Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
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Jacksonville, FL
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March 11, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00341


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CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Ships Capture Prestigious Award USS Roosevelt, USS Philippine Sea, USS Gettysburg See Story and More Photos, Pages 8-9 CSADD Invites You To Run For Sexual Assault AwarenessBy MC2 Damian BergNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) invites every Sailor, Marine and DOD Civilian in the Jacksonville area to join them for a 5k Color run/ walk in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAPM) aboard Naval Station Mayport April 23. The run/walk will be part of many events that CSADD is doing for the Navy Sexual Assault Awareness Month; a month dedicated educat ing Sailors and Marines about the effects of sexu al assault in the Navy. We chose a color run because colors represent diversity and diversity is what makes our Navy the best in the world, said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jose Pacheco. Sexual Assault Awareness month is an important time to remember those who have been victims and take lessons learned from their situation, and hopefully educate our selves from that. Signup starts at 10 a.m. in front of the Base Fitness Center and the race starts 11 a.m. This is a great way to get away from the usual boring PowerPoint and See CSADD, Page 11 April Is Sexual Assault Awareness MonthFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced the 2014 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) theme of Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault and issued guidance to focus efforts on aware ness and prevention of sexual violence in NAVADMIN 066/14 released March 20. The goal of the month is for indi vidual commands to pause and reflect on what the Navy has See SAAM, Page 12No Place For Assault Of Any Kind -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, signs a a Sexual Assault Awareness proclamation in front of members of Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), Base Chapel, SAPR advo cates and the Victim Advocacy team last week in honor of April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month. FFSC has scheduled several events throughout the month in conjunction with Naval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) including a Clothesline Project at the Single Sailor, a denim drive to benefit the local rape crisis center and a 5k Color Run on April 23. SERMC Awards 15 Sailors With NAMTS CertificatesFrom Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Public AffairsSoutheast Regional Maintenance Centers (SERMCs) Commanding Officer Capt. Dave Gombas awarded 15 Sailors with Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs) during an awards ceremony on Naval Station Mayport March 20. Of those awarded, five certifica tions were in Gas Turbine Repair (NEC 4140), three in Rigging/ Weight Test (NEC 0121), four in Valve Repair (NEC 4540) and three in Outside Machine (NEC 4542). NAMTS is a Navy training program designed to provide shore-based Sailors the oppor tunity to learn critical skills and earn NECs. The program trains Sailors alongside experi enced civilian technicians, who will, ultimately, take these skills back to sea. The goal is to return a more skilled technician to the Fleet; thereby, increasing ship self-sufficiency. My goal is for each Sailor to earn a NAMTS NEC, if not mul tiple NECs, Gombas said. This is a win-win situation where we can get great work from you sup porting our ships and you can return to sea a better technician and improve self-sufficiency on your next ship. Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class (SW/AW) Sande from the Valve Shop was one of the SERMC Sailors to receive an NEC. Sande, a SERMC Sailor who underwent a recent conversion from Machinists Mate to Gas Turbine System Technician, is assigned outside his rating. Despite this recent change, he earned his Valve Repair NEC in a relatively short period of time. I am spending my spare time working on my Gas Turbine Repair NEC (4140), said Sande. Working at a Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) is a great opportunity for me to get up to speed on gas turbine engines and learned them from the ground up. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC), visit: www.navsea.navy.mil/CNRMC/SERMC/ Power To PrevailRobert G. Bradley Decommissions Pages 4-5

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer .................................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: I remember vividly the sunlight streaming through a slit window in the small stone chapel, illuminating a bronze plaque with a cross and inscription. It read In honored remembrance of the fortitude and sacrifice of that valiant company that perished building the railway from Thailand to Burma dur ing their long captivity I will make a name and praise among all peo ple of the earth when I turn back your captivity before your eyes, saith the LORD. Located in a very hot and humid River Kwai valley region of central western Thailand lies an allied war cemetery. The land has been gifted by the King of Thailand and its people as the final resting place for hundreds of allied war riors who made the ulti mate sacrifice so very far from their family and home. As I stroll down row upon perfect row of gravestones, it is hard to wrap my mind around the contrast of the immaculate and beauti ful garden setting that is the final resting place of these men and the bar baric, horrendous condi tions that they lived in shortly before death. Students of World War II history will certainly know about the infamous death railway that was constructed by the Empire of Japan in 1943 in an effort to open a new logistical route safe from Allied Navy war ships in Asia. The pri mary means for building this line was provided through the forced labor of approximately 60,000 POWS from the United Kingdom, Australia, and The Netherlands. Included were also 400 Americans, some of whom were captured after surviving the sink ing of the USS Houston. It is estimated that about 12,400 allied POWs died as a result of the cruel and harsh living condi tions, malnutrition and back breaking forced labor. Years later a movie was made called The Bridge over the River Kwai that captured a small, largely inaccu rate piece of this infa mous time. As I visit CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Darin Dunham CHSMWLShipmates, On Friday, the crew of USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) departed the ship for the last time as the Fighting 49 was decommissioned during a ceremony that included nine former commanding officers, plankowners, city and state representatives, fami lies and friends of the crew. During its 30 years of service, USS Robert G. Bradley fought the war on drugs in South America, deployed to the Mediterranean numerous times, and carried out specialized operations in North American, Latin American and European waters. I wish the best of luck to Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, his crew and their families as they move on to their next challenging assignments. We will also say goodbye to USS De Wert (FFG 45) tomorrow during its decom missioning ceremony. Generations of service men and women have called USS De Wert home during its 30 years of service. Named after Hospitalman Richard De Wert, a hero of the Korean War, USS De Wert has maintained a level of superior service thats due their Medal of Honor namesake. I wish Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, his crew and their families, fair winds and following seas as they take on new responsibili ties and assignments. Last Friday, NS Mayport wel comed Ms. Jill Vines Loftus, Director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office for the Office of the Secretary of the Navy (SAPRO), and her staff to the base as part of a series of office calls, meetings and focus groups. Ms. Loftus is the first Director of SAPRO and reports directly to the Secretary and Under Secretary of the Navy. She serves as the Secretarys principal point of accountability for all sexual assault policy matters and as the primary resource for expert SAPR assessment, program support and oversight. During her visit, she met with Mayports leadership and Fleet and Family Support Center profession als to discuss sexual assault preven tion and response issues onboard the installation. Her visit is a perfect segue into my next topic, sexual assault aware ness and prevention. On March 28, I signed a proclamation declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport. To pro mote awareness here on base, our team at FFSC has set up several events throughout the month to include the Clothesline Project at the Single Sailor Center. This project allows Sailors the opportunity to decorate t-shirts and demonstrate their stance against sexual violence. Plus.for every entry, you get the chance to win a PS4. Visit the center to decorate your t-shirt through April 23. Shirts will be displayed at the Barracks Bash on April 24. Other events happening in March include CSADDs Denim Drive with donations going to local Rape Crisis Center and the Denim Day Color Run on April 23rd. April is also the Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month and the Month of the Military Child. FFSC is bringing back its Stroller Strut parade on April 10th. This event is open to all parents with young children in strollers. It will start behind Building One and is intended to show Mayports solidarity in fighting against child abuse. FFSC will also hold its annual English Tea for Expectant Moms on April 24. The tea honors expectant moms with two hours of pampering, good food and good company. To register for the English Tea, please call our FFSC at 270-600 ext. 1700. I also want to remind everyone that the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society fund drive is underway. Last year, Mayports active duty service members raised $215,000 to help their shipmates in need. That is a great amount, but nowhere near the more than $837,000 worth of loans and grants NMCRS Mayport distributed to 1,500 local families. For more information about receiving help from the NMCRS, call (904) 270-5418 or visit their Web site at www.nmcrsmayport.org. For more information about the fund drive, contact RPC Hector Feliciano at 2705212 or hector.feliciano@navy.mil. I want to welcome Cmdr. Michael Burd and Cmdr. Ken Anderson to the Mayport leadership team and wish fair winds and following seas to Cmdr. Sil Perrella and Cmdr. Chris Follin as they take on increased responsibilities. Cmdr. Burd took command of HSM-40 yesterday during a change of command ceremony at the squadrons hangar. Cmdr. Anderson will relieve Follin as Commanding Officer of USS Simpson (FFG 56) tomorrow during a change of command ceremony onboard the ship. Finally, on April 15, we will get the MWR Spring 2014 Sports Challenge (April 15-18) underway with the tra ditional CO/CMC canoe challenge on Lake Wonderwood. Team Mayport is positioning ourselves to bring home the winning trophy and out seat the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant. Best of luck to all who participate. HAVE FUN! Pick up your command pack age for the Sports Challenge at the Mayport Fitness Center. For more information, call Rita at 270-7718. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Our military children often face unique chal lenges such as having a parent who is deployed; the family moving fre quently or living with or helping to care for a par ent injured in combat; or members of the family carrying on the legacy of a fallen Service member. Children of military families represent our coun try in ways that makes any American proud. April is designat ed The Month of the Military Child. It is during this month, and especially throughout the year, that we recog nize the sacrifices made by military children. One military dependent shared this, My mom has been home for three years now. But she goes away a lot, too. Being a military kid means knowing my mom has to go away for weeks at a time, but shell always come back home for me and my little sister. I miss her and it is hard. But I know serving our country is important and I am proud of her. And she says she is proud of us for serving our coun try at home by being great military kids. For a military child, the word sacrifice means being a part of a family who may move frequent ly and having a parent whose duty it is to serve our country. This duty may take them away from the family for long periods of time. Another dependent shared his story: My mom, who used to work one week end a month for the Army National Guard, was deployed with the 42nd Infantry Division. All of a sudden, mom wasnt there to help with homework, make my lunch or do any family stuff. She was justwell, missing from our family. When she was gone, I was the only kid at my school with a parent in a war. And this was my mom. I felt really alone and a little scared. Kids told me about the bombs in Iraq and how danger ous it was over there and Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNER Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officerhow she could get killed. That scared me, but no one knew how I felt. And I didnt want my dad to feel bad that I was scared so I didnt tell him. My little sister really missed my mom so I couldnt talk to her, and anyway, she was only five. While deployments impact school grades, deployment may also have the same effects on military children as children of divorce. They worry about what will happen to them. They worry that the nondeployed parent will leave, too. Who will take care of them? Who will be at my baseball game, my dance recital? For these absences may have the parent miss impor tant events in the life of a child. And while the child certainly under stands that the parent sacrifices too, it is still difficult not having the parent in the stands for her first start as a soft ball pitcher or in the audience for that star ring role in a dance recital or in the car for the trip to the Grand Canyon. So as you and your family enter into this month, remember the many things your family has done apart or together, and especially remember to thank your children for the love and support they have provided to your fam ily. Whether it is taking out the trash, hanging those Christmas lights, remembering to feed the dog, or sending a per sonal message to their deployed mom or dad, KNOWINGTHE ROPES See SLO, Page 13 See Chaplain, Page 13

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Mayport TSD Supports Sailors TrainingBY MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs East, South east DetachmentMost Sailors need some type of training throughout their career. For Naval Station Mayport Sailors who need everything from shipboard firefighting to command drug and alcohol programs advisor (DAPA), the first place to visit is the Training Support Detachment (TSD). The TSD provides administrative support for the various training schools at Naval Station Mayport. These cours es include Center for Security Forces (CFS), Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), Center for information Dominance (CID) and Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS LS). According to TSD Officer in Charge Lt Paul Latina, TSD is a vital part to the training mission We provide admin istration and building maintenance support to the five training areas in the compound, he said. We are kind of an umbrella support for all the training sites. When a ship gets underway, all Sailors must get the qualifications for ship board firefighting or other damage control training. We provide the administration for stu dents to get the needed training to perform their job on the ship. The TSD staff does not teach the courses but handle all registra tion and other personnel administrative duties to get the students to the various courses. Most of the students are sent Temporary Assigned Duty (TAD) or have orders cut from the vari ous Navy detailers. Most of the classes are C schools special ized for advanced train ing in a certain job rate. TSD checks in all the hundreds of students, handles all personnel department duties, lodg ing (if needed), building maintenance and writes evaluations if needed. According to TSD staff member Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Elvis Batista, the process is busy, but the TSD staff runs the student conveyer belt with out a hitch. Some of the paper work is done beforehand, but we handle all the check in process to make sure the students get in the course, he said. The training courses are the important process here; we handle any issues the students have to make sure they can focus on the train ing they need to do their job. The training sites have a combined 68 different courses taught on a con tinuous basis. Although they do not teach the courses, the TSD depart ment makes sure the paperwork is processed and all administra tion issues are in order, so the students get the training which in turn provides the fleet with expertly trained profes sionals to help complete the mission. The fleet cannot operate without technical experts, said Latina. We dont teach the courses but provide the administrative support so students can become technical experts. -Photo by Ensign Jacklyn SmithMember of Training Support Detachment stand outside of their building, at the end of Baltimore Avenue. The detachment provides administrative support for training schools located at NS Mayport.The Hidden I In TeamAt regular intervals throughout his 26-year military career, my hus band has been promoted to the next rank. Each time this happens, there is a little ceremony, during which my husband gives a brief speech. After two decades of being married to a Navy man, I have that speech pretty much memorized. Captain So-and-so, thank you for the won derful introduction. Also, kudos go out to Petty Officer Whatsisface for the lovely decor and delicious cake. *clears throat* When I joined the Navy [#] years ago, I never imagined making [current rank]. I merely aspired to learn, to travel the world, and to serve my country. But I stayed in the Navy because, simply put, I love my job. And the reason I love my job is because of the people Ive been fortunate enough to work for and with. [Names various people in the command, to include Admiral Whooziewhat, seated nearby.] But there is someone else here that I need to rec ognize. Someone, with out whom, I would not be standing before you all here today. Someone who has been my team mate for [#] years -my wonderful wife, Lisa. Women swoon, men wink, cameras flash, I blow my husband a kiss, and he smiles in return. And every time, at that moment, I actually believe its true. Soon after, I find myself alone, changing the wiper blades, taking the dog to the vet, paying the exterminator bill, and ordering our son to shave. My teammate is not around, because he is halfway across the globe. Its not his fault; hes working to support our family. But, when I become the sole manager of our family, I am often frazzled, overwhelmed, and unshowered, walk ing around with my arms held up like a crazed zombie in search of Sauvignon Blanc. My personality waf fles between deranged inmate, vicious dicta tor, catatonic robot and hormonal sobbing mess, while I try my best to handle our chaotic home life on my own. This doesnt feel like team work, but more like some bizarre form of solitary confinement. My husband just left for Italy. Hell be gone for a only a week, then back for a week, then gone again to Alabama for a week, then home another week before hes off again to Texas for another week. These lit tle work trips are minor annoyances when com pared to the long deploy ments other military folks are enduring, and besides, managing the home front alone gets easier the older you get, right? Uh, not so much. Like an old umbrella stroller with a wobbly wheel, an old shirt with a loose button, an old desktop computer with too many image files, an old blender that gives Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFESee Team, Page 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 POWER TO PREVAILUSS Robert G. Bradley Is DecommissionedBy Ensign Christopher M. CateUSS Robert G. Bradley Public AffairsNearly 30 years after she was commissioned in 1984, Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, Commanding Officer of USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), decommis sioned the ship March 28, at a Naval Station Mayport ceremony. Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Votel, commander, Joint Special Operations Command, was the guest speaker; Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 14, Capt. Ryan Tillotson, presided over the decom missioning event. Also in attendance were pre vious commanding offi cers, as well as three sur vivors of USS Princeton (CVL 23). FFG 49 was the first U.S. Navy ship to be named for a Washington D.C. native. Lt. Robert Graham Bradley served as Assistant First Lieutenant aboard Princeton, where he led a repair party in efforts to save the ship after it was attacked by a Japanese dive bomber during the battle of Leyte Gulf. Bradley and his repair team lost their lives when the flames spread to an aft torpedo maga zine and detonated four, 100-pound bombs. For his actions, Bradley was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. For nearly 30 years this ship has carried Lt. Robert G. Bradleys name and spirit in defense of our nation, said Ehlers. It has been a privilege and an honor to be the commanding officer of the last crew of Bradleymen. I could not -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Justin Maynard rolls up the USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) banner attached to the brow after the ship was decommissioned during a ceremony held Friday at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Robert G. Bradley mans the ships rails one last time during a decommissioning ceremony held at NS Mayport on March 28.-Photo byPaige GnannThe crew of the ex-USS Robert G. Bradley stand in formation after departing the ship and securing the last watch.-Photo by Paige GnannYoeman 2nd Class Jonathan Meckstroth pulls transfer packages for the crew of USS Robert G. Bradley after the ships decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannRGB Plankowner Stephen Baer talks with current crewmembers, Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Marlon Narvaez and Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Paden Fackrell after the decommission ing ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannCMDCS(SW) Gary Jefferson presents the ships com missioning pennant to Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, during the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crewmembers enjoy one last walk around RGB during the decommissioning ceremony. See RGB, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebePlank owners of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradleys (FFG 49) pose for a picture prior to the ships decommissioning ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport. After almost 30 years of service, the ship named after Navy Cross recipient Lieutenant Robert G. Bradley (1921), was decommissioned on March 28. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFrank Moschella former crew member of USS Princeton (CVL 23) (Ret) salutes the flag during USS Robert G. Bradley's (FFG 49) decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Robert G. Bradley gets ready to depart the ship as the colors are hauled down for the last time during the decommissioning ceremony held pier side at Naval Station Mayport on March 28.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeArmy Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Votel, Cmdr. Peter J. Ehlers, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), and Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, Capt. Ryan C. Tillotson, salute the flag during the ships decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeCmdr. Peter J. Ehlers, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) gives his final remarks during the ships decommis sioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe crew of guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) depart the ship for the final time during the ship's decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport.be more proud of them. After participating in UNITAS in the Western Caribbean Sea in Sept. 2012, and completing a Board of Inspection and Survey, the ship departed in late October for a seven-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of respon sibility. Initially assigned an Africa Partnership mission, the crew quickly reconfigured the ship with four MQ-8B Fire Scouts to support Africa Command, Counter-Terrorism Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance tasking. They completed more than 900 flight hours with the MQ-8B Fire Scouts while on station and conducted the first-ever concurrent Dual-Air-Vehicle mission with another Fire Scout-equipped frigate. The end of 2013 found the crew assisting in deployment preparations and certifications for the USS West Virginia (SSBN 123), the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group, and the USS Bataan Expeditionary Strike Group. The ship is slated for foreign military sales.From Page 4RGB

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6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Deputy Position Changes Hands At Inter-American SecretariatFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsAn Argentinean offi cer assumed the role of deputy secretary of the Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network during a March 26 ceremony at U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet headquarters. Capitan de Corbeta (Lt. Cmdr.) Oscar Latorre replaced Capitan de Fragata (Cmdr.) Jose Antonio Mejia Flores of the Mexican navy. I feel so honored to have been able to serve with this organization for the peace of the west ern hemisphere, said Mejia, who received the IANTN medal and 50th Anniversary coin from Cmdr. Bradley Maas, the IANTN secretary, during the ceremony, attended by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet commander. You have represented Mexico as well as it could be represented, Harris told Mejia. The work of IANTN is essential to keeping the hemisphere stable, secure and united, he added. Regardless of the political circumstanc es the situation above us our navies have got to be able to interoper ate, Harris said. It starts with this staff, and it starts with the com munications between nations. Created in 1962 at the third Inter-American Naval Conference, in Vina Del Mar, Chile, IANTN provides secure communications at sea to ships of its 18 member countries. In addition to Argentina, Mexico and the United States and Chile, those countries include Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela. Originally based in Panama, the secretariat moved first to Puerto Rico and from there to U.S. 4th Fleet head quarters in Mayport. Its staff includes three Latin American officers and one Latin American chief petty officer. Noting that foreign officers assigned to Mayport improve their practical English quickly, Harris presented Latorre with a copy of Embrace the Suck, a dictionary of U.S. military jargon. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Mike Cody Capitan de Fragata (Cmdr.) Jose Antonio Mejia Flores of the Mexican navy, foreground, stands at attention as Teniente Primero (Lt.) Gonzalo Castaneda of Peru reads the duties of the Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network deputy secretary during a change of responsibility ceremony. At right, also at attention, is Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. -Photo by Lt. Lloyd Forbis Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks with midshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program on campus. 4th Fleet Harris Meets With UF MidshipmenFrom University of Florida NROTC Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet met with members of the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps unit dur ing their weekly leader ship lab in Gainesville March 25. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, his executive assistant, Lt. Cmdr. Jodi Beattie, and the 4th Fleet command master chief, Command Master Chief David Tellez dis cussed their experiences in the naval service and answered questions from the midshipmen. Harris, whose naval career spans 30 years, discussed his time in the surface fleet and empha sized that good officers will be necessary to lead the naval services in the future. He spoke about the importance of the Navy and Marine Corps team and on the neces sity that all the services maintain a high moral standard in order to retain the trust of the American people. The Navy has changed in many ways since he joined but Sailors, and what is expected of them, remain fundamentally the same, Harris said. When the midshipmen are commissioned, they will need to care for the Sailors under their charge, he added. Harris also discussed current Navy issues, such as officer retention rates and the Littoral Combat Ship program. Littoral combat ships, which are designed to be reconfigured for vari ous roles by changing mission modules, are expected to deploy in the 4th Fleet area of respon sibility starting next year. The midshipmen asked Harris about the Navys involvement in the World Cup this summer in Brazil, challenges faced by women in mili tary service, and how junior officers should interact with senior enlisted members. They also asked for sea stories. The opportunity to ask questions of experienced officers and a senior enlisted member was appreciated by the mid shipmen. Their knowledge is invaluable to any aspiring officer, said Midshipman 3rd Class Gerardo Contreras, a sustainability and built environment student from Pompano Beach. The NROTC program was established to devel op midshipmen men tally, morally and physically and to imbue them with the highest ideals of duty, loyalty and Navy core values. For more information about NROTC, visit https://www.nrotc.navy. mil/. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. 4th Fleet Reservists Achieve Weapons Quals By MC1 Sean AllenU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit achieved qualifications on a variety of weapons during a March 17-19 gun shoot aboard Naval Station Mayport. Twelve members of the units security depart ment took part in the event, which included one day of classroom instruction and two days at the range. They qualified on the 9 mm handgun, 12-gauge shotgun and M16 assault rifle. The Sailors were required to fire from various positions, includ ing kneeling and prone, and to fire while seeking cover. In one evolution, the Sailors were required to perform physical training for one minute before entering the range to fire their weapons. I found the PT part challenging and fun, said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Christopher Ortiz, who is a police officer in his civilian profession. In most gun shoots, you usually stand in one spot and fire your weap on, but this one created more of a realistic atmosphere. The aim of the gun shoot was to prepare the Sailors many of whom will deploy to Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvador, as part of the security team to support the 4th Fleet mission. CSL Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and oper ational support to forward deployed U.S. and partner nation aviation units participating in Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-S) assigned counter-illicit trafficking operations, NAVSO-directed humanitarian missions, and search-and-rescue (SAR) efforts. Of 23 Masters-atArms currently assigned to the location, 15 are Reserve personnel serve as Watch Commanders, security trainers, and other critical positions. Needless to say, without their support, our mission capabilities would be degraded immensely, said Chief Master-at-Arms (AW) David M. Shisk, the CSL Comalapa security offi cer. To maintain a strong security posture, the Masters-at-Arms must maintain proficiency on a variety of weapons systems, Shisk said. I couldnt be more pleased that everyone in the security family is doing his part to ensure we stay at the tip of the spear, he said. The motivation to excel shown by our reservists is inspiring. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet sup port U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/.-Photos by MC1 Sean AllenMaster at Arms Seaman Camille Thomas, assigned to COMUSNAVO/U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit prepares to fire a 9mm pistol as part of a weapons qualification course March 18 aboard Naval Station Mayport. The course involved the individuals particiapting to perform various exercises prior to entering the fir ing range to test the Sailors ability to fire thier weapon while being fatigued. Master-at-Arms 2nd Class James Bearden takes aim at a target March 18 during a gun shoot organized by the security department of the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit. Sailors were required to fire from various positions, including kneeling and prone, and to fire while seek ing cover.Midway Dinner Tickets On Sale For June 7From Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speak er is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be pur chased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tick ets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol.com

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By Lt. j.g. Stephanie SantarelliUSS HalyburtonTwelve Sailors from the USS Halyburton (FFG 40) carried out a community relations project March 19 at Sandy Bay Public School in Roatan, beau tifying the property and arranging a online class with students in North Carolina. With help from Sandy Bays ninth-grade stu dents, the Sailors plant ed 18 Christmas palm trees on the property and cleaned the Sandy Bay beachfront behind the school campus. Digging holes for the trees was harder than the Sailors expected because the soil was hard clay with large rocks, said Chief Logistics Specialist Leketa Gaines, of Lorman, Miss. When the post-hole digger hit the ground, it caused sparks, and when we thought we were get ting somewhere, the blades of the post-hole digger actually started bending inward, said Logistics Specialist Seaman Poliakoff Deliazard, of Miami. Despite the difficulty, the Sailors and students enjoyed themselves. The interaction with the youth was incred ible, Deliazard said. Even a van of tourists stopped to ask about the project. Lt. Tom Bingol, Halyburtons chaplain, coordinated with Rosa Danelia Hendrix, Sandy Bays sub-principal, to execute a virtual inter cultural exchange experi ence via Skype with students from Porter Ridge Elementary School in Indian Trail, N.C. The students exchanged greetings in English and Spanish, sang the national song of Honduras, and answered one anothers questions for nearly an hour. The questions ranged from the weather to the need to split the school day to accommodate all of the children in the Sandy Bay area who wish to attend class. It was the first tech nology-driven inter cambio, or intercultural exchange of its kind, for any Bay Island school in Honduras, Hendrix said. The Porter Ridge prin cipal, Lisa Taylor, mod erated the discussion in North Carolina. The Naval Station Mayport-based Halyburton is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations to conduct counter illicit trafficking operations. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet sup port U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. USS Halyburton Sailors Carry Out ComRel Project In Honduras -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettSailors from guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton pose for a photo with Honduran locals after planting trees for a Community Relations project during Halyburton's port visit to Roatan, Honduras. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Juan Naranjo and Chief Logistics Specialist Leketa Gaines of the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) plant a Christmas palm tree as part of a community relations project at Sandy Bay Public School in Roatan, Honduras. With help from Sandy Bays ninth-grade students, the Sailors planted trees on the property and cleaned the Sandy Bay beachfront behind the school campus. Sailors from guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton plants trees with Honduran locals for a Community Relations project during Halyburtons port visit to Roatan, Honduras. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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Phil Sea Wins E For 2nd YearFrom USS Philippine SeaThe crew of the Guided Missle Cruiser, USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), received the Battle Efficiency, or Battle E award, March 14. The Battle E award is a tribute to the ships overall readiness and was determined by a yearlong evaluation of Philippine Seas accom plishments during train ing exercises and various command inspections. Philippine Sea was nominated by Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG-2) Two and has received the Battle E two years in a row. I am overwhelmed with excitement and pride for the ownership of a second Battle E, said Executive Officer, Randolph Chestang. The Philippine Sea has put in hard work to sustain superior per formance. Winning this award demonstrates to the Navy that this is a world class crew. I am very proud of them and their work! Personnel aboard the Philippine Sea are now authorized to wear the Navy E ribbon and Battle E device. Its great to have the crew wear the Battle E for the second con secutive time, said Command Master Chief Lewis Jackson. This achievement is a true reflection of the crews commitment in dem onstrating excellence in every evolution. Philippine Seas con secutive wins sets a standard for other ships in the fleet, one that Navy leadership believes is achievable. The crew plans to contin ue to maintain that level of efficiency while on their scheduled deploy ment. Receiving the Battle E for the second year is a great reward for how hard the crew worked during 2013, said Boatsman Mate Seaman Apprentice Andrew Webb. I am proud to be a part of a crew that has -Photo by MC3 Abe McNattCmdr. Randolph Chestang, the executive officer, gives a bearing to the naviga tor aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) during a Suez Canal transit. Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. See Phil Sea, Page 9USS Roosevelt Earns 2013 Battle EBy MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsOn March 21 the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) received official notifica tion she had earned the coveted Battle E award for sustained superior performance. Commander, Naval Surface Force and Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic recently announced the calendar year 2013 Battle E and command excel lence awards for the sur face fleet. Roosevelt was honored with Destroyer Squadron Fourteens selection for superior battle efficiency during the calendar year along with two other out standing warships, USS Simpson (FFG 56) and USS Shamal (PC 13). A ship earns the Battle E for sustained supe rior performance in an operational environment throughout a 12-month cycle in various mission areas including maritime warfare; engineering/ survivability; command, control, communications and information warfare; logistics management; and ship safety. Earning the Battle E reflects directly on the ships crew, said Commander Jay Clark, Roosevelts Commanding Officer. I have always said if you do things the right way, good things happen. The dedication shown by the crew this past year and the earning of this award have undoubtedly shown them that hard work and dedication pays off. Cmdr. Jason Reller, Roosevelts execu tive officer, echoed the achievements of the crew during the evaluation period. It is a tremendous honor for the ship and crew, he said. It is an award that shows the pride, dedication and focus that Roosevelt Sailors bring to every mission. Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) heave in a line during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5). Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil ity. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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Gettysburg Wins 2013 Battle E By MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg PAOThe guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) was awarded the 2013 calendar year Battle Effectiveness Award by Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic, March 21. The Battle E is awarded annually to the ships that display the maxi mum condition of readi ness in their group and for their capability to perform their wartime responsibilities. Winning the Battle E was possible due to the exemplary performance the crew displayed throughout the year and through deployment, said Capt. Brad Cooper, commanding officer, USS Gettysburg. Its an honor to be recognized for this award and a priv ilege to work alongside such an amazing crew. To compete for the Battle E, ships are evaluated on major qualifi cations; inspections and assessments include engineering operations certifications, force maintenance and material management assess ments, mobility certifi cations and supply man agement certifications. Gettysburgs was one of five surface ships in the Atlantic Fleet to win all five catego ries of Battle E. The categories include: the Maritime Warfare Excellence Award (Black E), Engineering/ Survivability Excellence Award (Red E), Command and Control Excellence Award (Green E), Logistics Management Excellence Award (Blue E) and the CNSF Ship Safety Award (Yellow E). Each department has an important role aboard the ship and it takes a combined effort from each to achieve this award, said Gettysburgs Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker. When the crew has a central ized focus and works together towards a goal, they prove what we can achieve as a unit. Naval vessels recog nized for winning this award are authorized to paint a white E on the ship to acknowledge the achievement. Personnel assigned to a ship dur ing the time the ship was recognized for the award are authorized to wear the Battle E ribbon. Quartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Marlesha Parker said she is proud to be a part of the crew during this prestigious recognition. Winning the Battle E is significant because it shows that my ship is devoted to excellence, said Parker. Its great that we have something to show the dedication of our crew and the hard work they have exhibited throughout the year. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonThe crew of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) stand on the bow. The ship was just awarded the 2013 Battle Efectiveness Award. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. proved we are willing to take on any thing that comes our way. The Philippine Sea is underway as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWBCSG). The GHWBCSG is on a scheduled deployment to support maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. With USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as the flag ship, strike group assets include USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), the embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 8 (CVW 8), strike group staff, Destroyer Squadron 22 staff and ships USS Truxtun (DDG 103), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).From Page 8Phil Sea THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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DESRON 26 Ships Begin Joint WarriorBy MC3 Lacordrick WilsonDESRON 26 Public AffairsShips of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 participating in the multinational exer cise Joint Warrior 14-1 departed Faslane, United Kingdom, March 30 after a scheduled port visit. Joint Warrior 14-1 is a semiannual, United Kingdom-led training exercise designed to provide NATO and allied forces a unique, multiwarfare environment in which to prepare for global operations. Guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), guided-missile destroyers USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Cole (DDG 67), USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), and guided-missile cruis ers USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) and USS Vella Gulf (CG 72), are participat ing in the coalition exer cise, which is intended to improve interoperability between allied navies in a challenging operational environment and to pre pare them for real world events. Joint Warrior is one of the most realistic training exercises that the U.S. Navy is involved in, said Capt. Cary Krause, commander, DESRON 26. Working with allied partners will help us make connec tions and strengthen the U.S. Navys ability to operate with a variety of navies and platforms. The Joint Warrior exercise is designed and led by the joint tactical exercise planning staff in the United Kingdom, and is considered an advanced certification course for their ships. For the ships partici pating, it will be a very unique learning oppor tunity, said Krause. The exercise will require adequate focus and inte gration from all navies, which is necessary for giving our Sailors the proper training for real world future events. The two-week exer cise will include sce narios such as small boat attacks, boarding operations, air defense, anti-warfare, and ship maneuverability tasks. More than 30 individual units, including aviation, surface, and subsurface, are participating. -Photo by MC3 Lacordrick WilsonUSS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) transits the Atlantic Ocean in support of exercise Joint Warrior 14-1. Joint Warrior 14-1 is a semiannual, United Kingdom-led training exercise. Air Ops Is In Gear -Photo by Paige GnannABH2(AW) Anthony Edwards, above, and ABE2(AW) Mark Dagatan perform corrosion control on the E-28 gear on the north east end of Naval Station Mayports runway. The gear is used as a trapping in the event a plane must perform an emergency landing. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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actually get our fellow Sailors, Marines and civilians engaged both physically and mentally, said Yeoman 2nd Class Demario Smith. Its a run with a purpose and meaning to it. CSADD asks that you wear a white t-shirt and bring either goggles or sunglasses. For your safety and enjoyment we ask you to bring eye protection, said Master-at-Arms Seaman Jessie Robinson. We would hate for such a fun event to be remem bered as the time the CSADD ruined your day because you got powder in your eyes. During the whole month of April CSADD will have a bin available for anyone who would like to donate jeans. All the jeans raised will go to the Womens Center of Jacksonville and the Hubbard House. The Womens Center of Jacksonville was created to help women overcome social, economic, and personal barriers; such as sexual assault, abuse and financial issues. Hubbard House works to accomplish three main objectives: the first is safety for victims and their children, second is they work to empower victims and the third is social change through education and advocacy. This is the sec ond year that we will be raising jeans for the Womens Center of Jacksonville and the first time for the Hubbard House, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Sharon Berg. Its a good feeling knowing that something as simple as donating jeans that dont fit you or you just dont wear anymore will make someones life a lot easier and happier. There will be bins located across the Mayport area includ ing the Commissary, NS Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center in Building One, the MWR Liberty Center, the NEX Gas Station, USS New York, the Mayport Clinic, COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt, USO and at the Color Run. Please help us by donating jeans, they go to such a great cause and the more jeans that get donated the more peo ple in the Jacksonville area we can help, said Robinson. Our goal is to raise 1,000 pairs of jeans for the Hubbard House and Womens Center of Jacksonville. CSADD will also be holding a Jean Day on April 23 and would encourage all the com mands to participate. With a simple dona tion to CSADD of $50 per command of 10 or more people or $5 a person in commands 9 or less, Sailors can wear jeans and a collared shirt to work for a day in sup port of Denim Day, said Berg. We will be using the money to do more fun events like the color run in the future. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative and CSADD hopes that hold ing events like this will help not only raise the awareness of Sexual Assault but help prevent it from happening in our Navy. For more information regarding the color run, visit and like Naval Station Mayport CSADD Facebook page or contact MC2 Damian Berg at damian.berg@navy.mil. From Page 1CSADDMayport Celebrates Womens History MonthBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastCelebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment, was the theme as The Naval Station Mayport First Class Association host ed a Womens History Month program March 31. The 34th annual observance honors the extraordinary and often unrecognized determi nation and tenacity of women, they have creat ed a legacy that expands the frontiers of possi bility for generations to come. They have dem onstrated their charac ter, courage and com mitment as mothers, educators, institution builders, business, labor, political and community leaders, relief workers, women religious, and CEOs. Their lives and their work inspire girls and women to achieve their full potential and encourage boys and men to respect the diversity and depth of womens experience. The key note speaker at the event was National Naval Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Dept. Head Capt. Christine Dorr, M.D. Dorr is an inspirational example of the contributions by women in the military. She is known for her specialized expertise in Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Chronic Pain Management and one of the originators of the Nine Visit Obstetrical pathway, which contin ues to serve as the backbone for all prenatal care services for the entire Military Health System. According to Dorr, military women are starting to be recognized for their major contributions to military readiness. Military women are a reflection of the United States, she said. Our contributions are on par with our male counter parts. We are no longer the underdog, women are recognized in every aspect of the military and everyday society. One of the women highlighted during the program was American computer scientist Rear Adm Grace Murray Hopper (Dec. 9, 1906 Jan. 1, 1992). A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She popular ized the idea of machineindependent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is cred ited with popularizing the term debugging for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accom plishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as Amazing Grace U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 Hopper supercomputer at NERSC. According to Operations Specialist 1st Class Quincy Jackson, (one of the speakers at the program), this pro gram is only a small way to recognize the many contributions women make in the military and all walks of life. Women represent 18 percent of the Navy force, which is a very low number, but they make such great con tributions, he said. The Navy has changed with its roles, we have really pushed the sex ual assault awareness and equal opportunity programs, and the cul ture has dramatically changed for the better. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissNational Naval Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Dept. Head Capt. Christine Dorr, M.D. speaks at the Naval Station Mayport First Class Association Womens History Month program held Marh 31 at Mayport Memorial Park. Celebrating NGIS Photo by CTTC Carolyn ToneyNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall stands with the team of Mayports Navy Gateway Inns & Suites during a Navy Lodging Program Appreciation Day celebration and awards luncheon held March 26 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to congratulate Jessica Jones who is the Resident of the Week! We appre ciate the Jones Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the pro gram, please call 904-270-8870. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 off a burning smell every time you try to make a frozen margarita I used to work really well, but the older I get, the more likely it is that Im gonna blow. The kids tiptoe around the house, hoping that Ill wipe the smudged mascara away from my eyes before I take them to school, and wondering whether Ill force them to eat cheese and crack ers again for dinner. The dog senses tension, and follows me around the house, licking my pant legs. But with the distraction of the DVR, therapeutic happy hours with the neighbors, and a secret can of Pringles stashed in the laundry room, I know I will cope until my husband gets home. I must admit, I have come to enjoy certain aspects of my temporary solitude total control of the TV clicker, sleep uninterrupted by snor ing, cheese and cracker dinners. And he, too, relishes his me time while on travel total control of the TV clicker, sleep uninterrupted by his wife telling him to stop snor ing, restaurant dinners. Despite the suitcase full of dirty laundry and the generous gift of hotel mini-soaps he deposits with me upon returning home, we are undoubt edly happiest when we are together. But as a military family, we must often work separately toward our common goals. As sports writer Amber Harding once said, ... there most cer tainly is an I in team. It is the same I that appears three times in responsibility.From Page 3TeamFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. April 3, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding nonverbal cues, constructive criticism, and active lis tening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communica tion as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. April 3, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 This program focuses on the woman herself and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encour aged to set individual goals, complete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to identify family roles. April 7-11, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Building 1, RM 1616 The class is designed for military person nel who are within 24 months of retiring or 90-180 days of separat ing from completion of military services. It helps Service members understand the overall Transition GPS program, the requirements to meet Career Readiness Standards, and to iden tify common issues Service members and their families experience during the transition process. April 7, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management, Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn the skills to take control of their anger and direct it in ways that will make them more effective and productive at work and at home. April 7, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 Over the course of six sessions, parents learn discipline techniques and effective communi cation and encourage ments skills to build a solid foundation for the upcoming teen years. April 7, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are apply ing for. April 8, 2014 10 a.m.noon, What About the Kids, Building 1, RM 702 The purpose of this program is to educate parents on the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. April 9, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effective independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. April 9, 2014 11 a.m.noon, Gambling Awareness Building 1, RM 719 Participants will com plete a self-assessment of their gambling hab its and learn about the warning signs of prob lem behavior. April 10, 2014 9-10:30 a.m., Stroller Strut Behind Building 1 In support of Month of The Military Child, join us for some sun, fun, and exercise! April 10, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., EFMP Point of Contact Training Building 1, RM 702 Learn how to run an effective and efficient command program, in accordance with OPNAVINST 1754.2D program requirements, get best practices from other EFMP POCs, and learn about available resources. April 10, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 14-15, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Advanced Higher Education Track, Building 1, RM 708 Designed to guide transitioning service members through the process of choosing a degree program, pre paring for the college admissions application process, and finding the funds to attend school. April 14-18, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 14, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 14, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are apply ing for. April 16, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effective independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. April 16, 2014 4 p.m., Home Buying, Building, RM 1616 Get the latest infor mation on purchasing a home if you are a first-time homebuyer, or refresh your skills for your next home pur chase. April 17, 2014 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Building 1, RM 1124 April 17, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 21-25, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop, Building 1, RM 1616 April 21, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 El Espiritu De Santiago Debut A group of commu nity volunteers who have worked tirelessly over the past two years to create a 16th century replica caravel say their mission is now complete and willculminate in the long-awaited debut of the El Espiritu de Santiago as the main attraction on April 5 for the first annual Ponce de Leon Day Celebration at the Vilano Pier, as well as The Blessing of the Fleet on April 13. According to organiz ers, this inaugural Ponce Day will feature a classic car show, arts and crafts booths, live entertain ment, and a mock sea battle and treasure hunt onshore by the Black Raven Pirate Ship and Queen Anns revenge Adventure Landing Fun-Raiser Mark your calen dars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is hosting a FUN-raiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per per son ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be purchased at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retirees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday, April 14 from 5-7 P.M., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be par ticipating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity pro gram. This unique com munity-based fundrais ing initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encour age you to visit www. birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportunity to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to be eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Deadline is May 7. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSaccomplished over the past year with regard to sexual assault prevention and response and to look into the future as to how we can continue to eradicate this crime from our ranks. Commands are empowered to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2014 is a com ponent of our efforts in the 21st Century Sailor Office to build a resil ient Navy community and will use the theme Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault to highlight bystander intervention and accountability, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Office. Wed like Sailors to take the first half of the month to reflect on the efforts weve put in place this past year and how weve tackled sexual assault. The second half of April will focus on Sailors dedicating themselves to be active bystanders to step up and intervene in potentially destructive situations. In addition to asking Sailors to sit down and talk about sexual assault prevention, commands are encouraged to orga nize any number of events to highlight the awareness and preven tion of sexual assaults. Some of the suggested events include hanging ribbons on trees around base, hosting Meet your SARC and victim advo cate events, organizing skits at the local base theater and other such activities to raise aware ness during the month of April. In the past few months of traveling to meet the fleet, Ive noticed that Sailors themselves are stepping up and taking charge, said Buck. I encourage you to continue to look out for your shipmates and step up to stop sexu al assault. Sailors can also find information, references and resources at www. sapr.navy.mil to help them determine how they would like their individual command to observe this month. The website also includes resources for victims of sexual assault to reach out and get help. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the read iness area of the 21st Century Sailor Office which consolidates a set of objectives and poli cies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. The Department of the Navy is working aggres sively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sex ual assault victims and to hold offenders account able. For more information, read NAVADMIN 066/14 at www.npc. navy.mil and go to www. sapr.navy.mil and click on SAAM 2014.From Page 1SAAM

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13 Hellfire Pass, near the cemetery, and see first hand the remnants of a railroad line that is hewn through a granite mountain by hand, I realize Hollywood can never quite capture the sheer heaviness of what transpired here so long ago. And while my journey back in time and history is largely sad, there are bright moments of inspi ration that rise from my walk down the pathway between graves. Out of the darkness of the human heart and its capacity to engage in evil, rise stories of hero ism and courage beyond comprehension. As prison guards tried to crush the spirit of many, break minds by break ing the back and gener ally cheapen the value of human life, extraordi nary men defied at the cost of great suffering and sometimes there life. They clung to love of God and country, maintained faith in their fellow pris oners, and protected fiercely the value and the dignity inherent in every human being. As I think about this, it occurs to me that this is the great crime of blue on blue casual ties that occur today in our Navy. Conflict that comes in the form of physical assaults, sexual assaults, racism and bigotry, and discrimination of any kind. Even now in some work spaces in our Navy small battles still take place where a very small few try to degrade and devalue the inherent value of human dignity that lies in a fellow sail or. It is as wrong here as it was wrong on the Thai-Burma railroad line in the Kwai river valley. As I come to the end of the row of gravestones, I notice something quite peculiar. I have not seen one American headstone. I ask the curator at the museum across the street, where are the American fallen? He tells me that they have all been repatri ated. They are home. Suddenly I am over come with a great deal of pride I can barely keep my composure to thank the curator. These American war riors fought and died to protect certain selfevident truths, particu larly that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. And my country honored their sacrifice, maintained faith with the fallen, and took great efforts to bring them back. We, who are part of todays Navy, can do no less. We must fight any spirit of prejudice that attempts to maliciously erode and devalue our brother or sister in uni form. We must maintain faith with the constitu tion we swore to uphold. From Page 2Chaplainthese helpful things show how much they love and support what the entire family is doing to support our nations freedom. This month will also provide the opportu nity to make some new memories. Make plans to attend the Chapels Spring Festival on Saturday, April 19th at the Chapel from 11 am-2 pm. Crafts, free food, a Moonwalk, and a special visit by the Easter Bunny will provide some special fun for the kids. An Egg Hunt for ages infant to10 years of age is scheduled for 1 pm. Dont forget to bring your camera! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2SLO Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scaven ger hunt and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 5: Take Me Out to the Ballgame. 4 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Celebrate the beginning of baseball season. Whiffleball chal lenge, drink specials, snacks and prizes. 2707205 April 7: NCAA National Basketball Championship Watch the game and see if you won the bracket. 2707205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 4: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. April 9: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and transportation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. Intramural Sports April 8: Spring Forward 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. April 8: Womens Basketball Meeting. 5 p.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday 18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents April 4: Teen Movie Trip: Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Ages 13+. Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; per mission slip required. 246-0347 April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. Get ShipShapeThe Nutrition and Weight Management Class is still accept ing students. It runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty person nel, adult depen dents, and retirees. For more info, call 270-5251 ext. 16.

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CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Ships Capture Prestigious Award USS Roosevelt, USS Philippine Sea, USS Gettysburg See Story and More Photos, Pages 8-9 CSADD Invites You To Run For Sexual Assault AwarenessBy MC2 Damian BergNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastNaval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) invites every Sailor, Marine and DOD Civilian in the Jacksonville area to join them for a 5k Color run/ walk in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAPM) aboard Naval Station Mayport April 23. The run/walk will be part of many events that CSADD is doing for the Navy Sexual Assault Awareness Month; a month dedicated educating Sailors and Marines about the effects of sexual assault in the Navy. We chose a color run because colors represent diversity and diversity is what makes our Navy the best in the world, said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jose Pacheco. Sexual Assault Awareness month is an important time to remember those who have been victims and take lessons learned from their situation, and hopefully educate our selves from that. Signup starts at 10 a.m. in front of the Base Fitness Center and the race starts 11 a.m. This is a great way to get away from the usual boring PowerPoint and See CSADD, Page 11 April Is Sexual Assault Awareness MonthFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy announced the 2014 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) theme of Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault and issued guidance to focus efforts on aware ness and prevention of sexual violence in NAVADMIN 066/14 released March 20. The goal of the month is for indi vidual commands to pause and reflect on what the Navy has See SAAM, Page 12No Place For Assault Of Any Kind -Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, signs a a Sexual Assault Awareness proclamation in front of members of Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), Base Chapel, SAPR advocates and the Victim Advocacy team last week in honor of April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month. FFSC has scheduled several events throughout the month in conjunction with Naval Station Mayports Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) including a Clothesline Project at the Single Sailor, a denim drive to benefit the local rape crisis center and a 5k Color Run on April 23. SERMC Awards 15 Sailors With NAMTS CertificatesFrom Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Public AffairsSoutheast Regional Maintenance Centers (SERMCs) Commanding Officer Capt. Dave Gombas awarded 15 Sailors with Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs) during an awards ceremony on Naval Station Mayport March 20. Of those awarded, five certifications were in Gas Turbine Repair (NEC 4140), three in Rigging/ Weight Test (NEC 0121), four in Valve Repair (NEC 4540) and three in Outside Machine (NEC 4542). NAMTS is a Navy training program designed to provide shore-based Sailors the oppor tunity to learn critical skills and earn NECs. The program trains Sailors alongside experi enced civilian technicians, who will, ultimately, take these skills back to sea. The goal is to return a more skilled technician to the Fleet; thereby, increasing ship self-sufficiency. My goal is for each Sailor to earn a NAMTS NEC, if not mul tiple NECs, Gombas said. This is a win-win situation where we can get great work from you supporting our ships and you can return to sea a better technician and improve self-sufficiency on your next ship. Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 2nd Class (SW/AW) Sande from the Valve Shop was one of the SERMC Sailors to receive an NEC. Sande, a SERMC Sailor who underwent a recent conversion from Machinists Mate to Gas Turbine System Technician, is assigned outside his rating. Despite this recent change, he earned his Valve Repair NEC in a relatively short period of time. I am spending my spare time working on my Gas Turbine Repair NEC (4140), said Sande. Working at a Regional Maintenance Center (RMC) is a great opportunity for me to get up to speed on gas turbine engines and learned them from the ground up. For more information about Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC), visit: www.navsea.navy.mil/CNRMC/SERMC/ Power To PrevailRobert G. Bradley Decommissions Pages 4-5

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross Cramer ....................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: I remember vividly the sunlight streaming through a slit window in the small stone chapel, illuminating a bronze plaque with a cross and inscription. It read In honored remembrance of the fortitude and sacrifice of that valiant company that perished building the railway from Thailand to Burma dur ing their long captivity I will make a name and praise among all peo ple of the earth when I turn back your captivity before your eyes, saith the LORD. Located in a very hot and humid River Kwai valley region of central western Thailand lies an allied war cemetery. The land has been gifted by the King of Thailand and its people as the final resting place for hundreds of allied war riors who made the ultimate sacrifice so very far from their family and home. As I stroll down row upon perfect row of gravestones, it is hard to wrap my mind around the contrast of the immaculate and beauti ful garden setting that is the final resting place of these men and the bar baric, horrendous condi tions that they lived in shortly before death. Students of World War II history will certainly know about the infamous death railway that was constructed by the Empire of Japan in 1943 in an effort to open a new logistical route safe from Allied Navy war ships in Asia. The pri mary means for building this line was provided through the forced labor of approximately 60,000 POWS from the United Kingdom, Australia, and The Netherlands. Included were also 400 Americans, some of whom were captured after surviving the sink ing of the USS Houston. It is estimated that about 12,400 allied POWs died as a result of the cruel and harsh living condi tions, malnutrition and back breaking forced labor. Years later a movie was made called The Bridge over the River Kwai that captured a small, largely inaccurate piece of this infa mous time. As I visit CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Darin Dunham CHSMWLShipmates, On Friday, the crew of USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) departed the ship for the last time as the Fighting 49 was decommissioned during a ceremony that included nine former commanding officers, plankowners, city and state representatives, fami lies and friends of the crew. During its 30 years of service, USS Robert G. Bradley fought the war on drugs in South America, deployed to the Mediterranean numerous times, and carried out specialized operations in North American, Latin American and European waters. I wish the best of luck to Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, his crew and their families as they move on to their next challenging assignments. We will also say goodbye to USS De Wert (FFG 45) tomorrow during its decom missioning ceremony. Generations of service men and women have called USS De Wert home during its 30 years of service. Named after Hospitalman Richard De Wert, a hero of the Korean War, USS De Wert has maintained a level of superior service thats due their Medal of Honor namesake. I wish Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, his crew and their families, fair winds and following seas as they take on new responsibili ties and assignments. Last Friday, NS Mayport wel comed Ms. Jill Vines Loftus, Director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office for the Office of the Secretary of the Navy (SAPRO), and her staff to the base as part of a series of office calls, meetings and focus groups. Ms. Loftus is the first Director of SAPRO and reports directly to the Secretary and Under Secretary of the Navy. She serves as the Secretarys principal point of accountability for all sexual assault policy matters and as the primary resource for expert SAPR assessment, program support and oversight. During her visit, she met with Mayports leadership and Fleet and Family Support Center professionals to discuss sexual assault preven tion and response issues onboard the installation. Her visit is a perfect segue into my next topic, sexual assault aware ness and prevention. On March 28, I signed a proclamation declaring April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month at Naval Station Mayport. To pro mote awareness here on base, our team at FFSC has set up several events throughout the month to include the Clothesline Project at the Single Sailor Center. This project allows Sailors the opportunity to decorate t-shirts and demonstrate their stance against sexual violence. Plus.for every entry, you get the chance to win a PS4. Visit the center to decorate your t-shirt through April 23. Shirts will be displayed at the Barracks Bash on April 24. Other events happening in March include CSADDs Denim Drive with donations going to local Rape Crisis Center and the Denim Day Color Run on April 23rd. April is also the Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month and the Month of the Military Child. FFSC is bringing back its Stroller Strut parade on April 10th. This event is open to all parents with young children in strollers. It will start behind Building One and is intended to show Mayports solidarity in fighting against child abuse. FFSC will also hold its annual English Tea for Expectant Moms on April 24. The tea honors expectant moms with two hours of pampering, good food and good company. To register for the English Tea, please call our FFSC at 270-600 ext. 1700. I also want to remind everyone that the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society fund drive is underway. Last year, Mayports active duty service members raised $215,000 to help their shipmates in need. That is a great amount, but nowhere near the more than $837,000 worth of loans and grants NMCRS Mayport distributed to 1,500 local families. For more information about receiving help from the NMCRS, call (904) 270-5418 or visit their Web site at www.nmcrsmayport.org. For more information about the fund drive, contact RPC Hector Feliciano at 2705212 or hector.feliciano@navy.mil. I want to welcome Cmdr. Michael Burd and Cmdr. Ken Anderson to the Mayport leadership team and wish fair winds and following seas to Cmdr. Sil Perrella and Cmdr. Chris Follin as they take on increased responsibilities. Cmdr. Burd took command of HSM-40 yesterday during a change of command ceremony at the squadrons hangar. Cmdr. Anderson will relieve Follin as Commanding Officer of USS Simpson (FFG 56) tomorrow during a change of command ceremony onboard the ship. Finally, on April 15, we will get the MWR Spring 2014 Sports Challenge (April 15-18) underway with the tra ditional CO/CMC canoe challenge on Lake Wonderwood. Team Mayport is positioning ourselves to bring home the winning trophy and out seat the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant. Best of luck to all who participate. HAVE FUN! Pick up your command pack age for the Sports Challenge at the Mayport Fitness Center. For more information, call Rita at 270-7718. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Our military children often face unique chal lenges such as having a parent who is deployed; the family moving frequently or living with or helping to care for a parent injured in combat; or members of the family carrying on the legacy of a fallen Service member. Children of military families represent our coun try in ways that makes any American proud. April is designat ed The Month of the Military Child. It is during this month, and especially throughout the year, that we recog nize the sacrifices made by military children. One military dependent shared this, My mom has been home for three years now. But she goes away a lot, too. Being a military kid means knowing my mom has to go away for weeks at a time, but shell always come back home for me and my little sister. I miss her and it is hard. But I know serving our country is important and I am proud of her. And she says she is proud of us for serving our coun try at home by being great military kids. For a military child, the word sacrifice means being a part of a family who may move frequently and having a parent whose duty it is to serve our country. This duty may take them away from the family for long periods of time. Another dependent shared his story: My mom, who used to work one weekend a month for the Army National Guard, was deployed with the 42nd Infantry Division. All of a sudden, mom wasnt there to help with homework, make my lunch or do any family stuff. She was justwell, missing from our family. When she was gone, I was the only kid at my school with a parent in a war. And this was my mom. I felt really alone and a little scared. Kids told me about the bombs in Iraq and how danger ous it was over there and Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNER Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officerhow she could get killed. That scared me, but no one knew how I felt. And I didnt want my dad to feel bad that I was scared so I didnt tell him. My little sister really missed my mom so I couldnt talk to her, and anyway, she was only five. While deployments impact school grades, deployment may also have the same effects on military children as children of divorce. They worry about what will happen to them. They worry that the nondeployed parent will leave, too. Who will take care of them? Who will be at my baseball game, my dance recital? For these absences may have the parent miss impor tant events in the life of a child. And while the child certainly under stands that the parent sacrifices too, it is still difficult not having the parent in the stands for her first start as a soft ball pitcher or in the audience for that starring role in a dance recital or in the car for the trip to the Grand Canyon. So as you and your family enter into this month, remember the many things your family has done apart or together, and especially remember to thank your children for the love and support they have provided to your fam ily. Whether it is taking out the trash, hanging those Christmas lights, remembering to feed the dog, or sending a per sonal message to their deployed mom or dad, KNOWINGTHE ROPES See SLO, Page 13 See Chaplain, Page 13

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Mayport TSD Supports Sailors TrainingBY MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs East, Southeast DetachmentMost Sailors need some type of training throughout their career. For Naval Station Mayport Sailors who need everything from shipboard firefighting to command drug and alcohol programs advisor (DAPA), the first place to visit is the Training Support Detachment (TSD). The TSD provides administrative support for the various training schools at Naval Station Mayport. These cours es include Center for Security Forces (CFS), Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), Center for information Dominance (CID) and Surface Warfare Officers School (SWOS LS). According to TSD Officer in Charge Lt Paul Latina, TSD is a vital part to the training mission We provide administration and building maintenance support to the five training areas in the compound, he said. We are kind of an umbrella support for all the training sites. When a ship gets underway, all Sailors must get the qualifications for ship board firefighting or other damage control training. We provide the administration for stu dents to get the needed training to perform their job on the ship. The TSD staff does not teach the courses but handle all registra tion and other personnel administrative duties to get the students to the various courses. Most of the students are sent Temporary Assigned Duty (TAD) or have orders cut from the various Navy detailers. Most of the classes are C schools special ized for advanced train ing in a certain job rate. TSD checks in all the hundreds of students, handles all personnel department duties, lodg ing (if needed), building maintenance and writes evaluations if needed. According to TSD staff member Aviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Elvis Batista, the process is busy, but the TSD staff runs the student conveyer belt with out a hitch. Some of the paper work is done beforehand, but we handle all the check in process to make sure the students get in the course, he said. The training courses are the important process here; we handle any issues the students have to make sure they can focus on the train ing they need to do their job. The training sites have a combined 68 different courses taught on a continuous basis. Although they do not teach the courses, the TSD department makes sure the paperwork is processed and all administra tion issues are in order, so the students get the training which in turn provides the fleet with expertly trained profes sionals to help complete the mission. The fleet cannot operate without technical experts, said Latina. We dont teach the courses but provide the administrative support so students can become technical experts. -Photo by Ensign Jacklyn SmithMember of Training Support Detachment stand outside of their building, at the end of Baltimore Avenue. The detachment provides administrative support for training schools located at NS Mayport.The Hidden I In TeamAt regular intervals throughout his 26-year military career, my hus band has been promoted to the next rank. Each time this happens, there is a little ceremony, during which my husband gives a brief speech. After two decades of being married to a Navy man, I have that speech pretty much memorized. Captain So-and-so, thank you for the won derful introduction. Also, kudos go out to Petty Officer Whatsisface for the lovely decor and delicious cake. *clears throat* When I joined the Navy [#] years ago, I never imagined making [current rank]. I merely aspired to learn, to travel the world, and to serve my country. But I stayed in the Navy because, simply put, I love my job. And the reason I love my job is because of the people Ive been fortunate enough to work for and with. [Names various people in the command, to include Admiral Whooziewhat, seated nearby.] But there is someone else here that I need to rec ognize. Someone, with out whom, I would not be standing before you all here today. Someone who has been my team mate for [#] years -my wonderful wife, Lisa. Women swoon, men wink, cameras flash, I blow my husband a kiss, and he smiles in return. And every time, at that moment, I actually believe its true. Soon after, I find myself alone, changing the wiper blades, taking the dog to the vet, paying the exterminator bill, and ordering our son to shave. My teammate is not around, because he is halfway across the globe. Its not his fault; hes working to support our family. But, when I become the sole manager of our family, I am often frazzled, overwhelmed, and unshowered, walking around with my arms held up like a crazed zombie in search of Sauvignon Blanc. My personality waf fles between deranged inmate, vicious dicta tor, catatonic robot and hormonal sobbing mess, while I try my best to handle our chaotic home life on my own. This doesnt feel like team work, but more like some bizarre form of solitary confinement. My husband just left for Italy. Hell be gone for a only a week, then back for a week, then gone again to Alabama for a week, then home another week before hes off again to Texas for another week. These lit tle work trips are minor annoyances when com pared to the long deployments other military folks are enduring, and besides, managing the home front alone gets easier the older you get, right? Uh, not so much. Like an old umbrella stroller with a wobbly wheel, an old shirt with a loose button, an old desktop computer with too many image files, an old blender that gives Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFESee Team, Page 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 POWER TO PREVAILUSS Robert G. Bradley Is DecommissionedBy Ensign Christopher M. CateUSS Robert G. Bradley Public AffairsNearly 30 years after she was commissioned in 1984, Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, Commanding Officer of USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), decommis sioned the ship March 28, at a Naval Station Mayport ceremony. Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Votel, commander, Joint Special Operations Command, was the guest speaker; Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 14, Capt. Ryan Tillotson, presided over the decommissioning event. Also in attendance were pre vious commanding offi cers, as well as three survivors of USS Princeton (CVL 23). FFG 49 was the first U.S. Navy ship to be named for a Washington D.C. native. Lt. Robert Graham Bradley served as Assistant First Lieutenant aboard Princeton, where he led a repair party in efforts to save the ship after it was attacked by a Japanese dive bomber during the battle of Leyte Gulf. Bradley and his repair team lost their lives when the flames spread to an aft torpedo maga zine and detonated four, 100-pound bombs. For his actions, Bradley was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. For nearly 30 years this ship has carried Lt. Robert G. Bradleys name and spirit in defense of our nation, said Ehlers. It has been a privilege and an honor to be the commanding officer of the last crew of Bradleymen. I could not -Photo by Paige GnannOperations Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Justin Maynard rolls up the USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) banner attached to the brow after the ship was decommissioned during a ceremony held Friday at Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Robert G. Bradley mans the ships rails one last time during a decommissioning ceremony held at NS Mayport on March 28.-Photo byPaige GnannThe crew of the ex-USS Robert G. Bradley stand in formation after departing the ship and securing the last watch.-Photo by Paige GnannYoeman 2nd Class Jonathan Meckstroth pulls transfer packages for the crew of USS Robert G. Bradley after the ships decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannRGB Plankowner Stephen Baer talks with current crewmembers, Boatswains Mate 2nd Class (SW) Marlon Narvaez and Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Paden Fackrell after the decommission ing ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannCMDCS(SW) Gary Jefferson presents the ships commissioning pennant to Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, during the decommissioning ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannFormer crewmembers enjoy one last walk around RGB during the decommissioning ceremony. See RGB, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Salt CebePlank owners of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradleys (FFG 49) pose for a picture prior to the ships decommissioning ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport. After almost 30 years of service, the ship named after Navy Cross recipient Lieutenant Robert G. Bradley (1921), was decommissioned on March 28. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFrank Moschella former crew member of USS Princeton (CVL 23) (Ret) salutes the flag during USS Robert G. Bradley's (FFG 49) decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport.-Photo by Paige GnannThe crew of USS Robert G. Bradley gets ready to depart the ship as the colors are hauled down for the last time during the decommissioning ceremony held pierside at Naval Station Mayport on March 28.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeArmy Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Votel, Cmdr. Peter J. Ehlers, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49), and Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, Capt. Ryan C. Tillotson, salute the flag during the ships decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeCmdr. Peter J. Ehlers, commanding officer of the guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) gives his final remarks during the ships decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeThe crew of guided-missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) depart the ship for the final time during the ship's decommissioning ceremony on Naval Station Mayport.be more proud of them. After participating in UNITAS in the Western Caribbean Sea in Sept. 2012, and completing a Board of Inspection and Survey, the ship departed in late October for a seven-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Initially assigned an Africa Partnership mission, the crew quickly reconfigured the ship with four MQ-8B Fire Scouts to support Africa Command, Counter-Terrorism Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance tasking. They completed more than 900 flight hours with the MQ-8B Fire Scouts while on station and conducted the first-ever concurrent Dual-Air-Vehicle mission with another Fire Scout-equipped frigate. The end of 2013 found the crew assisting in deployment preparations and certifications for the USS West Virginia (SSBN 123), the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group, and the USS Bataan Expeditionary Strike Group. The ship is slated for foreign military sales.From Page 4RGB

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Deputy Position Changes Hands At Inter-American SecretariatFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsAn Argentinean offi cer assumed the role of deputy secretary of the Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network during a March 26 ceremony at U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet headquarters. Capitan de Corbeta (Lt. Cmdr.) Oscar Latorre replaced Capitan de Fragata (Cmdr.) Jose Antonio Mejia Flores of the Mexican navy. I feel so honored to have been able to serve with this organization for the peace of the western hemisphere, said Mejia, who received the IANTN medal and 50th Anniversary coin from Cmdr. Bradley Maas, the IANTN secretary, during the ceremony, attended by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet commander. You have represented Mexico as well as it could be represented, Harris told Mejia. The work of IANTN is essential to keeping the hemisphere stable, secure and united, he added. Regardless of the political circumstanc es the situation above us our navies have got to be able to interoper ate, Harris said. It starts with this staff, and it starts with the com munications between nations. Created in 1962 at the third Inter-American Naval Conference, in Vina Del Mar, Chile, IANTN provides secure communications at sea to ships of its 18 member countries. In addition to Argentina, Mexico and the United States and Chile, those countries include Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela. Originally based in Panama, the secretariat moved first to Puerto Rico and from there to U.S. 4th Fleet headquarters in Mayport. Its staff includes three Latin American officers and one Latin American chief petty officer. Noting that foreign officers assigned to Mayport improve their practical English quickly, Harris presented Latorre with a copy of Embrace the Suck, a dictionary of U.S. military jargon. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Mike Cody Capitan de Fragata (Cmdr.) Jose Antonio Mejia Flores of the Mexican navy, foreground, stands at attention as Teniente Primero (Lt.) Gonzalo Castaneda of Peru reads the duties of the Inter-American Naval Telecommunications Network deputy secretary during a change of responsibility ceremony. At right, also at attention, is Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. -Photo by Lt. Lloyd Forbis Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks with midshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program on campus. 4th Fleet Harris Meets With UF MidshipmenFrom University of Florida NROTC Public AffairsThe commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet met with members of the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps unit during their weekly leadership lab in Gainesville March 25. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, his executive assistant, Lt. Cmdr. Jodi Beattie, and the 4th Fleet command master chief, Command Master Chief David Tellez dis cussed their experiences in the naval service and answered questions from the midshipmen. Harris, whose naval career spans 30 years, discussed his time in the surface fleet and emphasized that good officers will be necessary to lead the naval services in the future. He spoke about the importance of the Navy and Marine Corps team and on the neces sity that all the services maintain a high moral standard in order to retain the trust of the American people. The Navy has changed in many ways since he joined but Sailors, and what is expected of them, remain fundamentally the same, Harris said. When the midshipmen are commissioned, they will need to care for the Sailors under their charge, he added. Harris also discussed current Navy issues, such as officer retention rates and the Littoral Combat Ship program. Littoral combat ships, which are designed to be reconfigured for vari ous roles by changing mission modules, are expected to deploy in the 4th Fleet area of responsibility starting next year. The midshipmen asked Harris about the Navys involvement in the World Cup this summer in Brazil, challenges faced by women in mili tary service, and how junior officers should interact with senior enlisted members. They also asked for sea stories. The opportunity to ask questions of experienced officers and a senior enlisted member was appreciated by the mid shipmen. Their knowledge is invaluable to any aspiring officer, said Midshipman 3rd Class Gerardo Contreras, a sustainability and built environment student from Pompano Beach. The NROTC program was established to develop midshipmen mentally, morally and physically and to imbue them with the highest ideals of duty, loyalty and Navy core values. For more information about NROTC, visit https://www.nrotc.navy. mil/. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. 4th Fleet Reservists Achieve Weapons Quals By MC1 Sean AllenU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsSailors from the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit achieved qualifications on a variety of weapons during a March 17-19 gun shoot aboard Naval Station Mayport. Twelve members of the units security depart ment took part in the event, which included one day of classroom instruction and two days at the range. They qualified on the 9 mm handgun, 12-gauge shotgun and M16 assault rifle. The Sailors were required to fire from various positions, including kneeling and prone, and to fire while seeking cover. In one evolution, the Sailors were required to perform physical training for one minute before entering the range to fire their weapons. I found the PT part challenging and fun, said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Christopher Ortiz, who is a police officer in his civilian profession. In most gun shoots, you usually stand in one spot and fire your weapon, but this one created more of a realistic atmosphere. The aim of the gun shoot was to prepare the Sailors many of whom will deploy to Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvador, as part of the security team to support the 4th Fleet mission. CSL Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and operational support to forward deployed U.S. and partner nation aviation units participating in Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-S) assigned counter-illicit trafficking operations, NAVSO-directed humanitarian missions, and search-and-rescue (SAR) efforts. Of 23 Masters-atArms currently assigned to the location, 15 are Reserve personnel serve as Watch Commanders, security trainers, and other critical positions. Needless to say, without their support, our mission capabilities would be degraded immensely, said Chief Master-at-Arms (AW) David M. Shisk, the CSL Comalapa security offi cer. To maintain a strong security posture, the Masters-at-Arms must maintain proficiency on a variety of weapons systems, Shisk said. I couldnt be more pleased that everyone in the security family is doing his part to ensure we stay at the tip of the spear, he said. The motivation to excel shown by our reservists is inspiring. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet support U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/.-Photos by MC1 Sean AllenMaster at Arms Seaman Camille Thomas, assigned to COMUSNAVO/U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit prepares to fire a 9mm pistol as part of a weapons qualification course March 18 aboard Naval Station Mayport. The course involved the individuals particiapting to perform various exercises prior to entering the firing range to test the Sailors ability to fire thier weapon while being fatigued. Master-at-Arms 2nd Class James Bearden takes aim at a target March 18 during a gun shoot organized by the security department of the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet reserve unit. Sailors were required to fire from various positions, including kneeling and prone, and to fire while seek ing cover.Midway Dinner Tickets On Sale For June 7From Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speak er is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be pur chased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tick ets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol.com

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By Lt. j.g. Stephanie SantarelliUSS HalyburtonTwelve Sailors from the USS Halyburton (FFG 40) carried out a community relations project March 19 at Sandy Bay Public School in Roatan, beau tifying the property and arranging a online class with students in North Carolina. With help from Sandy Bays ninth-grade stu dents, the Sailors plant ed 18 Christmas palm trees on the property and cleaned the Sandy Bay beachfront behind the school campus. Digging holes for the trees was harder than the Sailors expected because the soil was hard clay with large rocks, said Chief Logistics Specialist Leketa Gaines, of Lorman, Miss. When the post-hole digger hit the ground, it caused sparks, and when we thought we were getting somewhere, the blades of the post-hole digger actually started bending inward, said Logistics Specialist Seaman Poliakoff Deliazard, of Miami. Despite the difficulty, the Sailors and students enjoyed themselves. The interaction with the youth was incred ible, Deliazard said. Even a van of tourists stopped to ask about the project. Lt. Tom Bingol, Halyburtons chaplain, coordinated with Rosa Danelia Hendrix, Sandy Bays sub-principal, to execute a virtual inter cultural exchange experience via Skype with students from Porter Ridge Elementary School in Indian Trail, N.C. The students exchanged greetings in English and Spanish, sang the national song of Honduras, and answered one anothers questions for nearly an hour. The questions ranged from the weather to the need to split the school day to accommodate all of the children in the Sandy Bay area who wish to attend class. It was the first tech nology-driven inter cambio, or intercultural exchange of its kind, for any Bay Island school in Honduras, Hendrix said. The Porter Ridge principal, Lisa Taylor, mod erated the discussion in North Carolina. The Naval Station Mayport-based Halyburton is deployed to the U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations to conduct counter illicit trafficking operations. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet support U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. For more news from U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command & U.S. 4th Fleet, visit www. navy.mil/local/cusns/. USS Halyburton Sailors Carry Out ComRel Project In Honduras -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettSailors from guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton pose for a photo with Honduran locals after planting trees for a Community Relations project during Halyburton's port visit to Roatan, Honduras. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Juan Naranjo and Chief Logistics Specialist Leketa Gaines of the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) plant a Christmas palm tree as part of a community relations project at Sandy Bay Public School in Roatan, Honduras. With help from Sandy Bays ninth-grade students, the Sailors planted trees on the property and cleaned the Sandy Bay beachfront behind the school campus. Sailors from guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton plants trees with Honduran locals for a Community Relations project during Halyburtons port visit to Roatan, Honduras. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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Phil Sea Wins E For 2nd YearFrom USS Philippine SeaThe crew of the Guided Missle Cruiser, USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), received the Battle Efficiency, or Battle E award, March 14. The Battle E award is a tribute to the ships overall readiness and was determined by a yearlong evaluation of Philippine Seas accom plishments during train ing exercises and various command inspections. Philippine Sea was nominated by Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG-2) Two and has received the Battle E two years in a row. I am overwhelmed with excitement and pride for the ownership of a second Battle E, said Executive Officer, Randolph Chestang. The Philippine Sea has put in hard work to sustain superior per formance. Winning this award demonstrates to the Navy that this is a world class crew. I am very proud of them and their work! Personnel aboard the Philippine Sea are now authorized to wear the Navy E ribbon and Battle E device. Its great to have the crew wear the Battle E for the second con secutive time, said Command Master Chief Lewis Jackson. This achievement is a true reflection of the crews commitment in dem onstrating excellence in every evolution. Philippine Seas con secutive wins sets a standard for other ships in the fleet, one that Navy leadership believes is achievable. The crew plans to continue to maintain that level of efficiency while on their scheduled deploy ment. Receiving the Battle E for the second year is a great reward for how hard the crew worked during 2013, said Boatsman Mate Seaman Apprentice Andrew Webb. I am proud to be a part of a crew that has -Photo by MC3 Abe McNattCmdr. Randolph Chestang, the executive officer, gives a bearing to the navigator aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) during a Suez Canal transit. Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. See Phil Sea, Page 9USS Roosevelt Earns 2013 Battle EBy MC2 Justin WolpertGeorge H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsOn March 21 the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) received official notifica tion she had earned the coveted Battle E award for sustained superior performance. Commander, Naval Surface Force and Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic recently announced the calendar year 2013 Battle E and command excellence awards for the surface fleet. Roosevelt was honored with Destroyer Squadron Fourteens selection for superior battle efficiency during the calendar year along with two other out standing warships, USS Simpson (FFG 56) and USS Shamal (PC 13). A ship earns the Battle E for sustained superior performance in an operational environment throughout a 12-month cycle in various mission areas including maritime warfare; engineering/ survivability; command, control, communications and information warfare; logistics management; and ship safety. Earning the Battle E reflects directly on the ships crew, said Commander Jay Clark, Roosevelts Commanding Officer. I have always said if you do things the right way, good things happen. The dedication shown by the crew this past year and the earning of this award have undoubtedly shown them that hard work and dedication pays off. Cmdr. Jason Reller, Roosevelts execu tive officer, echoed the achievements of the crew during the evaluation period. It is a tremendous honor for the ship and crew, he said. It is an award that shows the pride, dedication and focus that Roosevelt Sailors bring to every mission. Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. -Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) heave in a line during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5). Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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Gettysburg Wins 2013 Battle E By MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg PAOThe guided missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) was awarded the 2013 calendar year Battle Effectiveness Award by Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic, March 21. The Battle E is awarded annually to the ships that display the maxi mum condition of readi ness in their group and for their capability to perform their wartime responsibilities. Winning the Battle E was possible due to the exemplary performance the crew displayed throughout the year and through deployment, said Capt. Brad Cooper, commanding officer, USS Gettysburg. Its an honor to be recognized for this award and a privilege to work alongside such an amazing crew. To compete for the Battle E, ships are evaluated on major qualifi cations; inspections and assessments include engineering operations certifications, force maintenance and material management assess ments, mobility certifi cations and supply management certifications. Gettysburgs was one of five surface ships in the Atlantic Fleet to win all five catego ries of Battle E. The categories include: the Maritime Warfare Excellence Award (Black E), Engineering/ Survivability Excellence Award (Red E), Command and Control Excellence Award (Green E), Logistics Management Excellence Award (Blue E) and the CNSF Ship Safety Award (Yellow E). Each department has an important role aboard the ship and it takes a combined effort from each to achieve this award, said Gettysburgs Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker. When the crew has a central ized focus and works together towards a goal, they prove what we can achieve as a unit. Naval vessels recog nized for winning this award are authorized to paint a white E on the ship to acknowledge the achievement. Personnel assigned to a ship dur ing the time the ship was recognized for the award are authorized to wear the Battle E ribbon. Quartermaster 3rd Class (SW) Marlesha Parker said she is proud to be a part of the crew during this prestigious recognition. Winning the Battle E is significant because it shows that my ship is devoted to excellence, said Parker. Its great that we have something to show the dedication of our crew and the hard work they have exhibited throughout the year. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonThe crew of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) stand on the bow. The ship was just awarded the 2013 Battle Efectiveness Award. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. proved we are willing to take on any thing that comes our way. The Philippine Sea is underway as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWBCSG). The GHWBCSG is on a scheduled deployment to support maritime secu rity operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. With USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as the flag ship, strike group assets include USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), the embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 8 (CVW 8), strike group staff, Destroyer Squadron 22 staff and ships USS Truxtun (DDG 103), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).From Page 8Phil Sea THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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DESRON 26 Ships Begin Joint WarriorBy MC3 Lacordrick WilsonDESRON 26 Public AffairsShips of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 participating in the multinational exer cise Joint Warrior 14-1 departed Faslane, United Kingdom, March 30 after a scheduled port visit. Joint Warrior 14-1 is a semiannual, United Kingdom-led training exercise designed to provide NATO and allied forces a unique, multiwarfare environment in which to prepare for global operations. Guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), guided-missile destroyers USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Cole (DDG 67), USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), and guided-missile cruisers USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) and USS Vella Gulf (CG 72), are participat ing in the coalition exercise, which is intended to improve interoperability between allied navies in a challenging operational environment and to prepare them for real world events. Joint Warrior is one of the most realistic training exercises that the U.S. Navy is involved in, said Capt. Cary Krause, commander, DESRON 26. Working with allied partners will help us make connec tions and strengthen the U.S. Navys ability to operate with a variety of navies and platforms. The Joint Warrior exercise is designed and led by the joint tactical exercise planning staff in the United Kingdom, and is considered an advanced certification course for their ships. For the ships partici pating, it will be a very unique learning oppor tunity, said Krause. The exercise will require adequate focus and integration from all navies, which is necessary for giving our Sailors the proper training for real world future events. The two-week exercise will include sce narios such as small boat attacks, boarding operations, air defense, anti-warfare, and ship maneuverability tasks. More than 30 individual units, including aviation, surface, and subsurface, are participating. -Photo by MC3 Lacordrick WilsonUSS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) transits the Atlantic Ocean in support of exercise Joint Warrior 14-1. Joint Warrior 14-1 is a semiannual, United Kingdom-led training exercise. Air Ops Is In Gear -Photo by Paige GnannABH2(AW) Anthony Edwards, above, and ABE2(AW) Mark Dagatan perform corrosion control on the E-28 gear on the north east end of Naval Station Mayports runway. The gear is used as a trapping in the event a plane must perform an emergency landing. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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actually get our fellow Sailors, Marines and civilians engaged both physically and mentally, said Yeoman 2nd Class Demario Smith. Its a run with a purpose and meaning to it. CSADD asks that you wear a white t-shirt and bring either goggles or sunglasses. For your safety and enjoyment we ask you to bring eye protection, said Master-at-Arms Seaman Jessie Robinson. We would hate for such a fun event to be remembered as the time the CSADD ruined your day because you got powder in your eyes. During the whole month of April CSADD will have a bin available for anyone who would like to donate jeans. All the jeans raised will go to the Womens Center of Jacksonville and the Hubbard House. The Womens Center of Jacksonville was created to help women overcome social, economic, and personal barriers; such as sexual assault, abuse and financial issues. Hubbard House works to accomplish three main objectives: the first is safety for victims and their children, second is they work to empower victims and the third is social change through education and advocacy. This is the sec ond year that we will be raising jeans for the Womens Center of Jacksonville and the first time for the Hubbard House, said Master-atArms 2nd Class Sharon Berg. Its a good feeling knowing that something as simple as donating jeans that dont fit you or you just dont wear anymore will make someones life a lot easier and happier. There will be bins located across the Mayport area includ ing the Commissary, NS Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center in Building One, the MWR Liberty Center, the NEX Gas Station, USS New York, the Mayport Clinic, COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt, USO and at the Color Run. Please help us by donating jeans, they go to such a great cause and the more jeans that get donated the more peo ple in the Jacksonville area we can help, said Robinson. Our goal is to raise 1,000 pairs of jeans for the Hubbard House and Womens Center of Jacksonville. CSADD will also be holding a Jean Day on April 23 and would encourage all the com mands to participate. With a simple dona tion to CSADD of $50 per command of 10 or more people or $5 a person in commands 9 or less, Sailors can wear jeans and a collared shirt to work for a day in support of Denim Day, said Berg. We will be using the money to do more fun events like the color run in the future. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative and CSADD hopes that holding events like this will help not only raise the awareness of Sexual Assault but help prevent it from happening in our Navy. For more information regarding the color run, visit and like Naval Station Mayport CSADD Facebook page or contact MC2 Damian Berg at damian.berg@navy.mil. From Page 1CSADDMayport Celebrates Womens History MonthBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastCelebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment, was the theme as The Naval Station Mayport First Class Association host ed a Womens History Month program March 31. The 34th annual observance honors the extraordinary and often unrecognized determi nation and tenacity of women, they have creat ed a legacy that expands the frontiers of possi bility for generations to come. They have dem onstrated their charac ter, courage and com mitment as mothers, educators, institution builders, business, labor, political and community leaders, relief workers, women religious, and CEOs. Their lives and their work inspire girls and women to achieve their full potential and encourage boys and men to respect the diversity and depth of womens experience. The key note speaker at the event was National Naval Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Dept. Head Capt. Christine Dorr, M.D. Dorr is an inspirational example of the contributions by women in the military. She is known for her specialized expertise in Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Chronic Pain Management and one of the originators of the Nine Visit Obstetrical pathway, which contin ues to serve as the backbone for all prenatal care services for the entire Military Health System. According to Dorr, military women are starting to be recognized for their major contributions to military readiness. Military women are a reflection of the United States, she said. Our contributions are on par with our male counterparts. We are no longer the underdog, women are recognized in every aspect of the military and everyday society. One of the women highlighted during the program was American computer scientist Rear Adm Grace Murray Hopper (Dec. 9, 1906 Jan. 1, 1992). A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She popular ized the idea of machineindependent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term debugging for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accom plishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as Amazing Grace U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 Hopper supercomputer at NERSC. According to Operations Specialist 1st Class Quincy Jackson, (one of the speakers at the program), this pro gram is only a small way to recognize the many contributions women make in the military and all walks of life. Women represent 18 percent of the Navy force, which is a very low number, but they make such great con tributions, he said. The Navy has changed with its roles, we have really pushed the sex ual assault awareness and equal opportunity programs, and the cul ture has dramatically changed for the better. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissNational Naval Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Dept. Head Capt. Christine Dorr, M.D. speaks at the Naval Station Mayport First Class Association Womens History Month program held Marh 31 at Mayport Memorial Park. Celebrating NGIS Photo by CTTC Carolyn ToneyNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall stands with the team of Mayports Navy Gateway Inns & Suites during a Navy Lodging Program Appreciation Day celebration and awards luncheon held March 26 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBalfour Beatty Communities would like to congratulate Jessica Jones who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Jones Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the pro gram, please call 904-270-8870. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 off a burning smell every time you try to make a frozen margarita I used to work really well, but the older I get, the more likely it is that Im gonna blow. The kids tiptoe around the house, hoping that Ill wipe the smudged mascara away from my eyes before I take them to school, and wondering whether Ill force them to eat cheese and crack ers again for dinner. The dog senses tension, and follows me around the house, licking my pant legs. But with the distraction of the DVR, therapeutic happy hours with the neighbors, and a secret can of Pringles stashed in the laundry room, I know I will cope until my husband gets home. I must admit, I have come to enjoy certain aspects of my temporary solitude total control of the TV clicker, sleep uninterrupted by snoring, cheese and cracker dinners. And he, too, relishes his me time while on travel total control of the TV clicker, sleep uninterrupted by his wife telling him to stop snor ing, restaurant dinners. Despite the suitcase full of dirty laundry and the generous gift of hotel mini-soaps he deposits with me upon returning home, we are undoubt edly happiest when we are together. But as a military family, we must often work separately toward our common goals. As sports writer Amber Harding once said, ... there most certainly is an I in team. It is the same I that appears three times in responsibility.From Page 3TeamFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. April 3, 2014 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn how to master the skills of understanding nonverbal cues, constructive criticism, and active lis tening. They also learn to explore the differences that affect communica tion as a couple, as well as how they can deepen their relationship. April 3, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 This program focuses on the woman herself and her power to change the course of her life. Participants are encour aged to set individual goals, complete a Myers Briggs Inventory, and to identify family roles. April 7-11, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Building 1, RM 1616 The class is designed for military person nel who are within 24 months of retiring or 90-180 days of separat ing from completion of military services. It helps Service members understand the overall Transition GPS program, the requirements to meet Career Readiness Standards, and to iden tify common issues Service members and their families experience during the transition process. April 7, 2014 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management, Building 1, RM 702 Participants learn the skills to take control of their anger and direct it in ways that will make them more effective and productive at work and at home. April 7, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 Over the course of six sessions, parents learn discipline techniques and effective communi cation and encouragements skills to build a solid foundation for the upcoming teen years. April 7, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are apply ing for. April 8, 2014 10 a.m.noon, What About the Kids, Building 1, RM 702 The purpose of this program is to educate parents on the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. April 9, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effective independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. April 9, 2014 11 a.m.noon, Gambling Awareness, Building 1, RM 719 Participants will com plete a self-assessment of their gambling hab its and learn about the warning signs of problem behavior. April 10, 2014 9-10:30 a.m., Stroller Strut Behind Building 1 In support of Month of The Military Child, join us for some sun, fun, and exercise! April 10, 2014 9-11:30 a.m., EFMP Point of Contact Training Building 1, RM 702 Learn how to run an effective and efficient command program, in accordance with OPNAVINST 1754.2D program requirements, get best practices from other EFMP POCs, and learn about available resources. April 10, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 14-15, 2014 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Advanced Higher Education Track, Building 1, RM 708 Designed to guide transitioning service members through the process of choosing a degree program, pre paring for the college admissions application process, and finding the funds to attend school. April 14-18, 2014 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training Building 1, RM 1616 April 14, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 April 14, 2014 1:30-3 p.m., Targeting Your Resume Building 1, RM 702 Participants will learn how to highlight their skills and experiences as they directly relate to the each job they are apply ing for. April 16, 2014 9 a.m.1 p.m., Organizing Your Job Search and Networking Building 1, RM 702 Participants will gain the tools and strategies necessary to map their career paths, organize and perform an effective independent job search, and how to build their own network of peers for continued support. April 16, 2014 4 p.m., Home Buying, Building, RM 1616 Get the latest infor mation on purchasing a home if you are a first-time homebuyer, or refresh your skills for your next home purchase. April 17, 2014 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training, Building 1, RM 1124 April 17, 2014 10-11 a.m., Healthy YOU, Health Family!, Building 1, RM 702 April 21-25, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Transition GPS Retiree Workshop, Building 1, RM 1616 April 21, 2014 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Building 1, RM 702 El Espiritu De Santiago Debut A group of community volunteers who have worked tirelessly over the past two years to create a 16th century replica caravel say their mission is now complete and willculminate in the long-awaited debut of the El Espiritu de Santiago as the main attraction on April 5 for the first annual Ponce de Leon Day Celebration at the Vilano Pier, as well as The Blessing of the Fleet on April 13. According to organiz ers, this inaugural Ponce Day will feature a classic car show, arts and crafts booths, live entertain ment, and a mock sea battle and treasure hunt onshore by the Black Raven Pirate Ship and Queen Anns revenge Adventure Landing Fun-Raiser Mark your calen dars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is hosting a FUN-raiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per per son ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be purchased at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retirees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. Mayport USO No Dough Dinner Monday, April 14 from 5-7 P.M., the Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be par ticipating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity pro gram. This unique com munity-based fundrais ing initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encourage you to visit www. birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportunity to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to be eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Deadline is May 7. There is a computer resource center available to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSaccomplished over the past year with regard to sexual assault prevention and response and to look into the future as to how we can continue to eradicate this crime from our ranks. Commands are empowered to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2014 is a com ponent of our efforts in the 21st Century Sailor Office to build a resil ient Navy community and will use the theme Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault to highlight bystander intervention and accountability, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Office. Wed like Sailors to take the first half of the month to reflect on the efforts weve put in place this past year and how weve tackled sexual assault. The second half of April will focus on Sailors dedicating themselves to be active bystanders to step up and intervene in potentially destructive situations. In addition to asking Sailors to sit down and talk about sexual assault prevention, commands are encouraged to orga nize any number of events to highlight the awareness and prevention of sexual assaults. Some of the suggested events include hanging ribbons on trees around base, hosting Meet your SARC and victim advocate events, organizing skits at the local base theater and other such activities to raise aware ness during the month of April. In the past few months of traveling to meet the fleet, Ive noticed that Sailors themselves are stepping up and taking charge, said Buck. I encourage you to continue to look out for your shipmates and step up to stop sexual assault. Sailors can also find information, references and resources at www. sapr.navy.mil to help them determine how they would like their individual command to observe this month. The website also includes resources for victims of sexual assault to reach out and get help. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor Office which consolidates a set of objectives and poli cies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Navy. The Department of the Navy is working aggres sively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sex ual assault victims and to hold offenders account able. For more information, read NAVADMIN 066/14 at www.npc. navy.mil and go to www. sapr.navy.mil and click on SAAM 2014.From Page 1SAAM

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13 Hellfire Pass, near the cemetery, and see first hand the remnants of a railroad line that is hewn through a granite mountain by hand, I realize Hollywood can never quite capture the sheer heaviness of what transpired here so long ago. And while my journey back in time and history is largely sad, there are bright moments of inspiration that rise from my walk down the pathway between graves. Out of the darkness of the human heart and its capacity to engage in evil, rise stories of hero ism and courage beyond comprehension. As prison guards tried to crush the spirit of many, break minds by break ing the back and gener ally cheapen the value of human life, extraordi nary men defied at the cost of great suffering and sometimes there life. They clung to love of God and country, maintained faith in their fellow prisoners, and protected fiercely the value and the dignity inherent in every human being. As I think about this, it occurs to me that this is the great crime of blue on blue casual ties that occur today in our Navy. Conflict that comes in the form of physical assaults, sexual assaults, racism and bigotry, and discrimination of any kind. Even now in some work spaces in our Navy small battles still take place where a very small few try to degrade and devalue the inherent value of human dignity that lies in a fellow sail or. It is as wrong here as it was wrong on the Thai-Burma railroad line in the Kwai river valley. As I come to the end of the row of gravestones, I notice something quite peculiar. I have not seen one American headstone. I ask the curator at the museum across the street, where are the American fallen? He tells me that they have all been repatri ated. They are home. Suddenly I am overcome with a great deal of pride I can barely keep my composure to thank the curator. These American war riors fought and died to protect certain selfevident truths, particu larly that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. And my country honored their sacrifice, maintained faith with the fallen, and took great efforts to bring them back. We, who are part of todays Navy, can do no less. We must fight any spirit of prejudice that attempts to maliciously erode and devalue our brother or sister in uni form. We must maintain faith with the constitu tion we swore to uphold. From Page 2Chaplainthese helpful things show how much they love and support what the entire family is doing to support our nations freedom. This month will also provide the opportu nity to make some new memories. Make plans to attend the Chapels Spring Festival on Saturday, April 19th at the Chapel from 11 am-2 pm. Crafts, free food, a Moonwalk, and a special visit by the Easter Bunny will provide some special fun for the kids. An Egg Hunt for ages infant to10 years of age is scheduled for 1 pm. Dont forget to bring your camera! Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 219-3894 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2SLO Auto Skills Center April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scaven ger hunt and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 April 5: Take Me Out to the Ballgame. 4 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Celebrate the beginning of baseball season. Whiffleball chal lenge, drink specials, snacks and prizes. 2707205 April 7: NCAA National Basketball Championship Watch the game and see if you won the bracket. 2707205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. April 4: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. April 9: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and transportation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. Intramural Sports April 8: Spring Forward 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. April 8: Womens Basketball Meeting. 5 p.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday 18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents April 4: Teen Movie Trip: Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Ages 13+. Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; per mission slip required. 246-0347 April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn. 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. Get ShipShapeThe Nutrition and Weight Management Class is still accept ing students. It runs for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9-11 a.m. Class is open to active duty personnel, adult depen dents, and retirees. For more info, call 270-5251 ext. 16.

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