Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
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Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00344


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CHINFO Award Winner SAVE A LIFENS Mayport Blood Drive On April 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1. For more info, redcrossblood.org Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Gettysburg Back After 9 MonthsSee Story and More Photos, Pages 4-5COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt Welcomes New COFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe former director of theater engagement for U.S. Southern Command assumed the respon sibilities of commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and commander, U.S. 4th Fleet on April 17 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center here. Rear Adm. George W. Ballance replaced Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, who will become the vice director for operations on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet are responsible for U.S. naval forces in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility, which includes Central and South America and the Caribbean Sea. Marine Gen. John F. Kelly, the commander of U.S. Southern Command, served as the presid ing officer for the ceremony. I believe Sincs greatest accomplishment while com manding NAVSO has been his commitment to building partnerships with naval forces through out the region, said Marine Gen. John Kelly, commander, U.S. Southern Command. The presence of representatives from Colombia, Brazil, Chile, and Peru at todays ceremony is a testament to the importance of those partnerships, which are critical for the United States and the region alike. Ballance, a Navy Reservist, has served as vice commander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, as direc tor of U.S. 6th Fleets Maritime Partnership Program, and as deputy commander of U.S. 7th Fleet. He is the 13th commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command since it was estab lished in 1942 and the fifth commander of U.S. 4th Fleet since it was re-established in 2008. Vice Admiral Robin Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve, commander of Navy Reserve Force was in attendance as the senior Navy official. Its the partnerships and rela tionships with military and political leaders throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as your innovation, vision, and charismatic leadership, that make you larger than life and so deserving of the high esteem in which you are held. Your efforts here have directly supported the CNOs Global Maritime Partnership Initiative. Harris thanked Kelly and Braun for their support, and offered congratulations to what he described as a few of our great partners in South America. The courage and sacrifices of the people of Colombia as they close out their 50-year struggle against armed revolutionaries is phenomenal, and the nations execution of the maritime exer cise UNITAS last year was inspiring, he said. He also praised the Chileans, Peruvians and Brazilians for their professionalism, partnership and leadership. Brazil has been leading inter national naval forces off the coast of Lebanon for several years and participated in Obangame Express, an exercise conducted by U.S. Naval Forces Africa. Your leadership role amongst See NAVSO, Page 7 Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (left) shakes hands with Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris after assuming command April 17 during the change of command ceremony held aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeLogistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer partici pates in a drunk driving simulation with Save a Life Tour Manager Andrew Tipton during a presentation at Naval Station Mayport. Save a Life Tour works towards reducing the number of unsafe driving incidents involving military personnel. Save A Life Teaches Safe Driving To SailorsBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Center East, Detachment SoutheastDistracted driving can pose a deadly threat. The Naval Station Mayport command took a step in the right direc tion to help eliminate this problem when they hosted the Save a Life Tour (SALT) on April 17. The SALT, (operated by Kramer Edutainment and based out of Grand Rapids, Michigan) is a National High Impact Alcohol Awareness and Distracted Driving Program. The tour visits military bases, schools and other institutions in order to inform and educate on the deadly effects of drinking and distrac tive driving. I think there is kind of a distinction from a prevention program, because it is awareness, said Andrew Tipton, the Save a Life Tour Manager. Just mak ing people aware of the consequences of [drunk driving], and not just saying dont do it ... making sure that people are See Save A Life, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer ....................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Homecomings Are Microcosm Of LifeThis past Friday week many of us celebrated with the Gettysburg crew and their families a wonderful homecoming after an incredibly successful ly 9-month deployment. There have been other homecomings in recent months as well, but this one gave me a flashback of my own homecoming on USS The Sullivans on Dec. 23 last year, two days before Christmas. And so Gettysburg returned on Good Friday, two days before the great Christian holi day of Easter. All homecomings are special, but coming home a few days before a special holiday like Christmas or Easter just makes it all the more amazing. So, what is it about homecomings that make them so special? Well, everyone has their own reasons that they could put on the top of the list which make these occa sions so special. At the top of my list is that it is the culmina tion of all the hard work, sacrifice, and separation during the months of deployment in one huge day of reunification with all that we love so dearly. This theme of sacri fice followed by rejoicing hits home for all of us because it is the nature of life this side of glory. Life is full of hardship and sacrifice that we all know too well in the Navy. Not only deployments, but we also have the hardships of life faced on a daily basis the death of a loved one, frustra tions at work, marriage struggles, financial struggles, health strug gles, and I could go on and on. But all of these struggles are side by side with moments of intense joy as well. Our bodies often heal, we get a pay raise, we witness the birth of a child, and we celebrate marriages together. We sing Christmas songs around the fire and spend Easter Sunday worshiping our Lord. Suffering and Joy, this is the drumbeat of life. And so homecomings are really a microcosm for life, only intensified beyond measure. They remind us of all the other sacrifices and struggles and give us hope that they too can be worked through. They give us hope that there is victory over all the pain of life. And yet, as sweet as homecoming from deployment is, it is but a shadow of the ulti mate homecoming. For Christians that ultimate homecoming is not Easter Sunday, but the day of Christs return when all things will be made right, when death will have no more vic tory, when separation from God and from each other will be at an end, when there will be no more pain and no more suffering but only joy, peace and eternal hap piness in the Lord for ever. The sufferings of Good Friday are followed by the victory of Easter Sunday. Thank you to all those Gettysburg sailors and families who sacri ficed so much these past 9 months and more. Thank you for allow ing me to witness your homecoming. Thank you for reminding me of the ultimate homecoming in Glory. Welcome home shipmates! CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry CenterHow Do I Get Help For My Special Needs Child. .From The School District?Last week my article emphasize that to get help for your special needs child, you must become an advocate for him. I reminded you that you are a natural advo cate for your child. You were his first teacher, his most important role model, and you have his best interests at heart! Because you will be involved with your child for life, you need to be an active participant in planning his education. After learning in last weeks article about Navy Child and Youth Programs Spec Ed Connection, you now have to identify what is available at your childs school and from the district to support his special needs. You will need to gather information about the processes used to make the decisions about your child and who are the people making these decisions. Who are the specific individuals in your childs school and at the district office you will work with to secure those services designed to meet your childs special needs? Since your child is entitled to an appropriate education, not the best education, nor an education that will maximize your childs potential, you must know these individuals, the pro cesses, and the State and Federal laws, especially The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. What do you currently know about your childs disability and educational history? Remember, the district only has to provide an appropriate education. Your main goal is to ensure that your child is provided with special educa tion and related services [which are] designed to meet [the childs] unique needs and prepare them for further educa tion, employment, and independent living 20U.S.C. 1400(d). You will not be able to determine if what they are offering is appropriate if you dont know what has been tried before, whether it worked or not, and if it worked, how well. Another important goal involves build ing a healthy working relationship with the school staff. Because you will be working with the school staff to design or revise your childs Individualized Educational Program (IEP), you will need your knowledge of spe cial education law, his disability, and his edu cational history. By maintaining a cordial relationship with school personnel, you will find them more willing to listen to your concerns, to discuss issues, and to craft accommoda tions which specifically address your childs needs, resulting in that appropriate education for your child. Are you the only one advocating for your child? Absolutely not! Teachers, school staff, and school-and districtbased administrators are available to provide support to you and your child. But as you know, schools and district spe cial education depart ments are woefully understaffed. They will evaluate your child and make recommendations to you about educational services. However, these evaluations and result ing recommendations will vary from school to school and from individual to individual as the educational background and training of these individuals is quite varied. A lay advocate can also advocate for your child. These individu als use their specialized knowledge and expertise to help parents resolve problems with schools. They can attend meet ings with you, help you craft letters, negotiate for services, and advise you about your legal rights and responsibilities. If this service sounds like what you need to get help for your special needs child, contact me at the email or phone below for information about local lay advocates. Another individu al who can help is the Exceptional Family Member Program Liaison (EFMP) at your installation. If you have a special needs child with a current IEP, you should be enrolled in EFMP. Jose Sanchez, EFMP Liaison NS Mayport, has as his role to tion of EFMP enrollment forms; with resource referrals, educational programs, and consultation; on Tricare Extended Healthcare Option (ECHO); tary programs, medical facilities, and community agencies to create a net work of support for each EFMP family; and networking and social opportunities within their area. Joses office is located in Building One (FFSC) and he can be reached at (904) 270-6600 x1713 or by email at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. KNOWINGTHE ROPESA Refreshed Refrig Is Better Than A Face LiftDespite the fact that Old Man Winter has been stalking some areas of our country, freez ing the poor pansies and keeping northern ers ensconced in wool, spring really has sprung. In keeping with the seasons theme of rebirth, this is the time of year when we are supposed to experience renewal. For fortysome things like me, this usu ally does not mean get ting a chin lift or booking a trip to visit the Dalai Lama. Generally, the revival that we encounter comes in the form of, yep, you guessed it, Spring Cleaning. But before I lift the couch cushions to reveal $3.96 in coins, two ballpoint pens, the DVD clicker we lost two moves ago, and a veritable snack mix of old popcorn, fuzzy gummy bears, stale peanuts and pulverized goldfish crackers.... Before I pull the bed away from the wall to discover a dust bunny large enough to knit into a size 12 cardigan sweater and a pair of knee socks.... Before I rummage through our closets to fill thrift store donation bags with flared jeans, Christmas pajamas, and those silly-looking shape up shoes.... Before all that, I real ly must tackle the most important job first: The Refrigerator. Despite its per fect chill of 36 degrees Fahrenheit, I know there are food items lurking in the back that are no longer edible. These items were forgotten months ago, remaining hidden behind the OJ and the leftover pot roast. In order to eliminate these phantoms of the fridge, its necessary to empty the whole thing out. I usually begin with the freezer. Hoping to find a forgotten casse role dish of coq au vin to cook for dinner, I usu ally end up with a dozen or so brownish bricks Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officerof unidentifiable meat encased in unlabeled storage bags. When I threw them in the freezer, I thought the contents would be obvi ous, but thanks to a thick layer of frost, I cant tell a turkey leg from a hamburger patty. After I reject the idea of licking each brick to determine the contents, I hedge my best guess, running the risk that I might end up inadvertently cooking Ham Hock Sloppy Joes or Rump Roast Noodle Soup. Next, I clear out the small shelves on the refrigerator door. For some unknown reason, items such as jelly jars, bottles of dressing, con tainers of mustard, and jars of pickles tend breed and multiply here. I usually have to take a deep breath, and tell myself that the world will not implode if I throw out the almost empty jar of Apricot spread, or the bottle of Catalina dress ing I used a quarter cup of for a recipe last sum mer. Moving to the main refrigerator shelves, I like to keep an eye out for things that are so old, they could be mis taken for something else. For example, expired feta looks just like bleu See Refrigerator, Page 3

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cheese. Expired sour cream mimics small curd cottage cheese, but smells like dirty feet. And interestingly, expired apple juice that makes a pffzzzt sound when the cap is opened has the same effect as tequila when ingested. After a quick poke in the lunchmeat drawer to remove any slippery slices of iridescent pas trami, I usually move on to the vegetable crispers. As anyone who has ever grabbed for a cucumber only to find a log of slimy mush knows, this area of the fridge can be a challenge to even the stron gest constitution. Rusty lettuce, milky tomatoes, shriveled apples and blackened cauliflower florets are only a few of the delicacies waiting to trigger a gag reflex. Once all the odifer ous offenders have been removed from our refrigerator, I give it a good scrub with some disin fectant, pop open a fresh box of baking soda and head off to the commis sary for replacement vittles. Considering that our military family budget does not include funds for cosmetic surgery or spiritual pilgrimages, a refreshed refrigerator is our best rendition of spring renewal. Get more whit and wisdom at www.theme atandpotatoesoflife.comFrom Page 2RefrigeratorMayport Chaplain Prepares Comalapa Sailors For EasterBy GM2(SW) Camille PerezCooperative Security Location Comalapa Public AffairsA chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., provided personal support April 9 and April 10 to Sailors deployed to Cooperative Security Location Comalapa Cmdr. Steven Souders, the director of the Commander, Surface Forces Atlantic Ministry Center at Mayport, sup plied Sailors and civil ians with the opportunity to receive one-on-one counseling April 9 and held a nondenomina tional service April 10. Because a chaplain would not be present the following week, he touched on a number of Easter-related themes. Having Chaplain Souders provide services and counsel ing to us here at the CSL is greatly appreciated, said Charles Mooradian, a contractor with DynCorp. Spiritual health is as important as physical and mental health, and he takes care of that aspect for us. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez accompanied the chaplain to Comalapa, reviewing quality-of-life and other improvement projects. Senior Chief Sergio Moreno, the command senior chief of CSL Comalapa, said Tellez has always considered the well-being of Sailors a priority. Having him here, seeing the great job the Sailors are doing, and seeing all the new quality of life programs imple mented and complet ed, lets him leave here assured that his Sailors are being taken care of, Moreno said. Cooperative Security Location Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and operational support to forward deployed U.S. and partner nation aviation units participating in Joint Interagency Task Force South assigned counter-illicit traffick ing operations, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian missions, and search-and-rescue efforts. -Photo by GM2 Camille PerezSailors and civilians from Cooperative Security Location Comalapa El Salvador and VP-8 bow their heads during religious services while Cmdr. Steven Souders, a chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., leads them in prayer. Because a chaplain would not be present the following week, Souders touched on a number of Easter-related themes. Utilitiesman 1st Class Eric Gonzalez receives com munion during religious services provided by Cmdr. Steven Souders, a chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Cmdr. Odin Klug, the commanding officer of Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, is next in line. Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 USS Gettysburg Returns To NS Mayport After 9 Month DeploymentBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) returned home to Naval Station Mayport, April 18, marking the completion of a nine-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility (AOR). Gettysburg was deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. This deployment boils down to mission suc cess through hard work and amazing achieve ment from the crew each and everyday, said Capt. Brad Cooper, commanding officer, USS Gettysburg. The crews performance was truly extraordinary and we look forward to this time as Sailors reunite with family, friends and loved ones. Over the course of the deployment, Gettysburg accomplished more than 17,000 in-flight checkins as an air regional defense commander, conducted joint opera tions with the French Navys Charles de Gaulle Carrier Strike Group, received the Golden Anchor Award and the Unit Tactics Award, and qualified more than 150 Sailors as enlisted surface warfare specialists. Gettysburg was also the recipient of the 2013 calendar year Battle E award for demonstrating superior performance in an operational envi ronment and sustained overall warfare readiness. Gettysburg was one of five ships in the Atlantic Fleet to win all five categories of the Battle E in addition to receiving the Green H award for Force Health and Wellness. Our accomplishments during deployment indi cate the level of positive influence that our lead ership has displayed, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker. I am incredibly proud of the crew and the high level of success they achieved for the command and for their own personal careers. Helicopter Maritime -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySonar Technician Surface 2nd Class Michael Velsor greets his wife, Michelle Velsor, with the traditional first kiss after the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) to Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergLt. j.g. Collin Roof, from Paducah, Ky., embraces his wife Kayla Roof and son Barrett Roof (18 months old) after the return of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) to Mayport, Fla. from a nine-month deployment. Gettysburg was a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.See Gettysburg, Page 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor aboard the USS Gettysburg (CG 64) holds his baby for the first time after returning to Naval Station Mayport aboard the guided-missile cruiser following a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64) receives a kiss after the guided-missile cruiser returned to Naval Station Mayport following a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5 From Page 4GettysburgAttack Squadron (HSM 74) Det. 2, embarked on board Gettysburg, successfully completed more than 1,800 flight hours and more than 2,000 safe deck landings dur ing the deployment. My expectations for the aircrew were high at the beginning of deployment and they were able to surpass them throughout deployment, said Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, detachment offi cer in charge. We came together as a team and were able to accomplish many firsts as a crew. It was through hard work and strict attention to detail that allowed us to reach our marks The holiday seasons proved eventful for Gettysburg as well. In November 2013, Gettysburg hosted a Thanksgiving Day visit from the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/ NAC) Mike Stevens. In December 2013, the crew hosted a visit from the non-profit organiza tion Operation Gratitude who presented their onemillionth care package to Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Brooke Oekerman. Now that deployment has come to an end, the crew is looking for ward to spending time back home and sharing experiences with family members. This was my first deployment and it allowed me to experience new things while learn ing about myself, my ship and the Navy, said Quartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Marlesha Parker. Im happy about all the knowledge and expe riences I have gained, but Im also happy to be heading home. I look forward to time with my family and Im excited to share with them all I have learned and have seen while deployed.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA little boy waves his American flags as family and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Sailor, Logistics Specialist Seaman Carolina Ortega hugs her father, Javier Ortega, after the guided-missile cruiser returned to Naval Station Mayport following a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. As a member of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, Gettysburg helped provide a wide range of flexible capabilities, including maritime security operations, expeditionary power projection, forward naval presence, crisis response, sea control, deterrence, counter-terrorism, information operations, theater security cooperation and counter proliferation. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64) man the rails as the guided-missile cruiser returns to Naval Station Mayport after a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) return to Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brooke Oekerman receives the keys at Naval Station Mayport for her brand new Ford F150 she won while deployed aboard the USS Gettysburg (CG 64) when she became the 1,000,000th Operation Gratitude care package recipient. Operation Gratitude is an organization that seeks to lift spirits and meet the evolving needs of our Active Duty and Veteran communities, and provide volunteer opportunities for all Americans to express their appreciation to members of the Military.

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Taylor Finishes Repairs, Returns To FleetFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), home ported in Mayport, Fla., successfully completed post-repair sea trials, April 21. Taylor was operat ing in the Black Sea when she ran aground in Samsun, Turkey, Feb. 12, damaging the ships propeller hub assem bly. Taylor was towed to Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, to complete replacements of the propeller blades and hub. The sea trials helped Taylors crew assess whether the ship was ready to return to operations, measuring the vessels performance, general seaworthiness, speed and maneuverability, while testing equipment and safety features. Taylor is continuing her scheduled deploy ment in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. The ship returned to the Black Sea on April 22 to promote peace and sta bility in the region. This will include support ing maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts, establishing and enhancing cooperation, and mutual training and interoperability with regional partner nations and NATO allies. U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts a full range of maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation missions in concert with allied, joint, and inter agency partners in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergThe Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) returns to her homeport of Naval Station Mayport following a fire that occurred on board April 14, 2014. There were no injuries to the crew and the ship continued to operate under her own power. USS Hu City ReturnsSoldier Reenlists Aboard USS HalyburtonFrom USS Halyburton Public Affairs A soldier assigned to the 189th Military Police Company at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, reenlisted on the flight deck of USS Halyburton (FFG 40) while the ship was pier side April 9. Staff Sgt. Christopher Cluts reenlisted in the presence of Halyburton Sailors, naval station residents and fellow MPs. Cluts, who has a brother in the Air Force, said he chose to hold the ceremony on a ship to honor their grandfather, Harry Keith Cluts, who served in the Navy during the Korean War. Every day, our Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines sacrifice time away from our families to defend our nation against all enemies; for eign and domestic, said Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander, the command master chief of the Halyburton. It was an honor to host Cluts as he contin ued his family legacy, Friedlander said. Halyburton visited Guantanamo Bay to resupply and complete voyage repairs. The stop also gave crew members a well-deserved break from their 2014 deploy ment to the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility in support of Operation Martillo. Martillo, Spanish for hammer, is an inter agency and international operation that includes 14 countries committed to a regional approach against the movement by transnational crimi nal organizations of illicit cargo in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime secu rity operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperabil ity, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy. mil/local/cusns/. -Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Kameren Guy HodnettArmy Staff Sgt. Christopher Cluts receives a command coin from Cmdr. David Fowler, the commanding officer of USS Halyburton (FFG40), following his reenlistment aboard the ship at Guantanamo Bay. Halyburton is deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility in support of counter illicit trafficking operations. Bringing the hospital to the poor... Provided as a public service. CFC ParticipantBringing the hospital to the worlds poor 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Torpedo Away On USS Roosevelt -Photos by MC2 Justin WolpertSailors recover a MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo during an exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Sailors recover an MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo during an exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). An exercise MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo is launched from the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as part of the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. our partners is highly valued, specifically in a region Brazil under stands so well, Harris said. We stand to learn much from you. Harris, who arrived in Mayport in 2012, previously served as commanding officer of Amphibious Squadron 4 and the Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Strike Group during humanitarian assis tance and disaster relief operations following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and dur ing the noncombatant emergency evacuations of Lebanon in 2006. He also commanded Expeditionary Strike Group 5, providing disaster relief during the Pakistan floods of 2010, and served as director of the Navys Irregular Warfare Office on the staff of the chief of naval operations. He joked that he wasnt in a hurry to give up Floridas sunshine and his easy commute. But there is more than that Im sorry for, Harris said. For instance, he wont be present for the tran sit of the future USS America (LHA 6) around South America this summer; nor for the likely return of USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) on a Continuing Promise mission next year. Hell miss the transi tion to the era of the Littoral Combat Ship, the Joint High Speed Vessel and patrol craft and hell miss something even bigger, he said. As our relationship continues to deepen in the hemisphere, I truly believe that a combined maritime force will one day come to fruition, as no nation can afford to protect the sea lanes alone, and we are all inextricably tied togeth er, Harris said. From Canada to Chile, we have shared values and con cerns that we have seen demonstrated in our exercises and operations for over 50 years.From Page 1NAVSO THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7

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HSM-40 Sailors Support Mayport CDCBy Lt. Timothy GrantHSM-40Twenty Sailors from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 40 (HSM-40) car ried out a community relations project on April 3 at the Child Development Center (CDC) located just off base near the Naval Station Mayport, assisting with a wide range of projects from general cleanup of the playgrounds to assembling furniture. The group found some time on that Thursday afternoon after the Squadrons Change of Command to meet at the CDC parking lot. After checking in with the CDC staff, the group divided into teams to tackle the various projects. Two of the teams armed with blowers and power washers proceeded to clear the playgrounds of tree debris and pollen, as well as wipe down playground equipment. Another team broke off and attended to the front entrance flower beds, weeds had taken over and were winning the fight. Sailors helped defeat the unwanted plant life and made the entrance a bit more invit ing for the little girls and boys going to and from the facility. Another critical project completed by a team was furni ture assembly, particularly the facilitys rocking chairs. The last team organized the toy shed. Fortunately for the children that frequent the CDC, there is no shortage of toys and activities. The challenge for the team was find ing a place for all the tricycles, balls, cones, bricks, carts, and hula hoops. The most rewarding part about working with the CDC is that many families of HSM40 have children who go there regularly. thinking about the fact that it doesnt just affect them. The multi-million dol lar simulator is designed to provide a realistic experience of what it is like to drive a car under the influence of alcohol. It consists of three tele vision screens (to simu late panoramic vision), a car seat, pedals, steering wheel, and other realistic motor vehicle controls. The simula tor runs using advanced software meant to recre ate the impaired faculties of a drunk driver. The reactions in the steer ing and pedals of the car are delayed, which is designed to simu late the slowed reaction time of a drunk driver. It gives people a chance to drive drunk from a sober perspective, said Tipton. We get people to realize how much focus and concentration it actually takes to try to control a car, especially when they have these delayed reactions they are fighting. Another modern prob lem people have today is the dangerous situa tion of texting and driving. Most everyone in the modern era basically lives through the use of smart phones. The program also has a simulator to show the effects this dangerous habit has. The program asks people to answer a text message while operating a vehicle at aver age to high speeds. Most who went through the simulator found out how dangerous and reckless their driving became when they are concen trating on answering a text message and not the road. Many came to the conclusion that no text message is important enough that cannot wait until you are parked to answer. It is a real eye open ing experience said Logistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer. It is a great program to make you aware of the effects of distractive driving. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) describes three differ ent types of distractions while driving: manual or taking hands off the steering wheel; visual, taking eyes off the road; and cognitive, taking the mind off of driving. Texting has become the key target for safe ty advocates because it includes all three types in one act. According to Tipton, The SALT strives to make a difference and hopefully raises aware ness of the dangers of distracted driving. The biggest message we want to stress is dont drink and drive and dont be distracted when you are behind the wheel, Tipton said. Take responsibility for your actions. Operations Specialist 1st Class Quincey Jackson participates in a distracted driving simulation with Save a Life Tour Manager Andrew Tipton during a presentation at Naval Station Mayport. Save a Life Tour works towards reducing the number of unsafe driving incidents involving military personnel. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeLogistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer participates in a drunk driving simulation during a presentation by Save a Life Tour at Naval Station Mayport.From Page 1Save A Life -Photos courtesy of HSM-40Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Betuel Fuentes, Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Clas Douglas Link, and Senior Chief Aviation Electricians Mate Rebecca Leathers cleaning up the tree debris. Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Gabrielle Malone and Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Keith Hermiston pulling weeds. Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Simeon Santo feeling like a kid again and in the background is Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Jennifer Contreras, Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Quentin Kennedy and Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Ihosvany Diaz cleaning playground equipment.Free Admission, More For Military At THE PLAYERSFrom THE PLAYERS ChampionshipOne of the premier golfing events in the world, THE PLAYERS Championship, is returning to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida from May 6-11, 2014 and will be honoring the militarys men and women. Among other militaryspecific activities, all military personal and their dependents will receive complimentary admis sion to the tournament all week. In 2013, THE PLAYERS issued 21,000 complimentary military tickets. THE PLAYERS also offers discounted admission to veterans. Country music star and Florida native, Jake Owen, will perform on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 as part of the tournaments Military Appreciation Day. Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost: Opening on Wednesday, May 7 at 9 a.m., all active duty, Reserve and retired military person nel and their dependents will have access to the Patriots Outpost, a hospitality tent exclu sively for the military which offers complimentary food, beverages and activities. Military Job Fair at THE PLAYERS: Taking place on Saturday, May 3 at the Patriots Outpost from 12 to 3 p.m., all active duty, reserve, retired, veterans, and military spouses can attend the third annual job fair free of charge, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition. The fair will offer informa tion on local educational institutions with veter ans programs, career counseling and resumewriting assistance. Operation Shower: Taking place on Monday, May 5 from 10 a.m. to noon, THE PLAYERS and Birdies for the Brave will partner with Operation Shower to host a group baby shower for 30 military momsto-be whose husbands are deployed members of the U.S. Navy. The event will feature Operation Showers signature Showers-In-A-Box gifts of high-quality products for the moms and babies that will be provided by sponsors and donors. For more about com plimentary admission, please go to PGATOUR. COM/THE PLAYERS and click on ticket link for instructions to gain complimentary access to the tournament. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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USS Philippine Sea Turns Up The HeatStory/photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaConsidering what is about to happen, there are an awful lot of smiles amongst the group of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Sailors. Perhaps its nervous anticipation. Maybe its denial; it couldnt possi bly be as bad as everyone says it is, could it? Not everybody is smiling though, and the truth of the situation is reflected in those faces. Red cheeks drained to white, beads of sweat collecting at the brow, and thou sand-yard stares looking well beyond the impending dread that lay immediately before them. One of the smiley ones is up first. You are about to be exposed to a level one contamination, booms the instructor, Gunners Mate 1st Class Nicholas Christman. Do you understand? Yes, escapes through a clenched smile. Turn around, close your eyes and when you are ready turn back around keeping your eyes closed, instructs Christman. Like an impressionist changing characters the Sailor turns away, takes a deep breath, and then turns back. O-C! O-C! O-C! Christman makes it ver bally clear what is hitting the Sailor in the face. Now open your eyes. Tell me how many fin gers Im holding up. There is a split second pause; a calm before the storm; a glimmer of hope that its not as bad as everyone made it out to be. Before the number can get past the Sailors lips, the glimmer flashes into a four-alarm blaze. Eyes slam shut; the smile is gone. The fun hasnt even started yet. There is still the obstacle course. This is the culmina tion of security reaction force basic (SRF-B) training a Navy-wide 15-day course designed to better support watch standing principles. One of the more significant evolutions in the training is exposure to Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray. The training requires Sailors to be sprayed with OC in order to become qualified to carry and use it, said Christman. Sailors who experience the effects of OC will better under stand and appreciate it as a means to incapaci tate threats in a less than lethal way. OC is a chemical com pound, derived from chili pepper plants, which irritates the eyes to cause pain and tem porary blindness. It is used as a less than lethal weapon to subdue vio lent or threatening subjects. My heart was beating really, really fast, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class James Box. I thought, Im never going to turn around. It was cold at first and smelled like aerosol. Then I opened my eyes and it instantly sucked. During the course, Sailors are also taught to use mechanical advantage control hold (MACH) maneuvers and when to use different levels of force. I feel more confi dent about confronting threats because I know what my resources are and what to look for when someone is pos ing a threat, said Box. I know now that OC spray will impair someone if I need to use it. After being exposed to OC, the Sailors still had to demonstrate take down maneuvers, baton strikes, and face an ulti mate showdown with the red man, an attacker completely encased in a red padded suit. Besides the pain it was pretty fun, said Box. Fighting the red man was the best part because it was a guy completely covered with pads so you could just wail on him. The SRF-B train ing instructors not only taught the students various methods of dealing with hostile situations but also raised their confidence so that they can react appropriately when a real-life situation aris es. I did want to see how I handled it compared to others, said Interior Communications Electricians Mate 3rd Class Courtney Trzinski. I feel much more informed on how it feels for someone if I have to spray them. Id prob ably spray someone and then apologize, because I know what they are feeling. It was really impres sive to see everyone handle themselves so well after being sprayed, said Box. Nobody was screaming or yelling; they just went straight through the course like it was nothing. Swollen and red, yet triumphant, they stagger to the water hose seeking relief. In a mere couple hours nearly all of the hellish effects will fade away. With the feeling of OC now burned into their memories, this SRF-B class of Philippine Sea will now stand watch with a little more grit in their eye. Every single one of the Sailors walks away from this training better pre pared to protect their ship and shipmates a result well worth the torturous day. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class James Box, from Hoover, Ala., puts his face in running water to rise off Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) during security reaction force basic training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Box defends himself from a simulated attacker after being sprayed with OC during security reaction force basic training aboard USS Philippine Sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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Easter Fun At ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel held its annual Easter celebration and egg hunt on April 19 on the chapel premesis. Hundreds of Sailors and their families came out on Saturday to the event to enjoy free food and games, and a chance to visit with the Easter Bunny.-Photos by QM3 Sharlaysha PowersA young boy tries his best putt at one of the games at the Chapel Easter celebration. A mom high-fives her daughter during one of the games at the celebration. A young boy tries out his strength at one of the games featured at this years Easter celebration sponsored by the Mayport Chapel. Kids enjoy an arts and crafts area at this years Easter event. Some children go for free candy at one of the tables. Snacks, like popcorn, was provided thanks to the Mayport Chapel and its congregation. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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-Photos by QM3 Sharlaysha PowersThe Easter Bunny gives a young boy an egg at the Mayport Chapel annual Easter celebration and egg hunt on April 19.An Egg-cellent Time With Mayport ChapelThe Easter Bunny poses with friends at the celebration. A young girl gets to sit in the fire truck. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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NMCRS Mayport Thanks Volunteers -Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers for the Mayport Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) pose for a group photo after enjoying an appreciation luncheon at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 10. The volunteers have spent thousands of hours helping Sailors, Marines, retirees and their families in times of need. NMCRS is currently holding its annual active duty fund drive. To find out how you can donate, contact your command representative or email RPC Hector Feliciano at hector. feliciano@navy.mil.FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.April 24, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. April 24, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to identify family roles. April 24, 2014 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Mothers Chapel April 28-30, 2014 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training, Building 1, RM 702 OBT is a standardized and mandatory multi-day training for all Ombudsmen, in accordance with OPNAVINST 1750.1G CH-1. Command lead ership and their spous es are also welcome to attend all or part of the training. Preregistration is required. April 28, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR Command Liaison Training, Building 1, RM 1616 SAPR Liaisons act as a single point of contact for the vic tim, promote respon sive management of a sexual assault case, ensure victims receive monthly updates, and also ensure the victim is not re-victimized. Liaisons should be an E-7 or above and have direct access to the Commanding Officer. April 28, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn the skills to take control of their anger and direct it in ways that will make them more effective and productive at work and at home. April 28, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 28, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume, Building 1, RM 702 April 28, 2014 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group USO, Mayport RD April 29, 2014 8 a.m.noon, SAPR Point of Contact (POC) Training, Building 1, RM 1616 April 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management Building 1, RM 702 April 29, 2014 1-3 p.m., SAPR Data Collection Coordinator (DCC) Training, Building 1, RM 1616 April 30, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Building 1, RM 702 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Adventure Landing NightWristbands On Sale Wristbands for the annu al USO night at Adventure Landing at Jacksonville Beach are on sale at the NAS Jax, NSB Kings Bay and NS Mayport USO offic es. The annual USO night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, May 28 from 6-11 p.m. Tickets are open to active duty and dependents only (National Guard and Reservists on active orders are elligible). This event will sell out. Dont wait to buy your wristbands. Mayport No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Monday, April 28 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve sloppy joe sandwiches, baked beans, macaroni and cheese, salad, and dessert. NAS Jacksonville No Dough Dinner Join us for the first NAS Jacksonville No Dough Dinner on Wednesday, April 30 from 5-7 p.m. at Fleet Reserve #91 on Collins Road. The staff and vol unteers will serve spa ghetti and meat sauce, gar lic bread, salad and dessert. Please RSVP on Facebook at https://www.facebook. com/JaxUSO?ref=hl#!/ events/1567376320153699/ (RSVP not required but appreciated). This is free for active duty and their dependents. Interested in volunteering to serve dinner? Please email lquinn@usojax.com for more information. USO World Record Attempt As a way of showing our gratitude to our men and women in uniform, the USO invites the American people to join us in attempting to set a Guinness World Record for the most signatures on a flag. Now until May 30, peo ple can add their digital sig nature to the Every Moment Counts flag online by visiting USOmoments.org or in per son at various USO events. Together, lets show our commitment to our troops and their families. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be participating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique community-based fundraising initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encourage you to visit www.birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportunity to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2014 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an additional $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-breaker ques tion will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 7. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouse-tospouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer net work, acquire knowledge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future chal lenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, provide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reimburse you for baby sitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library. Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and over head projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy of BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Erica Jackson who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Jackson Family and all of our resi dents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870.Saturday, April 26 Tree Hill Nature Center will play host to a kaleidoscope of colorful butterflies on Saturday, April 26, 2014, from 10 a.m. 4 p.m. As the premier Butterfly Festival in the region, this years event will feature a walk-through butterfly exhibit; hands-on animal encounters; live music all day; local artists and vendors of handmade and eco-friendly arts and crafts; food/drink/frozen treats (all proceeds to be donated to Tree Hill and local schools); face painting; free kids crafts by Pink Flamingo Arts; inflatables and much more. The highlight of the event each year is the live butterfly release, which will take place at 3:30 p.m. (weather per mitting) and will include a child from Dreams Come True assisting in the release. A compli mentary shuttle will run all day between off-site parking at St. Andrews Episcopal and Parkwood Baptist churches and the Festival. For more information or to buy tickets, please visit treehill.org. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 14-04 as a public service is offer ing an About Boating Safely class on April 26, Sept. 13, or Oct. 18 at the Captains Club located at 13363 Beach Blvd. between Hodges and Kernan Blvd. The program will start at 7:30 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. Program meets the Florida State Requirement for a Boaters Safety Card and costs $25 including materials. Contact Mike at 904-502-9154 for more information or to register. Log onto our website at www.uscga jaxbeach.com Get ready for safe boating this year by having your vessel safety checked. We will meet you at your home or marina, check your boats safety equipment and provide a Safety Decal at no charge. Mike@ 904-502-9154. Come celebrate Earth Day with a park ranger at the Talbot Discovery Table at Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive Park. You will learn interest ing facts and get a hands on experience through environmentally themed games. A table will be set up in the North Beach parking area at the end of the boardwalk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come test your knowledge to see how much you know! Saturday, May 3 Jacksonville Public Library invites all area superheroes to join forc es at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd Street, Neptune Beach, for superpower fun from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The day will feature local comic art ists, a costume contest, a Create-A-Comic Book Cover contest, Team Trivia, food, games, a movie and activities. The event is free, but superheroes are asked to drop off a non-per ishable food item at the library for the Beaches Emergency Assistance Ministry (BEAM). This 2nd annual Beaches Comic Con is being held in collaboration with the nearby Superhero Beach comic book shop, which is sponsoring free comic book day at its 1124 N. 3rd Street location. Free shuttle service will be provided between the two sites. Children, teens and adults are invited to display their own artistic talents by enter ing the Create-A-Comic Book Cover contest. Entry forms are available online, at the Beaches Branch Library, and at Superhero Beach, and must be returned to the Beaches Branch Library by 6 p.m. Saturday, April 26. Winners will be selected by people attending Comic Con and notified by phone after the event. Eleven local comic artists will be on hand to share their work with fans and answer questions. Outin Town THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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Coast Guard Mayport Brings Home MWR Spring Sports Challenge WinFrom StaffIt came down to a game of cornhole and the U.S. Coast Guard Mayport team took home bragging rights at the MWR 2014 Spring Sports Challenge. After four days of grueling events played in foul weather, NS Mayport and Coast Guard broke a 1150 point tie with the backyard game CO against CO. Coast Guard was able to hedge out Mayport, sending the command into second place, fol lowed by SERMC Mayport in third. This was one of the most trying events in recent memory, cold weather and rain ended up cancelling Tennis, Auto Racing and Tugo-War, but teams still brought their game faces to face the weather and each other between April 15-18. The first day opened with a win for FRCSE Mayport in the CO/ CMC Canoe Race and SERMC Mayport in the Experience Canoe Race. NS Mayport also brought home a win in 3-on-3 Basketball. On day two, HSL-48 make a splash as the winners of the Swim Relay while Coast Guard Mayport pulled out wins in both Bocce and Frisbee Golf. NS Mayport had its sec ond win at the Wallyball event. Day three included wins for FLC Jax in Golf, SERMC in Table Tennis, Coast Guard Mayport in Kickball and ASD Mayport in 8-Ball Pool. The last day of com petition, Coast Guard ANT Jax spiked a in in Volleyball, while FRCSE took home a win in the Cornhole. Coast Guard Mayport showed its strength dur ing the Strongman com petition while the nimble fingers of NS Mayports team was able to pull out a win in Jenga and in Darts. Yoeman 1st Class Sheena Taylor of FRCSE Mayport was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. A Sailor from HSL-60 tries to keep the ball in during a game of Volleyball against SERMC at this years Sports Challenge. SERMC won the game, but U.S. Coast Guard ANT Jax would go on to win the event.-Photos by Paige GnannTeam members from Coast Guard Mayport stand with NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, left, and sponsor representatives after being named the winners of the 2014 Spring Sports Challenge. McCall presents Yoeman 1st Class Sheena Taylor of FRCSE Mayport with the MVP award. Cmdr. Mike Barriere and AVCM Greg Culverhouse of FRCSE Mayport hold the coveted trophy and are surrounded by Challenge sponsors after winning this years CO/CMC Canoe Race. Gas Turbine System (Mechanical) 1st Class James Davis and Kris Mitchell push hard to maintain their lead and bring home the win for SERMC Mayport during this years Experienced Canoe Race. CMDCM James Daniels and Capt. Joseph Gombas, SERMC Mayport command master chief and commanding officer, swim their canoe in after tipping over into Lake Wonderwood during the CO/CMC Canoe Race. A team member from CSCS Mayport takes his first throw at the Frisbee Golf event. Team members go for the ball in a game of Wallyball, a new event at this years Challenge. Seaman Tyler Hioe of ANT Jax tries to keep the Jenga tower for toppling during the event. Participants let their darts fly during the Cricket Darts event. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Teams try to knock out each others balls during the Bocce event. Dozens of bowlers showed up at Mayport Bowl to help their commands out during this years Sports Challenge. A Sailor from SERMC Mayports Strongman team heaves a keg over his head and an obstacle during this years event. This was the only show of strength this year since the Tug-o-War event was cancelled due to weather. A Sailor goes for the net during the 3 on 3 Basketball event. A Sailor tries to sink his ball during the 8-Ball Pool event held this year at the Single Sailor Liberty Center, across from Bravo Pier. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 May 9: Castaways Putt n Crawl Challenge. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Think you can putt like Tiger Woods? Show us your stuff. Free for all adults. Win a free round of golf at Windy Harbor Golf Club. 270-7205 Community Activities May 2: 2014 Mayport Music Fest. 7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion featuring Blue October & The Cab. Admission opens at 6 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Sign up deadline April 24. May 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation only. May 3: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline May 1. May 4: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 1. May 6: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline May 5. May 8: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 9: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 10: Food Drive Volunteers. Van departs 12:30 p.m. Trucks Needed. Sign up deadline May 8. May 14: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! May 15: Trampoline Arena Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. May 16: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. May 17: Dancing in the Street Festival. Van departs Liberty Center at 11 a.m. Transportation only. May 18: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 15. May 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 25: Ichetucknee Springs Tubing Trip. Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $8. Sign up by May 22. May 26: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. Intramural Sports April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. 270-5451 May 8: Mens Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by May 2. 270-5451 May 13: Armed Forces 5K/10K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. May 13: Co-Ed Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451. Aquatics May 5: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, Jun. 8. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. May 2: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 May 16: Elementary Prom Under the Sea. 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $5 advanced sign-up and $7 day of, space permitting. May 21: Americas Kids Run. 3 pm at the Youth Center. Ages 5-13. May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of. A CFC participant provided as a public service. 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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CHINFO Award Winner SAVE A LIFENS Mayport Blood Drive On April 29 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building 1. For more info, redcrossblood.org Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Gettysburg Back After 9 MonthsSee Story and More Photos, Pages 4-5COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt Welcomes New COFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe former director of theater engagement for U.S. Southern Command assumed the respon sibilities of commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and commander, U.S. 4th Fleet on April 17 at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center here. Rear Adm. George W. Ballance replaced Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, who will become the vice director for operations on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet are responsible for U.S. naval forces in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility, which includes Central and South America and the Caribbean Sea. Marine Gen. John F. Kelly, the commander of U.S. Southern Command, served as the presid ing officer for the ceremony. I believe Sincs greatest accomplishment while com manding NAVSO has been his commitment to building partnerships with naval forces through out the region, said Marine Gen. John Kelly, commander, U.S. Southern Command. The presence of representatives from Colombia, Brazil, Chile, and Peru at todays ceremony is a testa ment to the importance of those partnerships, which are critical for the United States and the region alike. Ballance, a Navy Reservist, has served as vice commander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, as direc tor of U.S. 6th Fleets Maritime Partnership Program, and as deputy commander of U.S. 7th Fleet. He is the 13th commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command since it was estab lished in 1942 and the fifth commander of U.S. 4th Fleet since it was re-established in 2008. Vice Admiral Robin Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve, commander of Navy Reserve Force was in attendance as the senior Navy official. Its the partnerships and rela tionships with military and politi cal leaders throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as your innovation, vision, and charismatic leadership, that make you larger than life and so deserving of the high esteem in which you are held. Your efforts here have direct ly supported the CNOs Global Maritime Partnership Initiative. Harris thanked Kelly and Braun for their support, and offered congratulations to what he described as a few of our great partners in South America. The courage and sacrifices of the people of Colombia as they close out their 50-year struggle against armed revolutionaries is phenomenal, and the nations execution of the maritime exer cise UNITAS last year was inspir ing, he said. He also praised the Chileans, Peruvians and Brazilians for their professionalism, partnership and leadership. Brazil has been leading inter national naval forces off the coast of Lebanon for several years and participated in Obangame Express, an exercise conducted by U.S. Naval Forces Africa. Your leadership role amongst See NAVSO, Page 7 Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Rear Adm. George Ballance, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (left) shakes hands with Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris after assuming command April 17 during the change of command ceremony held aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeLogistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer partici pates in a drunk driving simulation with Save a Life Tour Manager Andrew Tipton during a presentation at Naval Station Mayport. Save a Life Tour works towards reducing the number of unsafe driving inci dents involving military personnel. Save A Life Teaches Safe Driving To SailorsBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Center East, Detachment SoutheastDistracted driving can pose a deadly threat. The Naval Station Mayport command took a step in the right direc tion to help eliminate this problem when they hosted the Save a Life Tour (SALT) on April 17. The SALT, (oper ated by Kramer Edutainment and based out of Grand Rapids, Michigan) is a National High Impact Alcohol Awareness and Distracted Driving Program. The tour visits military bases, schools and other institutions in order to inform and edu cate on the deadly effects of drinking and distrac tive driving. I think there is kind of a distinction from a prevention program, because it is awareness, said Andrew Tipton, the Save a Life Tour Manager. Just mak ing people aware of the consequences of [drunk driving], and not just saying dont do it ... mak ing sure that people are See Save A Life, Page 8

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer .................................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Homecomings Are Microcosm Of LifeThis past Friday week many of us celebrated with the Gettysburg crew and their families a won derful homecoming after an incredibly successful ly 9-month deployment. There have been other homecomings in recent months as well, but this one gave me a flashback of my own homecoming on USS The Sullivans on Dec. 23 last year, two days before Christmas. And so Gettysburg returned on Good Friday, two days before the great Christian holi day of Easter. All home comings are special, but coming home a few days before a special holiday like Christmas or Easter just makes it all the more amazing. So, what is it about homecomings that make them so special? Well, everyone has their own reasons that they could put on the top of the list which make these occa sions so special. At the top of my list is that it is the culmina tion of all the hard work, sacrifice, and separation during the months of deployment in one huge day of reunification with all that we love so dearly. This theme of sacri fice followed by rejoicing hits home for all of us because it is the nature of life this side of glory. Life is full of hardship and sacrifice that we all know too well in the Navy. Not only deployments, but we also have the hardships of life faced on a daily basis the death of a loved one, frustra tions at work, marriage struggles, financial struggles, health strug gles, and I could go on and on. But all of these struggles are side by side with moments of intense joy as well. Our bodies often heal, we get a pay raise, we witness the birth of a child, and we celebrate marriages together. We sing Christmas songs around the fire and spend Easter Sunday worshiping our Lord. Suffering and Joy, this is the drumbeat of life. And so homecomings are really a microcosm for life, only intensified beyond measure. They remind us of all the other sacrifices and struggles and give us hope that they too can be worked through. They give us hope that there is victory over all the pain of life. And yet, as sweet as homecoming from deployment is, it is but a shadow of the ulti mate homecoming. For Christians that ultimate homecoming is not Easter Sunday, but the day of Christs return when all things will be made right, when death will have no more vic tory, when separation from God and from each other will be at an end, when there will be no more pain and no more suffering but only joy, peace and eternal hap piness in the Lord for ever. The sufferings of Good Friday are followed by the victory of Easter Sunday. Thank you to all those Gettysburg sailors and families who sacri ficed so much these past 9 months and more. Thank you for allow ing me to witness your homecoming. Thank you for reminding me of the ultimate homecoming in Glory. Welcome home shipmates! CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry CenterHow Do I Get Help For My Special Needs Child. .From The School District?Last week my article emphasize that to get help for your special needs child, you must become an advocate for him. I reminded you that you are a natural advo cate for your child. You were his first teacher, his most important role model, and you have his best interests at heart! Because you will be involved with your child for life, you need to be an active participant in planning his education. After learning in last weeks article about Navy Child and Youth Programs Spec Ed Connection you now have to identify what is available at your childs school and from the dis trict to support his spe cial needs. You will need to gather information about the processes used to make the decisions about your child and who are the people making these decisions. Who are the specific individuals in your childs school and at the district office you will work with to secure those services designed to meet your childs special needs? Since your child is enti tled to an appropriate education, not the best education, nor an educa tion that will maximize your childs potential, you must know these individuals, the pro cesses, and the State and Federal laws, especially The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004. What do you currently know about your childs disability and education al history? Remember, the district only has to provide an appropri ate education. Your main goal is to ensure that your child is provided with special educa tion and related services [which are] designed to meet [the childs] unique needs and prepare them for further educa tion, employment, and independent living 20U.S.C. 1400(d). You will not be able to deter mine if what they are offering is appropriate if you dont know what has been tried before, wheth er it worked or not, and if it worked, how well. Another important goal involves build ing a healthy working relationship with the school staff. Because you will be working with the school staff to design or revise your childs Individualized Educational Program (IEP), you will need your knowledge of spe cial education law, his disability, and his edu cational history. By maintaining a cordial relationship with school personnel, you will find them more willing to listen to your concerns, to discuss issues, and to craft accommoda tions which specifically address your childs needs, resulting in that appropriate education for your child. Are you the only one advocating for your child? Absolutely not! Teachers, school staff, and school-and districtbased administrators are available to provide support to you and your child. But as you know, schools and district spe cial education depart ments are woefully understaffed. They will evaluate your child and make recommendations to you about educational services. However, these evaluations and result ing recommendations will vary from school to school and from individual to individual as the educational background and training of these individuals is quite varied. A lay advocate can also advocate for your child. These individu als use their specialized knowledge and expertise to help parents resolve problems with schools. They can attend meet ings with you, help you craft letters, negotiate for services, and advise you about your legal rights and responsibilities. If this service sounds like what you need to get help for your special needs child, contact me at the email or phone below for information about local lay advocates. Another individu al who can help is the Exceptional Family Member Program Liaison (EFMP) at your installation. If you have a special needs child with a current IEP, you should be enrolled in EFMP. Jose Sanchez, EFMP Liaison NS Mayport, has as his role to tion of EFMP enrollment forms; with resource referrals, educational programs, and consultation; on Tricare Extended Healthcare Option (ECHO); tary programs, medical facilities, and community agencies to create a net work of support for each EFMP family; and networking and social opportunities within their area. Joses office is located in Building One (FFSC) and he can be reached at (904) 270-6600 x1713 or by email at jose.san chez3.ctr@navy.mil. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. KNOWINGTHE ROPESA Refreshed Refrig Is Better Than A Face LiftDespite the fact that Old Man Winter has been stalking some areas of our country, freez ing the poor pansies and keeping northern ers ensconced in wool, spring really has sprung. In keeping with the seasons theme of rebirth, this is the time of year when we are supposed to experience renewal. For fortysome things like me, this usu ally does not mean get ting a chin lift or booking a trip to visit the Dalai Lama. Generally, the revival that we encounter comes in the form of, yep, you guessed it, Spring Cleaning. But before I lift the couch cushions to reveal $3.96 in coins, two ballpoint pens, the DVD clicker we lost two moves ago, and a veritable snack mix of old popcorn, fuzzy gummy bears, stale peanuts and pulverized goldfish crackers.... Before I pull the bed away from the wall to discover a dust bunny large enough to knit into a size 12 cardigan sweat er and a pair of knee socks.... Before I rummage through our closets to fill thrift store donation bags with flared jeans, Christmas pajamas, and those silly-looking shape up shoes.... Before all that, I real ly must tackle the most important job first: The Refrigerator. Despite its per fect chill of 36 degrees Fahrenheit, I know there are food items lurking in the back that are no longer edible. These items were forgotten months ago, remaining hidden behind the OJ and the leftover pot roast. In order to eliminate these phantoms of the fridge, its necessary to empty the whole thing out. I usually begin with the freezer. Hoping to find a forgotten casse role dish of coq au vin to cook for dinner, I usu ally end up with a dozen or so brownish bricks Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officerof unidentifiable meat encased in unlabeled storage bags. When I threw them in the freezer, I thought the contents would be obvi ous, but thanks to a thick layer of frost, I cant tell a turkey leg from a hamburger patty. After I reject the idea of licking each brick to determine the contents, I hedge my best guess, running the risk that I might end up inadvertently cooking Ham Hock Sloppy Joes or Rump Roast Noodle Soup. Next, I clear out the small shelves on the refrigerator door. For some unknown reason, items such as jelly jars, bottles of dressing, con tainers of mustard, and jars of pickles tend breed and multiply here. I usu ally have to take a deep breath, and tell myself that the world will not implode if I throw out the almost empty jar of Apricot spread, or the bottle of Catalina dress ing I used a quarter cup of for a recipe last sum mer. Moving to the main refrigerator shelves, I like to keep an eye out for things that are so old, they could be mis taken for something else. For example, expired feta looks just like bleu See Refrigerator, Page 3

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cheese. Expired sour cream mimics small curd cottage cheese, but smells like dirty feet. And interestingly, expired apple juice that makes a pffzzzt sound when the cap is opened has the same effect as tequila when ingested. After a quick poke in the lunchmeat drawer to remove any slippery slices of iridescent pas trami, I usually move on to the vegetable crispers. As anyone who has ever grabbed for a cucumber only to find a log of slimy mush knows, this area of the fridge can be a challenge to even the stron gest constitution. Rusty lettuce, milky tomatoes, shriveled apples and blackened cauliflower florets are only a few of the delicacies waiting to trigger a gag reflex. Once all the odifer ous offenders have been removed from our refrig erator, I give it a good scrub with some disin fectant, pop open a fresh box of baking soda and head off to the commis sary for replacement vit tles. Considering that our military family budget does not include funds for cosmetic surgery or spiritual pilgrimages, a refreshed refrigerator is our best rendition of spring renewal. Get more whit and wisdom at www.theme atandpotatoesoflife.comFrom Page 2RefrigeratorMayport Chaplain Prepares Comalapa Sailors For EasterBy GM2(SW) Camille PerezCooperative Security Location Comalapa Public AffairsA chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., provided personal sup port April 9 and April 10 to Sailors deployed to Cooperative Security Location Comalapa Cmdr. Steven Souders, the director of the Commander, Surface Forces Atlantic Ministry Center at Mayport, sup plied Sailors and civil ians with the opportunity to receive one-on-one counseling April 9 and held a nondenomina tional service April 10. Because a chaplain would not be present the following week, he touched on a number of Easter-related themes. Having Chaplain Souders provide ser vices and counsel ing to us here at the CSL is greatly appre ciated, said Charles Mooradian, a contractor with DynCorp. Spiritual health is as important as physical and mental health, and he takes care of that aspect for us. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez accompanied the chaplain to Comalapa, reviewing quality-of-life and other improvement projects. Senior Chief Sergio Moreno, the command senior chief of CSL Comalapa, said Tellez has always considered the well-being of Sailors a priority. Having him here, seeing the great job the Sailors are doing, and seeing all the new quality of life programs imple mented and complet ed, lets him leave here assured that his Sailors are being taken care of, Moreno said. Cooperative Security Location Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and oper ational support to forward deployed U.S. and partner nation aviation units participating in Joint Interagency Task Force South assigned counter-illicit traffick ing operations, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian missions, and search-and-rescue efforts. -Photo by GM2 Camille PerezSailors and civilians from Cooperative Security Location Comalapa El Salvador and VP-8 bow their heads during religious services while Cmdr. Steven Souders, a chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., leads them in prayer. Because a chaplain would not be present the following week, Souders touched on a number of Easter-related themes. Utilitiesman 1st Class Eric Gonzalez receives com munion during religious services provided by Cmdr. Steven Souders, a chaplain from Naval Station Mayport, Fla. Cmdr. Odin Klug, the commanding officer of Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, is next in line. Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speaker is Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/din ner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are man datory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be pur chased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 USS Gettysburg Returns To NS Mayport After 9 Month DeploymentBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsGuided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) returned home to Naval Station Mayport, April 18, marking the completion of a nine-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility (AOR). Gettysburg was deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. This deployment boils down to mission suc cess through hard work and amazing achieve ment from the crew each and everyday, said Capt. Brad Cooper, commanding officer, USS Gettysburg. The crews performance was truly extraordinary and we look forward to this time as Sailors reunite with family, friends and loved ones. Over the course of the deployment, Gettysburg accomplished more than 17,000 in-flight checkins as an air regional defense commander, conducted joint opera tions with the French Navys Charles de Gaulle Carrier Strike Group, received the Golden Anchor Award and the Unit Tactics Award, and qualified more than 150 Sailors as enlisted surface warfare specialists. Gettysburg was also the recipient of the 2013 calendar year Battle E award for demonstrating superior performance in an operational envi ronment and sustained overall warfare readiness. Gettysburg was one of five ships in the Atlantic Fleet to win all five categories of the Battle E in addition to receiving the Green H award for Force Health and Wellness. Our accomplishments during deployment indi cate the level of positive influence that our lead ership has displayed, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker. I am incredibly proud of the crew and the high level of success they achieved for the command and for their own personal careers. Helicopter Maritime -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySonar Technician Surface 2nd Class Michael Velsor greets his wife, Michelle Velsor, with the traditional first kiss after the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) to Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergLt. j.g. Collin Roof, from Paducah, Ky., embraces his wife Kayla Roof and son Barrett Roof (18 months old) after the return of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) to Mayport, Fla. from a nine-month deployment. Gettysburg was a part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.See Gettysburg, Page 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor aboard the USS Gettysburg (CG 64) holds his baby for the first time after returning to Naval Station Mayport aboard the guided-missile cruiser fol lowing a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA Sailor aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64) receives a kiss after the guided-missile cruiser returned to Naval Station Mayport following a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5 From Page 4GettysburgAttack Squadron (HSM 74) Det. 2, embarked on board Gettysburg, successfully completed more than 1,800 flight hours and more than 2,000 safe deck landings dur ing the deployment. My expectations for the aircrew were high at the beginning of deploy ment and they were able to surpass them throughout deployment, said Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, detachment offi cer in charge. We came together as a team and were able to accomplish many firsts as a crew. It was through hard work and strict attention to detail that allowed us to reach our marks The holiday seasons proved eventful for Gettysburg as well. In November 2013, Gettysburg hosted a Thanksgiving Day visit from the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/ NAC) Mike Stevens. In December 2013, the crew hosted a visit from the non-profit organiza tion Operation Gratitude who presented their onemillionth care package to Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Brooke Oekerman. Now that deployment has come to an end, the crew is looking for ward to spending time back home and sharing experiences with family members. This was my first deployment and it allowed me to experience new things while learn ing about myself, my ship and the Navy, said Quartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Marlesha Parker. Im happy about all the knowledge and expe riences I have gained, but Im also happy to be heading home. I look forward to time with my family and Im excited to share with them all I have learned and have seen while deployed.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyA little boy waves his American flags as family and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Sailor, Logistics Specialist Seaman Carolina Ortega hugs her father, Javier Ortega, after the guided-missile cruiser returned to Naval Station Mayport following a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. As a member of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, Gettysburg helped provide a wide range of flexible capabilities, including maritime security operations, expeditionary power projection, forward naval presence, crisis response, sea control, deterrence, counter-terrorism, information operations, theater security cooperation and counter proliferation. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFamily and friends gathered on the pier at Naval Station Mayport for the arrival of USS Gettysburg (CG 64) from a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64) man the rails as the guided-missile cruiser returns to Naval Station Mayport after a nine-month deployment to the 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) return to Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyHospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brooke Oekerman receives the keys at Naval Station Mayport for her brand new Ford F150 she won while deployed aboard the USS Gettysburg (CG 64) when she became the 1,000,000th Operation Gratitude care package recipient. Operation Gratitude is an organization that seeks to lift spirits and meet the evolving needs of our Active Duty and Veteran communities, and provide volun teer opportunities for all Americans to express their appreciation to members of the Military.

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Taylor Finishes Repairs, Returns To FleetFrom Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), home ported in Mayport, Fla., successfully completed post-repair sea trials, April 21. Taylor was operat ing in the Black Sea when she ran aground in Samsun, Turkey, Feb. 12, damaging the ships propeller hub assem bly. Taylor was towed to Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, to complete replacements of the propeller blades and hub. The sea trials helped Taylors crew assess whether the ship was ready to return to opera tions, measuring the vessels performance, gener al seaworthiness, speed and maneuverability, while testing equipment and safety features. Taylor is continuing her scheduled deploy ment in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. The ship returned to the Black Sea on April 22 to promote peace and sta bility in the region. This will include support ing maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts, establishing and enhancing cooperation, and mutual training and interoperability with regional partner nations and NATO allies. U.S. 6th Fleet, head quartered in Naples, Italy, conducts a full range of maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation missions in concert with allied, joint, and inter agency partners in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergThe Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) returns to her homeport of Naval Station Mayport following a fire that occurred on board April 14, 2014. There were no injuries to the crew and the ship contin ued to operate under her own power. USS Hu City ReturnsSoldier Reenlists Aboard USS HalyburtonFrom USS Halyburton Public Affairs A soldier assigned to the 189th Military Police Company at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, reenlisted on the flight deck of USS Halyburton (FFG 40) while the ship was pier side April 9. Staff Sgt. Christopher Cluts reenlisted in the presence of Halyburton Sailors, naval station residents and fellow MPs. Cluts, who has a brother in the Air Force, said he chose to hold the ceremony on a ship to honor their grandfather, Harry Keith Cluts, who served in the Navy dur ing the Korean War. Every day, our Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and Marines sacrifice time away from our families to defend our nation against all enemies; for eign and domestic, said Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander, the command master chief of the Halyburton. It was an honor to host Cluts as he contin ued his family legacy, Friedlander said. Halyburton visited Guantanamo Bay to resupply and complete voyage repairs. The stop also gave crew members a well-deserved break from their 2014 deploy ment to the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility in support of Operation Martillo. Martillo, Spanish for hammer, is an inter agency and international operation that includes 14 countries committed to a regional approach against the movement by transnational crimi nal organizations of illicit cargo in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime secu rity operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperabil ity, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy. mil/local/cusns/. -Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Kameren Guy HodnettArmy Staff Sgt. Christopher Cluts receives a command coin from Cmdr. David Fowler, the commanding officer of USS Halyburton (FFG40), following his reenlistment aboard the ship at Guantanamo Bay. Halyburton is deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility in support of counter illicit trafficking operations. Bringing the hospital to the poor... Provided as a public service. CFC ParticipantBringing the hospital to the worlds poor 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Torpedo Away On USS Roosevelt -Photos by MC2 Justin WolpertSailors recover a MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo during an exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Sailors recover an MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo during an exercise aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). An exercise MK 54 Mod 0 Torpedo is launched from the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is deployed as part of the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility. our partners is highly valued, specifically in a region Brazil under stands so well, Harris said. We stand to learn much from you. Harris, who arrived in Mayport in 2012, previously served as commanding officer of Amphibious Squadron 4 and the Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Strike Group during humanitarian assis tance and disaster relief operations following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and dur ing the noncombatant emergency evacuations of Lebanon in 2006. He also commanded Expeditionary Strike Group 5, providing disaster relief during the Pakistan floods of 2010, and served as director of the Navys Irregular Warfare Office on the staff of the chief of naval operations. He joked that he wasnt in a hurry to give up Floridas sunshine and his easy commute. But there is more than that Im sorry for, Harris said. For instance, he wont be present for the tran sit of the future USS America (LHA 6) around South America this summer; nor for the likely return of USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) on a Continuing Promise mission next year. Hell miss the transi tion to the era of the Littoral Combat Ship, the Joint High Speed Vessel and patrol craft and hell miss something even bigger, he said. As our relationship continues to deepen in the hemisphere, I truly believe that a combined maritime force will one day come to fruition, as no nation can afford to protect the sea lanes alone, and we are all inextricably tied togeth er, Harris said. From Canada to Chile, we have shared values and con cerns that we have seen demonstrated in our exercises and operations for over 50 years.From Page 1NAVSO THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7

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HSM-40 Sailors Support Mayport CDCBy Lt. Timothy GrantHSM-40Twenty Sailors from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 40 (HSM-40) car ried out a community relations project on April 3 at the Child Development Center (CDC) located just off base near the Naval Station Mayport, assisting with a wide range of projects from general cleanup of the playgrounds to assembling furniture. The group found some time on that Thursday afternoon after the Squadrons Change of Command to meet at the CDC parking lot. After checking in with the CDC staff, the group divided into teams to tackle the various projects. Two of the teams armed with blowers and power wash ers proceeded to clear the playgrounds of tree debris and pollen, as well as wipe down playground equipment. Another team broke off and attended to the front entrance flower beds, weeds had taken over and were winning the fight. Sailors helped defeat the unwanted plant life and made the entrance a bit more invit ing for the little girls and boys going to and from the facility. Another critical project completed by a team was furni ture assembly, particularly the facilitys rocking chairs. The last team organized the toy shed. Fortunately for the children that frequent the CDC, there is no shortage of toys and activities. The challenge for the team was find ing a place for all the tricycles, balls, cones, bricks, carts, and hula hoops. The most rewarding part about working with the CDC is that many families of HSM40 have children who go there regularly. thinking about the fact that it doesnt just affect them. The multi-million dol lar simulator is designed to provide a realistic experience of what it is like to drive a car under the influence of alcohol. It consists of three tele vision screens (to simu late panoramic vision), a car seat, pedals, steering wheel, and other realistic motor vehicle controls. The simula tor runs using advanced software meant to recre ate the impaired faculties of a drunk driver. The reactions in the steer ing and pedals of the car are delayed, which is designed to simu late the slowed reaction time of a drunk driver. It gives people a chance to drive drunk from a sober perspective, said Tipton. We get people to realize how much focus and concentration it actually takes to try to control a car, especially when they have these delayed reactions they are fighting. Another modern prob lem people have today is the dangerous situa tion of texting and driv ing. Most everyone in the modern era basically lives through the use of smart phones. The program also has a simulator to show the effects this dangerous habit has. The program asks people to answer a text message while oper ating a vehicle at aver age to high speeds. Most who went through the simulator found out how dangerous and reckless their driving became when they are concen trating on answering a text message and not the road. Many came to the conclusion that no text message is important enough that cannot wait until you are parked to answer. It is a real eye open ing experience said Logistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer. It is a great program to make you aware of the effects of distractive driving. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) describes three differ ent types of distractions while driving: manual or taking hands off the steering wheel; visual, taking eyes off the road; and cognitive, taking the mind off of driv ing. Texting has become the key target for safe ty advocates because it includes all three types in one act. According to Tipton, The SALT strives to make a difference and hopefully raises aware ness of the dangers of distracted driving. The biggest message we want to stress is dont drink and drive and dont be distracted when you are behind the wheel, Tipton said. Take responsibility for your actions. Operations Specialist 1st Class Quincey Jackson participates in a distracted driving simulation with Save a Life Tour Manager Andrew Tipton during a pre sentation at Naval Station Mayport. Save a Life Tour works towards reducing the number of unsafe driving incidents involving military personnel. -Photos by MC2 Salt CebeLogistics Specialist Seaman Rachael Kizer participates in a drunk driving simu lation during a presentation by Save a Life Tour at Naval Station Mayport.From Page 1Save A Life -Photos courtesy of HSM-40Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Betuel Fuentes, Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Clas Douglas Link, and Senior Chief Aviation Electricians Mate Rebecca Leathers cleaning up the tree debris. Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Gabrielle Malone and Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Keith Hermiston pulling weeds. Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Simeon Santo feeling like a kid again and in the background is Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Jennifer Contreras, Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Quentin Kennedy and Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Ihosvany Diaz cleaning playground equipment.Free Admission, More For Military At THE PLAYERSFrom THE PLAYERS ChampionshipOne of the premier golfing events in the world, THE PLAYERS Championship, is returning to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida from May 6-11, 2014 and will be honoring the militarys men and women. Among other militaryspecific activities, all mil itary personal and their dependents will receive complimentary admis sion to the tournament all week. In 2013, THE PLAYERS issued 21,000 complimentary military tickets. THE PLAYERS also offers discounted admission to veterans. Country music star and Florida native, Jake Owen, will perform on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 as part of the tournaments Military Appreciation Day. Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost: Opening on Wednesday, May 7 at 9 a.m., all active duty, Reserve and retired military person nel and their dependents will have access to the Patriots Outpost, a hospitality tent exclu sively for the military which offers complimen tary food, beverages and activities. Military Job Fair at THE PLAYERS: Taking place on Saturday, May 3 at the Patriots Outpost from 12 to 3 p.m., all active duty, reserve, retired, veterans, and military spouses can attend the third annual job fair free of charge, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition. The fair will offer informa tion on local educational institutions with veter ans programs, career counseling and resumewriting assistance. Operation Shower: Taking place on Monday, May 5 from 10 a.m. to noon, THE PLAYERS and Birdies for the Brave will partner with Operation Shower to host a group baby show er for 30 military momsto-be whose husbands are deployed members of the U.S. Navy. The event will feature Operation Showers signature Showers-In-A-Box gifts of high-quality products for the moms and babies that will be provided by sponsors and donors. For more about com plimentary admission, please go to PGATOUR. COM/THE PLAYERS and click on ticket link for instructions to gain complimentary access to the tournament. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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USS Philippine Sea Turns Up The HeatStory/photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaConsidering what is about to happen, there are an awful lot of smiles amongst the group of USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Sailors. Perhaps its nervous anticipation. Maybe its denial; it couldnt possi bly be as bad as everyone says it is, could it? Not everybody is smiling though, and the truth of the situation is reflect ed in those faces. Red cheeks drained to white, beads of sweat collecting at the brow, and thou sand-yard stares looking well beyond the impend ing dread that lay immediately before them. One of the smiley ones is up first. You are about to be exposed to a level one contamination, booms the instructor, Gunners Mate 1st Class Nicholas Christman. Do you understand? Yes, escapes through a clenched smile. Turn around, close your eyes and when you are ready turn back around keeping your eyes closed, instructs Christman. Like an impressionist changing characters the Sailor turns away, takes a deep breath, and then turns back. O-C! O-C! O-C! Christman makes it ver bally clear what is hitting the Sailor in the face. Now open your eyes. Tell me how many fin gers Im holding up. There is a split second pause; a calm before the storm; a glimmer of hope that its not as bad as everyone made it out to be. Before the number can get past the Sailors lips, the glimmer flashes into a four-alarm blaze. Eyes slam shut; the smile is gone. The fun hasnt even started yet. There is still the obstacle course. This is the culmina tion of security reaction force basic (SRF-B) training a Navy-wide 15-day course designed to better support watch standing principles. One of the more significant evolutions in the training is exposure to Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray. The training requires Sailors to be sprayed with OC in order to become qualified to carry and use it, said Christman. Sailors who experience the effects of OC will better under stand and appreciate it as a means to incapaci tate threats in a less than lethal way. OC is a chemical com pound, derived from chili pepper plants, which irritates the eyes to cause pain and tem porary blindness. It is used as a less than lethal weapon to subdue vio lent or threatening sub jects. My heart was beating really, really fast, said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class James Box. I thought, Im never going to turn around. It was cold at first and smelled like aerosol. Then I opened my eyes and it instantly sucked. During the course, Sailors are also taught to use mechanical advantage control hold (MACH) maneuvers and when to use different levels of force. I feel more confi dent about confronting threats because I know what my resources are and what to look for when someone is pos ing a threat, said Box. I know now that OC spray will impair someone if I need to use it. After being exposed to OC, the Sailors still had to demonstrate take down maneuvers, baton strikes, and face an ulti mate showdown with the red man, an attacker completely encased in a red padded suit. Besides the pain it was pretty fun, said Box. Fighting the red man was the best part because it was a guy completely covered with pads so you could just wail on him. The SRF-B train ing instructors not only taught the students various methods of dealing with hostile situations but also raised their confidence so that they can react appropriately when a real-life situation aris es. I did want to see how I handled it compared to others, said Interior Communications Electricians Mate 3rd Class Courtney Trzinski. I feel much more informed on how it feels for someone if I have to spray them. Id prob ably spray someone and then apologize, because I know what they are feel ing. It was really impres sive to see everyone handle themselves so well after being sprayed, said Box. Nobody was screaming or yelling; they just went straight through the course like it was nothing. Swollen and red, yet triumphant, they stagger to the water hose seeking relief. In a mere couple hours nearly all of the hellish effects will fade away. With the feeling of OC now burned into their memories, this SRF-B class of Philippine Sea will now stand watch with a little more grit in their eye. Every single one of the Sailors walks away from this training better pre pared to protect their ship and shipmates a result well worth the tor turous day. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class James Box, from Hoover, Ala., puts his face in running water to rise off Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) during security reaction force basic training aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Box defends himself from a simulated attacker after being sprayed with OC dur ing security reaction force basic training aboard USS Philippine Sea. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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Easter Fun At ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel held its annual Easter celebration and egg hunt on April 19 on the chapel premesis. Hundreds of Sailors and their families came out on Saturday to the event to enjoy free food and games, and a chance to visit with the Easter Bunny.-Photos by QM3 Sharlaysha PowersA young boy tries his best putt at one of the games at the Chapel Easter celebration. A mom high-fives her daughter during one of the games at the celebration. A young boy tries out his strength at one of the games featured at this years Easter celebration sponsored by the Mayport Chapel. Kids enjoy an arts and crafts area at this years Easter event. Some children go for free candy at one of the tables. Snacks, like popcorn, was provided thanks to the Mayport Chapel and its con gregation. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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-Photos by QM3 Sharlaysha PowersThe Easter Bunny gives a young boy an egg at the Mayport Chapel annual Easter celebration and egg hunt on April 19.An Egg-cellent Time With Mayport ChapelThe Easter Bunny poses with friends at the celebration. A young girl gets to sit in the fire truck. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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NMCRS Mayport Thanks Volunteers -Photo by Paige GnannVolunteers for the Mayport Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) pose for a group photo after enjoying an appreciation luncheon at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 10. The volunteers have spent thousands of hours helping Sailors, Marines, retirees and their families in times of need. NMCRS is cur rently holding its annual active duty fund drive. To find out how you can donate, contact your command representative or email RPC Hector Feliciano at hector. feliciano@navy.mil.FFSC Workshops Available For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.April 24, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding non-verbal cues, con structive criticism, and active listening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communication as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. April 24, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 This program focus es on the woman her self and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encouraged to set individual goals, com plete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to iden tify family roles. April 24, 2014 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Mothers Chapel April 28-30, 2014 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training Building 1, RM 702 OBT is a standard ized and mandatory multi-day training for all Ombudsmen, in accordance with OPNAVINST 1750.1G CH-1. Command lead ership and their spous es are also welcome to attend all or part of the training. Preregistration is required. April 28, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SAPR Command Liaison Training Building 1, RM 1616 SAPR Liaisons act as a single point of contact for the vic tim, promote respon sive management of a sexual assault case, ensure victims receive monthly updates, and also ensure the victim is not re-victimized. Liaisons should be an E-7 or above and have direct access to the Commanding Officer. April 28, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn the skills to take control of their anger and direct it in ways that will make them more effective and productive at work and at home. April 28, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Building 1, RM 702 April 28, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 April 28, 2014 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group USO, Mayport RD April 29, 2014 8 a.m.noon, SAPR Point of Contact (POC) Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 29, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management Building 1, RM 702 April 29, 2014 1-3 p.m., SAPR Data Collection Coordinator (DCC) Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 30, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking, Building 1, RM 702 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Adventure Landing NightWristbands On Sale Wristbands for the annu al USO night at Adventure Landing at Jacksonville Beach are on sale at the NAS Jax, NSB Kings Bay and NS Mayport USO offic es. The annual USO night at Adventure Landing (Jacksonville Beach) will be held on Wednesday, May 28 from 6-11 p.m. Tickets are open to active duty and depen dents only (National Guard and Reservists on active orders are elligible). This event will sell out. Dont wait to buy your wristbands. Mayport No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Monday, April 28 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve sloppy joe sandwich es, baked beans, macaroni and cheese, salad, and dessert. NAS Jacksonville No Dough Dinner Join us for the first NAS Jacksonville No Dough Dinner on Wednesday, April 30 from 5-7 p.m. at Fleet Reserve #91 on Collins Road. The staff and vol unteers will serve spa ghetti and meat sauce, gar lic bread, salad and dessert. Please RSVP on Facebook at https://www.facebook. com/JaxUSO?ref=hl#!/ events/1567376320153699/ (RSVP not required but appre ciated). This is free for active duty and their dependents. Interested in volunteering to serve dinner? Please email lquinn@usojax.com for more information. USO World Record Attempt As a way of showing our gratitude to our men and women in uniform, the USO invites the American people to join us in attempting to set a Guinness World Record for the most signatures on a flag. Now until May 30, peo ple can add their digital sig nature to the Every Moment Counts flag online by visiting USOmoments.org or in per son at various USO events. Together, lets show our commitment to our troops and their families. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be participating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique community-based fundraising initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encourage you to visit www.birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportunity to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2014 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an additional $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-breaker ques tion will be used to determine the winner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 7. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouse-tospouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer net work, acquire knowledge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future chal lenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, provide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reimburse you for baby sitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and over head projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy of BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Erica Jackson who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Jackson Family and all of our resi dents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870.Saturday, April 26 Tree Hill Nature Center will play host to a kaleidoscope of colorful butterflies on Saturday, April 26, 2014, from 10 a.m. 4 p.m. As the premier Butterfly Festival in the region, this years event will feature a walk-through butterfly exhibit; hands-on animal encounters; live music all day; local artists and vendors of handmade and eco-friendly arts and crafts; food/drink/frozen treats (all proceeds to be donated to Tree Hill and local schools); face painting; free kids crafts by Pink Flamingo Arts; inflatables and much more. The highlight of the event each year is the live butterfly release, which will take place at 3:30 p.m. (weather per mitting) and will include a child from Dreams Come True assisting in the release. A compli mentary shuttle will run all day between off-site parking at St. Andrews Episcopal and Parkwood Baptist churches and the Festival. For more infor mation or to buy tickets, please visit treehill.org. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 14-04 as a public service is offer ing an About Boating Safely class on April 26, Sept. 13, or Oct. 18 at the Captains Club located at 13363 Beach Blvd. between Hodges and Kernan Blvd. The program will start at 7:30 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. Program meets the Florida State Requirement for a Boaters Safety Card and costs $25 includ ing materials. Contact Mike at 904-502-9154 for more information or to register. Log onto our website at www.uscga jaxbeach.com Get ready for safe boating this year by having your vessel safety checked. We will meet you at your home or marina, check your boats safety equipment and provide a Safety Decal at no charge. Mike@ 904-502-9154. Come celebrate Earth Day with a park ranger at the Talbot Discovery Table at Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive Park. You will learn interest ing facts and get a hands on experience through environmentally themed games. A table will be set up in the North Beach parking area at the end of the boardwalk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come test your knowledge to see how much you know! Saturday, May 3 Jacksonville Public Library invites all area superheroes to join forc es at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd Street, Neptune Beach, for superpower fun from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The day will feature local comic art ists, a costume contest, a Create-A-Comic Book Cover contest, Team Trivia, food, games, a movie and activities. The event is free, but superheroes are asked to drop off a non-per ishable food item at the library for the Beaches Emergency Assistance Ministry (BEAM). This 2nd annual Beaches Comic Con is being held in collaboration with the nearby Superhero Beach comic book shop, which is sponsoring free comic book day at its 1124 N. 3rd Street location. Free shuttle service will be provided between the two sites. Children, teens and adults are invited to display their own artistic talents by enter ing the Create-A-Comic Book Cover contest. Entry forms are available online, at the Beaches Branch Library, and at Superhero Beach, and must be returned to the Beaches Branch Library by 6 p.m. Saturday, April 26. Winners will be selected by people attending Comic Con and notified by phone after the event. Eleven local comic artists will be on hand to share their work with fans and answer questions. Outin Town THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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Coast Guard Mayport Brings Home MWR Spring Sports Challenge WinFrom StaffIt came down to a game of cornhole and the U.S. Coast Guard Mayport team took home bragging rights at the MWR 2014 Spring Sports Challenge. After four days of grueling events played in foul weather, NS Mayport and Coast Guard broke a 1150 point tie with the backyard game CO against CO. Coast Guard was able to hedge out Mayport, sending the command into second place, fol lowed by SERMC Mayport in third. This was one of the most trying events in recent memory, cold weather and rain ended up cancelling Tennis, Auto Racing and Tugo-War, but teams still brought their game faces to face the weather and each other between April 15-18. The first day opened with a win for FRCSE Mayport in the CO/ CMC Canoe Race and SERMC Mayport in the Experience Canoe Race. NS Mayport also brought home a win in 3-on-3 Basketball. On day two, HSL-48 make a splash as the winners of the Swim Relay while Coast Guard Mayport pulled out wins in both Bocce and Frisbee Golf. NS Mayport had its sec ond win at the Wallyball event. Day three included wins for FLC Jax in Golf, SERMC in Table Tennis, Coast Guard Mayport in Kickball and ASD Mayport in 8-Ball Pool. The last day of com petition, Coast Guard ANT Jax spiked a in in Volleyball, while FRCSE took home a win in the Cornhole. Coast Guard Mayport showed its strength dur ing the Strongman com petition while the nimble fingers of NS Mayports team was able to pull out a win in Jenga and in Darts. Yoeman 1st Class Sheena Taylor of FRCSE Mayport was named MVP for this years Sports Challenge. A Sailor from HSL-60 tries to keep the ball in during a game of Volleyball against SERMC at this years Sports Challenge. SERMC won the game, but U.S. Coast Guard ANT Jax would go on to win the event.-Photos by Paige GnannTeam members from Coast Guard Mayport stand with NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, left, and sponsor representatives after being named the winners of the 2014 Spring Sports Challenge. McCall presents Yoeman 1st Class Sheena Taylor of FRCSE Mayport with the MVP award. Cmdr. Mike Barriere and AVCM Greg Culverhouse of FRCSE Mayport hold the coveted trophy and are surrounded by Challenge sponsors after winning this years CO/CMC Canoe Race. Gas Turbine System (Mechanical) 1st Class James Davis and Kris Mitchell push hard to maintain their lead and bring home the win for SERMC Mayport during this years Experienced Canoe Race. CMDCM James Daniels and Capt. Joseph Gombas, SERMC Mayport command master chief and commanding officer, swim their canoe in after tipping over into Lake Wonderwood during the CO/CMC Canoe Race. A team member from CSCS Mayport takes his first throw at the Frisbee Golf event. Team members go for the ball in a game of Wallyball, a new event at this years Challenge. Seaman Tyler Hioe of ANT Jax tries to keep the Jenga tower for toppling during the event. Participants let their darts fly during the Cricket Darts event. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Teams try to knock out each others balls during the Bocce event. Dozens of bowlers showed up at Mayport Bowl to help their commands out during this years Sports Challenge. A Sailor from SERMC Mayports Strongman team heaves a keg over his head and an obstacle during this years event. This was the only show of strength this year since the Tug-o-War event was cancelled due to weather. A Sailor goes for the net during the 3 on 3 Basketball event. A Sailor tries to sink his ball during the 8-Ball Pool event held this year at the Single Sailor Liberty Center, across from Bravo Pier. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 May 12: Mothers Day Bingo12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. 5x $1000 Jackpots, 1x $500 Quinella, free food, extra drawings and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Wednesday: Whiffle Ball Wednesdays. 5 pm at Castaways. Bring your friends and play some Whiffle Ball! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! The winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 May 9: Castaways Putt n Crawl Challenge 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Think you can putt like Tiger Woods? Show us your stuff. Free for all adults. Win a free round of golf at Windy Harbor Golf Club. 270-7205 Community Activities May 2: 2014 Mayport Music Fest. 7:30 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion featuring Blue October & The Cab. Admission opens at 6 p.m. FREE. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Coke Zero 400 Tickets on sale. Race is July 4-5 at Daytona International Speedway. Tickets start at $24.00 for Subway Firecracker 250 General Admission Seating (July 4 only). Jacksonville Suns Baseball. Ticket of sale now. Tickets run $5.50$11.50. 270-5145 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Sign up deadline April 24. May 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Transportation only. May 3: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline May 1. May 4: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 1. May 6: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline May 5. May 8: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 9: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 10: Food Drive Volunteers. Van departs 12:30 p.m. Trucks Needed. Sign up deadline May 8. May 14: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! May 15: Trampoline Arena Trip. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. May 16: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. May 17: Dancing in the Street Festival. Van departs Liberty Center at 11 a.m. Transportation only. May 18: Paintball. Van departs 9 a.m. Transportation only, you pay for your paint. Sign up by May 15. May 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 23: Movie Trip. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation only. May 25: Ichetucknee Springs Tubing Trip Van departs 7 a.m. Cost $8. Sign up by May 22. May 26: Ping Pong Tournament. 5 p.m. at Liberty Center. May 30: Latitude 30 Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. May 31: Alligator Farm. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $13. Sign up by May 29. Intramural Sports April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. 270-5451 May 8: Mens Doubles Tennis Tournament. Sign up by May 2. 270-5451 May 13: Armed Forces 5K/10K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. May 13: Co-Ed Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451. Aquatics May 5: Pool Open for Recreation Swim Open on Weekends. Saturdays 11 a.m.6 p.m. Sundays and holidays 1-6 p.m. Full hours begin Friday, Jun. 8. Active Duty and children ages 2 or under free. Entrance fees are ages 13-15 $1.50, and ages 16 or older $2.00. Season passes available for sale at ITT. 270-5101/5425 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents. April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. May 2: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 May 16: Elementary Prom Under the Sea. 7-9 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $5 advanced sign-up and $7 day of, space permitting. May 21: Americas Kids Run 3 pm at the Youth Center. Ages 5-13. May 30: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of. A CFC participant provided as a public service. 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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