Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00346


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By MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastThe Air Operations Department at Naval Station Mayport con tinued their upgrades with the installation of the Digital Airport Surveillance Radar (DASR-11) System. The DASR-11 is a new terminal air traffic con trol radar system that replaces current ana log systems with new digital technology. The United States Air Force Electronics Systems Center, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy are in the process of procuring DASR sys tems to upgrade existing radar facilities for U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and civilian air fields. According to Naval Station Mayport Assistant Ground Electronics Maintenance Officer Tom Douget, this system is the latest in a long list of improvements to Air Operations at Naval Station Mayport. We have been on a continuous improve ment mode since 1995, he said. We used to be in a small trailer facil ity and have evolved and improved the building for the air traffic controllers and have new equipment to meet the latest updated technology. The DASR system detects aircraft position and weather conditions in the vicinity of civilian and military airfields. The ASR-11 will replace an existing ASR-8. The older radar, installed in 1983, is being replaced to improve reliability, pro CHINFO Award Winner USS RooseveltCelebrates Their Moms Page 11 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Air Ops Installs ASR-11 Radar System-Photo by Paige GnannContractors work to install a new Digital Airport Surveillance Radar to replace the existing ASR-8 in service at Naval Station Mayport since 1983. The new radar system detects aircraft position and weather conditions in the vicinity for surrounding civilian and military airfields.-Photo by MC2 Cyrus RosonSeaman Justinne Ivanitskiy looks through binocu lars for surface contact while standing as lookout aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). USS New York Wins Battleship Fund AwardBy MC2 Cyrus RosonUSS New York (LPD 21) Public AffairsThe amphibious transport dock ship USS New York received the prestigious Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award for superior performance and battle efficiency among amphibious ships in U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The award is presented annually by the Chief of Naval Operations to one ship in the Atlantic Fleet and one in the Pacific Fleet based on overall readi ness. New Yorks crew was cited for their indomi table spirit, superior performance and consistently high standards of readiness. Our crew is honored to receive this prestigious award. It is another symbol of the dedication they have to make New York the best ship in the fleet; always ready to go and do the nations bidding, said Lt. Justin Bernard, New Yorks chaplain. The award includes a small monetary stipend, which will be given to the ships Morale, Welfare Navy Updates Enlisted Advancement PolicyBy MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 114/14 announced changes to its current enlisted advancement policy, includ ing a new formula for the Final Multiple Score (FMS) and changes to the Command Advancement Program (CAP) May 15. These revisions are designed to reward sustained superior performance and strengthen the role of the Command Triad (command ing officer, executive officer, and command master chief) in the advancement of their Sailors. This isnt the first time weve done this, said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens. Periodically we take a look at how were advancing Sailors and how the Final Multiple Score is put together. We do that based on feedback we get from the Fleet. The Final Multiple Score is a weight-based calculation used to rank Sailors eligible for advancement. In the new FMS, the value of the advancement exam becomes the largest factor considered for advancement to E4 and E5, increasing in weight by eight percent, going from 37 percent to 45 percent. For E6 and E7, Performance Mark Average (PMA) becomes the largest factor in determin ing Sailors FMS. For advance ment to E6, PMA increased three percent and now counts for 50 percent of the FMS calculation. For advancement to E7, PMA increased 10 percent to count for 60 percent of the total FMS. This adjustment changes the emphasis on how performance is measured for junior and senior Sailors. Leaderships expectation is that junior Sailors know their occupational skill, said Fleet Master Chief for Manpower Personnel Training and Education April Beldo. As they rise to the level of E6 and E7, were looking for them to be ready to be in a management and leadership role, so their perfor mance is more weighted. The Good Conduct Medal and the Reserve Meritorious Service Medal will no longer contribute award points in the FMS. We were seeing that the majority of our Sailors receive this award, and so to give a point for it was a zero sum, said Stevens. Sailors werent gaining anything by it. Sailors who pass the advance ment exam, but do not advance due to quotas limitations, are eligible to receive Pass Not Advanced (PNA) points; how ever, the new policy limits PNA points to the top 25 percent of Sailors. 1.5 PNA points go to the top 25 percent of Sailors by PNA Points For Top 25 Percent Good Conduct, Reserve Meritorious Service Medals No Longer Contribute In FMS CAP Period Established -Photo by MC2 Damian BergCeremony Marks 27th Anniversary Of Attack. See Story/ Photos, Pages 4-5See USS New York, Page 13 See Advancement, Page 10 See Radar, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer ....................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: How Do I Get Out Of The Navy?It is common, espe cially among younger Sailors who are some what new to the Navy, for Sailors to struggle adjusting to Navy life and to seek a way out of their commitment early. This article is my response to Sailors who are unhappy and want to get out early. When you are strug gling and miserable in your job it can seem like it is ruining your whole life. It is true that the Navy may not be a good fit for you, but before you make that decision it is important to think things through carefully. Here are some things to consider when you are struggling adjusting to the Navy. What you want may not be what is best for you. Of the many people I talk to who just want to quit, I would estimate that about 5% have really legitimate reasons. For the rest, what they are simply saying is, It is hard and I dont like it. This is why you may not be taken seriously by your chain of command. They have seen it a lot before, and they them selves likely were in your exact position in their early years, but they know now that what you want may not be what is best for you. Much of your trouble may simply grow out of the fact that you may have never really had to face this kind of challenge. That means that the chances are really good that if you stick it out, things will get better for you. If you run from something just because it is hard, you may miss opportunities and adventures that will change your life. It may turn out that your Chief or LPO who is pushing you hard and doesnt seem to care about your happiness actually knows more about what will help you succeed than you do. Hard and uncomfort able things are essential for our growth and hap piness. Many people believe that the way to be happy is to elimi nate everything that is difficult, challenging, and un-enjoyable from their life. If you train yourself to blame your unhappiness on your circumstancesif every time you are faced with something hard you just say, I dont like it and quitthen you will miss out on some of the greatest satisfactions and joys in life. Marriage can be really hard, but if you quit, you may miss out on the deep love that can only come from work ing through hard things. Most jobs are not fun, but you can learn to take satisfaction in what you do. Being a par ent is really hard, but it is definitely worth it. You have an incredible opportunity to learn one of the most important lessons in life: that your happiness has very little to do with your circum stances and everything to do with your attitude. Choose now to learn to be happy in whatever circumstances you find yourself. Whats your alterna tive? Remember that the grass often looks greener on the other side of the fence, but rarely is. Most people joined the Navy because it offered something bet ter than what they had in their life at that time. So as you look back on that old life, wishing you could go back, remember that it wasnt as great as it seems now, otherwise you wouldnt be here. Make sure that you dont paint life outside the military in an unrealistic light. If you do, you will just end up in this same position again in a few months. Okay, now to answer your question. Is there any way to get out of the Navy? The answer is yes. If you have a legitimate problem (physical, mental, fam ily, etc.), there are procedures in place that can help. You can continue to follow the appropri ate channels to request that. Expect some ini tial resistance, but if your reasons are valid, eventually you will get the help you need. But remember that everyone thinks that their reasons are valid, and that they are the exception. I hope you are able to examine yourself enough to listen to what others are telling you. For the majority who find them selves stuck where they are, my advice is simple. Choose to make the best of it. You can be bitter and angry all you want, but you are only hurt ing yourself. You signed the contract. You made the choice to be here, and it looks like you are going to be here for a while. Why not decide now to learn how to be happy where you are? If you cant change your circumstances, change your attitude instead. I know it isnt easy, but it is really your only choice. If you need help with this, seek the guidance of a mentor, counselor, chaplain, religious lead er or friend. God bless you with the courage to face the hard things in your life and do the right thing. Chaplain Justin Top CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNER CREDO Offers Enrichment Retreats To Mayport Sailors, FamiliesBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Elelment East, Detachment SoutheastAt one time or another, the everyday life in the military can be very stress ful. Long duty hours and watch standing, sometimes can be a daunting task. Couple this with the stress of taking care of the spouse and kids at home, everyone reaches their boiling point and needs a break for a few days. But who can afford to go to a retreat for a couple of days? For Naval Station Mayport Sailors, the Chaplains office will pick up the tab for a much needed break. The Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) focuses on the development of ones personal and spiritual growth through various weekend retreats and desig nated workshops. Such topics include marriage enrichment, self-confidence, relaxation, combating personal afflic tion, suicide prevention and how to better communicate with others. The main goal with these retreats is to get personnel away from the work environment and help them solve their issues in a peaceful surrounding, said Naval Station Mayport CREDO Facilitator Atticus Taylor. Instead of sending a person to three or four dif ferent programs, the retreat can be one place where the person can get away to relax, and understand themselves better and get to the root of their problems. The two main retreats Southeast CREDO offers o are the Personal Growth and the Marriage Enrichment retreats The personal growth focuses on understanding yourself better, tak ing personal responsibility in decisions and look at goals and reshape them. The marriage enhancement (Most popular) deals with nurturing your mar riage, handling the inevitable conflicts and strengthen the emotional, physi cal and spiritual aspects of the mar riage. According to Taylor, the mar riage retreat is designed to encourage healthy marriages and to help couples grow. In the marriage enrichment retreat, the first thing we focus on is how the couple develops their communication skills to be more effective, Taylor said. We talk to them about ways to resolve conflict. Marriage is very important to a stable society, and a very valu able resource to create strong family bonds. All retreats are 48 hours long, and are held at the Epworth by The Sea in St. Simons Island GA, which is about 2 hours south of Mayport. All retreats begin at 5 p.m. and last until around noon on Sunday. The activ ity is open to all active duty, reservists and their family members. All work shops and retreats are at no cost to participants and transportation is provided. For more information about upcoming retreats contact the Naval Station Mayport Chapel at 904-2705212/5213/5214.Moving? Dont Pack School Records!The most important piece of advice I can give parents moving with school age chil dren is this: Do not pack your childrens school records. Put them in a carry on or in your purse or in a special folder in the car. School systems now have such different summer vacation and first day of school schedules that you dont know if anyone will be in the schools office to fax or mail OFFICIAL school records to your chil drens new school. Budget cuts in education are rampant all over the world, and while schools will use hand-carried records to enroll and select courses for your children, they will need the OFFICIAL records to verify placement. If you have a child who is a special needs stu dent, be sure the receiv ing school requests the special education records. Many school districts require a separate form for those record requests. If the receiving school forgets to ask that question, those records may be delayed several weeks possibly not allowing the receiving school to provide the necessary accommodations needed for the childs academic and behavioral success. You should actu ally ask that question yourself before you leave the sending school. You could even ask for a copy of the required form to give to the receiving school. That way you have cov ered your bases! Remember that part of the school records includes records of physical exams and immu nizations. Florida law requires all school chil dren have the appropriate health exam and immunization documen tation. A physical examination must be per formed by a health care provider licensed to per form physical exams and must be completed within the past 12 months (This is not an annual exam.). The school entry Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KNOWINGTHE ROPEShealth exam (form DH 3040) is a requirement for students in grades kindergarten through 12th grade who are making their initial entry into a Florida school. A new entrant is a child entering a school See Records, Page 13

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Mayport Remembers Starks FallenFrom StaffMore than 300 civilians and service members gathered at Naval Station Mayports Memorial Park Friday for the 27th anniversa ry of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31). On May 17, 1987, 37 Sailors aboard USS Stark were killed after the frigate was struck by two Iraqi missiles while it was deployed on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. Despite the severe dam age, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Guest speaker, Capt. Wes McCall, com manding officer of NS Mayport, reminded the attendees of the crews efforts to save their shipmates and the ship. The service featured accounts of some of the events that occurred during the attack and also events that followed. Shortly after [9 p.m.], the ship was hit by two Exocet anti-ship cruise missiles fired by a single Iraqi F-1 Mirage fighter, Mccall recounted. The first missile entered the port side of the ship. Parts of that missile travelled through the ship, creating a hole in the starboard hull. The second missile entered the ship near he same location and exploded approximately three feet inside the skin of the ship. Each missile injected approximately 300 pounds of propellant into the ships con trol berthing and chief petty officers quarters. The combination of 600 pounds of burning propellant resulted in a near instantaneous heat release of approximately 12 million BTUs, ending the lives of many Sailors immediately. The CPO mess imme diately filled with smoke, as did the officer quarters, he said. The decks forward of the explo sion were in flames and the fire spread through the mess line and starboard passageway for ward. Smoke filled the repair locker number 5 and repair 2 areas and firemain pressure was reduced to 60 PSI due to a ruptured firemain for ward. Radio communications were all but lost. In fact the crew had to use the PrC-90 radios from the helicopter air crew survival vests to coordinate rescue and damage control efforts. And those efforts would last for almost 20 hours as the crew fought rag ing fires and looked for missing shipmates. McCall also told the story of fallen shipmate Seaman Recruit Brian Clinefelter, whose father Senior Chief Gary Clinefelter was stationed at NS Mayport during the attack. On April 23, 1987, Brian arrived on board USS Stark eager to begin his naval career and honor his family with service to his nation, McCall said. Twentyfour days later, Brian had just completed his watch and was preparing for bed when the missiles struck. Although grieving the loss of his son, Gary volunteered to work at the coordination center the base had set up to support the grieving families. He simply said, I need to keep working. In keeping with Garys sterling example, we too must continue to work. We must work to keep our shipmates memory alive, he continued. This tragic loss reminds us that even when America is not at war, servicemen and women risk everything so that all Americans can be at peace.May our memories be long. During the somber ceremony, the names of those killed at sea were read aloud by a fellow shipmate and a bell tolled for each one; 37 strikes of a bell and a 21-gun salute honored the Sailors who lost their lives. Stark was decommis sioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to preserve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedication of the Stark monument. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergYN2 Demario Smith places a wreath in front of the USS Stark Memorial plaque on display at Naval Station Mayport's Memorial Park during the annual USS Stark remembrance ceremony held in memory of the 37 Sailors killed aboard the ship in 1987. The ship was hit on May 17, 1987, by two Iraqi missiles while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. -Photo by Paige GnannSailors from Naval Station Mayport perform a 21-gun salute for the 37 lost Sailors of the USS Stark (FFG 31) on its 27th anniversary.-Photo by Paige GnannA musician from Navy Region Southeast Band plays Taps during the USS Stark Memorial.-Photo by Paige GnannErnestine Foster, widow of QMCS Vernon Foster, holds up his last will and testament after reading a scripture during the memorial service.-Photo by Paige GnannA former USS Stark crew member stands during the tolling of the ship bell in remembrance of the 37 fallen Sailors.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crew members of USS Doyle attended this years event as part of their own reunion activities.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the USS Power reunion joined more than 300 attendees in remembering the fallen Stark Sailors.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 5 -Photo by Paige GnannFormer Crew member Clifford Cellars of the USS Stark (FFG 31) rings one bell for each of his 37 fallen shipmates who were lost 26 years ago. The Stark remembrance ceremony took place at the Naval Station Mayport Memorial Park. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergGuest speaker, Capt. Wes McCall, commanding officer of NS Mayport, talks to the friends, family and former crew members of USS Stark during the annual Stark remembrance ceremony held on May 16 at the Naval Station Mayport Memorial Park.-Photo by MC2 Damian BergAbove, The childrens choir from General Joseph Finegan Elementary School perform patriotic songs as part of the USS Stark remembrance ceremony on May 16. Left, USS Stark crewmember Bernard Martin reads a scripture during this years ceremony.-Photo by MC2 Damian BergNS Mayport Color Guard parade the colors during the annual USS Stark remembrance ceremony held in memory of the 37 Sailors killed aboard the ship in 1987. The ship was hit on May 17, 1987, by two Iraqi missiles while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Ross Cramer, salutes during the National Anthem. Cramer served as MC at this years ceremony.

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Auto Skills Center May Special: Free tire rotation with paid alignment. Transmission flush, coolant flush and fuel injection cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 May 22: Stanley Cup NHL 14 PS3 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 May 24: UFC 173Barao vs Dillashaw. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 May 31: All Request Saturday Night. All night long at Castaways. DJ Adam will be playing your song requests all night! 270-7205 June 6: NBA 2K14 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 June 14: UFC 174Johnson vs. Bagautinov. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Community Activities May 23: Outdoor MoviesMadagascar 2 (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 30: Outdoor MoviesFrozen (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 6: Outdoor MoviesIron Man 3 (PG-13). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Lego Movie (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 20: Outdoor MoviesPlanes (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 27: Outdoor MoviesGhostbusters (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Freedom Fest 2014. 4-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, water slides, inflatables, archery tag, live music and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 2705228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 50-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $8.00. 270-5431 June 11: All-Hands Brisket Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by CDS-14. For tickets, (904) 2705801 x148 June 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per person. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by NAVSTA CPOA. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 2705145 Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Orlando: Come see the excitement that is the Blue Man Group. Tickets are just $49; save $55.75 off the gate price. 270-5145Lake Wonderwood Project Enters Second PhaseBy MC1(SW) Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastTrue Blue: Navy Families Benefactors, Inc. (JAX True BlueTM) has teamed with Naval Station Mayport Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to begin phase two of the Wonderwood Project. (JAX True BlueTM) was founded by Sharon Ellis in 2012 on the premise that Jacksonville and Mayport Navy person nel and their families make such selfless sac rifices for the American people that she wanted to enhance their quality of on base life in return. Sharon committed to do more than just raise funds and write a check. She wanted to get the community involved by asking them to roll up their sleeves and physi cally work towards the project goals. JAX True BlueTM was estab lished as an all-volun teer 501c3 non-profit organization and part nered MWR Mayport, in the fall of 2012. The mission of MWR is to provide world class programs that sup port Fleet, Fighter, and Family readiness and improve quality of life. Together they brain stormed to determine a project that would be sustainable and mean ingful to naval person nel and their families at Naval Station Mayport. The Lake Wonderwood Project was born. Lake Wonderwood is a 22-acre lake nestled within base hous ing on Naval Station Mayport. Until The Lake Wonderwood Project was launched, The Lake was primar ily neglected. The cement paths around The Lake, cracked and raised by tree roots, became unsafe for use. The bridges, splintered and sagging became unstable. The sawgrass and brush around the lake grew out of control. The childrens play areas and pavilions while still functional had withered, losing their zest and appeal. The Lake Wonderwood Project, approved by the Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus in May 2013, will completely renovate Lake Wonderwood. The result will be a continu ous pathway around the 22-acre lake including a waterfront boardwalk, pavilions with gathering, eating and grill areas, fitness stations, childrens play areas, and humani tarian nature preserves. The nature preserves area will include a botanical garden with walking stones contributed by the youth of Naval Station Mayport. According to MWR Mayport Director Lonnie Kenney, the improvements will ben efit base personnel for decades to come. We are moving for ward with the project, it will be a great place for all military families to enjoy, he said. In addition to a great area for recreation, it is also a great asset for people who might decide to move into military housing. Many people live on base for security reasons; this project would be an added bonus to their decision. The Lake Wonderwood Project is a multiphase, multi-year project with an estimated cost between $400,000 and $750,000. All funds will be gifted to MWR Mayport from JAX True BlueTM as a result of fund raising, and corpo rate project team part ners and individuals from the Mayport community will volunteer labor. Materials and supplies will also be solicited for donation from local community vendors. Phase Two of the proj ect is the actual blueprint plan and the hiring of the Prosser Corporation of Jacksonville as the contractor for the proj ect. According to JAX True BlueTM President and Board Chair Sharon Ellis, helping the lives of Naval Station Mayport and NAS JAX is what this project if for. Lake Wonderwood Preserve called to me. Seeing sailors and their families relaxing and enjoying this beauti ful recreational area for years to come means everything to me, she said. They selflessly serve our great country and us. Completing this project will be just one small way to say thank you for all they do and have done. Artist rendition of the Lake Wonderwood project. FIGHTA CFC participant provided as a public service. Deadly Childhood Disea ses. stjude.org 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Intramural Sports May 27: Co-Ed Softball Begins. Season Ends July 10. 270-5451 June 2: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends July 24. 270-5451 Aquatics Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, June 8. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 14 & 15, 8:30 a.m. shot gun start. Liberty Call The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 25: Ichetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $8. Sign up by May 22. May 26: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. June 1: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 29. June 3: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Child and Youth Programs May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680All Navy Mens Volleyball Spends Time at YAC -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the All Navy Mens Volleyball Team teaches children at the Mayport Youth Activities Center some tricks and techniques to playing volleyball during a community relations project on Friday. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 7

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8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Carney Sailors Enjoy Liberty, Run 15K In TurkeyBy Ensign Marina NanartowichUSS Carney (DDG 64) Public AffairsUSS Carney (DDG 64) recent port visit to Bodrum, Turkey pro vided Carney Sailors with an opportunity to interact with locals and experience the rich history and culture of Turkey. While in port, the crew had the oppor tunity to participate in several Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours, including a scuba diving trip, a tour of the classical city of Ephesus and a tour to Pamukkale. The generous hospitality of the people of Turkey helped Carney Sailors gain an appreciation for the rich history of Turkey, thus strengthen ing the bonds between the U.S. and Turkey. Cmdr. Eddie Crossman, the ships Captain, said he was pleased with the out come of the port visit. Bodrum is a beautiful city, and well deserved port visit for the Crew of the USS Carney after a long time at sea, he said. A strong NATO partner, Turkey shares our commitment to enhancing maritime security. Our visit to Bodrum only strength ens our partnership, as the Sailors are able to see first hand the rich Turkish culture and his tory. We truly enjoyed our visit and I know we will try to come back soon. The food, the sights, and the people are worth coming back for! Crossman met with the Mayor of Bodrum, Mahmet Kocadon as well as the District Governor, Mehmet Godekmerdan and the local Garrison Commander, Colonel Ahmet Sevki while in Turkey. Interoperability between the U.S. and Turkey was the primary discussion point for these visits. During his meeting with Mayor Kocadon, Crossman discussed the exten sive security measures taken to accommodate Carneys stay. Excited to host an American war ship, a rare occurrence for the seaside town, Bodrum officials went above and beyond, pro viding extra police forces from neighboring towns to ensure adequate security for Carney. While in Bodrum, a few members of the crew, including Crossman, the Executive Officer, Cmdr. Ken Pickard, and Command Master Chief Jon Lonsdale, participated in a 15-kilometer race through the scenic har bor city of Bodrum. Running side-by-side local athletes, seven Carney Sailors partici pated in the event. The local runners were excited for Carney to partici pate and made several announcements welcom ing the American Sailors to Bodrum and wishing them luck on the race. Ive always enjoyed running and have done plenty of races, but doing a race in a different country was a different experience. It was amazing running through the streets and beachside as random people cheered you on, commented Seaman Matthew Cecotti who represented Carney well at the race, finishing with a top score. Carney departed Turkey after six months in the Arabian Gulf where she was forward deployed and conducted BMD and Maritime Security Operations. -Photo courtesy of USS Carney Carney Sailors enjoy the local sights, shopping and food of Bodrum while on liberty. BBC To Kick-off 2014 Housing Survey From BBCIn a few weeks, resi dents will be invited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations through our CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. The annual survey is an important part of our contin uous improvement program that helps us analyze perfor mance and make any neces sary changes and enhance ments to ensure we consistently deliver quality service across all aspects of our community operations. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of the homes. All sur veys are completely confiden tial and anonymous and resi dents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. The Resident Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we are excelling operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Heather Sanders, Community Manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to complete the sur vey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be available at the kick-off event: Spring Beautification, scheduled for May 31 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. Balfour Beatty Communities has events planned throughout the month of June if you cannot attend the annual Beautification. An event schedule can be found at www.facebook.com/mayporthomes Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office. Residents that hand in a survey on or before June 20th will qualify for a special Early Bird prize drawing. The final day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Thank you in advance to all residents for their participa tion in the survey process we look forward to receiving your feedback. If you have any questions about the Resident Satisfaction Survey, please contact the main office at 904270-8870. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 9

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Phil Sea Sailors Accessorize With ESWS PinsBy MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaIts has been casually observed by some that a uniform adds a certain level of attractiveness to a person. While there are countless reasons more important to peo ple for choosing to wear the uniform of a US Navy Sailor one of the most iconic uniforms in the world at some point, probably at a Fleet Week, that small factoid has inevitably crossed every Sailors mind. Beyond tailoring, steam pressing and obsessive grooming, there is only one way for Sailors to acces sorize and make their uniforms pop, and thats by earning ribbons and pins. Often referred to as chest candy, the brightly colored ribbons and shiny pins are more than just flare or bling. They represent service, accomplish ment and sacrifice; thus its no wonder why they become a point of pride. Sailors aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) are no exception. One of the most respected pins a Sailor can earn is the Enlisted Sea Warfare Specialist (ESWS) insignia. The program is fleetwide, but every command must tailor the program to fit its platform and needs. From Philippine Sea Instruction 1414.1, The ESWS insignia signifies that the Sailor is competent in their assigned rating and has acquired additional knowledge that enhances their understanding of warfighting, mission effectiveness, and command survivability. Sailors who wear the ESWS insignia stand out as significant contributors to our ships mission and combat readiness. The pressure to earn an ESWS pin starts the moment a new recruit is processed into boot camp, and it doesnt ever let up till the pinning ceremony. Once in the fleet Sailors are con stantly reminded of that pressure every time a superior glances down at where the pin should be. The ESWS program comes down to pro tecting the ship and its crew, said Chief Damage Controlman Chad Davis, the ships ESWS coordi nator. It makes the Navy stronger by pushing Sailors into spaces they wouldnt normally go. It gives every sailor an advanced knowledge of all shipboard operations. Even though ESWS is a requirement for Sailors assigned to a ship, its still not a given and its no less of an honor to earn it. The timeline for finishing is generous enough that Sailors who choose not to reenlist after their first contract can still serve adequately without earning an ESWS pin. When I got to the ship I still wasnt sure how far I wanted to go in the Navy, and I didnt make getting the pin a priority said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Joshua Songer. When I decided I was going to reenlist I knew I still had something to prove. ESWS is a career milestone, said Songer, who is one of the ships most recent ESWS qualifi ers. It distinguishes who takes their Navy career seriously. Sailors get a lot more respect and trust from the command when they earn an ESWS pin. When I see a Sailor with an ESWS pin, I see a Sailor who is commit ted and who knows what they are doing, said Davis. Contrary to the nickname, ESWS pins are not handed out like candy, according to Davis. Sailors must be able to demonstrate knowledge on more than 450 line items through out the qualification process. That includes col lecting signatures on all said 450 line items from qualified crew members: a written exam: a walk through of every major operation space on the ship, where Sailors have to identify key equip ment and their func tions: a 1st class petty officers board and finally by a Chiefs board. Its very stressful, said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Edjoel Ortiz Martinez, who is pre paring for the 1st class board. Its too much information; its never enough. Ortiz Martinez said, he studies as much as he can during his two six-hour watches a day. Then another two to three hours at night with a study group. It adds up to eight to nine hours a day and hes been doing this for the past month. He has made more than 300 hand written flash cards and taken almost 100 pages of notes, and he is still making more. By the time Sailors hit the Chiefs board, because of the time and effort that it takes to get to that point, they rarely fail, said Davis. Credit goes to the 1st classes for taking pride in the pro gram and providing such a high level of guidance to the ESWS trainees. Right now eight Philippine Sea Sailors have qualified so far on this deployment, said Davis. There will be another nine or 10 in the next month, and that number should grow every month. Its my goal to get as many Sailors we can through the program, said Davis. Its what we owe to our Sailors. Ill be very proud to be able to wear the ESWS pin, said Ortiz Martinez. It will show Ive done something important for myself and my ship. The uniform of a Sailor is more than eye candy; every badge, pin and ribbon has a story to tell. Where a Sailor has served and what they have accomplished is stitched into the fabric. Ask what pin a Sailor is most proud of and nine times out of 10 the Sailor will point to the large silver pin of crossed swords and a ship crashing through the waves the ESWS pin. Regardless, the answer will come with a story worth hear ing. -Photo by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattCryptologic Technician (Maintenance) 1st Class Lee Tyo, left, and Machinist's Mate 2nd Class stand at attention in preparation of receiving their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) pin aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.test score, and 1.5 go to the top 25 percent by Performance Mark Average. I believe putting this 25-percent window in place will motivate Sailors, said Stevens. Its not just about passing the exam. Its about passing the exam with flying colors. Total PNA points in the FMS are determined from a Sailors last five advancement cycles for a maximum of 15 possible points. Service in Pay Grade has been reduced from seven percent to a weight of one percent of the Final Multiple Score for advancement to E4 through E6. Changes to the Command Advancement Program (CAP) will take effect Oct. 1 for Fiscal Year 2015. The new policy estab lishes the period from July 1 to Sept. 30 as the Navys CAP Season, and that timeframe is the only time that com mands can CAP Sailors. MCPON added that this change is designed to prevent commands from inadvertently over manning ratings by pro moting Sailors after the Navy establishes the quotas needed based on vacancies. By capping first and then building the Navywide advancement exam quotas, we prevent that from happening and allows us to maintain stable rating health, said Stevens. Commands must use their remaining quotas for CAP from the current policy prior to Sept. 30. vide additional weather data, reduce mainte nance cost, improve performance, and provide digital data to new digi tal automation systems for presentation on air traffic control displays. According to Douget, with the system and technology improvements mean improved reliability. This radar will com pletely digitize the weather picture resolution the air traffic con trollers see, so they warn and steer airplanes out of dangerous weather situations, he said. The complete system will cost over $4 million when the construction is complete. Although the cost of the project seems like a lot, according to Douget, the new radar will save money in the end. The system will make improvements in the picture resolution, but also use less electrical power than the old systems. Douget said. We are going to reduce the overall power consumption for the base and improve the presentation and mission readiness of our air traffic controllers. From Page 1RadarFrom Page 1Advancement 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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USS Roosevelt Celebrates Mothers DayBy MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush Strike Group (CVN 77) Public AffairsSailors took time to honor the mothers aboard USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) with a Mothers Day dinner and presentation hosted by the Junior Enlisted Association on May 11. The dinner highlight ed the importance of mothers everywhere and served as a time to honor the mothers that are serving as crew members of the Roosevelt during her current deployment. We wanted the mothers on board to know that their sacrifice is a valued one, said Cmdr. Jay Clark, commanding officer of USS Roosevelt. It truly takes an extraordinary woman to be both a mother and a United States Sailor. The events included a steak and lobster dinner and a custom Mothers Day cake along with poems and songs per formed by the crew, as well as, cards written to the mothers from the crew thanking them for their service. It is hard, said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Shannon Hendricks. I miss my children immensely, but I take comfort in the fact that I am doing something that they are proud of and understand. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Karina Gasca echoed the same sentiment. It is unimaginably difficult to be apart from your children for many months at a time, she said. However, I remember that I am doing this all for them and that alone makes it all worth it. Roosevelt is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Justin WolpertFire Controlman 2nd Class Shannon Hendricks reads a Mother's Day Card written by the crew aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). -Photo by MC3 Justin WolpertBoatswain's Mate 1st Class Karina Gasca reads a Mother's Day Card written by the crew aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theatre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. Top Chef Competition Held On USS Roosevelt By MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush Strike Group (CVN 77) Public AffairsSailors aboard USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) had the opportunity to partici pate in a Top Chef style competition presented by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation committee. The competition is a contest between Sailors of any rate who want to show off their culinary prowess to the rest of Roosevelts crew who were tasked with judging the meals. Six teams of three or four Sailors were encouraged to utilize Roosevelts galley in order to provide one entre at the ships dinner seating Its a great opportunity to pro mote cohesiveness amongst the crew, said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Jose Arteagaduran. Its a tough competi tion, but lets be honest, its also a great opportunity. The competition was organized to provide the Sailors on board a slight relief from the typical cyclical galley menu. We have had some great dishes from some unexpected competitors said Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramirez. We have had things like blackened catfish with a fruit and cilantro salsa, spicy bread ed chicken poppers, and some brown sugar and apple pork dish; some real great and out-of-the-ordinary dishes. Each team had approximately two hours to prepare an entre. Following the meal preparation, the crew ate and judged the prepared dishes. The deviation from the usual ships faire was refreshing and welcome, said Master at Arms 1st class Joseph Peckfelder. Out of all the dishes the cilantro-garlic strip steak was probably my favorite, but then again, it was so hard to choose. The competition, although still in progress, already has one clear cut winner: The crew of the Roosevelt who has been treated to different and delicious meals throughout the duration. -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertSenior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramierz, from El Paso, Texas serves a Sailor during evening meal service aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guidedmissile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security opera tions and theatre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 11

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FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and child care is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.May 22, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, complete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. May 27, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to identify stress and its causes, how to identify problems asso ciated with prolonged stress, and participants also learn positive ways to deal with stress. May 27, 2014 9-11 a.m., Move.mil Workshop, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 All military ser vice members or mili tary spouses in receipt of PCS, Separation, Retirement or Change of Homeport Certificate orders are encouraged to attend. Please bring a copy of your PCS orders, House Hold Goods power of attor ney, and know the dates you want to request for your Pack-up/Pick-up. May 28, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effec tive independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. May 28-29, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., Resume Writing, Bldg 1, RM 1616 Create an effective resume or improve the one you already have. This workshop will outline the essential infor mation you need to develop a great resume in a competitive job environment. May 29, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. May 29, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, complete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. May 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., FRG Basic Training, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Training custom ized to fit your FRG, whether the command is starting a group or re-energizing an exist ing group. Discuss the FRG Instruction/policy, leadership structure, communication tech niques, team-building ideas, fundraising guidelines, and ideas for fun activities. May 31, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are applying for. Practice Fire Safety When Grilling OutdoorsFrom First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency ServicesEnjoyment of outdoor grilling and barbecuing is totally understand able. Barbecuing gives food great flavor, its fun, it keeps the kitchen cool, and its a great way to entertain. However, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), in 2007-2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 8,800 home and outside fires. These 8,800 fires caused an annual average of 10 civilian deaths, 140 civilian injuries and $96 million in direct property of the home structure fires involving grills started on a courtyard, terrace the home outdoor fires in which grills fires, the fire started when a flammable or combustible gas or liquid caught fire. should only be used outdoors. from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. the grill area. grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill. Charcoal grills charcoal ready to use. Charcoal chimney starters allow you to start the charcoal using newspaper as a fuel. charcoal starter fluid. Never add charcoal fluid or any other flammable liq uids to the fire. of children and away from heat sources. starters, which do not use fire. Be sure to use an extension cord for outdoor use. the coals completely cool before dis posing in a metal container. Propane grills leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will quickly reveal escaping propane by releasing bubbles. gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame: -Turn off the propane tank and grill. -If the leak stops, get the grill ser viced by a professional before using it again. -If the leak does not stop, call the fire department. immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill. buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside. For additional information on Fire Safety contact the Fire Prevention Office at 270-5647 x1421 or x1404. Keeping Up Appearances-Photo by Paige GnannLSSN Chantise Daniel and OS3 Kylee Rivera polish the brass on a steering stand displayed on the quarterdeck of Building One. The wheel belonged to USS John W. Weeks (DD 701), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer that was in service during World War II up until 1970. Memorial Day At Beaches Vet ParkFrom Beaches Veterans AssociationThis Memorial Day, May 26, the Beaches Veterans will salute their fallen Comrades with wreaths presented by various veterans organi zations in their memory starting at 2 p.m.. They will also recog nize the Terry Parker; First Coast high schools Junior ROTC Cadets, future leaders and vet erans of our Armed Forces, who will per form their Drill Team exhibitions beginning at 2 p.m. Additionally, the Fletcher High School Band Ensemble will entertain with patriotic music. During the pro gram, the Sandalwood AFROTC Team will explain and demonstrate the proper folding of our National Standard. Guest speaker this year is Congressman Ander Crenshaw. New GI Bill Comparison ToolFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a new website which makes it easier For Sailors trying to decide how to best use their Post-9/11 GI Bill to cal culate benefits and learn more about approved colleges, universities and other training programs. The GI Bill Comparison Tool website -http://benefits. va.gov/gibill/comparison provides key information about college affordability and brings together information from more than 17 different online sources and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA benefits at each school. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a comprehensive education benefit created by Congress in 2008. In general, veterans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001 are eligible. For more information about GI Bill programs, visit: http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ career/education/GIBill/ Pages/default.aspx 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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From Page 2RecordsWe used to be so good together. You comforted me. You made me happy. I loved you... But after all these years, Ive become too dependent. I want you too much, and I now realize, its just not healthy. I need to strike out on my own and try new things. Its not you, its me Carbohydrates, Im breaking up with you. In the early days, I couldnt foresee how addicting our relation ship would become. I didnt fear our love affair, because I believed the science of the 1990s, which decreed that low fat carbs were healthy fuel for my body. I was so naive, ignorantly indulging in second helpings of sticky rice, snacking on crackers, and adding a hunk of ciabatta bread alongside my pasta. Oh, the ciabatta bread! When I gained weight, I never blamed you. I thought cheese, meat, butter, cream and nuts were my enemies. As long as I didnt put mayo or cheese on my sandwich, it was health food. As long as I ladled red sauce on my spaghetti, it was good for me. As long as I used skim milk a bowl of cereal, a glass of juice and a butterless slice of toast was the perfect breakfast. What a fool I was! When I married a Navy man, you didnt leave me. In fact, our threesome was quite happy in an open relationship. Together, you and I won my new husbands heart, and his stomach, too. While stationed in Monterey, California, you introduced us to the wiles of sourdough we felt so naughty as we loaded chowder into your bread bowls. While stationed in England, you never told us that the baked beans the English dollop on their breakfast plates, pour over their toast, and glob on their baked potatoes were as bad as the scones, bis cuits and puddings. Excess glucose surged through our blood while we were stationed in Germany, as we washed pretzels, noo dles and potatoes down with wheaty beers and sweet wines. In the South, we were so busy avoid ing fried chicken, sau sage gravy and bacon fat, we didnt notice that you were secretly feeding our addiction with sweet tea, sticky barbecue sauce, and starchy corn bread. Worst of all, I could never seem to resist the chocolate with which you regularly seduced me. How could you smugly stand by while I wallowed in guilt over the fat content? Little did I know, your sugar was the culprit all along! You betrayed me, and as hard as it is for me to say this, its over. Sure, you will always be a part of my life, but Im ready to explore the rest of the food pyramid. The rotisserie chickens with their crisp skins, the creamy camembert cheeses, the olive oils, the avocados, and the bacon ... the glorious bacon! I dont mean to hurt you, but there are a lot more fish (like salmon with a generous slathering of creamy dill sauce) in the sea. When we do run into each other, I hope we can be civil. I wont rudely turn away from you on special occasions (espe cially if you come in the form of homemade maca roni and cheese with buttered breadcrumbs on top), but lets keep our contact to a minimum. Of course, the kids will still want to have you around, but during scheduled visi tations, please keep your high fructose corn syrup to yourself. One last thing before you go. If, by chance, I should have a moment of weakness over, lets say, a bag of Hershey Kisses with Almonds during a hormone spike, I can tell you right now that it will be a nothing more than a meaningless fling. So long, Carbohydrates. Its been nice knowing you. Get more whit and wis dom at www.themeatand potatoesoflife.com Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFE VCNO Howard To Speak At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine din ing and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are manda tory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast. net. in Florida for the first time or entering after having been absent from a school for more than 12 months or one school year. You have up to one year prior to entering the Florida school sys tem in which to obtain the school entry health exam. A certificate of immu nization (form DH 680) is also a requirement for all children in grades kindergarten through 12th grade for entry and attendance in Florida schools. The form is valid until the child enters seventh grade, at which time a new form will be issued when additional immu nization requirements are met. If you have already met these requirements, you can take your documentation to Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport, to have the records transferred to the appro priate Florida form NBHS Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities locat ed across Florida and Georgia. Additional information you should have with you at time of enrollment includes the following: Proof of home address Duval requires 2 proofs. Kindergarten and First Grade Students: certified birth record. Acceptable birth records include the following: record; Certificate of Baptism; the childs life that has been in force for at least two years; by parent and signed by a public health official; of arrival in the United States indicating the age of the child; or with record of age in the childs school, stating the DOB. Academic Records: When a child has been enrolled in another school district, parents are asked to provide the latest report card from that district and transcript if appli cable. Most schools will accept an unofficial record (a hand-carried report card, for example) for registration, but the school will then request official records from the previous school as indi cated earlier in the arti cle. Ive received many calls and emails this past month from parents who have just moved to the Jacksonville area or who will be arriving sometime during the summer or even the fall. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore differ ent scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, a move can be filled with anxiety. Children have left friends and will be starting in a new school. Most of the students in this school have already formed friendships. They may even know the teacher. Your child is worried about Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions you are probably going to hear over and over this summer. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your children are worried about school and right now Who am I going to play or do things with? When can we go to the beach? I am bored what can I do? Totally preventing moving anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the children. Consider three key elements: reliability, routine, and relationships. By promoting these three elements, youll experience a more positive move for everyone. When parents trust the move, you will send a positive message to children about the good place they have moved to and the good people, and especially, the school here in Jax. Your feeling of reliability will be transferred to your children, helping them to feel confident about the move and the school experience. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reliabil ity should be developed through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If you didnt have time before you left your last base, have your chil dren now go online to learn about NS Mayport on Facebook, their new school at www. duvalschools.org, and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. They can also check out the happenings in and around town and the beach at www.coj.net. If your child is too young to do an internet research, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports schedules, and clubs available will pro vide information to ease the transition. Routine is another key element to reducing anxiety because it pro vides structure to the childrens day and secu rity in knowing what to expect. Even though it is almost summer and a time when most sched ules just fly out of the window, consider having a summer routine. Establish a bed time and a waking up sched ule followed by some jobs which will help you to get moved in. If your children are really young, maybe they can help with removing all that paper from the packing. Be inventive so they feel a part of this exciting experience! Relationship-building does not have to wait until the start of school. The Youth Sponsorship Program coordina tor at the Youth Center (904) 270-5680 can provide names of stu dents at the new school who would be willing to become email bud dies. Or once you are here, have your chil dren try out the activities at the Youth Activity Center on base at NS Mayport. You can access their Activity Calendar online at Facebook.com/ mwrmayport. That is a great way to make new friends. Knowing some one before school starts can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? Positive communica tion and continuing to establish reliability, rou tine, and relationships will ensure a happier less anxious summer. For more information, go to Military OneSource is a useful resource for relocation information, child care, and help with child or teenager with special needs. Access the service at 800.342.9647 or at www.militaryone source.com. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC ( www.militarychild.org) is a non-profit, worldwide organization which identifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child. Military Teens on the Move: This program is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. J udy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. and Recreation fund to benefit crewmembers. Getting this award is a huge honor to the crew of USS New York and all who have served on her. It is a reflection of the dedication, determi nation and hard work of every Sailor and Marine on board. This shows that we are ready for any task and any mission that can be given to us, said Operation Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Woelky, New Yorks MWR president. The stipend that we receive for this award will go into our MWR fund and will be used anywhere from gym equipment to command functions and competitions. The Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award was established in 1917 by the New York Tribune Association. The fund was initiated by a letter from 13-year-old Marjorie Sterrett in February 1916. Marjorie, who lived in Brooklyn, contributed her weekly allowance of a dime to Help build a battleship for Uncle Sam. Prior to World War II, income from this fund was used to pay prizes annually to turret and gun crews making the high est scores in short-range battle practice, and sub marine crews making the highest scores in torpedo firing. It is now used to recognize those ships which display battle efficiency and emphasize readiness and fitness of the ship. It is pretty amazing that a 13 year old girl would give her allowance to build a battleship. If she were alive today, Im sure Marjorie would be incredibly proud to know of the impact she has had on our Navy. I bet she would be equally proud to know USS New York, a ship named for her home state, has won her namesake award, said Capt. Christopher Brunett, New Yorks commanding officer. The crew of New York take their service very seriously and never forget the brave men and women we are sworn to defend. They worked extremely hard for this award and I couldnt be prouder of them.From Page 1USS New York THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 13

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By MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastThe Air Operations Department at Naval Station Mayport con tinued their upgrades with the installation of the Digital Airport Surveillance Radar (DASR-11) System. The DASR-11 is a new terminal air traffic con trol radar system that replaces current ana log systems with new digital technology. The United States Air Force Electronics Systems Center, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy are in the process of procuring DASR sys tems to upgrade existing radar facilities for U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and civilian air fields. According to Naval Station Mayport Assistant Ground Electronics Maintenance Officer Tom Douget, this system is the latest in a long list of improvements to Air Operations at Naval Station Mayport. We have been on a continuous improve ment mode since 1995, he said. We used to be in a small trailer facil ity and have evolved and improved the building for the air traffic controllers and have new equip ment to meet the latest updated technology. The DASR system detects aircraft position and weather conditions in the vicinity of civilian and military airfields. The ASR-11 will replace an existing ASR-8. The older radar, installed in 1983, is being replaced to improve reliability, pro CHINFO Award Winner USS RooseveltCelebrates Their Moms Page 11 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Air Ops Installs ASR-11 Radar System-Photo by Paige GnannContractors work to install a new Digital Airport Surveillance Radar to replace the existing ASR-8 in service at Naval Station Mayport since 1983. The new radar system detects aircraft position and weather conditions in the vicinity for surrounding civilian and military airfields.-Photo by MC2 Cyrus RosonSeaman Justinne Ivanitskiy looks through binocu lars for surface contact while standing as lookout aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). USS New York Wins Battleship Fund AwardBy MC2 Cyrus RosonUSS New York (LPD 21) Public AffairsThe amphibious transport dock ship USS New York received the prestigious Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award for superior performance and battle efficiency among amphibious ships in U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The award is presented annually by the Chief of Naval Operations to one ship in the Atlantic Fleet and one in the Pacific Fleet based on overall readi ness. New Yorks crew was cited for their indomi table spirit, superior performance and consistently high standards of readiness. Our crew is honored to receive this prestigious award. It is another sym bol of the dedication they have to make New York the best ship in the fleet; always ready to go and do the nations bidding, said Lt. Justin Bernard, New Yorks chaplain. The award includes a small monetary stipend, which will be given to the ships Morale, Welfare Navy Updates Enlisted Advancement PolicyBy MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsNAVADMIN 114/14 announced changes to its current enlisted advancement policy, includ ing a new formula for the Final Multiple Score (FMS) and chang es to the Command Advancement Program (CAP) May 15. These revisions are designed to reward sustained superior perfor mance and strengthen the role of the Command Triad (command ing officer, executive officer, and command master chief) in the advancement of their Sailors. This isnt the first time weve done this, said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens. Periodically we take a look at how were advancing Sailors and how the Final Multiple Score is put together. We do that based on feedback we get from the Fleet. The Final Multiple Score is a weight-based calculation used to rank Sailors eligible for advance ment. In the new FMS, the value of the advancement exam becomes the largest factor considered for advancement to E4 and E5, increasing in weight by eight per cent, going from 37 percent to 45 percent. For E6 and E7, Performance Mark Average (PMA) becomes the largest factor in determin ing Sailors FMS. For advance ment to E6, PMA increased three percent and now counts for 50 percent of the FMS calculation. For advancement to E7, PMA increased 10 percent to count for 60 percent of the total FMS. This adjustment changes the emphasis on how performance is measured for junior and senior Sailors. Leaderships expecta tion is that junior Sailors know their occupational skill, said Fleet Master Chief for Manpower Personnel Training and Education April Beldo. As they rise to the level of E6 and E7, were looking for them to be ready to be in a management and leadership role, so their perfor mance is more weighted. The Good Conduct Medal and the Reserve Meritorious Service Medal will no longer contribute award points in the FMS. We were seeing that the majority of our Sailors receive this award, and so to give a point for it was a zero sum, said Stevens. Sailors werent gaining anything by it. Sailors who pass the advance ment exam, but do not advance due to quotas limitations, are eligible to receive Pass Not Advanced (PNA) points; how ever, the new policy limits PNA points to the top 25 percent of Sailors. 1.5 PNA points go to the top 25 percent of Sailors by PNA Points For Top 25 Percent Good Conduct, Reserve Meritorious Service Medals No Longer Contribute In FMS CAP Period Established -Photo by MC2 Damian BergCeremony Marks 27th Anniversary Of Attack. See Story/ Photos, Pages 4-5See USS New York, Page 13 See Advancement, Page 10 See Radar, Page 10

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer .................................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: How Do I Get Out Of The Navy?It is common, espe cially among younger Sailors who are some what new to the Navy, for Sailors to struggle adjusting to Navy life and to seek a way out of their commitment early. This article is my response to Sailors who are unhappy and want to get out early. When you are strug gling and miserable in your job it can seem like it is ruining your whole life. It is true that the Navy may not be a good fit for you, but before you make that decision it is important to think things through carefully. Here are some things to consider when you are struggling adjusting to the Navy. What you want may not be what is best for you. Of the many people I talk to who just want to quit, I would estimate that about 5% have really legitimate reasons. For the rest, what they are simply saying is, It is hard and I dont like it. This is why you may not be taken seriously by your chain of command. They have seen it a lot before, and they them selves likely were in your exact position in their early years, but they know now that what you want may not be what is best for you. Much of your trouble may simply grow out of the fact that you may have never really had to face this kind of challenge. That means that the chances are real ly good that if you stick it out, things will get better for you. If you run from something just because it is hard, you may miss opportunities and adventures that will change your life. It may turn out that your Chief or LPO who is pushing you hard and doesnt seem to care about your happiness actually knows more about what will help you succeed than you do. Hard and uncomfort able things are essential for our growth and hap piness. Many people believe that the way to be happy is to elimi nate everything that is difficult, challenging, and un-enjoyable from their life. If you train yourself to blame your unhappiness on your circumstancesif every time you are faced with something hard you just say, I dont like it and quitthen you will miss out on some of the great est satisfactions and joys in life. Marriage can be really hard, but if you quit, you may miss out on the deep love that can only come from work ing through hard things. Most jobs are not fun, but you can learn to take satisfaction in what you do. Being a par ent is really hard, but it is definitely worth it. You have an incredible opportunity to learn one of the most important lessons in life: that your happiness has very little to do with your circum stances and everything to do with your attitude. Choose now to learn to be happy in whatever circumstances you find yourself. Whats your alterna tive? Remember that the grass often looks greener on the other side of the fence, but rarely is. Most people joined the Navy because it offered something bet ter than what they had in their life at that time. So as you look back on that old life, wishing you could go back, remember that it wasnt as great as it seems now, otherwise you wouldnt be here. Make sure that you dont paint life outside the military in an unrealistic light. If you do, you will just end up in this same position again in a few months. Okay, now to answer your question. Is there any way to get out of the Navy? The answer is yes. If you have a legitimate problem (physical, mental, fam ily, etc.), there are procedures in place that can help. You can continue to follow the appropri ate channels to request that. Expect some ini tial resistance, but if your reasons are valid, eventually you will get the help you need. But remember that everyone thinks that their rea sons are valid, and that they are the exception. I hope you are able to examine yourself enough to listen to what others are telling you. For the majority who find them selves stuck where they are, my advice is simple. Choose to make the best of it. You can be bitter and angry all you want, but you are only hurt ing yourself. You signed the contract. You made the choice to be here, and it looks like you are going to be here for a while. Why not decide now to learn how to be happy where you are? If you cant change your circumstances, change your attitude instead. I know it isnt easy, but it is really your only choice. If you need help with this, seek the guidance of a mentor, counselor, chaplain, religious lead er or friend. God bless you with the courage to face the hard things in your life and do the right thing. Chaplain Justin Top CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNER CREDO Offers Enrichment Retreats To Mayport Sailors, FamiliesBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Elelment East, Detachment SoutheastAt one time or another, the everyday life in the military can be very stress ful. Long duty hours and watch standing, sometimes can be a daunting task. Couple this with the stress of taking care of the spouse and kids at home, everyone reaches their boiling point and needs a break for a few days. But who can afford to go to a retreat for a couple of days? For Naval Station Mayport Sailors, the Chaplains office will pick up the tab for a much needed break. The Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation (CREDO) focuses on the development of ones personal and spiritual growth through various weekend retreats and desig nated workshops. Such topics include marriage enrichment, self-confidence, relaxation, combating personal afflic tion, suicide prevention and how to better communicate with others. The main goal with these retreats is to get personnel away from the work environment and help them solve their issues in a peaceful surrounding, said Naval Station Mayport CREDO Facilitator Atticus Taylor. Instead of sending a person to three or four dif ferent programs, the retreat can be one place where the person can get away to relax, and understand themselves better and get to the root of their problems. The two main retreats Southeast CREDO offers o are the Personal Growth and the Marriage Enrichment retreats The personal growth focuses on understanding yourself better, tak ing personal responsibility in decisions and look at goals and reshape them. The marriage enhancement (Most pop ular) deals with nurturing your mar riage, handling the inevitable conflicts and strengthen the emotional, physi cal and spiritual aspects of the mar riage. According to Taylor, the mar riage retreat is designed to encourage healthy marriages and to help couples grow. In the marriage enrichment retreat, the first thing we focus on is how the couple develops their communication skills to be more effective, Taylor said. We talk to them about ways to resolve conflict. Marriage is very important to a stable society, and a very valu able resource to create strong family bonds. All retreats are 48 hours long, and are held at the Epworth by The Sea in St. Simons Island GA, which is about 2 hours south of Mayport. All retreats begin at 5 p.m. and last until around noon on Sunday. The activ ity is open to all active duty, reservists and their family members. All work shops and retreats are at no cost to participants and transportation is provided. For more information about upcoming retreats contact the Naval Station Mayport Chapel at 904-2705212/5213/5214.Moving? Dont Pack School Records!The most important piece of advice I can give parents moving with school age chil dren is this: Do not pack your childrens school records. Put them in a carry on or in your purse or in a special folder in the car. School systems now have such different sum mer vacation and first day of school schedules that you dont know if anyone will be in the schools office to fax or mail OFFICIAL school records to your chil drens new school. Budget cuts in education are rampant all over the world, and while schools will use hand-carried records to enroll and select courses for your children, they will need the OFFICIAL records to verify placement. If you have a child who is a special needs stu dent, be sure the receiv ing school requests the special education records. Many school districts require a sepa rate form for those record requests. If the receiving school forgets to ask that question, those records may be delayed several weeks possibly not allowing the receiving school to provide the necessary accommodations needed for the childs academic and behavioral success. You should actu ally ask that ques tion yourself before you leave the sending school. You could even ask for a copy of the required form to give to the receiving school. That way you have cov ered your bases! Remember that part of the school records includes records of phys ical exams and immu nizations. Florida law requires all school chil dren have the appropriate health exam and immunization documen tation. A physical examination must be per formed by a health care provider licensed to per form physical exams and must be completed with in the past 12 months (This is not an annual exam.). The school entry Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KNOWINGTHE ROPEShealth exam (form DH 3040) is a requirement for students in grades kindergarten through 12th grade who are mak ing their initial entry into a Florida school. A new entrant is a child entering a school See Records, Page 13

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Mayport Remembers Starks FallenFrom StaffMore than 300 civilians and service mem bers gathered at Naval Station Mayports Memorial Park Friday for the 27th anniversa ry of the attack on USS Stark (FFG 31). On May 17, 1987, 37 Sailors aboard USS Stark were killed after the frigate was struck by two Iraqi missiles while it was deployed on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. Despite the severe dam age, the heroic efforts of Starks crew saved the ship. Guest speaker, Capt. Wes McCall, com manding officer of NS Mayport, reminded the attendees of the crews efforts to save their ship mates and the ship. The service featured accounts of some of the events that occurred dur ing the attack and also events that followed. Shortly after [9 p.m.], the ship was hit by two Exocet anti-ship cruise missiles fired by a single Iraqi F-1 Mirage fighter, Mccall recounted. The first missile entered the port side of the ship. Parts of that missile travelled through the ship, creating a hole in the starboard hull. The second missile entered the ship near he same location and exploded approximately three feet inside the skin of the ship. Each missile injected approximately 300 pounds of propel lant into the ships con trol berthing and chief petty officers quarters. The combination of 600 pounds of burning propellant resulted in a near instantaneous heat release of approximately 12 million BTUs, ending the lives of many Sailors immediately. The CPO mess imme diately filled with smoke, as did the officer quar ters, he said. The decks forward of the explo sion were in flames and the fire spread through the mess line and starboard passageway for ward. Smoke filled the repair locker number 5 and repair 2 areas and firemain pressure was reduced to 60 PSI due to a ruptured firemain for ward. Radio communications were all but lost. In fact the crew had to use the PrC-90 radios from the helicopter air crew survival vests to coordinate rescue and damage control efforts. And those efforts would last for almost 20 hours as the crew fought rag ing fires and looked for missing shipmates. McCall also told the story of fallen ship mate Seaman Recruit Brian Clinefelter, whose father Senior Chief Gary Clinefelter was stationed at NS Mayport during the attack. On April 23, 1987, Brian arrived on board USS Stark eager to begin his naval career and honor his family with service to his nation, McCall said. Twentyfour days later, Brian had just completed his watch and was preparing for bed when the missiles struck. Although grieving the loss of his son, Gary volunteered to work at the coordination center the base had set up to support the grieving families. He simply said, I need to keep working. In keeping with Garys sterling example, we too must continue to work. We must work to keep our shipmates memory alive, he continued. This tragic loss reminds us that even when America is not at war, servicemen and women risk everything so that all Americans can be at peace.May our memo ries be long. During the somber ceremony, the names of those killed at sea were read aloud by a fellow shipmate and a bell tolled for each one; 37 strikes of a bell and a 21-gun salute honored the Sailors who lost their lives. Stark was decommis sioned at Mayport in 1999. In order to preserve the tradition once the ship was retired, the Naval Order of the United States, North Florida Commandery, assumed sponsorship for the memorial service. Mayports Memorial Park was established Aug. 1, 1987, with the dedication of the Stark monument. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergYN2 Demario Smith places a wreath in front of the USS Stark Memorial plaque on display at Naval Station Mayport's Memorial Park during the annual USS Stark remembrance ceremony held in memory of the 37 Sailors killed aboard the ship in 1987. The ship was hit on May 17, 1987, by two Iraqi missiles while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. -Photo by Paige GnannSailors from Naval Station Mayport perform a 21-gun salute for the 37 lost Sailors of the USS Stark (FFG 31) on its 27th anniversary.-Photo by Paige GnannA musician from Navy Region Southeast Band plays Taps during the USS Stark Memorial.-Photo by Paige GnannErnestine Foster, widow of QMCS Vernon Foster, holds up his last will and testament after reading a scrip ture during the memorial service.-Photo by Paige GnannA former USS Stark crew member stands during the tolling of the ship bell in remembrance of the 37 fallen Sailors.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crew members of USS Doyle attended this years event as part of their own reunion activities.-Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the USS Power reunion joined more than 300 attendees in remem bering the fallen Stark Sailors.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 5 -Photo by Paige GnannFormer Crew member Clifford Cellars of the USS Stark (FFG 31) rings one bell for each of his 37 fallen shipmates who were lost 26 years ago. The Stark remem brance ceremony took place at the Naval Station Mayport Memorial Park. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergGuest speaker, Capt. Wes McCall, commanding officer of NS Mayport, talks to the friends, family and former crew members of USS Stark during the annual Stark remembrance ceremony held on May 16 at the Naval Station Mayport Memorial Park.-Photo by MC2 Damian BergAbove, The childrens choir from General Joseph Finegan Elementary School perform patriotic songs as part of the USS Stark remembrance ceremony on May 16. Left, USS Stark crewmember Bernard Martin reads a scripture during this years ceremony.-Photo by MC2 Damian BergNS Mayport Color Guard parade the colors during the annual USS Stark remembrance ceremony held in memory of the 37 Sailors killed aboard the ship in 1987. The ship was hit on May 17, 1987, by two Iraqi missiles while on patrol in the Arabian Gulf. -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Ross Cramer, salutes during the National Anthem. Cramer served as MC at this years ceremony.

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Auto Skills Center May Special: Free tire rotation with paid alignment. Transmission flush, coolant flush and fuel injection cleaning, $180 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 May 22: Stanley Cup NHL 14 PS3 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 May 24: UFC 173Barao vs Dillashaw. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 May 31: All Request Saturday Night. All night long at Castaways. DJ Adam will be playing your song requests all night! 270-7205 June 6: NBA 2K14 Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Great prize for winner. 270-7205 June 14: UFC 174Johnson vs. Bagautinov. 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Community Activities May 23: Outdoor MoviesMadagascar 2 (PG). Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 May 30: Outdoor MoviesFrozen (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 6: Outdoor MoviesIron Man 3 (PG-13) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 13: Outdoor MoviesThe Lego Movie (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 20: Outdoor MoviesPlanes (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 27: Outdoor MoviesGhostbusters (PG) Film begins at Sunset behind Beachside Community Center. FREE. 270-7205 June 28: Freedom Fest 2014. 4-8 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Come out and enjoy free fun for the entire family: games, rides, face painting, water slides, inflatables, archery tag, live music and much more! Food and beverages will be available for purchase. No outside coolers, food or beverages allowed at the event site. Fireworks will be at 9 p.m. 2705228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 50-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $8.00. 270-5431 June 11: All-Hands Brisket Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by CDS-14. For tickets, (904) 2705801 x148 June 25: All-Hands Steak Night. 4-7 p.m. at Focsle Lounge CPO Club. Cost is $12 per per son. Purchase tickets in advance; limited tickets available at the door. Sponsored by NAVSTA CPOA. For tickets, (904) 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Children under 12 are free in Sprint Fanzone or General Admission. 2705145 Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 Blue Man Group at Universal Orlando: Come see the excitement that is the Blue Man Group. Tickets are just $49; save $55.75 off the gate price. 270-5145Lake Wonderwood Project Enters Second PhaseBy MC1(SW) Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Ele ment East, Detachment SoutheastTrue Blue: Navy Families Benefactors, Inc. (JAX True BlueTM) has teamed with Naval Station Mayport Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to begin phase two of the Wonderwood Project. (JAX True BlueTM) was founded by Sharon Ellis in 2012 on the premise that Jacksonville and Mayport Navy person nel and their families make such selfless sac rifices for the American people that she wanted to enhance their quality of on base life in return. Sharon committed to do more than just raise funds and write a check. She wanted to get the community involved by asking them to roll up their sleeves and physi cally work towards the project goals. JAX True BlueTM was estab lished as an all-volun teer 501c3 non-profit organization and part nered MWR Mayport, in the fall of 2012. The mission of MWR is to provide world class programs that sup port Fleet, Fighter, and Family readiness and improve quality of life. Together they brain stormed to determine a project that would be sustainable and mean ingful to naval person nel and their families at Naval Station Mayport. The Lake Wonderwood Project was born. Lake Wonderwood is a 22-acre lake nestled within base hous ing on Naval Station Mayport. Until The Lake Wonderwood Project was launched, The Lake was primar ily neglected. The cement paths around The Lake, cracked and raised by tree roots, became unsafe for use. The bridges, splintered and sagging became unstable. The sawgrass and brush around the lake grew out of control. The childrens play areas and pavilions while still functional had withered, losing their zest and appeal. The Lake Wonderwood Project, approved by the Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus in May 2013, will completely renovate Lake Wonderwood. The result will be a continu ous pathway around the 22-acre lake including a waterfront boardwalk, pavilions with gathering, eating and grill areas, fit ness stations, childrens play areas, and humani tarian nature preserves. The nature preserves area will include a botanical garden with walking stones contributed by the youth of Naval Station Mayport. According to MWR Mayport Director Lonnie Kenney, the improvements will ben efit base personnel for decades to come. We are moving for ward with the project, it will be a great place for all military families to enjoy, he said. In addition to a great area for recreation, it is also a great asset for people who might decide to move into military housing. Many people live on base for security reasons; this project would be an added bonus to their decision. The Lake Wonderwood Project is a multiphase, multi-year project with an estimated cost between $400,000 and $750,000. All funds will be gifted to MWR Mayport from JAX True BlueTM as a result of fund raising, and corpo rate project team part ners and individuals from the Mayport com munity will volunteer labor. Materials and sup plies will also be solicited for donation from local community vendors. Phase Two of the proj ect is the actual blueprint plan and the hiring of the Prosser Corporation of Jacksonville as the contractor for the proj ect. According to JAX True BlueTM President and Board Chair Sharon Ellis, helping the lives of Naval Station Mayport and NAS JAX is what this project if for. Lake Wonderwood Preserve called to me. Seeing sailors and their families relaxing and enjoying this beauti ful recreational area for years to come means everything to me, she said. They selflessly serve our great country and us. Completing this project will be just one small way to say thank you for all they do and have done. Artist rendition of the Lake Wonderwood project. FIGHTA CFC participant provided as a public service. Deadly Childhood Disea ses. stjude.org 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Intramural Sports May 27: Co-Ed Softball Begins. Season Ends July 10. 270-5451 June 2: Mens Tennis Begins. Season ends July 24. 270-5451 Aquatics Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, June 8. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID) Windy Harbor Base Championship: June 14 & 15, 8:30 a.m. shot gun start. Liberty Call The following activities target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. May 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 25: Ichetucknee Springs Tubing Trip Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $8. Sign up by May 22. May 26: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. June 1: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 29. June 3: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Child and Youth Programs May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680All Navy Mens Volleyball Spends Time at YAC -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the All Navy Mens Volleyball Team teaches children at the Mayport Youth Activities Center some tricks and techniques to playing volleyball during a community relations project on Friday. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 7

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8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Carney Sailors Enjoy Liberty, Run 15K In TurkeyBy Ensign Marina NanartowichUSS Carney (DDG 64) Public AffairsUSS Carney (DDG 64) recent port visit to Bodrum, Turkey pro vided Carney Sailors with an opportunity to interact with locals and experience the rich history and culture of Turkey. While in port, the crew had the oppor tunity to participate in several Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours, including a scuba diving trip, a tour of the classical city of Ephesus and a tour to Pamukkale. The generous hospitality of the people of Turkey helped Carney Sailors gain an appreciation for the rich history of Turkey, thus strengthen ing the bonds between the U.S. and Turkey. Cmdr. Eddie Crossman, the ships Captain, said he was pleased with the out come of the port visit. Bodrum is a beautiful city, and well deserved port visit for the Crew of the USS Carney after a long time at sea, he said. A strong NATO partner, Turkey shares our commitment to enhancing maritime security. Our visit to Bodrum only strength ens our partnership, as the Sailors are able to see first hand the rich Turkish culture and his tory. We truly enjoyed our visit and I know we will try to come back soon. The food, the sights, and the people are worth coming back for! Crossman met with the Mayor of Bodrum, Mahmet Kocadon as well as the District Governor, Mehmet Godekmerdan and the local Garrison Commander, Colonel Ahmet Sevki while in Turkey. Interoperability between the U.S. and Turkey was the primary discussion point for these visits. During his meeting with Mayor Kocadon, Crossman discussed the exten sive security measures taken to accommodate Carneys stay. Excited to host an American war ship, a rare occurrence for the seaside town, Bodrum officials went above and beyond, pro viding extra police forces from neighboring towns to ensure adequate secu rity for Carney. While in Bodrum, a few members of the crew, including Crossman, the Executive Officer, Cmdr. Ken Pickard, and Command Master Chief Jon Lonsdale, participated in a 15-kilometer race through the scenic har bor city of Bodrum. Running side-by-side local athletes, seven Carney Sailors partici pated in the event. The local runners were excit ed for Carney to partici pate and made several announcements welcom ing the American Sailors to Bodrum and wishing them luck on the race. Ive always enjoyed running and have done plenty of races, but doing a race in a different country was a different experience. It was amaz ing running through the streets and beachside as random people cheered you on, commented Seaman Matthew Cecotti who represented Carney well at the race, finishing with a top score. Carney departed Turkey after six months in the Arabian Gulf where she was forward deployed and conduct ed BMD and Maritime Security Operations. -Photo courtesy of USS Carney Carney Sailors enjoy the local sights, shopping and food of Bodrum while on lib erty. BBC To Kick-off 2014 Housing Survey From BBCIn a few weeks, resi dents will be invited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations through our CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. The annual survey is an important part of our contin uous improvement program that helps us analyze perfor mance and make any neces sary changes and enhance ments to ensure we consistent ly deliver quality service across all aspects of our community operations. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of the homes. All sur veys are completely confiden tial and anonymous and resi dents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. The Resident Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we are excelling operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Heather Sanders, Community Manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to complete the sur vey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be available at the kick-off event: Spring Beautification, scheduled for May 31 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. Balfour Beatty Communities has events planned throughout the month of June if you cannot attend the annual Beautification. An event schedule can be found at www.facebook.com/mayporthomes Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office. Residents that hand in a survey on or before June 20th will qualify for a special Early Bird prize drawing. The final day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Thank you in advance to all residents for their participa tion in the survey process we look forward to receiving your feedback. If you have any questions about the Resident Satisfaction Survey, please contact the main office at 904270-8870. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 9

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Phil Sea Sailors Accessorize With ESWS PinsBy MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaIts has been casually observed by some that a uniform adds a certain level of attractiveness to a person. While there are countless reasons more important to peo ple for choosing to wear the uniform of a US Navy Sailor one of the most iconic uniforms in the world at some point, probably at a Fleet Week, that small factoid has inevitably crossed every Sailors mind. Beyond tailoring, steam pressing and obsessive grooming, there is only one way for Sailors to acces sorize and make their uniforms pop, and thats by earning ribbons and pins. Often referred to as chest candy, the brightly colored ribbons and shiny pins are more than just flare or bling. They represent service, accomplish ment and sacrifice; thus its no wonder why they become a point of pride. Sailors aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) are no exception. One of the most respected pins a Sailor can earn is the Enlisted Sea Warfare Specialist (ESWS) insignia. The program is fleetwide, but every command must tailor the program to fit its platform and needs. From Philippine Sea Instruction 1414.1, The ESWS insignia signifies that the Sailor is competent in their assigned rating and has acquired additional knowledge that enhances their understanding of warfighting, mission effec tiveness, and command survivability. Sailors who wear the ESWS insignia stand out as significant contributors to our ships mission and combat readiness. The pressure to earn an ESWS pin starts the moment a new recruit is processed into boot camp, and it doesnt ever let up till the pin ning ceremony. Once in the fleet Sailors are con stantly reminded of that pressure every time a superior glances down at where the pin should be. The ESWS program comes down to pro tecting the ship and its crew, said Chief Damage Controlman Chad Davis, the ships ESWS coordi nator. It makes the Navy stronger by pushing Sailors into spaces they wouldnt normally go. It gives every sailor an advanced knowledge of all shipboard operations. Even though ESWS is a requirement for Sailors assigned to a ship, its still not a given and its no less of an honor to earn it. The timeline for finishing is generous enough that Sailors who choose not to reenlist after their first contract can still serve adequately without earning an ESWS pin. When I got to the ship I still wasnt sure how far I wanted to go in the Navy, and I didnt make getting the pin a priority said Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Joshua Songer. When I decided I was going to reenlist I knew I still had something to prove. ESWS is a career milestone, said Songer, who is one of the ships most recent ESWS qualifi ers. It distinguishes who takes their Navy career seriously. Sailors get a lot more respect and trust from the command when they earn an ESWS pin. When I see a Sailor with an ESWS pin, I see a Sailor who is commit ted and who knows what they are doing, said Davis. Contrary to the nick name, ESWS pins are not handed out like candy, according to Davis. Sailors must be able to demonstrate knowledge on more than 450 line items through out the qualification process. That includes col lecting signatures on all said 450 line items from qualified crew members: a written exam: a walk through of every major operation space on the ship, where Sailors have to identify key equip ment and their func tions: a 1st class petty officers board and finally by a Chiefs board. Its very stressful, said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Edjoel Ortiz Martinez, who is pre paring for the 1st class board. Its too much information; its never enough. Ortiz Martinez said, he studies as much as he can during his two six-hour watches a day. Then another two to three hours at night with a study group. It adds up to eight to nine hours a day and hes been doing this for the past month. He has made more than 300 hand written flash cards and taken almost 100 pages of notes, and he is still making more. By the time Sailors hit the Chiefs board, because of the time and effort that it takes to get to that point, they rarely fail, said Davis. Credit goes to the 1st classes for taking pride in the pro gram and providing such a high level of guidance to the ESWS trainees. Right now eight Philippine Sea Sailors have qualified so far on this deployment, said Davis. There will be another nine or 10 in the next month, and that number should grow every month. Its my goal to get as many Sailors we can through the program, said Davis. Its what we owe to our Sailors. Ill be very proud to be able to wear the ESWS pin, said Ortiz Martinez. It will show Ive done something important for myself and my ship. The uniform of a Sailor is more than eye candy; every badge, pin and ribbon has a story to tell. Where a Sailor has served and what they have accomplished is stitched into the fabric. Ask what pin a Sailor is most proud of and nine times out of 10 the Sailor will point to the large sil ver pin of crossed swords and a ship crashing through the waves the ESWS pin. Regardless, the answer will come with a story worth hear ing. -Photo by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattCryptologic Technician (Maintenance) 1st Class Lee Tyo, left, and Machinist's Mate 2nd Class stand at attention in preparation of receiving their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) pin aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.test score, and 1.5 go to the top 25 percent by Performance Mark Average. I believe putting this 25-percent window in place will motivate Sailors, said Stevens. Its not just about pass ing the exam. Its about passing the exam with flying colors. Total PNA points in the FMS are determined from a Sailors last five advancement cycles for a maximum of 15 possible points. Service in Pay Grade has been reduced from seven percent to a weight of one percent of the Final Multiple Score for advancement to E4 through E6. Changes to the Command Advancement Program (CAP) will take effect Oct. 1 for Fiscal Year 2015. The new policy estab lishes the period from July 1 to Sept. 30 as the Navys CAP Season, and that timeframe is the only time that com mands can CAP Sailors. MCPON added that this change is designed to prevent commands from inadvertently over manning ratings by pro moting Sailors after the Navy establishes the quotas needed based on vacancies. By capping first and then building the Navywide advancement exam quotas, we prevent that from happening and allows us to maintain stable rating health, said Stevens. Commands must use their remaining quotas for CAP from the current policy prior to Sept. 30. vide additional weather data, reduce mainte nance cost, improve per formance, and provide digital data to new digi tal automation systems for presentation on air traffic control displays. According to Douget, with the system and technology improvements mean improved reliability. This radar will com pletely digitize the weather picture resolution the air traffic con trollers see, so they warn and steer airplanes out of dangerous weather situations, he said. The complete system will cost over $4 million when the construction is complete. Although the cost of the project seems like a lot, according to Douget, the new radar will save money in the end. The system will make improvements in the picture resolution, but also use less electrical power than the old systems. Douget said. We are going to reduce the overall power consumption for the base and improve the presentation and mission readiness of our air traffic controllers. From Page 1RadarFrom Page 1Advancement 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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USS Roosevelt Celebrates Mothers DayBy MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush Strike Group (CVN 77) Public AffairsSailors took time to honor the mothers aboard USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) with a Mothers Day dinner and presentation hosted by the Junior Enlisted Association on May 11. The dinner highlight ed the importance of mothers everywhere and served as a time to honor the mothers that are serving as crew members of the Roosevelt during her current deployment. We wanted the mothers on board to know that their sacrifice is a valued one, said Cmdr. Jay Clark, commanding officer of USS Roosevelt. It truly takes an extraordinary woman to be both a mother and a United States Sailor. The events included a steak and lobster dinner and a custom Mothers Day cake along with poems and songs per formed by the crew, as well as, cards written to the mothers from the crew thanking them for their service. It is hard, said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Shannon Hendricks. I miss my children immensely, but I take comfort in the fact that I am doing something that they are proud of and understand. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Karina Gasca echoed the same senti ment. It is unimaginably difficult to be apart from your children for many months at a time, she said. However, I remember that I am doing this all for them and that alone makes it all worth it. Roosevelt is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Justin WolpertFire Controlman 2nd Class Shannon Hendricks reads a Mother's Day Card writ ten by the crew aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). -Photo by MC3 Justin WolpertBoatswain's Mate 1st Class Karina Gasca reads a Mother's Day Card written by the crew aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theatre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. Top Chef Competition Held On USS Roosevelt By MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush Strike Group (CVN 77) Public AffairsSailors aboard USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) had the opportunity to partici pate in a Top Chef style competition presented by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation committee. The competition is a contest between Sailors of any rate who want to show off their culinary prowess to the rest of Roosevelts crew who were tasked with judging the meals. Six teams of three or four Sailors were encouraged to utilize Roosevelts galley in order to provide one entre at the ships dinner seating Its a great opportunity to pro mote cohesiveness amongst the crew, said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Jose Arteagaduran. Its a tough competi tion, but lets be honest, its also a great opportunity. The competition was organized to provide the Sailors on board a slight relief from the typical cyclical galley menu. We have had some great dishes from some unexpected competitors said Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramirez. We have had things like blackened catfish with a fruit and cilantro salsa, spicy bread ed chicken poppers, and some brown sugar and apple pork dish; some real great and out-of-the-ordinary dishes. Each team had approximately two hours to prepare an entre. Following the meal preparation, the crew ate and judged the prepared dishes. The deviation from the usual ships faire was refreshing and welcome, said Master at Arms 1st class Joseph Peckfelder. Out of all the dishes the cilantro-garlic strip steak was probably my favorite, but then again, it was so hard to choose. The competition, although still in progress, already has one clear cut win ner: The crew of the Roosevelt who has been treated to different and delicious meals throughout the duration. -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertSenior Chief Culinary Specialist Francisco Ramierz, from El Paso, Texas serves a Sailor during evening meal service aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guidedmissile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security opera tions and theatre security efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 11

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FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and child care is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.May 22, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. May 27, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to identify stress and its causes, how to identify problems asso ciated with prolonged stress, and participants also learn positive ways to deal with stress. May 27, 2014 9-11 a.m., Move.mil Workshop, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 All military ser vice members or mili tary spouses in receipt of PCS, Separation, Retirement or Change of Homeport Certificate orders are encouraged to attend. Please bring a copy of your PCS orders, House Hold Goods power of attor ney, and know the dates you want to request for your Pack-up/Pick-up. May 28, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effec tive independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. May 28-29, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., Resume Writing, Bldg 1, RM 1616 Create an effective resume or improve the one you already have. This workshop will outline the essential infor mation you need to develop a great resume in a competitive job environment. May 29, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. May 29, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Bldg. 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. May 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., FRG Basic Training, Bldg. 1, RM 1616 Training custom ized to fit your FRG, whether the command is starting a group or re-energizing an exist ing group. Discuss the FRG Instruction/policy, leadership structure, communication tech niques, team-building ideas, fundraising guidelines, and ideas for fun activities. May 31, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are applying for. Practice Fire Safety When Grilling OutdoorsFrom First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency ServicesEnjoyment of outdoor grilling and barbecuing is totally understand able. Barbecuing gives food great flavor, its fun, it keeps the kitchen cool, and its a great way to entertain. However, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), in 2007-2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 8,800 home and outside fires. These 8,800 fires caused an annual average of 10 civilian deaths, 140 civilian injuries and $96 million in direct property of the home structure fires involving grills started on a courtyard, terrace the home outdoor fires in which grills fires, the fire started when a flammable or combustible gas or liquid caught fire. should only be used outdoors. from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. the grill area. grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill. Charcoal grills charcoal ready to use. Charcoal chim ney starters allow you to start the char coal using newspaper as a fuel. charcoal starter fluid. Never add char coal fluid or any other flammable liq uids to the fire. of children and away from heat sourc es. starters, which do not use fire. Be sure to use an extension cord for outdoor use. the coals completely cool before dis posing in a metal container. Propane grills leaks before using it for the first time each year. A light soap and water solu tion applied to the hose will quickly reveal escaping propane by releasing bubbles. gas leak by smell or the soapy bubble test and there is no flame: -Turn off the propane tank and grill. -If the leak stops, get the grill ser viced by a professional before using it again. -If the leak does not stop, call the fire department. immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill. buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside. For additional information on Fire Safety contact the Fire Prevention Office at 270-5647 x1421 or x1404. Keeping Up Appearances-Photo by Paige GnannLSSN Chantise Daniel and OS3 Kylee Rivera polish the brass on a steer ing stand displayed on the quarterdeck of Building One. The wheel belonged to USS John W. Weeks (DD 701), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer that was in service during World War II up until 1970. Memorial Day At Beaches Vet ParkFrom Beaches Veterans AssociationThis Memorial Day, May 26, the Beaches Veterans will salute their fallen Comrades with wreaths presented by various veterans organi zations in their memory starting at 2 p.m.. They will also recog nize the Terry Parker; First Coast high schools Junior ROTC Cadets, future leaders and vet erans of our Armed Forces, who will per form their Drill Team exhibitions beginning at 2 p.m. Additionally, the Fletcher High School Band Ensemble will entertain with patriotic music. During the pro gram, the Sandalwood AFROTC Team will explain and demonstrate the proper folding of our National Standard. Guest speaker this year is Congressman Ander Crenshaw. New GI Bill Comparison ToolFrom Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsThe Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a new website which makes it easier For Sailors trying to decide how to best use their Post-9/11 GI Bill to cal culate benefits and learn more about approved colleges, universities and other training programs. The GI Bill Comparison Tool website -http://benefits. va.gov/gibill/compari son provides key infor mation about college affordability and brings together information from more than 17 dif ferent online sources and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA benefits at each school. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a comprehensive edu cation benefit created by Congress in 2008. In general, veterans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001 are eligible. For more information about GI Bill programs, visit: http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ career/education/GIBill/ Pages/default.aspx 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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From Page 2RecordsWe used to be so good together. You comforted me. You made me happy. I loved you... But after all these years, Ive become too depen dent. I want you too much, and I now realize, its just not healthy. I need to strike out on my own and try new things. Its not you, its me Carbohydrates, Im breaking up with you. In the early days, I couldnt foresee how addicting our relation ship would become. I didnt fear our love affair, because I believed the science of the 1990s, which decreed that low fat carbs were healthy fuel for my body. I was so naive, igno rantly indulging in second helpings of sticky rice, snacking on crackers, and adding a hunk of ciabatta bread alongside my pasta. Oh, the ciabatta bread! When I gained weight, I never blamed you. I thought cheese, meat, butter, cream and nuts were my enemies. As long as I didnt put mayo or cheese on my sandwich, it was health food. As long as I ladled red sauce on my spaghetti, it was good for me. As long as I used skim milk a bowl of cereal, a glass of juice and a butter less slice of toast was the perfect breakfast. What a fool I was! When I married a Navy man, you didnt leave me. In fact, our threesome was quite happy in an open relationship. Together, you and I won my new husbands heart, and his stomach, too. While stationed in Monterey, California, you introduced us to the wiles of sourdough we felt so naughty as we loaded chowder into your bread bowls. While stationed in England, you never told us that the baked beans the English dollop on their breakfast plates, pour over their toast, and glob on their baked potatoes were as bad as the scones, bis cuits and puddings. Excess glucose surged through our blood while we were stationed in Germany, as we washed pretzels, noo dles and potatoes down with wheaty beers and sweet wines. In the South, we were so busy avoid ing fried chicken, sau sage gravy and bacon fat, we didnt notice that you were secretly feeding our addiction with sweet tea, sticky barbecue sauce, and starchy corn bread. Worst of all, I could never seem to resist the chocolate with which you regularly seduced me. How could you smugly stand by while I wallowed in guilt over the fat con tent? Little did I know, your sugar was the culprit all along! You betrayed me, and as hard as it is for me to say this, its over. Sure, you will always be a part of my life, but Im ready to explore the rest of the food pyramid. The rotisserie chickens with their crisp skins, the creamy camembert cheeses, the olive oils, the avocados, and the bacon ... the glorious bacon! I dont mean to hurt you, but there are a lot more fish (like salmon with a gener ous slathering of creamy dill sauce) in the sea. When we do run into each other, I hope we can be civil. I wont rudely turn away from you on special occasions (espe cially if you come in the form of homemade maca roni and cheese with but tered breadcrumbs on top), but lets keep our contact to a minimum. Of course, the kids will still want to have you around, but during scheduled visi tations, please keep your high fructose corn syrup to yourself. One last thing before you go. If, by chance, I should have a moment of weakness over, lets say, a bag of Hershey Kisses with Almonds during a hormone spike, I can tell you right now that it will be a nothing more than a meaningless fling. So long, Carbohydrates. Its been nice knowing you. Get more whit and wis dom at www.themeatand potatoesoflife.com Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFE VCNO Howard To Speak At Midway DinnerFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine din ing and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below din ner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are manda tory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast. net. in Florida for the first time or entering after having been absent from a school for more than 12 months or one school year. You have up to one year prior to entering the Florida school sys tem in which to obtain the school entry health exam. A certificate of immu nization (form DH 680) is also a requirement for all children in grades kindergarten through 12th grade for entry and attendance in Florida schools. The form is valid until the child enters seventh grade, at which time a new form will be issued when additional immu nization requirements are met. If you have already met these requirements, you can take your doc umentation to Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport, to have the records trans ferred to the appro priate Florida form NBHS Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities locat ed across Florida and Georgia. Additional information you should have with you at time of enrollment includes the following: Proof of home address Duval requires 2 proofs. Kindergarten and First Grade Students: certified birth record. Acceptable birth records include the following: record; Certificate of Baptism; the childs life that has been in force for at least two years; by parent and signed by a public health official; of arrival in the United States indicating the age of the child; or with record of age in the childs school, stating the DOB. Academic Records: When a child has been enrolled in another school district, par ents are asked to provide the latest report card from that district and transcript if appli cable. Most schools will accept an unofficial record (a hand-carried report card, for example) for registration, but the school will then request official records from the previous school as indi cated earlier in the arti cle. Ive received many calls and emails this past month from parents who have just moved to the Jacksonville area or who will be arriving sometime during the summer or even the fall. While most children and their families get excited about moving to a new community because it is an opportunity to start afresh, make new friends, explore differ ent scenery, and maybe get your own bedroom, a move can be filled with anxiety. Children have left friends and will be starting in a new school. Most of the students in this school have already formed friendships. They may even know the teacher. Your child is worried about Who will be my teacher? Who will I sit with at lunch? Will I have to ride a bus? These are common questions you are probably going to hear over and over this summer. While you may be concerned about housing, a job, and new clothes due to a climate change, your children are worried about school and right now Who am I going to play or do things with? When can we go to the beach? I am bored what can I do? Totally preventing moving anxiety may not be possible, but attempts to do so can benefit all in the family not just the children. Consider three key elements: reli ability, routine, and rela tionships. By promoting these three elements, youll experience a more positive move for every one. When parents trust the move, you will send a positive message to children about the good place they have moved to and the good people, and especially, the school here in Jax. Your feeling of reliability will be transferred to your children, helping them to feel confident about the move and the school experience. It is easy to distrust the unknown, so reliabil ity should be developed through familiarity and a pattern of helpful response. If you didnt have time before you left your last base, have your chil dren now go online to learn about NS Mayport on Facebook, their new school at www. duvalschools.org, and what has been going on there like athletics, clubs, grade level activi ties. They can also check out the happenings in and around town and the beach at www.coj.net. If your child is too young to do an internet research, you can help. Finding out the start and end times, cost of the lunch, sports schedules, and clubs available will pro vide information to ease the transition. Routine is another key element to reducing anxiety because it pro vides structure to the childrens day and secu rity in knowing what to expect. Even though it is almost summer and a time when most sched ules just fly out of the window, consider having a summer routine. Establish a bed time and a waking up sched ule followed by some jobs which will help you to get moved in. If your children are really young, maybe they can help with removing all that paper from the packing. Be inventive so they feel a part of this exciting experience! Relationship-building does not have to wait until the start of school. The Youth Sponsorship Program coordina tor at the Youth Center (904) 270-5680 can provide names of stu dents at the new school who would be willing to become email bud dies. Or once you are here, have your chil dren try out the activi ties at the Youth Activity Center on base at NS Mayport. You can access their Activity Calendar online at Facebook.com/ mwrmayport. That is a great way to make new friends. Knowing some one before school starts can relieve some of the anxiety about who will I know or who will sit with me at lunch? Positive communica tion and continuing to establish reliability, rou tine, and relationships will ensure a happier less anxious summer. For more information, go to Military OneSource is a useful resource for relocation information, child care, and help with child or teenager with special needs. Access the service at 800.342.9647 or at www.militaryone source.com. Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC): MCEC ( www.militarychild.org) is a non-profit, worldwide organization which identifies the challenges facing the highly mobile military child. Military Teens on the Move: This pro gram is supported by the Department of Defense and available at http:// dod.mil/mtom. This website is designed to provide relocation and outreach support to military youth ages 6-18. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. and Recreation fund to benefit crewmembers. Getting this award is a huge honor to the crew of USS New York and all who have served on her. It is a reflection of the dedication, determi nation and hard work of every Sailor and Marine on board. This shows that we are ready for any task and any mission that can be given to us, said Operation Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Woelky, New Yorks MWR president. The stipend that we receive for this award will go into our MWR fund and will be used anywhere from gym equipment to command functions and competitions. The Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award was established in 1917 by the New York Tribune Association. The fund was initiated by a letter from 13-year-old Marjorie Sterrett in February 1916. Marjorie, who lived in Brooklyn, contributed her weekly allowance of a dime to Help build a battleship for Uncle Sam. Prior to World War II, income from this fund was used to pay prizes annu ally to turret and gun crews making the high est scores in short-range battle practice, and sub marine crews making the highest scores in torpedo firing. It is now used to recognize those ships which display battle effi ciency and emphasize readiness and fitness of the ship. It is pretty amazing that a 13 year old girl would give her allowance to build a battleship. If she were alive today, Im sure Marjorie would be incredibly proud to know of the impact she has had on our Navy. I bet she would be equally proud to know USS New York, a ship named for her home state, has won her namesake award, said Capt. Christopher Brunett, New Yorks commanding officer. The crew of New York take their service very seriously and never forget the brave men and women we are sworn to defend. They worked extremely hard for this award and I couldnt be prouder of them.From Page 1USS New York THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, May 22, 2014 13

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