Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00342


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CHINFO Award Winner Saying GoodbyeUSS De Wert Decommissions Pages 4-5 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall and FFSC New Parent Support Counselor Jaye Meyer are joined by the VPK children at NS Mayports Child Development Center to sign the proclamation declaring April as Child Abuse Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. After McCall signed as commanding officer, he invited the children to come up and sign their names to the poster as well.By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department believes military children serve their country alongside their service member par ents, DODs director of the office of family policy/chil dren and youth said. When military children serve, they do so by making sacrifices when parents are deployed, through frequent moves, starting new schools and making new friends on a continuing basis, Barbara Thompson said in a recent interview with The Pentagon Channel for the Month of the Military Child thats being celebrated in April. We feel its important for the nation to know that military children also serve their country, Thompson said. To honor military chil dren for their sacrifices and service, DOD and the ser vices have planned activi ties this month that range from installation-based fairs, parades, and literacy and art events, she said. Military Kids Day, April 15, marks the third-annual Purple Up! day when adults wear purple to show support of children from all the ser vices, Thompson said. DOD has numerous yearround programs and aware ness efforts to honor mili tary children, and Thompson elaborated on some of those initiatives. To help children build their resilience, DOD has coordi nated programs with Sesame Street to help with ongoing change in military childrens lives, Thompson noted. Sesame [Street] has been an outstanding contributor to the well-being of military children, she said, naming a series of DVDs that cover such topics for military chil dren as divorce, grief, separation and deployment, resil ience skills, and visible or invisible injuries. Sesame Street also recent ly launched two new smart phone applications. One [app] covers reloca tion, and another is to help children learn self-regulation skills so they become more resilient, Thompson said. And everything is free. Thompson emphasized that April also is Child Abuse Prevention Month and said awareness in this arena is important to DOD. Child Abuse Prevention Month is particularly impor tant because its a social responsibility for all of us to make sure children are safe and their well-being is pro tected, she said. Everybody has a responsibility. Giving parents the tools to make them strong supporters of their children and to keep them safe from predators and from violence within the family is crucial, she added. Parenting is tough, regardless of the situation and the age of the child. They each bring their nuances to the table, whether its children at [age] 2 who say no, or a teenager whos some times a little defiant, she said. DOD offers parenting skill resources, Thompson noted, such as the newly launched Parenting Course. The course, she explained, examines parenting from the context of the military life style, which revolves around deployments and parental separations from their chil dren at different stages of their development. And an installation-based initiative, the new Parent Support Program, involves DOD Salutes Military Children FFSC Plans Events To Honor Military Children Join Fleet and Family Support Center today (April 10) for the 2nd Annual Stroller Strut starting at 9 a.m. at the back of Building One. Moms are encouraged to bring their strollers and get in some sun, fun and exer cise in suppport of Month of the Military Children. FFSC is looking for the best decorated stroller on base! ... English Tea For Expectant Mothers will be held on April 24 from 1-3 p.m. at the Base Chapel. FFSC is honor ing our expectant moms in recognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. Registration required.-Photo by Paige GnannHarper Fernandez, 4, signs her name to the Child Abuse Prevention Month Proclamation.A Drop At A TimeBy Lt.j.g. Stephen BakerPWD Mayport Commodity ManagerYou use it day, but have you ever wondered where the water flowing out of faucets throughout Naval Station Mayports buildings, homes and even the water on its ships comes from? NS Mayport provides pota ble water to all ships, tenant commands, residents, and visitors. An average of approxi mately 1 million gallons (MG) of water is consumed per day for drinking, toilets, irrigation, and various other reasons. NS Mayport operates and maintains a sophisticated water treatment plant and distribution system. Water is drawn from the Floridian Aquifer via three deep wells at a depth of approximately 1000 feet. The aquifer is the source of freshwater for most of Florida; it is the larg est and deepest aquifer in the southeastern U.S. The aqui fer is an abundant, but not limitless, source of water that recharges from surface water that moves downward through porous rock and soil lay ers. The raw water is tested to ensure it does not exceed a maximum contaminant level before treatment. Once drawn from the earth, the raw water is treated by inject ing a chlorine solution to kill bacteria and other organ isms. This is referred to as pre-chlorination. Chlorine is the method for treating raw water for consumption and use in Community Public Water Systems. Next, aerator units allow water to gravity fall through a series of trays where insolu ble gases are removed from the water via blower units. The blower units remove the gases through an exhaust and water continues through the process. The aerator units are integral in enhancing taste, color, and odor of our drinking water. See Water, Page 13 See Child, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer ....................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Chief Petty Officers Celebrate 121 Years of ExcellenceBy Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike StevensAs the master chief petty officer of the Navy, I get the chance to talk with chief petty officers from all across the world. As I travel throughout the fleet, it is evident that chiefs are doing great things. Their Sailors are a reflection of their amazing work. Established on April 1, 1893, chiefs No one can be under any illusions of what being a chief petty officer means. You must be All In, All The Time. We must live honest and humble lives because our Sailors can see between the lines. They can see through the chief who tells his or her Sailors one thing, but does the opposite on the weekends. You must live and lead consistently. By myself, I dont have the capacity to come up with all of the answers, but I believe that our chiefs mess must have common ground, something that we can all work on together. We must have a focus. This is where Zeroing in on Excellence comes in. Developing leaders: Leaders are the lids to their organizations. Leadership touches us all. Leadership is also ones ability to influence others. I was in a command that made every mission, people were happy to come to work, they were proud to wear the command col ors, and people wanted to be there. There was very little misconduct, or mishaps, and it was a good place to be sta tioned. The lid was the commanding officer and the command master chief. Nothing changed within that command except for the change of command. Within 30 days of the change of command, the command went from being world champions to the worst in the league. It took me years to understand the significance of influence our senior leaders make. Great leaders are what make great organiza tions. If we want to mitigate many problems we are facing, we must have the right leaders in the right place at the right time. We are investing our time, energy and effort into the problem, but the reality is that without the leadership we wont rid the prob lem. Good order and dis cipline: I think with our young men and women who serve, their behavior is a reflection of our behavior. If you want people to do the right thing, then we must to do the right thing. Across the board of senior leaders, if we live the life beyond reproach then we would highly encour age, through our actions, young men and women who serve beneath us to do the same thing. Our greatest failure has been our failure to lead by example. Im not look ing to start a program, collect date, but rather just do the right thing. Especially when its hard because young Sailors will see you when they look in the mirror. Controlling what we own: The greatest dif ference maker in life is our attitude. You cant always control what happens to you but you can control how you react. We often spend so much time complaining about some of the challenges that life has dealt us, and Im guilty too, but if we really stood back and took a hard look, wed realize that within those challenges, lies tremen dous opportunities. With the many challenges facing our Navy today, as much or more than ever, controlling what we own is of utmost importance. The things that we have no control over simply cannot distract us. Ive been a chief petty officer for 19 years, and I understand the per ceived history and tra ditions of our Chiefs Mess. Ive seen a lot during evolution of the way weve trained our first class petty officers. For many years, we werent physically hurting people, but it seemed to bring out the worst in our chief petty offi cers. Wed do things in a group that we would never do individually. I saw people say and do things that they normal ly wouldnt do on their own. I just knew that if I didnt stand for what is fundamentally right, with treating people with dignity and respect, then I was just as guilty as the people I had a problem with. If you look through out our history of the United States, some of the greatest things weve done have created strife and discontent. We say that we are a democrat ic society and that the majority has the say so, but every once in a while in our history, theres a person that goes against the majority because its simply the right thing to do. Chief petty officers are very influential in the Navy. If we can train our reliefs with dignity and respect, then we can ultimately get it right with every Sailor we come across. Remember, when you do the right things for the right reasons, you will always prevail. There are many young Sailors who will one day serve among the ranks as chief petty officers to continue commemorat ing the legacy of excellence. Id like to take a moment to say thank you for everything you do, every single day. Our time in these jobs as seniors is short and we must continue to make every day our master piece.-Photo by MC1 Michael WissChief Petty Officers from Naval Station Mayport and its tenant commands gather for a photo during the CPO Dine In held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 1 to celebrate the 121 birthday of the Chief Petty Officer.Everyone Needs A Second Chance Some TimesWhen Abram was 99 years old, the Lord appeared to him and said, I am the Almighty God; walk and live habitually before Me and be perfect (blameless, wholehearted, complete). And I will make My covenant (solemn pledge) between Me and you and will mul tiply you exceedingly. Then Abram fell on his face.. (Genesis 17:1-3a, Amplified Bible). What do you plan to be doing when you are 99 years old? Jet Skiing? Sky Diving? Probably notwell maybe SMILE. If you are like me if the LORD wills when I turn 99, I plan to be doing very little but my actions do not appear to be the norm for those walking with God in the Old Testament. The first thing I noticed in the above passage was that Abram was 99 years old and yet in spite of his age the Bible says the Lord appeared to him. Before we deal with what God said to Abram, I want to spend a moment exploring the context of this passage. This was not the first time God had appeared or spoken to Abram. The first time God spoke to Abram he called him into a covenant relationship (Gen. 12). One of the aspects of this covenant was that Abram and his wife, Sarah, would be blessed with a son. But after waiting for a long time for this promise to be fulfilled, they decided that God was taking too long and needed their assistance. Their plan backfired. Can you relate to this? Have you ever tried to assist God with a promise, only to find yourself frustrated? That is the context of the passage. It has been 13 years. Abram and Sarah are sorry, frustrated and desperate, but Gods timing is always right. In the mist of their mess up and frustra tion, God appears before Abram and rebukes him for taking things into his own hands. Well, not actually. The text tells us that it is not a rebuke that Abram hears, but an instruction. God commands Abram to walk and live habitually before Him. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Calvin B. Gardner, Sr. CNSL Ministry CenterGod then reminds Abram of the covenant that he made with him. I know what you have done Abram. I know you are embarrassed and frustrated, but I am the God of a second chance. What you have done or have not done does not void my covenant with you. Walk blameless, wholeheartedly, and complete before me this day forward. Wow, what a gracious God we serve. Do you need a second chance? Here is proof posi tive that God is willing to give you a second chance. The revelation of this passage is not necessarily what God does, but how he chooses to reveal himself to Abram. In the mist of Abrams wrong turns, God identifies himself as the Almighty God. The Hebrew word for Almighty God in the Hebrew is El Shaddai. This is the first time God has chosen to reveal himself to Abram by this name but it will not be the last (Gen 28:3, 35:11). In all uses of the name El Shaddai, God is reminding his people that His power is over all situations. He reminds Abram in the above passage that He is all pow erful. Nothing or no one exceeds the power of God. Whatever God promises, He has the power to perform (Ex. 6:4). Do you have a situation that seems impossible? Have you made a few wrong turns in your life? Do you need a sec ond chance? Remember, God is El Shaddai (Almighty God) and this means He is all-powerful in spite of our good and bad choices. He rules His people by His word and Spirit, and He rules over the barrenness of your situation. Call on El Shaddai, the Almighty God!

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Shark Bites Coming To Mayport MiddleDa dum..da dum.. da dum.da dumda dumda dum..da dum.. da dumda dumdadum No, not that kind of Shark Bite! Shark Bites is Mayport Middle Schools 6th Grade Transition Camp for all students current ly in 5th grade projected to 6th grade at Mayport Middle School for the 2014-2015 year. This is a 6th Grade Orientation but in much greater detail to allow the new students to get the feel of the campus from going through the lunch line to changing classes on an A/B schedule. Students will attend camp for FREE Monday, Aug. 4 Friday, Aug. 8. Monday Thursday the camp hours are 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Friday hours are from 8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. A morning snack will be served each day, but students must bring their own lunches, including a drink. The morning sessions will focus on Time Management, Applications, and All this will be done on an A/B schedule just like a students schedule is formatted during the regular school year. Afternoon classes, which are also on the A/B schedule, will focus on the Coastal Sciences and Field Studies. These classes will be taught by the schools science teachers. Students will be pro vided with work, class schedule which they bring each day to camp, and student ID. Mrs. Kristen Archon, Assistant Principal, has directed the camp for the past 6 years. She is assisted by Mrs. Kilby, Mrs. Wakefield, and Mrs. Welch. After sharing the Student Handbook and Code of Conduct with the stu dents during daily snack times, they meet with the parents of rising 6th grade for a breakfast on KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerPlans Finalized For USNS Spearheads Deployment To 4th Fleet AORBy Lt. Sonny LorriusU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs Service members and civilians involved in the scheduled deployment of the joint high speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) this summer to the U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations met March 25 and March for the mission. The Spearhead is a 338-foot-long catama ran with a top speed of 43 knots and an average speed of 35 knots. With airline-style seat ing for 312 troops, a mission bay area of 20,000 square feet and a heli copter deck, it can be used in each of the 4th Fleet lines of opera tion: security coopera tion activities, maritime security and contingency operations, including humanitarian assis tance and disaster relief. During its 4 1/2 months in the joint area of operGuatemala, Honduras and Colombia. It also will participate in coun terdrug operations and conduct experiments on behalf of the Naval Warfare Development Command. The mission, known as Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2014, will build on the experiences USNS Swift (HSV-2), another catamaran, which par ticipated in Southern Partnership Station 2013 and completed testing of an unmanned blimp and unmanned aerial vehicle last year. The SPS-JHSV 14 mission is set to be an exciting deployment, said Ken Miller, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Commands lead plan ner for the mission. The final planning confer ence is a key milestone in the operations planning cycle and helps to blend the detailed planning being done by all stake holders. The deployment will begin in late May from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, Va. After a Mayport, the vessel will carry what are known as adaptive force packages in this case including a Seabee detachment, a Marine Corps security cooperation team, a riv erine crew and others packages are nonstan dard sets of personnel and equipment needed to accomplish particular missions. The vessel will complete an experimentation period near Key West and then carry Marines from the 4th Law Enforcement Battalion and their equipment, including shipping containers, a truck and Humvees, to the Dominican Republic for Tradewinds 2014, a U.S. Southern Commandsponsored exercise that aims to increase regional cooperation in counter ing illicit trafficking. The vessel will conduct detection and monitor ing activities in support of Operation Martillo, return the Marines to Florida, and then resume its Martillo activities. Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. mili tary participation is led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, a component of U.S. Southern Command. In late summer, the ves sel will transport the adaptive force pack Guatemala and transport a mobile diving and sal vage unit and an explosive ordnance disposal team from Guatemala to Colombia. It will then take the same units from Guatemala and Colombia to Honduras for training there. After additional detec tion and monitoring and experimentation periods, it will return the units to the United States in early October, conclud ing Southern Partnership Station 2014. Spearhead was built in Mobile, Ala., and delivered to the Military Sealift Command in late 2012. The vessels first deployment began early this year and was to the 6th Fleet area of opera tions, where it supported security cooperation and maritime security efforts in the Mediterranean Sea, on the Atlantic coast of Africa and in the Gulf of Guinea. It is one of 10 joint high speed vessels to be built for the Navy. The vessels will have civilian crews. Capt. Sam Hancock, the commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, will be the Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2014 mission commander. DESRON 40 is look ing forward to this deployment, Hancock said. We look forward to the opportunity to see what JHSV can do on its maiden voyage to our AOR and build on that for the future. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy. mil/local/cusns/. See SLO, Page 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 USS De Wert Decommissions At MayportBy Ensign Kierstin KingUSS De Wert Public Affairs OfficerAfter more than 30 years of Naval ser vice, crew members, plankowners, fam ily members and friends gathered at Naval Station Mayport April 4, to bid farewell to the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate USS De Wert (FFG 45) during a decommis sioning ceremony. De Wert completed its last deployment Dec. 23, after successfully com pleting operations in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. There the crew provided maritime security in the Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa regions as part of NATOs counter-piracy operations. I am grateful for the crews relentless service and dedication to our mission, said De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas. It has been an extraor dinary honor to be the decommissioning com manding officer of this amazing ship. Celebrating years of inspections, deploy ments, port visits, heli copter operations, main tenance periods and underway replenishments, generations of De Wert crewmembers shared stories about their time aboard the ship. Now, with years of perspective, and looking at the ships history, I am proud to have been part of starting her out and to be part of the De Wert family, said plankowner Jerry Miller. The ship was commis sioned Nov. 19, 1983 and named after Hospital Corpsman Richard De Wert, who was posthu mously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor after repeat edly entering the battle field in order to aid the wounded and bring them to safety. -Photo by Paige GnannThe official party salutes as the Naval Station Mayport color guard presents the colors during the decommissioning ceremony of guidedmissile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) aboard Naval Station Mayport. De Wert is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), salutes as he walks through the sideboys dur ing a decommissioning ceremony at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannA former crew member of USS De Wert attends the decommissioning ceremony of the ship on April 4. -Photo by Paige GnannGuests and former crewmembers of USS De Wert give a round of applause to the current crew at the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannAdm. (Ret.) Walter F. Doran, the second commanding officer of tUSS De Wert, delivers remarks during the ship's decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew stands at parade rest on board the ship as USS De Wert Executive Officer, Cmdr. Chris Dickerson, listens to the final remarks from the ships captain, Cmdr. Joseph C. Thomas. during USS De Werts decommissioning ceremony at Naval Station Mayport on April 4.-Photo by Paige GnannA crewmember signals the ship to retire the colors during USS De Werts decommissioning ceremony on April 4.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Damian BergThe crew of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) depart the ship for the final time during the ship's decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), stand at parade rest during the ship's decommissioning ceremony. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service-Photo by MC2 Damian BergSailors retire the colors during a decommissioning ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) at Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergEnsign Courtney Banske bows her head in prayer during the decommission ing ceremony of guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) on Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crewmembers and guests tour the ship for the last time and get a chance to mingle with the current crew after the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannThe family of the ships namesake, Hospital Corpsman Richard De Wert, sits with guests, plankowners and former crewmembers as the ship is decommis sioned during a ceremony on board Naval Station Mayport on April 4. De Wert was decommissioned after 30 years of service.-Photo by Paige GnannCMDCM Thomas Caudle presents the ships commissioning pennant to Cmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45).

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Burd Becomes 20th Skipper Of HSM-40From StaffCmdr. Michael Burd relieved Cmdr. Sil Perrella as commanding officer of HSM-40 during a change of com mand ceremony held at the squadron hangar on April 3. Burd graduated in 1993 from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science. In November 1995, he completed advanced rotary flight training and was designated a Naval Aviator. Burds sea assign ments include an initial operational tour with the HSL-42 Proud Warriors. He served as squad ron Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor (SWTI) with the HSL46 Grandmasters where he was responsible for advanced tactical train ing and qualification of detachment aircrews. In 2003, Commander Burd returned to HSL-42 for his Department Head tour where he ultimate ly served as Operations Officer. As Officer-in-Charge, he led a two-plane detachment in USS Vicksburg (CG 69), shotgun escort for the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) Carrier Strike Group, during a combat deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. From February 2011 to May 2012, Burd served as Commanding Officer of HSL-46 and led his squadron through the HSM communitys first expeditionary-to-expedi tionary transition to the MH-60R Seahawk. Ashore, Burd served with the HSL-40 Airwolves as an FRS Flight Instructor and was recognized as squadron Pilot of the Year in 2001 and 2002. Prior to command, he served in Washington, D.C. on the Joint Staff, Operations Directorate (J-3), as Global Strike Advisor, Assistant Deputy Director for Operations, and Emergency Actions Officer for Operations Team Three in the National Military Command Center. Following his com mand tour, Burd served as PERS-43 Deputy Director and Head Air Combat Placement Officer, Aviation Officer Distribution Division, Navy Personnel Command, in Millington, Tenn. Perrella enlisted in the Navy in 1985 from Fountain Valley, Calif., and served as an Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Technician (AX) in HSL-41 and HSL-47 located at NAS North Island, CA. He was commissioned an Ensign and designated a Naval Aviator through the Naval Aviation Cadet Program (NAVCAD) in December 1992. Perrella reported in January 1994 to the Warlords of HSL-51 in Atsugi, Japan as part of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces. His next assignment was as a FRS Flight Instructor with HSL-41 from March 1997 to June 1999 where he served as the Training Schedules Officer, Personnel Officer, and SH-60B Curriculum Model Manager. In July 1999, he reported to USS Tarawa (LHA 1) as the Mini Boss In July 2004, Perrella joined the Easy Riders of HSL-37 in Kaneohe Bay, HI. He reported to Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., in October 2006. In December 2008, Perrella returned to the Forward Deployed Naval Forces as HSL 51s Executive Officer and assumed command of the Warlords in May 2010. In July 2011, Perrella reported to the Joint Staff, Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate, J5. Perrella served as HSM-40s CO since October 2013.USS Simpson Welcomes Final Commanding OfficerBy Lt. j.g. Julie RosaUSS Simpson Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) held a change of command ceremony April 4 at Naval Station Mayport. Cmdr. Ken Anderson relieved Cmdr. Chris Follin as commanding officer. Anderson is fleeting up after being Simpsons executive officer since November 2012 and will serve as the ships final command ing officer. Simpson is scheduled to be decom missioned in August 2015. Follin came to Simpson as executive officer in April 2011 and assumed command in November 2012. His next assignment is to support the Chief of Naval Operations in Washington, D.C. Anderson and Follin share similar career paths. Both got their start as a submariner and were commissioned via the Seaman-toAdmiral Program. Anderson enlisted in the Navy in August 1990. After complet ing the nuclear power pipeline, he served as a Machinist Mate onboard the USS Bluefish (SSN675), homeported initially in Charleston, SC then Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Selected for the Seaman to Admiral program, he completed Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida in June 1996, then attended Surface Warfare Officer School in Newport, Rhode Island. In February 1997 he reported aboard USS Scott (DDG-995) where he served as Damage Control Assistant and the decommissioning Chief Engineer. In February 1999, he reported aboard USS Hu City (CG-66) in Mayport, Fla., as the Fire Control Officer. Upon complet ing Department Head School, he reported in May 2004 to USS Roosevelt (DDG-80) in Mayport, where he served as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer. During this tour he was rec ognized as the 2007 Atlantic Fleet Tactician of the Year. Anderson reported to USS Simpson (FFG 56) as Executive Officer in November 2012. Ashore he served as the Executive Assistant to the Chief of Legislative Affairs from 20072009, then as the Deputy Division Chief for the Resource and Acquisition Management Office and Military Secretariat in the J-8 Directorate of the Joint Staff from 2009-2012. Follin enlisted under the advanced electronics field in 1987. He served five years on board USS Birmingham (SSN 695) as a Second Class Electronics Technician and Navy Diver. While attached to the Chief of Naval Operations Special Project, Submarine Surveillance Equipment Program and ESM Certification team, he was one of the first 50 Sailors selected for Admiral Boordas Seaman to Admiral Program. After receiving his commission at Officer Candidate School and completing Surface Warfare Division Officer Course in 1996, he reported to USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) where he served as the Main Propulsion Division officer and Strike Officer and earned the SURFPAC ship handler of the year award. In June 1998, Follin reported to Mine Countermeasures Rotational Crew Bravo embarked onboard USS Pioneer (MCM 9) as the Operations Officer deploying to the Arabian Gulf in USS Ardent (MCM 12). While attached to the Naval ROTC unit in Jacksonville, Florida from December 1999 to December 2002, he earned a Bachelor of Science in History and a Masters Degree in Business. Returning to Sea Duty for his Department Head tours, onboard USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), Follin served as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer. His most recent shore assignment was to U.S. Joint Forces Command, Joint War-fighting Center. Follin was selected for the XO/CO fleet up pro gram and has served as Executive Officer aboard USS Simpson (FFG 56) from April 2011 to November 2012, when he assumed Command of Simpson November 16, 2012. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Philippine Sea Names Top Sailors Of The QuarterFrom USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Public AffairsUSS Philippine Sea (CG 58) selected three Sailors as the Sailor, Junior Sailor, and Blue Jacket of the Quarter for the first quarter of fiscal year 2014, April 2. Cheers and con gratulations went to Culinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza, of El Paso, Texas, Sailor of the Quarter; Hull Technician 2nd Class John Geneus, of New York, Junior Sailor of the Quarter: Ships Serviceman Seaman Matthew Muhl, of Waco, Texas, Blue Jacket of the Quarter as their names were announced over the ships intercom system during dinner. The Philippine Sea is loaded top to bottom with great Sailors, so this was not an easy deci sion, said Command Master Chief Lewis Jackson. CS1 Barraza, HT2 Geneus and SHSN Muhl have done an incredible job to stand out amongst their peers and truly deserve to be commended. To be considered, Sailors are nominated by their departments chain of command and have a performance package submitted to the Command Master Chief. This is followed by an oral board, comprised of senior enlisted person nel, in which candidates are asked a series of questions ranging from Naval history and uni form standards to cur rent events and Naval strategy. I was really surprised because all the guys I went up against are top notch, said Barraza. Id like to thank all my peers and junior Sailors because I couldnt be where I am without them. At an awards ceremo ny the Sailors will be given a certificate and a command plaque. I have a great chain of command to thank, said Geneus. Without them I dont think I could be as motivated as I am. They make it easy. Im humbled, said Muhl. I wasnt expect ing to be given this title considering that I was up against some fine Sailors. This is really a win for the ships sup ply department who has supported me. The Philippine Sea is currently on deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Abe McNattShips Serviceman Seaman Matthew Muhl, left, Hull Maintenance Technician 2nd Class John Geneus, center, and Culinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza pose for a picture after being selected as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Sailor, Junior Sailor and Blue Jacket of the Quarter. Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Meritorious Service Medal CMDCM Ross Cramer, NS MayportNavy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal MA1 Michael Kekedakis, NS Mayport AC2 Clayton Alexander, NS Mayport ET2 Louis Alvarez, NS Mayport MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport SH2 Andre Harris, NS Mayport ABE2 Ryan Six, NS Mayport ET3 Allen Edington, NS Mayport ET3 Kevin Walton, NS Mayport Good Conduct Award ET3 Michael Jordan, NS Mayport ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport Acan Levi Jasmer, NS Mayport Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport Flag Letter Of Commendation ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport AC3 Lawrence Shields, NS Mayport MILESTONESAT NS MAYPORThome visitation for new parents of children up to age 3, to help parents reach their full potential working with and being responsible for their children, Thompson said. The Marine Corps pro gram supports parents with children up to age 5, she added. The New Parent Support Program is a part of the Family Advocacy Program, which has a preven tion piece that offers courses and opportuni ties for support groups, Thompson said.From Page 1Child THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 7

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NMCRS Rising -Photo by Paige GnannChief Religious Programs Specialist (SW/EXW/FMF) Hector Feliciano adds to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Active Duty Fund Drive thermometer set up at the NS Mayport static display on Maine Street. The NMCRS is a nonprofit organization that offers interest-free loans and grants for emergencies and tuition assistance. The fund drive is currently underway. In 2013 Naval Station Mayport ships and commands raised over $215,000 for NMCRS. The society helped out over 1,500 families with over $800,000 in grant money. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 9

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Friday morning. The parent breakfast is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 8 at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 12:30 p.m. Parents will be briefed on the Student Code of Conduct, behavioral and academic expec tations, special pro grams, and adjustment to middle school other wise known as cutting the cord at the gym car loop! Students are dis missed after the parent breakfast on Friday to go home with their parents. Students who attend camp and parents who attend this breakfast whether their student attends the camp or not, are not required to attend regular 6th Grade Orientation which is part of a School-Wide Orientation on Friday, Aug. 8 from 1 4 p.m. Postcards announcing the School-Wide Orientation will be sent via US Mail. The Shark Bites Transition Program has spaces for 200 rising 6th graders. Dont be left out! For an application, email archonk1@ duvalschools.org Applications are also available at the school. Completed applications can be emailed to Mrs. Archon at the above email address or faxed to her at (904) 247-5987. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. From Page 3Sharks Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scavenger hunt and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-the-World Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awe some prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activities tar get single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete list ing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and trans portation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. April 23: CSADD Color Run 5K Run/3K Walk. Sign ups start 7 a.m. Run starts 8 a.m. Must bring eye protection. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Intramural Sports April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday 18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide Lock-In 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at Teen Center. $18 advanced, $20 day if space permits. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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-Photo courtesy of Oasis GalleyNaval Station Mayports Oasis Galley Staff set the pace at the 5th Annual Setting the Pace for Peace Hubbard House Awareness Walk for Domestic Violence held on April 5. Pictured from left is CWO3 Griffith, CWO4 Jakes, CSCM Williams, CSCS Gomez, CSC Cole, CSC Rickerson, CSC Colter, CS1 Latham, CS1 Guidry, CS1 Smith, CS2 Watson, LS2 Morrow, CS2 Oaks, Erin Mcfeeley, CS2 Wilson, CS2 Ringgold, CS2 Fortney, CS3 Graham, and CSSN Darring.Walk Against Domestic ViolenceFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.April 10, 2014 9-10:30 a.m., Stroller Strut, Behind Building 1 April 10, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., EFMP Point of Contact Training, Building 1, RM 702 April 10, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 14-15, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Advanced Higher Education Track, Building 1, RM 708 April 14-18, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 14, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 14, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 April 16, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 April 16, 2014 4 p.m., Home Buying, Building, RM 1616 April 17, 2014 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training, Building 1, RM 1124 April 17, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 21-25, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop Building 1, RM 1616 April 21, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 21, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 April 23, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 April 23, 2014 11 a.m.-noon, Raising Financially Fit Kids Building 1, RM 719 April 24, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Building 1, RM 702 April 24, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 24, 2014 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Mothers Chapel THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 11

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Truman CSG Completes 5th Fleet MissionFrom Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsShips and embarked squadrons from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOR) March 28. The strike group com pleted a 120-mile transit of the Suez Canal, marking the end to more than seven straight months of operations in the Middle East in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), maritime security operations and security coopera tion efforts with various countries throughout the region. The Truman Strike Group has been Americas away team these past eight months, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, HST CSG commander. Our young Sailors and Marines have operated in a very demanding environ ment and executed with professionalism, preci sion and lethality when called upon. I could not be more proud of their dedication and sacrifice. While in the 5th Fleet AOR, the strike group conducted a full range of maritime operations and theater security coopera-Gettysburg Visits Longtime Ally, Honors FallenBy Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) participated in a com munity engagement project during its scheduled port visit in Toulon, France, April 4. Fifty Sailors traveled to a cemetery in Rhone and spent the morning working on the grounds and laying wreaths in honor of American soldiers who died in World War II. It is a reminder of the honor and courage that our predecessors portrayed, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class James Wallace, who spent the morning working at the cemetery. It is a privilege to be able to honor their legacy by working here today. Earlier in deployment, Gettysburg spent more than five weeks conducting operations with the French navys Charles de Gaulle Strike Group, as part of Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. The cruiser also vis ited Marseille, France, in early August. The current visit allowed Gettysburg Sailors to reflect on their previ ous interactions with the French. Our joint operations with the French were an incredible experience, said Lt.j.g. Collin Roof, who served as Gettysburgs liaison on board French frigate FS Forbin (D620). Working so closely with the French has taught us so much about each other. On the first part of our deployment, we had the privilege of stopping in Marseille, France, and now we visit Toulon, says Lt. Justin Top, the ships chaplain, who organized many of the community relations events for the cruiser. We have been welcomed with abso lute hospitality by both cities and it has been an incredible experience working with the French. Gettysburg, as part of Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is operat ing in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts as it completes a nine month deployment to the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet AORs. tion efforts with coalition partners and allies, ranging from OEF support to assisting mariners in distress. The strike group also conducted five weeks of integrated operations with French Task Force 473, led by the French aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91). The two navies operated and exercised together conducting flight operations, board ing exercises, air defense exercises, combat search and rescue training, livegunnery exercises and personnel exchanges. HST CSG also interacted with the Spanish, Italian, Norwegian navies and the Australian-led coun ter-piracy task force, Combined Task Force 151 during its deploy ment to the region. Sweeney said the strike groups time was very successful. HST CSG consists of the aircraft car rier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), along with embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 and its squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadron 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes; guidedmissile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64); and guided-missile destroy ers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87). 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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The aeration process can sometimes cause a rotten egg like smell near the Water Treatment Plant (WTP). The water is stored in one of two reservoirs after it leaves the aera tor units. The 2 MG reservoir is located on the north side of Massey Avenue at the WTP and the 0.5 MG reservoir is on the South south side across the street from the plant. Following storage in the reservoirs, the water is sent to the water dis tribution system by one of the six high service pumps. Prior to being sent into the water dis tribution system via the pumps, the water is treated again with chlo rine in a process called post-chlorination. A minimum residual chlo rine concentration of 0.2 milligrams per liter (mg/l) is required by Federal, State and Local regulations at the furthest point in the water distribution system. This process ensures safety to all recipients of the water throughout the system. Once in the distribution system, water is used to meet base demands. The operators of the system take great pride in producing high quality water for NS Mayport. For any questions related to the water production and distribution, or concerns about water quality, please contact the Naval Station Public Works Department, Water Commodity Manager, Lt.j.g. Baker at 904-2703152.From Page 1Water Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to congratulate Christopher and Stephanie Kujat who are the Residents of the Week! We appreciate the Kujat Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. Pictured from left is Stephanie Kujat, Christopher Kujat and Jessica Menard, BBC Resident SpecialistScholarship Application Deadline Extended For Balfour Beatty ResidentsFrom BBCBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation has extend ed accepting scholar ship applications from high school seniors and undergraduate students who live in a Balfour Beatty Community and are attending or planning to attend an accredited educational/ technical institution for the2014 2015 aca demic year. To apply for these scholarships go to the Foundations website, www.bbcom munitiesfoundation. org/scholarships.aspx, print out, complete, and submit the appli cation and all required materials to Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation at 10 Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073. Applications must be postmarked by Friday, May 2, 2014. Midway Dinner Tickets On Sale For June 7From Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrat ing the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speaker is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or email anu day00@aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 13

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CHINFO Award Winner Saying GoodbyeUSS De Wert Decommissions Pages 4-5 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall and FFSC New Parent Support Counselor Jaye Meyer are joined by the VPK children at NS Mayports Child Development Center to sign the proclamation declaring April as Child Abuse Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. After McCall signed as commanding officer, he invited the children to come up and sign their names to the poster as well.By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department believes military children serve their country alongside their service member par ents, DODs director of the office of family policy/chil dren and youth said. When military children serve, they do so by making sacrifices when parents are deployed, through frequent moves, starting new schools and making new friends on a continuing basis, Barbara Thompson said in a recent interview with The Pentagon Channel for the Month of the Military Child thats being celebrated in April. We feel its important for the nation to know that military children also serve their country, Thompson said. To honor military chil dren for their sacrifices and service, DOD and the ser vices have planned activi ties this month that range from installation-based fairs, parades, and literacy and art events, she said. Military Kids Day, April 15, marks the third-annual Purple Up! day when adults wear purple to show support of children from all the ser vices, Thompson said. DOD has numerous yearround programs and aware ness efforts to honor mili tary children, and Thompson elaborated on some of those initiatives. To help children build their resilience, DOD has coordi nated programs with Sesame Street to help with ongoing change in military childrens lives, Thompson noted. Sesame [Street] has been an outstanding contributor to the well-being of military children, she said, naming a series of DVDs that cover such topics for military chil dren as divorce, grief, separa tion and deployment, resil ience skills, and visible or invisible injuries. Sesame Street also recent ly launched two new smart phone applications. One [app] covers reloca tion, and another is to help children learn self-regulation skills so they become more resilient, Thompson said. And everything is free. Thompson emphasized that April also is Child Abuse Prevention Month and said awareness in this arena is important to DOD. Child Abuse Prevention Month is particularly impor tant because its a social responsibility for all of us to make sure children are safe and their well-being is pro tected, she said. Everybody has a responsibility. Giving parents the tools to make them strong supporters of their children and to keep them safe from predators and from violence within the family is crucial, she added. Parenting is tough, regardless of the situation and the age of the child. They each bring their nuances to the table, whether its chil dren at [age] 2 who say no, or a teenager whos some times a little defiant, she said. DOD offers parenting skill resources, Thompson noted, such as the newly launched Parenting Course. The course, she explained, examines parenting from the context of the military life style, which revolves around deployments and parental separations from their chil dren at different stages of their development. And an installation-based initiative, the new Parent Support Program, involves DOD Salutes Military Children FFSC Plans Events To Honor Military Children Join Fleet and Family Support Center today (April 10) for the 2nd Annual Stroller Strut starting at 9 a.m. at the back of Building One. Moms are encouraged to bring their strollers and get in some sun, fun and exer cise in suppport of Month of the Military Children. FFSC is looking for the best decorated stroller on base! ... English Tea For Expectant Mothers will be held on April 24 from 1-3 p.m. at the Base Chapel. FFSC is honor ing our expectant moms in recognition of Aprils Child Abuse Prevention Month. Registration required.-Photo by Paige GnannHarper Fernandez, 4, signs her name to the Child Abuse Prevention Month Proclamation.A Drop At A TimeBy Lt.j.g. Stephen BakerPWD Mayport Commodity ManagerYou use it day, but have you ever wondered where the water flowing out of faucets throughout Naval Station Mayports buildings, homes and even the water on its ships comes from? NS Mayport provides pota ble water to all ships, tenant commands, residents, and visitors. An average of approxi mately 1 million gallons (MG) of water is consumed per day for drinking, toilets, irrigation, and various other reasons. NS Mayport operates and maintains a sophisticated water treatment plant and distribution system. Water is drawn from the Floridian Aquifer via three deep wells at a depth of approximate ly 1000 feet. The aquifer is the source of freshwater for most of Florida; it is the larg est and deepest aquifer in the southeastern U.S. The aqui fer is an abundant, but not limitless, source of water that recharges from surface water that moves downward through porous rock and soil lay ers. The raw water is tested to ensure it does not exceed a maximum contaminant level before treatment. Once drawn from the earth, the raw water is treated by inject ing a chlorine solution to kill bacteria and other organ isms. This is referred to as pre-chlorination. Chlorine is the method for treating raw water for consumption and use in Community Public Water Systems. Next, aerator units allow water to gravity fall through a series of trays where insolu ble gases are removed from the water via blower units. The blower units remove the gases through an exhaust and water continues through the process. The aerator units are integral in enhancing taste, color, and odor of our drinking water. See Water, Page 13 See Child, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Command Chaplain Chap. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer .................................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Chief Petty Officers Celebrate 121 Years of ExcellenceBy Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike StevensAs the master chief petty officer of the Navy, I get the chance to talk with chief petty officers from all across the world. As I travel throughout the fleet, it is evident that chiefs are doing great things. Their Sailors are a reflection of their amazing work. Established on April 1, 1893, chiefs No one can be under any illusions of what being a chief petty officer means. You must be All In, All The Time. We must live honest and humble lives because our Sailors can see between the lines. They can see through the chief who tells his or her Sailors one thing, but does the opposite on the week ends. You must live and lead consistently. By myself, I dont have the capacity to come up with all of the answers, but I believe that our chiefs mess must have common ground, something that we can all work on together. We must have a focus. This is where Zeroing in on Excellence comes in. Developing leaders: Leaders are the lids to their organizations. Leadership touches us all. Leadership is also ones ability to influence others. I was in a command that made every mission, people were happy to come to work, they were proud to wear the command col ors, and people wanted to be there. There was very little misconduct, or mishaps, and it was a good place to be sta tioned. The lid was the commanding officer and the command master chief. Nothing changed within that command except for the change of command. Within 30 days of the change of command, the command went from being world champions to the worst in the league. It took me years to understand the significance of influence our senior leaders make. Great leaders are what make great organiza tions. If we want to mitigate many problems we are facing, we must have the right leaders in the right place at the right time. We are investing our time, energy and effort into the problem, but the reality is that without the leadership we wont rid the prob lem. Good order and dis cipline: I think with our young men and women who serve, their behavior is a reflection of our behavior. If you want people to do the right thing, then we must to do the right thing. Across the board of senior lead ers, if we live the life beyond reproach then we would highly encour age, through our actions, young men and women who serve beneath us to do the same thing. Our greatest failure has been our failure to lead by example. Im not look ing to start a program, collect date, but rather just do the right thing. Especially when its hard because young Sailors will see you when they look in the mirror. Controlling what we own: The greatest dif ference maker in life is our attitude. You cant always control what hap pens to you but you can control how you react. We often spend so much time complaining about some of the challenges that life has dealt us, and Im guilty too, but if we really stood back and took a hard look, wed realize that within those challenges, lies tremen dous opportunities. With the many challenges facing our Navy today, as much or more than ever, controlling what we own is of utmost importance. The things that we have no control over simply cannot distract us. Ive been a chief petty officer for 19 years, and I understand the per ceived history and tra ditions of our Chiefs Mess. Ive seen a lot during evolution of the way weve trained our first class petty officers. For many years, we werent physically hurt ing people, but it seemed to bring out the worst in our chief petty offi cers. Wed do things in a group that we would never do individually. I saw people say and do things that they normal ly wouldnt do on their own. I just knew that if I didnt stand for what is fundamentally right, with treating people with dignity and respect, then I was just as guilty as the people I had a problem with. If you look through out our history of the United States, some of the greatest things weve done have created strife and discontent. We say that we are a democrat ic society and that the majority has the say so, but every once in a while in our history, theres a person that goes against the majority because its simply the right thing to do. Chief petty officers are very influential in the Navy. If we can train our reliefs with dignity and respect, then we can ulti mately get it right with every Sailor we come across. Remember, when you do the right things for the right reasons, you will always prevail. There are many young Sailors who will one day serve among the ranks as chief petty officers to continue commemorat ing the legacy of excel lence. Id like to take a moment to say thank you for everything you do, every single day. Our time in these jobs as seniors is short and we must continue to make every day our master piece.-Photo by MC1 Michael WissChief Petty Officers from Naval Station Mayport and its tenant commands gather for a photo during the CPO Dine In held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on April 1 to celebrate the 121 birthday of the Chief Petty Officer.Everyone Needs A Second Chance Some TimesWhen Abram was 99 years old, the Lord appeared to him and said, I am the Almighty God; walk and live habitually before Me and be perfect (blameless, wholehearted, complete). And I will make My covenant (solemn pledge) between Me and you and will mul tiply you exceedingly. Then Abram fell on his face.. (Genesis 17:1-3a, Amplified Bible). What do you plan to be doing when you are 99 years old? Jet Skiing? Sky Diving? Probably notwell maybe SMILE. If you are like me if the LORD wills when I turn 99, I plan to be doing very little but my actions do not appear to be the norm for those walking with God in the Old Testament. The first thing I noticed in the above passage was that Abram was 99 years old and yet in spite of his age the Bible says the Lord appeared to him. Before we deal with what God said to Abram, I want to spend a moment exploring the context of this passage. This was not the first time God had appeared or spoken to Abram. The first time God spoke to Abram he called him into a covenant relationship (Gen. 12). One of the aspects of this covenant was that Abram and his wife, Sarah, would be blessed with a son. But after waiting for a long time for this promise to be fulfilled, they decided that God was taking too long and needed their assistance. Their plan backfired. Can you relate to this? Have you ever tried to assist God with a prom ise, only to find yourself frustrated? That is the context of the passage. It has been 13 years. Abram and Sarah are sorry, frustrated and des perate, but Gods timing is always right. In the mist of their mess up and frustra tion, God appears before Abram and rebukes him for taking things into his own hands. Well, not actually. The text tells us that it is not a rebuke that Abram hears, but an instruction. God com mands Abram to walk and live habitually before Him. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Calvin B. Gardner, Sr. CNSL Ministry CenterGod then reminds Abram of the covenant that he made with him. I know what you have done Abram. I know you are embarrassed and frustrated, but I am the God of a second chance. What you have done or have not done does not void my covenant with you. Walk blameless, wholeheartedly, and complete before me this day forward. Wow, what a gracious God we serve. Do you need a second chance? Here is proof posi tive that God is willing to give you a second chance. The revelation of this passage is not necessarily what God does, but how he chooses to reveal himself to Abram. In the mist of Abrams wrong turns, God identifies himself as the Almighty God. The Hebrew word for Almighty God in the Hebrew is El Shaddai. This is the first time God has chosen to reveal himself to Abram by this name but it will not be the last (Gen 28:3, 35:11). In all uses of the name El Shaddai, God is reminding his people that His power is over all situations. He reminds Abram in the above pas sage that He is all pow erful. Nothing or no one exceeds the power of God. Whatever God promises, He has the power to perform (Ex. 6:4). Do you have a situation that seems impos sible? Have you made a few wrong turns in your life? Do you need a sec ond chance? Remember, God is El Shaddai (Almighty God) and this means He is all-powerful in spite of our good and bad choices. He rules His people by His word and Spirit, and He rules over the barrenness of your situation. Call on El Shaddai, the Almighty God!

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Shark Bites Coming To Mayport MiddleDa dum..da dum.. da dum.da dumda dumda dum..da dum.. da dumda dumdadum No, not that kind of Shark Bite! Shark Bites is Mayport Middle Schools 6th Grade Transition Camp for all students current ly in 5th grade projected to 6th grade at Mayport Middle School for the 2014-2015 year. This is a 6th Grade Orientation but in much greater detail to allow the new students to get the feel of the campus from going through the lunch line to changing classes on an A/B sched ule. Students will attend camp for FREE Monday, Aug. 4 Friday, Aug. 8. Monday Thursday the camp hours are 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Friday hours are from 8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. A morning snack will be served each day, but students must bring their own lunches, including a drink. The morning sessions will focus on Time Management, Applications, and All this will be done on an A/B schedule just like a students schedule is formatted during the regular school year. Afternoon classes, which are also on the A/B schedule, will focus on the Coastal Sciences and Field Studies. These classes will be taught by the schools science teachers. Students will be pro vided with work, class schedule which they bring each day to camp, and student ID. Mrs. Kristen Archon, Assistant Principal, has directed the camp for the past 6 years. She is assisted by Mrs. Kilby, Mrs. Wakefield, and Mrs. Welch. After sharing the Student Handbook and Code of Conduct with the stu dents during daily snack times, they meet with the parents of rising 6th grade for a breakfast on KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerPlans Finalized For USNS Spearheads Deployment To 4th Fleet AORBy Lt. Sonny LorriusU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs Service members and civilians involved in the scheduled deployment of the joint high speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) this summer to the U.S. Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations met March 25 and March for the mission. The Spearhead is a 338-foot-long catama ran with a top speed of 43 knots and an aver age speed of 35 knots. With airline-style seat ing for 312 troops, a mis sion bay area of 20,000 square feet and a heli copter deck, it can be used in each of the 4th Fleet lines of opera tion: security coopera tion activities, maritime security and contingency operations, including humanitarian assis tance and disaster relief. During its 4 1/2 months in the joint area of operGuatemala, Honduras and Colombia. It also will participate in coun terdrug operations and conduct experiments on behalf of the Naval Warfare Development Command. The mission, known as Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2014, will build on the experiences USNS Swift (HSV-2), another catamaran, which par ticipated in Southern Partnership Station 2013 and completed testing of an unmanned blimp and unmanned aerial vehicle last year. The SPS-JHSV 14 mission is set to be an exciting deployment, said Ken Miller, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Commands lead plan ner for the mission. The final planning confer ence is a key milestone in the operations planning cycle and helps to blend the detailed planning being done by all stake holders. The deployment will begin in late May from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, Va. After a Mayport, the vessel will carry what are known as adaptive force packages in this case including a Seabee detachment, a Marine Corps security cooperation team, a riv erine crew and others packages are nonstan dard sets of personnel and equipment needed to accomplish particular missions. The vessel will com plete an experimentation period near Key West and then carry Marines from the 4th Law Enforcement Battalion and their equipment, including shipping containers, a truck and Humvees, to the Dominican Republic for Tradewinds 2014, a U.S. Southern Commandsponsored exercise that aims to increase regional cooperation in counter ing illicit trafficking. The vessel will conduct detection and monitor ing activities in support of Operation Martillo, return the Marines to Florida, and then resume its Martillo activities. Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. mili tary participation is led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, a component of U.S. Southern Command. In late summer, the ves sel will transport the adaptive force pack Guatemala and transport a mobile diving and sal vage unit and an explo sive ordnance disposal team from Guatemala to Colombia. It will then take the same units from Guatemala and Colombia to Honduras for training there. After additional detec tion and monitoring and experimentation periods, it will return the units to the United States in early October, conclud ing Southern Partnership Station 2014. Spearhead was built in Mobile, Ala., and delivered to the Military Sealift Command in late 2012. The vessels first deployment began early this year and was to the 6th Fleet area of opera tions, where it supported security cooperation and maritime security efforts in the Mediterranean Sea, on the Atlantic coast of Africa and in the Gulf of Guinea. It is one of 10 joint high speed vessels to be built for the Navy. The vessels will have civilian crews. Capt. Sam Hancock, the commander of Destroyer Squadron 40, will be the Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2014 mission commander. DESRON 40 is look ing forward to this deployment, Hancock said. We look forward to the opportunity to see what JHSV can do on its maiden voyage to our AOR and build on that for the future. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www.navy. mil/local/cusns/. See SLO, Page 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 USS De Wert Decommissions At MayportBy Ensign Kierstin KingUSS De Wert Public Affairs OfficerAfter more than 30 years of Naval ser vice, crew members, plankowners, fam ily members and friends gathered at Naval Station Mayport April 4, to bid farewell to the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate USS De Wert (FFG 45) during a decommis sioning ceremony. De Wert completed its last deployment Dec. 23, after successfully com pleting operations in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. There the crew provided mari time security in the Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa regions as part of NATOs counter-piracy operations. I am grateful for the crews relentless service and dedication to our mission, said De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas. It has been an extraor dinary honor to be the decommissioning com manding officer of this amazing ship. Celebrating years of inspections, deploy ments, port visits, heli copter operations, main tenance periods and underway replenish ments, generations of De Wert crewmembers shared stories about their time aboard the ship. Now, with years of perspective, and looking at the ships history, I am proud to have been part of starting her out and to be part of the De Wert family, said plankowner Jerry Miller. The ship was commis sioned Nov. 19, 1983 and named after Hospital Corpsman Richard De Wert, who was posthu mously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor after repeat edly entering the battle field in order to aid the wounded and bring them to safety. -Photo by Paige GnannThe official party salutes as the Naval Station Mayport color guard presents the colors during the decommissioning ceremony of guidedmissile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) aboard Naval Station Mayport. De Wert is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergCmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), salutes as he walks through the sideboys dur ing a decommissioning ceremony at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannA former crew member of USS De Wert attends the decommissioning ceremony of the ship on April 4. -Photo by Paige GnannGuests and former crewmembers of USS De Wert give a round of applause to the current crew at the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannAdm. (Ret.) Walter F. Doran, the second commanding officer of tUSS De Wert, delivers remarks during the ship's decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew stands at parade rest on board the ship as USS De Wert Executive Officer, Cmdr. Chris Dickerson, listens to the final remarks from the ships captain, Cmdr. Joseph C. Thomas. during USS De Werts decommissioning ceremony at Naval Station Mayport on April 4.-Photo by Paige GnannA crewmember signals the ship to retire the colors during USS De Werts decommissioning ceremony on April 4.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Damian BergThe crew of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) depart the ship for the final time during the ship's decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45), stand at parade rest during the ship's decommissioning ceremony. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service-Photo by MC2 Damian BergSailors retire the colors during a decommissioning ceremony aboard the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) at Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service. -Photo by MC2 Damian BergEnsign Courtney Banske bows her head in prayer during the decommission ing ceremony of guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45) on Naval Station Mayport. The ship is being decommissioned after 30 years of service.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crewmembers and guests tour the ship for the last time and get a chance to mingle with the current crew after the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannThe family of the ships namesake, Hospital Corpsman Richard De Wert, sits with guests, plankowners and former crewmembers as the ship is decommis sioned during a ceremony on board Naval Station Mayport on April 4. De Wert was decommissioned after 30 years of service.-Photo by Paige GnannCMDCM Thomas Caudle presents the ships commissioning pennant to Cmdr. Joseph C. Thomas, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS De Wert (FFG 45).

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Burd Becomes 20th Skipper Of HSM-40From StaffCmdr. Michael Burd relieved Cmdr. Sil Perrella as command ing officer of HSM-40 during a change of com mand ceremony held at the squadron hangar on April 3. Burd graduated in 1993 from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science. In November 1995, he completed advanced rotary flight training and was designated a Naval Aviator. Burds sea assign ments include an initial operational tour with the HSL-42 Proud Warriors. He served as squad ron Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor (SWTI) with the HSL46 Grandmasters where he was responsible for advanced tactical train ing and qualification of detachment aircrews. In 2003, Commander Burd returned to HSL-42 for his Department Head tour where he ultimate ly served as Operations Officer. As Officer-in-Charge, he led a two-plane detachment in USS Vicksburg (CG 69), shotgun escort for the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) Carrier Strike Group, during a combat deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. From February 2011 to May 2012, Burd served as Commanding Officer of HSL-46 and led his squadron through the HSM communitys first expeditionary-to-expedi tionary transition to the MH-60R Seahawk. Ashore, Burd served with the HSL-40 Airwolves as an FRS Flight Instructor and was recognized as squadron Pilot of the Year in 2001 and 2002. Prior to command, he served in Washington, D.C. on the Joint Staff, Operations Directorate (J-3), as Global Strike Advisor, Assistant Deputy Director for Operations, and Emergency Actions Officer for Operations Team Three in the National Military Command Center. Following his com mand tour, Burd served as PERS-43 Deputy Director and Head Air Combat Placement Officer, Aviation Officer Distribution Division, Navy Personnel Command, in Millington, Tenn. Perrella enlisted in the Navy in 1985 from Fountain Valley, Calif., and served as an Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Technician (AX) in HSL-41 and HSL-47 located at NAS North Island, CA. He was commissioned an Ensign and designated a Naval Aviator through the Naval Aviation Cadet Program (NAVCAD) in December 1992. Perrella reported in January 1994 to the Warlords of HSL-51 in Atsugi, Japan as part of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces. His next assignment was as a FRS Flight Instructor with HSL-41 from March 1997 to June 1999 where he served as the Training Schedules Officer, Personnel Officer, and SH-60B Curriculum Model Manager. In July 1999, he reported to USS Tarawa (LHA 1) as the Mini Boss In July 2004, Perrella joined the Easy Riders of HSL-37 in Kaneohe Bay, HI. He reported to Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., in October 2006. In December 2008, Perrella returned to the Forward Deployed Naval Forces as HSL 51s Executive Officer and assumed command of the Warlords in May 2010. In July 2011, Perrella reported to the Joint Staff, Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate, J5. Perrella served as HSM-40s CO since October 2013.USS Simpson Welcomes Final Commanding OfficerBy Lt. j.g. Julie RosaUSS Simpson Public AffairsGuided-missile frig ate USS Simpson (FFG 56) held a change of command ceremony April 4 at Naval Station Mayport. Cmdr. Ken Anderson relieved Cmdr. Chris Follin as commanding officer. Anderson is fleeting up after being Simpsons executive officer since November 2012 and will serve as the ships final command ing officer. Simpson is scheduled to be decom missioned in August 2015. Follin came to Simpson as executive officer in April 2011 and assumed command in November 2012. His next assignment is to support the Chief of Naval Operations in Washington, D.C. Anderson and Follin share similar career paths. Both got their start as a submariner and were commissioned via the Seaman-toAdmiral Program. Anderson enlisted in the Navy in August 1990. After complet ing the nuclear power pipeline, he served as a Machinist Mate onboard the USS Bluefish (SSN675), homeported ini tially in Charleston, SC then Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Selected for the Seaman to Admiral program, he completed Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida in June 1996, then attended Surface Warfare Officer School in Newport, Rhode Island. In February 1997 he reported aboard USS Scott (DDG-995) where he served as Damage Control Assistant and the decommissioning Chief Engineer. In February 1999, he reported aboard USS Hu City (CG-66) in Mayport, Fla., as the Fire Control Officer. Upon complet ing Department Head School, he reported in May 2004 to USS Roosevelt (DDG-80) in Mayport, where he served as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer. During this tour he was rec ognized as the 2007 Atlantic Fleet Tactician of the Year. Anderson reported to USS Simpson (FFG 56) as Executive Officer in November 2012. Ashore he served as the Executive Assistant to the Chief of Legislative Affairs from 20072009, then as the Deputy Division Chief for the Resource and Acquisition Management Office and Military Secretariat in the J-8 Directorate of the Joint Staff from 2009-2012. Follin enlisted under the advanced electronics field in 1987. He served five years on board USS Birmingham (SSN 695) as a Second Class Electronics Technician and Navy Diver. While attached to the Chief of Naval Operations Special Project, Submarine Surveillance Equipment Program and ESM Certification team, he was one of the first 50 Sailors selected for Admiral Boordas Seaman to Admiral Program. After receiving his commission at Officer Candidate School and completing Surface Warfare Division Officer Course in 1996, he reported to USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) where he served as the Main Propulsion Division officer and Strike Officer and earned the SURFPAC ship handler of the year award. In June 1998, Follin reported to Mine Countermeasures Rotational Crew Bravo embarked onboard USS Pioneer (MCM 9) as the Operations Officer deploying to the Arabian Gulf in USS Ardent (MCM 12). While attached to the Naval ROTC unit in Jacksonville, Florida from December 1999 to December 2002, he earned a Bachelor of Science in History and a Masters Degree in Business. Returning to Sea Duty for his Department Head tours, onboard USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), Follin served as Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer. His most recent shore assignment was to U.S. Joint Forces Command, Joint War-fighting Center. Follin was selected for the XO/CO fleet up pro gram and has served as Executive Officer aboard USS Simpson (FFG 56) from April 2011 to November 2012, when he assumed Command of Simpson November 16, 2012. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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Philippine Sea Names Top Sailors Of The QuarterFrom USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Public AffairsUSS Philippine Sea (CG 58) selected three Sailors as the Sailor, Junior Sailor, and Blue Jacket of the Quarter for the first quarter of fiscal year 2014, April 2. Cheers and con gratulations went to Culinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza, of El Paso, Texas, Sailor of the Quarter; Hull Technician 2nd Class John Geneus, of New York, Junior Sailor of the Quarter: Ships Serviceman Seaman Matthew Muhl, of Waco, Texas, Blue Jacket of the Quarter as their names were announced over the ships intercom system during dinner. The Philippine Sea is loaded top to bottom with great Sailors, so this was not an easy deci sion, said Command Master Chief Lewis Jackson. CS1 Barraza, HT2 Geneus and SHSN Muhl have done an incredible job to stand out amongst their peers and truly deserve to be commended. To be considered, Sailors are nominated by their departments chain of command and have a performance package submitted to the Command Master Chief. This is followed by an oral board, comprised of senior enlisted person nel, in which candidates are asked a series of questions ranging from Naval history and uni form standards to cur rent events and Naval strategy. I was really surprised because all the guys I went up against are top notch, said Barraza. Id like to thank all my peers and junior Sailors because I couldnt be where I am without them. At an awards ceremo ny the Sailors will be given a certificate and a command plaque. I have a great chain of command to thank, said Geneus. Without them I dont think I could be as motivated as I am. They make it easy. Im humbled, said Muhl. I wasnt expect ing to be given this title considering that I was up against some fine Sailors. This is really a win for the ships sup ply department who has supported me. The Philippine Sea is currently on deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. -Photo by MC3 Abe McNattShips Serviceman Seaman Matthew Muhl, left, Hull Maintenance Technician 2nd Class John Geneus, center, and Culinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza pose for a picture after being selected as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) Sailor, Junior Sailor and Blue Jacket of the Quarter. Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Meritorious Service Medal CMDCM Ross Cramer, NS MayportNavy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal MA1 Michael Kekedakis, NS Mayport AC2 Clayton Alexander, NS Mayport ET2 Louis Alvarez, NS Mayport MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport SH2 Andre Harris, NS Mayport ABE2 Ryan Six, NS Mayport ET3 Allen Edington, NS Mayport ET3 Kevin Walton, NS Mayport Good Conduct Award ET3 Michael Jordan, NS Mayport ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport Acan Levi Jasmer, NS Mayport Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport Flag Letter Of Commendation ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport AC3 Lawrence Shields, NS Mayport MILESTONESAT NS MAYPORThome visitation for new parents of children up to age 3, to help parents reach their full potential working with and being responsible for their chil dren, Thompson said. The Marine Corps pro gram supports parents with children up to age 5, she added. The New Parent Support Program is a part of the Family Advocacy Program, which has a preven tion piece that offers courses and opportuni ties for support groups, Thompson said.From Page 1Child THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 7

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NMCRS Rising -Photo by Paige GnannChief Religious Programs Specialist (SW/EXW/FMF) Hector Feliciano adds to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Active Duty Fund Drive ther mometer set up at the NS Mayport static display on Maine Street. The NMCRS is a nonprofit organization that offers interest-free loans and grants for emergen cies and tuition assistance. The fund drive is currently underway. In 2013 Naval Station Mayport ships and commands raised over $215,000 for NMCRS. The society helped out over 1,500 families with over $800,000 in grant money. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 9

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Friday morning. The parent breakfast is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 8 at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 12:30 p.m. Parents will be briefed on the Student Code of Conduct, behavioral and academic expec tations, special pro grams, and adjustment to middle school other wise known as cutting the cord at the gym car loop! Students are dis missed after the parent breakfast on Friday to go home with their parents. Students who attend camp and parents who attend this breakfast whether their student attends the camp or not, are not required to attend regular 6th Grade Orientation which is part of a School-Wide Orientation on Friday, Aug. 8 from 1 4 p.m. Postcards announcing the School-Wide Orientation will be sent via US Mail. The Shark Bites Transition Program has spaces for 200 rising 6th graders. Dont be left out! For an application, email archonk1@ duvalschools.org Applications are also available at the school. Completed applications can be emailed to Mrs. Archon at the above email address or faxed to her at (904) 247-5987. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. From Page 3Sharks Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scavenger hunt and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly spe cials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-the-World Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awe some prizes! 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activities tar get single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete list ing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and trans portation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. April 23: CSADD Color Run 5K Run/3K Walk. Sign ups start 7 a.m. Run starts 8 a.m. Must bring eye protection. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Intramural Sports April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday 18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide Lock-In 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at Teen Center. $18 advanced, $20 day if space permits. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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-Photo courtesy of Oasis GalleyNaval Station Mayports Oasis Galley Staff set the pace at the 5th Annual Setting the Pace for Peace Hubbard House Awareness Walk for Domestic Violence held on April 5. Pictured from left is CWO3 Griffith, CWO4 Jakes, CSCM Williams, CSCS Gomez, CSC Cole, CSC Rickerson, CSC Colter, CS1 Latham, CS1 Guidry, CS1 Smith, CS2 Watson, LS2 Morrow, CS2 Oaks, Erin Mcfeeley, CS2 Wilson, CS2 Ringgold, CS2 Fortney, CS3 Graham, and CSSN Darring.Walk Against Domestic ViolenceFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue.April 10, 2014 9-10:30 a.m., Stroller Strut, Behind Building 1 April 10, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., EFMP Point of Contact Training Building 1, RM 702 April 10, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 14-15, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Advanced Higher Education Track, Building 1, RM 708 April 14-18, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 14, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 14, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 April 16, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 April 16, 2014 4 p.m., Home Buying, Building, RM 1616 April 17, 2014 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, RM 1124 April 17, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 21-25, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop Building 1, RM 1616 April 21, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 21, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 April 23, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 April 23, 2014 11 a.m.-noon, Raising Financially Fit Kids Building 1, RM 719 April 24, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, RM 702 April 24, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 24, 2014 1-3 p.m., English Tea for Expectant Mothers Chapel THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 11

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Truman CSG Completes 5th Fleet MissionFrom Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsShips and embarked squadrons from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOR) March 28. The strike group com pleted a 120-mile transit of the Suez Canal, mark ing the end to more than seven straight months of operations in the Middle East in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), mari time security operations and security coopera tion efforts with various countries throughout the region. The Truman Strike Group has been Americas away team these past eight months, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, HST CSG commander. Our young Sailors and Marines have operated in a very demanding environ ment and executed with professionalism, preci sion and lethality when called upon. I could not be more proud of their dedication and sacrifice. While in the 5th Fleet AOR, the strike group conducted a full range of maritime operations and theater security coopera-Gettysburg Visits Longtime Ally, Honors FallenBy Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) participated in a com munity engagement project during its sched uled port visit in Toulon, France, April 4. Fifty Sailors traveled to a cemetery in Rhone and spent the morning work ing on the grounds and laying wreaths in honor of American soldiers who died in World War II. It is a reminder of the honor and courage that our predecessors portrayed, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class James Wallace, who spent the morning work ing at the cemetery. It is a privilege to be able to honor their legacy by working here today. Earlier in deployment, Gettysburg spent more than five weeks conducting operations with the French navys Charles de Gaulle Strike Group, as part of Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. The cruiser also vis ited Marseille, France, in early August. The current visit allowed Gettysburg Sailors to reflect on their previ ous interactions with the French. Our joint operations with the French were an incredible experience, said Lt.j.g. Collin Roof, who served as Gettysburgs liaison on board French frig ate FS Forbin (D620). Working so closely with the French has taught us so much about each other. On the first part of our deployment, we had the privilege of stopping in Marseille, France, and now we visit Toulon, says Lt. Justin Top, the ships chaplain, who organized many of the community relations events for the cruiser. We have been welcomed with abso lute hospitality by both cities and it has been an incredible experience working with the French. Gettysburg, as part of Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is operat ing in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts as it completes a nine month deployment to the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet AORs. tion efforts with coalition partners and allies, ranging from OEF support to assisting mariners in dis tress. The strike group also conducted five weeks of integrated operations with French Task Force 473, led by the French aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91). The two navies operated and exercised together conducting flight operations, board ing exercises, air defense exercises, combat search and rescue training, livegunnery exercises and personnel exchanges. HST CSG also inter acted with the Spanish, Italian, Norwegian navies and the Australian-led coun ter-piracy task force, Combined Task Force 151 during its deploy ment to the region. Sweeney said the strike groups time was very successful. HST CSG consists of the aircraft car rier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), along with embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 and its squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadron 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes; guidedmissile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64); and guided-missile destroy ers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87). 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014

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The aeration process can sometimes cause a rotten egg like smell near the Water Treatment Plant (WTP). The water is stored in one of two reservoirs after it leaves the aera tor units. The 2 MG reservoir is located on the north side of Massey Avenue at the WTP and the 0.5 MG reservoir is on the South south side across the street from the plant. Following storage in the reservoirs, the water is sent to the water dis tribution system by one of the six high service pumps. Prior to being sent into the water dis tribution system via the pumps, the water is treated again with chlo rine in a process called post-chlorination. A minimum residual chlo rine concentration of 0.2 milligrams per liter (mg/l) is required by Federal, State and Local regulations at the furthest point in the water distribution system. This process ensures safety to all recipients of the water throughout the system. Once in the distribution system, water is used to meet base demands. The opera tors of the system take great pride in producing high quality water for NS Mayport. For any questions related to the water production and distribution, or concerns about water quality, please contact the Naval Station Public Works Department, Water Commodity Manager, Lt.j.g. Baker at 904-2703152.From Page 1Water Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to congratulate Christopher and Stephanie Kujat who are the Residents of the Week! We appreciate the Kujat Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. Pictured from left is Stephanie Kujat, Christopher Kujat and Jessica Menard, BBC Resident SpecialistScholarship Application Deadline Extended For Balfour Beatty ResidentsFrom BBCBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation has extend ed accepting scholar ship applications from high school seniors and undergraduate students who live in a Balfour Beatty Community and are attending or planning to attend an accredited educational/ technical institution for the2014 2015 aca demic year. To apply for these scholarships go to the Foundations website, www.bbcom munitiesfoundation. org/scholarships.aspx, print out, complete, and submit the appli cation and all required materials to Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation at 10 Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073. Applications must be postmarked by Friday, May 2, 2014. Midway Dinner Tickets On Sale For June 7From Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrat ing the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical dis plays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speaker is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or email anu day00@aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 10, 2014 13

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