing ones own reflection through the sea of names etched into the gleaming, polished stone invoked several emo tions for me and I won dered how that black wall stretching across the landscape was interpreted by others who saw it? For some, did the wall represent the concrete reality of Vietnam as a war and not a conflict? Perhaps to others, the metaphor of the wall symbolized the reality of sacrifice of the lost American lives in what had been called a for gotten war. For those who approached this wall they could not sim ply pass by, they must move along the wall and the names that it bears. Some Vietnam Veterans might even suggest that the wall is an appropriate metaphor to the barriers which they experienced in their own re-entry and re-integration into society after their home coming from Viet Nam. Some may have felt emotional walls or barriers had kept them isolated from loved ones and others. Today, I think of dozens of monuments and memorials that I have visited over the years that have touched my heart in various ways. But one of the simplest and best examples that I can share is a collec tion of memorial statues that grace the landscape around Jacksonville. Although they are not as towering as that first statue I marched to forty years ago, nor is it as famous as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial they are equally signifi cant to me. In 2008, I was introduced to David Seamans and the Florida Fallen Heroes Foundation. David began the founda tion as a way to honor the service of his son, Timothy J. Seamans. Their goal has been to place a simple Boots and Rifle bronze statue at the hometown high schools of fallen ser vice members from Florida during the Iraq/ Afghanistan Conflict. For me, Memorial Day is more than statues, monuments, flags fly ing at half mast, or the somber notes of taps echoing over a cemetery. Memorial Day is keep ing the remembrance of those who have served and those who had died in Military Service alive in our hearts. Whether this comes through a focused time of medi tation, a conversation with a fellow vet, stand ing along a parade route with unfurled flags as Veterans march by, or traveling to a place of Holy ground like wit nessing the changing of the Guard at Arlington National Cemetery, I wish each of you bless ings on your Memorial Day observance. Chaplain Thomas Bingol CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNERemotional functioning, at least based on caregiver reports. challenges varied by age and gender: Older youths experienced greater schooland peer-relat ed difficulties during deployment; girls experienced greater difficulties than boys did during the period of reintegration. givers had better selfreported mental health were better able to cope with the deployment experience both during and after. linked with reduced dif ficulties both during and after deployment. The results represent ed an important first step in understanding the link between paren tal deployment and military child and fam ily well-being. The find ings suggest the need for more research and also highlight several avenues for possible intervention. For example, families may benefit from target KNOWINGTHE ROPESSee DREAM, Page 3

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William Sy Is Navy Lodge Associate Of YearBy Kristine M. SturkieNEXCOM Public Affairs Specialist William Sy, room attendant/houseman, Navy Lodge Mayport, Fla., has been named the Navy Lodge Programs Associate of the Year for 2013. Sy has worked at the Navy Lodge since 2011. From the start, William has shown a full commitment to improv ing, enhancing and pro viding quality service at Navy Lodge Mayport, said Gwen Ellis-Smith, General Manager, Navy Lodge Mayport. William has been the forerunner in planning and execut ing renovations at the Navy Lodge. While he was hired as our house man, his skill levels as a landscaper, carpenter, draftsman, plumber and artist make him so much more. During 2013, Sy designed and upgraded Navy Lodge Mayports lobby, saving the lodge money. Sy took imme diate ownership of the project, using his drafts mens skills to design a complete lobby reset set around the existing front desk located in the center of the lobby. The renovation included new ceiling fans, furniture and paint. He completed an allinclusive upgrade on the existing front desk, creating an atmosphere of newness and unique ness, said Ellis-Smith. He designed and built a souvenir display case in the lobby to display NEX souvenirs, saving NEX overhead expenses and at the same time vastly improving the appear ance and showcase of the merchandise. We have received praise from returning guest as well as first time visitors who are in awe that the work was done in house by one of our own associ ates. During the holidays, Sy built a holiday won derland for the base as well as guests spending the holidays at the Navy Lodge. He drafted and built giant stars, sleighs and signage. The display was included in the bases annual ship light ing contest because of all the chatter around base praising Sys work. William is a true shining star to all guests that he comes in contact with on a daily basis, said Ellis-Smith. He is The customer service exam ple for all NEX and Navy Lodge associates to emulate. ed support to deal with stressors from multiple months of deployment, rather than only during initial months. Further, families in which care givers face mental health issues may need more support for both caregiver and child. Communities in Schools is providing tar geted support suggested by the study through the D.R.E.A.M. Project. Led by Justin Warren, D.R.E.A.M. stands for Duval Reads Engaging Americas Military and is designed to help stu dents focus on improv ing their grades, behav ior, and self-confidence. Support will be provided to children of active duty parents/guardians by caring adult volunteers. The Project engages active duty, reserve or retired/separated military personnel, as well as civilians, as volunteers. The project is divided into three components: Literacy Events/ Programs: Mayport Middle School host ed a Literacy Career Day on February 27th. Seventy-three profes sional and military per sonnel shared with stu dents school-wide how they use reading in their careers. Community Engagement: Dads Do Duty encourages male participation in elemen tary schools. Dads who volunteer for this pro gram at either Finegan or Mayport Elementary encourage students just by their presence in the lunch room. The program is now in its pilot stage but will go full-out this fall. Military Education: A military drill team has been formed via Team Up at Mayport Middle School. The group meets during Team Up on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and is led by Retired Chief Donald Coop Cooper. Drill times focus on military history, ranks, and leadership roles in the vari ous services. Special Memorial Celebrations are tak ing place the week of May 26th to educate students on the importance of those who have served in the military. Celebrations will occur on May 28th at Mayport Elementary from 8:40 9:30 am and Mayport Middle from 1:30 2:20 pm in each schools gym. On May 30th the celebration will occur at Finegan Elementary at 8:45 am. Each cele bration will begin with a Presentation of the Colors and Pledge of Allegiance. Selected Sailors from NS Mayport will then deliver the cel ebratory address. For more information about these programs or to volunteer, contact Justin Warren by phone at (904) 534-2643 or by email at jwarren@ CISJax.org. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Read the full report from the study Longer Parental Deployment Linked to More Emotional Challenges for Military Children at http:// www.rand,org/news/ press/2009//12/07. html.From Page 2DREAMWilliam Sy Navy Lodge Associate of the Year Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy of BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to con gratulate Mrs. Donaher who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Donaher Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS 13 MILLION ACRES AND COUNTING Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Carney Nation Returns To MayportBy Ensign Marina Nanartowich and Ensign Michael BalistreriUSS Carney Public AffairsGuided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) returned home to Naval Station Mayport May 25 after almost eight months in the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf. The first Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) 4.0 ship to deploy in support of Commander, Fifth Fleet, Carney sup ported Maritime Security and BMD Operations in Europe and the Middle East. Carney worked in partnership with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 as well as USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and CSG 2 while forward deployed to the 5th Fleet area of operations (AOR) and sup ported a variety of joint operations, promoting interoperability in the region and across the services. The Arabian Gulf has changed over the last few -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeLt. Mack Elliot holds his son and his new born daughter alongside his wife Erin upon the return of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, from a regular scheduled deployment.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeElectronics Technician 1st Class Jason James hugs his mom upon the return of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment. Carney deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theatre security cooperation efforts.-Photo by Paige GnannSiena Mejia, 8, waves at her father, Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Salomon Mejia, as she waits with her family for him pierside May 25.-Photo by Paige GnannSisters Lily, 7, Charlotte, 4, and Grace, 5, hold up signs to welcome home their father, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Chris Loy, from deployment with USS Carney. -Photo by Paige GnannKingston Loring, 2, waves flags and smiles big dur ing the homecoming celebration for USS Carney. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe crew of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) mans the rails as the ship returns to Naval Station Mayport.See Carney, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeAbigail Brown awaits the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeAshley Erickson awaits the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64).-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeJasmine and Ronnie Reynolds await the arrival of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) to Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannNew moms, Stacey Mesecher, Stefanee McFarlane and Charlotte Herrera, watch as USS Carney pulls into the Naval Station Mayport basin. -Photo by Paige GnannCulinary Specialist Seaman Igor Panjkovic is welcomed home by his father, Vlavo Panjkovic, along with his mother, Bajra, left and wife, Cindy, right. years. It is no longer just a Navy environment, said Cmdr. Edward Crossman, commanding officer USS Carney. We have to seamlessly integrate our training and operations out here to ensure success in keep ing the Gulf stable. These visits and joint exercises are necessary to make the joint environment possible. Carney was integral to the implementation of the Combined Defense of the Arabian Gulf (CDAG) Concept. She supported integrated training with more than 30 U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps units. It was a great oppor tunity to meet and talk with my counterparts from my sister services in theater, said Lt. Cmdr. Erik Graham, Carneys combat systems officer. It will make future operations smoother and more suc cessful, Carney was selected to provide air coverage in support of the first ever Griffin Missile test launch in the Arabian Gulf. Carney served as the CTF-55 Flag Ship, embarking Capt. Joseph Naman, Commodore Destroyer Squadron 50 and his staff, as well as a Program Executive OfficeIntegrated Warfare Systems (PEOIWS) team for the shoot. As a result of Carneys coordination, the launches were success ful, safely executed, and provided important data to the U.S. Cyclone Class Patrol Crafts from which the missiles were fired, as well as squadron staff, Task Force Commander, and the Griffin Missile testing community. Carney supported international partnerships in the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf through port visits to Rota, Spain; El Ferrol, Spain; Palermo, Sicily; Bodrum, Turkey; Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Jubail, Saudi Arabia, and Manama, Bahrain. Each port visit provided the crew with an opportuni ty to experience the rich culture and history of the host nation. As Carney heads into maintenance and train ing phase, her crew will prepare for the scheduled homeport shift to Rota, Spain in September 2015.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) returns to NS Mayport, after a regular scheduled deployment.From Page 4Carney -Photo by Paige GnannSeaman Jonathan McFarlane holds his four-month-old daughter, Aubrey, for the first time after completing a seven-month deployment aboard USS Carney.

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Free Marriage Retreats For Military CouplesBy MC2 Marcus StanleyNavy Public Affairs Support Element, Southeast Public Affairs At one time or anoth er, the everyday life in the military can be very stressful. You factor in the long duty hours and watch standing, which at times can be overwhelming. Couple this with the stress of taking care of your spouse and kids at home; sometimes you need a break for a few days. But who can afford to go to a retreat for a couple of days? For Servicemembers in the Southeast Region, the Chaplains office will pick up the tab for a much needed break. The Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) assists service members and retirees in the Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and their spouses by offering retreats and workshops to help with marital, family, and deployment issues. CREDO covers topics such as marriage enrichment, self-confidence, and relaxation, combat ing personal affliction, suicide prevention and how to better communicate with others. The main goal with these retreats is to get personnel away from the work environment and help them address their issues in a peaceful sur rounding, said Naval Station Mayport CREDO Facilitator Atticus Taylor. Instead of sending a person to three or four different programs, the retreat can be one place where the person can get away to relax, and understand them selves better and get to the root of their prob lems. The military lifestyle can and does take a toll on even the best of marriages. However, help is available for those cou ples seeking to enhance and improve their rela tionship. Being married one year is just as hard as 30, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Sharon Berg. During the first year, youre still get ting used to your mom not cooking and hav ing to get used to living together, then you throw in a baby and its chaos. So its good that there are other people out there acting as a support team. During the retreats, couples are provided ample free time to relax, reconnect and enjoy moments alone without the demands and inter ruptions that often occur in daily life. In the marriage enrichment retreat (MER), the first thing we focus on is how the couple develops their communication skills to be more effective, Taylor said. We talk to them about ways to resolve conflict. Marriage is very important to a sta ble society, and a very valuable resource to cre ate strong family bonds. The marriage retreat is designed to encourage healthy marriages and to help couples grow. Even though I have been married for over 20 years, I had no idea that there was a name for what I have been doing and what has been working for me and my wife as it relates to for example Languages of Love amongst other top ics that gave me a bet ter understanding of our relationship, said Navy Counselor 1st Class Victor Enriquez. It also proved that you are never too experienced to learn. Its important to note that the CREDO marriage retreats are designed to enrich a marriage and are not a substitute for marital counseling. I would highly rec ommend any couple to attend the retreat. No matter where they are in their relationship, new lyweds, middle of the pack, or over 20 years married, its geared for any couple that wants to learn something new about each other and who truly wants their relationship to last, said Chief Religious Program Specialist Hector Feliciano. MERs may not save marriages but its meant to be a tool to strengthen already strong marriages or to lead marriages that are in troubled waters into the right path. All retreats are 48 hours long, and are held at the Epworth by The Sea in St. Simons Island Ga., which is about 80 minute north of Mayport. All retreats begin at 5 p.m. and last until around noon on Sunday. The activity is open to all active duty, reservists and their fam ily members. All work shops and retreats are at no cost to participants and transportation is provided. The CREDO marriage retreats are designed to help couples strengthen and deepen their commitment to each other as well as gain a better of understanding of themselves and their spouse. Feliciano went on to say, Besides MERs, CREDO offers Personal Growth Retreats for the individual, and Family Enrichment Retreats for families. For more information on upcoming retreats contact the Naval Station Mayport Base Chapel at (904) 270-5212. -U.S. Navy PhotosAbove, through the Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation program (CREDO), servicemembers in the Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and their spouses are offered free enrichment retreats to help them reconnect. The retreat offers a safe environment to help build better communication skills, trust and strengthen ties. Below, Chief Religious Program Specialist Hector Feliciano participates in an excerise durring the CREDO program. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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NS Mayport Celebrates Navys DiversityBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastI Am Beyond was the underlying theme dur ing the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) celebration at the Naval Station Mayport chapel May 21. Directed by Congress in 1978 and estab lished by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week was first observed the week of May 4, 1979. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush expanded the observance to encompass the entire month, and in 1992, Congress passed a law permanently designat ing May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. AAPI Heritage Month recognizes the chal lenges faced by Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians and their vital contributions to the American story. According to Naval Station Mayport Diversity Program President Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Leonard Collins, this celebration, along with other ethnic celebrations throughout the year rec ognizes important contributions from many diverse groups that make up the U.S. Navy force. The diverse commit tee recognizes and celebrates the many con tributions that different cultures provide that people probably dont know about, he said. The bigger picture is we want to strengthen relationships and set the example of a culture of tolerance and promote diversity within the Navy. This years national theme is I Am Beyond, capturing the aspirations of the American spirit and how Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander descent have sought to excel beyond the challenges they have faced over the years. Asians and Pacific Islanders of various nationalities and ances try have been serving in the Navy since the early 19th century. Asians and Pacific Islanders have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every aspect of American life, including Adm. Harry B. Harris, Jr., the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Born in Japan and raised in Tennessee and Florida, Adm. Harris graduated the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978 and became a P-3 Orion navigator. In addition to U.S. Pacific Fleet, he commanded Patrol Squadron 46, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 1, Joint Task ForceGuantanamo, U.S. 6th Fleet and Striking and Support Forces NATO. Another Sailor of Asian American decent is Capt. and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, of Asian Indian parent age. She served as the flight engineer for the Expedition-14 crew and science officer at the International Space Station in 2007. Her four space walks and six months in orbit set records for women at the time. According to Key Note Speaker of the ceremony U.S. Navy Force 4th Fleet Surface Planner Lt. Maili Neverosky, it is an honor to help promote and recognize the AAPI contri bution to todays Navy. Asian and Pacific Islanders have a big presence in the military she said. The Navy is very diverse and I think everyone should learn about the different traditions and cultures of all ethnic groups. In 2014, Sailors of Asian and Pacific Islander heritage com prise 6.43 percent of our active duty naval force. More than 20,500 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employ ees identify as Asian American or Pacific Islander, including 10 flag officers, 9 members of the Senior Executive Service (SES), and 176 master chief petty offi cers. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and historical roots. A main goal of the diversity committee is to make people aware of the contributions of other cultures in the Navy, Collins said. We hope people learn some thing about the different groups of people that makes this a great Navy community. Sailors aboard Naval Station Mayport watch a video commemorating the accomplishments of Asians and Pacific Islanders throughout American history during the Asian American Pacific Islander heritage ceremony held at the base chapel.-Photos by MC2 Marcus StanleyKeynote speaker, Lt. Maili Neverosky, speaks about her family history during the Asian American Pacific Islander heritage ceremony at the chapel aboard Naval Station Mayport. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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Do You Know The Risks Of Social Media And OPSEC?By MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastSailors and Marines deployed around the world, and their families at home dont go a day without a reminder of the benefits and risks of the communication environment of today. While social networking can be useful and fun, service members and their families should consider the risks and vulnerabilities in both personal and command activities by practicing opera tion security (OPSEC). Representatives from the Navy Information Operations Command (NOIC) in Norfolk VA, held an All Hands Brief at Naval Station Mayport, May 12, to discuss the operation security dangers for Sailors of friending or liking on Facebook, following and tweeting on Twitter, shar ing photo stream on Flickr or virtually hanging out with a circle of friends on Google+. According to Operations Security Specialist Lee Case, all military members should think about OPSEC before posting any information. Social media is a big prob lem with regards to operational security, she said. Most people dont understand the value of their information or the audience they are broadcast ing to. Many dont realize how valuable or harmful that piece of information can be. Military and family mem bers all know some bits of critical information. It may not be classified, and it may even seem insignificant. But, to the potential adversary, it is a piece of the puzzle. The power of emerging media tools is a two-edged sword: It makes information exception ally accessible when posted for anyone who is interested, including potential adversaries. When communicating on social media sites do not post the following information: Exact deployment dates or return dates. This applies to ships, subs, squadrons and individual augmentees. Dates or location of a ships upcoming ports of call. Detailed information about a mission. References to trends in crews morale or an individu als personal problems. Details concerning security procedures, response times or tactics. Information about equip ment readiness. Speculations about future operations. My main goal is to teach people to control their signa ture management, Case said. Simply saying you are going on vacation, could announce to people where you are going to be and your possible finan cial situation. Understand that information knowledge is power. If people could be a little more tight lipped, my goal will be accomplished. Bring Them In Safely Aviation Boatswains Mate Handling 3rd Class Benjamin Kimbrough directs an MH-60S helicopter attached to Dragon Whale Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC-28) aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during flight operations. New York was underway earlier this month conducting training and exercises for a future deployment.-Photos by MC2 Cyrus Roson 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Intramural Sports June 2: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends July 24. 270-5451 June 6: Mini Biathalon (Swim/ Run.) 9 a.m. at Beachside Community Center. Sign up by May 30. 270-5452 June 10: Moonlight 5K Run/3K Walk. 6:10 p.m. in front of the Fitness Center. June 10: 4v4 Beach Volleyball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. Season begins June 23; ends Aug. 21. 270-5451. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 14 & 15, 8:30 a.m. shot gun start. Open to any player with established handicaps at Mayport. Cost is $40; includes awards ceremony. Liberty Call The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. June 1: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 29. June 3: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline June 2. June 6: The Catty Shack Night Feeding. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Cost $15; sign up by June 5. June 7: Fort Clinch Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline June 5. June 8: Billiards Tournament. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. June 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! June 13: Movie Trip: 22 Jump Street. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. June 15: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by June 12. June 17: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:30 p.m. Sign up deadline June 16. June 19: Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Van departs Liberty Center at 5:45 p.m. FREE. June 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation only. June 21: Wet n Wild Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. Cost $37. Sign up by May 19. June 22: Fort George Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; sign up by June 19. June 26: Bowling. 6-8 p.m. FREE; sign up until 5 p.m. June 27: Movie Trip: Transformers 4. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. June 29: Fort Castillo De San Marcos Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE; Sign up by June 26. May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 June 13: One Sweet Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 2705680 June 14: Family Pool Party. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Outdoor Pool. FREE. Children under the age of 10 must be accompanied by an adult for the entire event. 2705680 Auto Skills Center May Special: Free tire rotation with paid alignment. Transmission flush, coolant flush and fuel injection cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 June Special: No charge on all air tools all month long and free brake inspections. 2705392 Aquatics Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 2705101/5425 June 8: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open Full Time. Tuesdays-Fridays12-6 p.m. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Beachside Bingo Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 May 31: All Request Saturday Night. All night long at Castaways. DJ Adam will be playing your song requests all night! 270-7205 June 12-July 13: Watch the World Cup at Castaways Lounge Come and watch the international excitement of the World Cup. Wear your best patriotic gear and come cheer on Team USA on June 16 and 22 at 6pm. Free for all adults.. 270-7205 June 20: XBOX 360 FIFA World Cup Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 June 14: UFC 174Johnson vs. Bagautinov. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 June 6: NBA 2K14 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 Community Activities May 30: Outdoor MoviesFrozen (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 6: Outdoor MoviesIron Man 3 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Freedom Fest 2014. 4-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, caricature artists, live bands, water slides, inflatables and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase at reasonable prices. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9:30 p.m. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 50-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $8.00. 270-5431 June 11: All-Hands Brisket Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by CDS-14/ Crudes CPOA. For tickets, (904) 270-5801 x148 June 18: Family Day. Noon-6 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Open to all active and retired Chiefs and their families. Free food, fun and games for all! 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 2705145 Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 Coasties The Champions-Photo by Rita HammerstadMens softball league champion Coasties held an undefeated season. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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Scam Artists Posing As Debt CollectorsBy Lt. Daniel R. McGinleyNLSOServicemembers are often the target of a number of scams designed to scare the member into paying money they never owed. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), debt collection scams rank second only to identity theft. Servicemembers are easy targets since they know that their credit history can affect their ability to maintain their security clearance. This article is designed to alert you to a fresh scam that appears to be rearing its head in North Florida as well as pro vide you information on how to detect a debt collection scam and protect yourself The new scam goes like this: first, the service member gets an auto mated call from some one identifying himself as Richard Jeffers attempting to collect on a debt and informing the servicemember to call a 1-866 telephone num ber to settle the alleged debt. When the service member calls the num ber, an automated voice states that the company is named Green, Daley, and Associates. A live operator then comes on the line demanding that the servicemember pay more than $1,000.00 by credit card or debit card. At this point, the scam mer reads off the servicemembers social security number and then ties the debt to a location where the servicemember legit imately lived. For example, the scammer states the debt is from a bank in New York from 2008 when the servicemem ber did in fact live in New York in 2008 and also used that particu lar bank. Next, the ser vicemember is told that the company is working with the Duval County Sheriffs office to file a warrant and that the servicemember will be served, and potentially arrested, if he does not pay immediately. If the servicemember does not agree to pay, addi tional calls are made to threaten a warrant/ arrest, and sometimes another member of the scam operation calls and impersonates a police officer. If the service member asks for the mailing address or addi tional information on the company or debt, then they are threatened with more severe action, and may get to talk to the attorney. (spoiler alert: not likely a real attor ney). Being the target of the above scam or one like it can be stressful and even scary, however, if you familiarize yourself with the warning signs and know what resources are available to you, you can protect yourself. Here are some warning signs to look for when you are contacted by blocked or random 1-800 numbers: received any written communication from the debt collector give you a physical address identify the business for whom they are collecting the debt criminal action (which is not allowed to collect a civil debt) contact your command about the debt (which is also not allowed except under limited circum stances) fane, obscene or harass ing language You should remem ber that the scammers goal is to scare you into paying the debt on the phone. First, you should never pay a purported debt over the phone using a credit card or debit card. You should also know that according to a federal law known as the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), you have the right to demand validation of the debt in writing. What should you do? (1) Calmly gather as much information as possible. Do they have personally identifiable information (PII) about you (e.g., social security number)? CAREFUL, do not verify that the information the scam mer has is accurate. Also, you should ask for (and write down) as much information about the debt collector as possible, including: the name of the collector, the name of the company attempting to collect the debt, the mailing address of the company, and any additional contact infor mation you can gather. (2) Take action! Visit or call the closest legal assistance office ASAP! In the meantime, get to work protecting yourself. Any legwork you do will also help your attorney. review your credit report through www. annual creditreport.com. Does anything look fishy? Dispute it! While you are at it, create an iden tity theft report with the 3 major credit reporting agencies (i.e., Equifax, TransUnion, Experian). credit card companies that you are being tar geted. Attorney Generals office to file a complaint. Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Fair Trade Commission (FTC) websites to submit complaints. At the end of the day, you cannot always avoid being the target of a scam, but you can protect yourself once you are being targeted. If you have would like assistance in taking any action recommended above, or believe you have been the victim of a scam, please contact a military legal assistance office. The Navy legal assistance offices in the southeast region are: Jacksonville, Florida at (904) 542-2565 ext. 3006; Mayport, Florida at (904) 270-5445 ext. 3017; Kings Bay, Georgia at (912) 573-3959. This article is not intended to substitute for the per sonal advice of a licensed attorney. A CFC participant provided as a public service. Practing Tactics -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertAbove, Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Todd McElvene practices tactics during a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team training exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and the atre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. Below, Fire Controlman 2nd Class Justin Betz, from Jacksonville, Fla. practices tactics during a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team training exercise. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014 11

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From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.May 28, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effec tive independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. May 28-29, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., Resume Writing, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Create an effective resume or improve the one you already have. This workshop will outline the essential information you need to develop a great resume in a competitive job environment. May 29, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. May 29, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to identify family roles. May 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., FRG Basic Training, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Training customized to fit your FRG, whether the command is starting a group or re-energizing an exist ing group. Discuss the FRG Instruction/policy, leadership structure, communication tech niques, team-building ideas, fundraising guidelines, and ideas for fun activities. May 31, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are applying for. FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, Families VCNO Howard To Speak At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speak er is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below din ner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or busi ness attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, din ner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory. Make checks pay able to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. Friday, May 30 The UF/IFAS Extension Duval County Office will offer a class on Food Preservation from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. The program will focus mainly on the proper techniques in canning foods safely, however freezing and drying will also be covered. Come and learn the newest rules and techniques for keeping your family safe while preserving your favorite foods all year long. All participants will receive the newest food preservation information and will have the opportunity to make their own homemade jelly. Cost is $10 per person. Space is limited, pre-registration and pre-payment are required. Please contact Sarah or Melanie at 904255-7450 to register. Tuesday June 3 Beaches Photography Club will meet on at the Beaches Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, 6-8 p.m. The program will be presented by Damon Young of Florida UAV on Photography and Video with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles aka drones. Come out and see why drones are becoming so popular in photography! This is a free event with people at all levels of photography welcomed. For more information www.beachesphotogra phyclub.org Sunday, June 8 Bring the family and learn tricks to care for our trails. Enjoy a rang er-led hike along with Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers along the Dune Ridge Trail, one of Floridas premier nature trails at Talbot Island State Park. Learn about the diverse plants and wildlife while dis covering techniques to keep this habitat pris tine. The trail meanders for two miles atop an ancient dune ridge under a canopy of live oaks, cedars and sable palms in a lush maritime hammock and concludes with a two mile walk along Little Talbot Islands picturesque beach. Meet at Pavilion One on Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive, at 10 a.m. Water, snacks, insect repellant, layered clothing and a camera are recommended. For more information, please visit www. floridastateparks.org or www.LNT.org http:// www.americasstate parks.org/. Saturday, June 21 Bring the family and your handheld GPSenabled device for a funfilled day of geocaching at Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve State Park, 13802 Pumpkin Hill Road. This is a realworld, outdoors trea sure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices. Most smart phones are now GPS-enabled devic es making this game accessible to many. Players navigate to a specific set of coordinates to find hidden caches, enjoying the fresh air and the thrill of the hunt. This pristine park offers over 4,000 acres of natural Florida uplands with miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails and canoe/kayak access to the salt marsh. Meet at the Main Parking lot of Pumpkin Hill Creek Preserve State Park at 9 a.m. for a breakfast and meet and greet. Then, gather at 9:30 a.m. to learn the basics of this activity from an expert in Geocaching 101. Afterwards, try your new skills out searching for 30 new caches along the trails. Learn about the parks plant and animal species as you explore and collect clues to find the super secret Pumpkin Hill Final cache. For information, visit www.floridastate parks.org or www.geo caching.com; www. americasstateparks.org/. Outin Townscheduled for May 31 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. Balfour Beatty Communities has events planned throughout the month of June if you cannot attend the annual Beautification. An event schedule can be found at www.facebook.com/ mayporthomes Completed sur veys should be sealed in the postage paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the autho rized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office. Residents that hand in a survey on or before June 20th will qualify for a special Early Bird prize drawing. The final day for resi dents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Thank you in advance to all residents for their participation in the sur vey processwe look forward to receiving your feedback. If you have any questions about the Resident Satisfaction Survey, please contact the main office at 904270-8870.From Page 1SurveyRetirement Chief Fire Controlman (SW) John M. Broughton retired recently after 20 years of honorable ser vice. Broughton enlisted in the Navy in June of 1994. His sea tours include Maintenance Supervisor from 19962001 in USS Doyle (FFG-39), Leading Petty Officer in USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) from November 2004 to December 2009. Shore Duty assignments included Testing NonCommissioning Officer in Charge Military Entrance Processing Command Miami, Fla., Air Warfare Instructor, Ships Team Lead and Training Liaison Officer for all Frigates attached to Afloat Training Group Mayport, Fla., from December 2009 to May 2014. In his 20 years of faithful and honorable service, Broughton has had a positive impact. His years of mentorship and training in the Fleet have and will continue to have a lasting and posi tive impact on the Sailors with whom he served. His awards include a Joint Service Achievement Medal and six Navy Achievement Medals. During the cer emony, he received the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. On hand to celebrate and honor his service were his father and mother, various friends and his Shipmates at ATG Mayport. Also recognized for their selfless dedica tion to the Navy and the Nation were his wife Elizabeth and daughter Samantha. MilestonesAt NS Mayport 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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