Mirror (Mayport, FL)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00340


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 2

2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Ross A. Cramer ................................................................................ Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: To Everything There Is A SeasonAccording to the Holman Bible Dictionary, the English word lent (stems from an Anglo-Saxon word for spring and is related to the English word length en) refers to the peni tential period preceding Easter. Early Christians felt that the magnitude of the Easter celebration called for special prepa ration. As early as the second century, many Christians observed several days of fasting as part of that prepara tion. Over the next few centuries, perhaps in remembrance of Jesus fasting for 40 days in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-2), 40 days became the accepted length of the Lenten season. In the early centuries, the season before Easter was also the usual period of intense training for new Christians. During this period, the catechumens (those learning what it meant to be Christians) went through the final stages of preparation for baptism, which usu ally occurred at dawn on Easter Sunday. In Western Christianity, Ash Wednesday marks the first day, or the start of the season of Lent, which begins 40 days prior to Easter. Lent is a time when many Christians prepare for Easter by observing a period of fasting, repentance, moderation and spiritual discipline. The purpose is to set aside time for reflection on Jesus Christ his suffering and his sacrifice, his life, death, burial and resurrection. Although the custom ary forms of Lent do not appear in scripture, the spirit of Lent is bibli cally supported through repentance and mourn ing in ashes (2 Samuel 13:19; Esther 4:1; Job 2:8; Daniel 9:3; Matthew 11:21). One of the primary reasons we celebrate non-sectarian special days such as birthdays, veterans/ memorial days, and wedding anni versaries is to set aside a period of time to give honor to people and to let them know we care. Likewise, Lent is a time to commemorate, reflect, give attention to, and recognize the sacrifice, life and work of Jesus Christ. Those of us who participate in some sort of spiritual discipline during the Lenten season ought not to think we are more spiritual than those who choose not to. Nonetheless, we should all understand that just as there are health bene fits for physical exercise. There are also spiritual benefits for those who practice spiritual disciplines. Whether you partici pant in Lent or not, the daily intake of Gods Holy Word is essential to your spiritual well being. Scripture teaches and Christ confirmed that a person cannot live by bread alone (Matt. 4:4a). To this end, I leave you with this modern trans lation (Message Bible) of Romans 12:1-2: So heres what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your every day, ordinary lifeyour sleeping, eating, goingto-work, and walkingaround lifeand place it before God as an offer ing. Embracing what God does for you is the best thing you can do for him. Dont become so well-adjusted to your culture that you fit into it without even thinking. Instead, fix your atten tion on God. Youll be changed from the inside out. Readily recognize what he wants from you, and quickly respond to it. Unlike the culture around you, always dragging you down to its level of immaturity, God brings the best out of you, develops wellformed maturity in you. Now go back and Read this passage out loud. Think about the ideas and commands in this verse. Pray about what you hear God saying to you. Live out what you learn in your every day, ordinary life. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Calvin B. Gardner, Sr. CNSL Ministry CenterSchool Counselor Can Ease End-of-School WoesAll students can learn. However, a student who is troubled cannot learn as easily. Dealing with physical illness, divorce, abuse, or poverty, for example places students at-risk of educational failure and maybe drop ping out of school. Military students have the added social stressor of deployment: transi tions, family relocations, and extended separa tions. Students and parents report mobility as the most challenging aspect of the military. Most young people report the greatest stress is anticipation of the move and then the first month of the move. Add to that academic adjust ment and peer accep tance throughout the first year of the move and a family may be left with a sense of little con trol over their environ ment. NS Mayport is cur rently experiencing the movement of families onto and off of the base with homeport changes and PCSing moves. Students have begun to stress about leaving friends they have made this year to making new friends in a new school. Some of those students are here in Jacksonville looking to move to Austin, San Diego, and even to Japan. Other students are in the Norfolk area wondering what it will be like to live 3 hours north of Disney World and blocks from the beach. And they are both worrying about new schools. Their school counselors can help. These counselors have unique qualifications and skills to address all students academic, personal/ social, and career development needs. They are trained to advocate, mediate, coor dinate, refer, lead and collaborate with teach ers, administrators and parents to help students be successful. They pro vide services to military students in need through specialized groups, such as the Student2Student program which helps students deal with tran sitions. Another important program at this time is the Military Family Life Counselor (MFLC) program which I have recently described in another article. But right now these counselors along with the schools counsel or may be the perfect response for those tran sition worries that so many of NS Mayports students or soon to be NS Mayports stu dents are experiencing. Locally, the counselors are available at Finegan, Mayport, and Jax Beach Elementary Schools and Mayport Middle School. An MFLC is also avail able at NS Mayports Youth Activity Center. You can also contact Dr. Mia Wilson at (904) 7383657 or mia.wilson@ healthnet.com. Another resource for coping with transition stress is NS Mayports Youth Sponsorship Program. Part of the Navys Child and Youth Programs, Youth Sponsorship will connect your child or Teen to positive peer groups and KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer social activities at their new duty station. To get your child connected to our Youth Sponsorship Program go to www. mayport_youthsponsor ship@yahoo.com In approximately two weeks, the 3rd quarter report card will go home. If your child is struggling academically or behav iorally as a response to an impending transition or deployment, it may be time to connect with the school counselor or the MFLC. Depending on the grade your child is in, whether he is in a spe cial program, a magnet school, or on a special diploma track, now is the perfect time to deter mine what needs to hap pen and when. It is not too late to craft positive changes to be implemented for the rest of the school year. Consider scheduling a conference to discuss your childs concerns about the upcoming move or deployment. As a parent, you know your child best. However, these counselors can offer options for dealing with concerns, includ ing better ways to com municate with your child and with the childs teacher(s). By sharing informa tion with each other, you establish a helping relationship which can turn problems around. You will find that these counselors are excellent resources; however, they do not provide therapy or long-term counsel ing. Referrals to outside agencies may be initiated at the school. But remember that parent-counselor col laboration may take some time to work. This collaboration requires tenacity because things dont always go perfectly at first. But when par ents work with counsel ors, their children tend to have greater social adjustment. They get along better with fellow students and teachers. They commu nicate more effectively, and believe it or not, sometimes they do their homework more will ingly. By taking advan tage of all these coun selors have to offer, you can help your child fin ish this school year on a positive note. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.CorrectionIn the March 19 edi tion of The Mirror, the second to the last para graph of the article titled, Team Effort to Conserve Energy at NS Mayport indicates that an ener gy billing program has not happened yet at NS Mayport Base Housing. Base Housing estab lished the Resident Conservation Program (RECP) in 2012 and introduced live billing in spring 2013. The program involves charging residents if over, and reimburses if under, their long term goal with respect to ener gy consumption. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused.

PAGE 3

UF Midshipmen Visit NS MayportBy Midshipman 3rd Class Adam CampbellUniversity of Florida NROTCMidshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) unit in Gainesville, Fla., traveled to Naval Station Mayport, March 14. While there, the group toured the Ticonderogaclass cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and was able to practice con ning a ship in a full mis sion bridge simulator. As part of the NROTC program, the midship men submit their prefer ences for which warfare community they would like to enter upon commissioning. This group of midshipmen was a mix of seniors, juniors, sophomores, and fresh men who have expressed interest in being a sur face warfare officer. The goal of this visit was to show the midshipmen an active duty warship, and related duties that sur face warfare officers per form, so they can make a more informed decision. While aboard Vicksburg, the midship men were shown vari ous areas of the ship, including the bridge, combat information center (CIC), flight deck, and officers country, where officer staterooms are located. During the tour, Fire Control Officer, Lt. Derek Cribbs, and Weapons Officer, Lt. Doug Ivey, discussed the responsibilities, duties, and general life of a surface warfare officer. The midshipmen said the experience and advice provided to them by Cribbs and Ivey was invaluable, as they could potentially fill those same positions in just a few years. While at the full mis sion bridge simulator, the midshipmen spoke with junior officers from the USS Somerset (LPD 25) who were finishing up a week of training in the simulator. The mid shipmen watched as the officers ran through different scenarios, and some performed as helmsmen for the sce narios. After the officers from Somerset complet ed their training, retired Navy Capt. Earl Yerger and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Kevin King had the midshipmen each take the CONN, or control of a simulat ed cruiser, driving the ship through simulated smoke floats, a pyro technic device dropped from an aircraft that emits smoke while float ing on top of the water. The midshipmen then gave the orders to move alongside an oiler for an underway replenish ment. Not only touring the ship but getting to see the daily functions and preparations that go into getting underway was highly rewarding, said Midshipman 2nd Class Kaylan King, from Jacksonville, Fla., on how the day proved to be a very valuable experience. Today the NROTC program is overseen by Rear Adm. Dee L. Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC) headquartered at Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill. The NROTC program was estab lished to develop mid shipmen mentally, mor ally and physically and to imbue them with the highest ideals of duty, loyalty and Navy core values. Those ideals and values are the backbone of all NROTC midshipmen as they work toward becoming college gradu ates and commission as Navy and Marine Corps officers who pos sess a basic professional background, are moti vated toward careers in the Naval service and have a potential for future development in mind and charac ter so as to assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizen ship and government. Mewbourne and his NSTC staff oversee 98 percent of initial officer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. This includes NROTC at more than 160 col leges and universi ties, Officer Training Command (OTC) on Naval Station Newport, R.I.; Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill.; and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development pro grams at more than 600 high schools worldwide. For more information about NROTC, visit https://www.nrotc.navy. mil/. For more infor mation about NSTC, visit http://www.netc. navy.mil/nstc/ or visit the NSTC Facebook pages at https:// www.facebook.com/ NavalServiceTraining/. -Photo courtesy of University of Florida NROTC unit Lt. Derek Cribbs, USS Vicksburg (CG 69) fire control officer, shows midship men from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) unit the forward Vertical Launching System (VLS) during a tour of the Ticonderoga-Class Cruiser for the midshipmen on March 16. Midshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) unit learn about the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CWIS) on board USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during a tour of the Ticonderoga-Class Cruiser here, March 16. The goal of this visit was to show the midship men an active duty warship, and related duties that surface warfare officers perform, so they can make a more informed decision. ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JOIN TODAY! Continental Conservation: You Make it HappenA CFC participant provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 USS Simpson Returns HomeStory by USS Simpson Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), and embarked HSM-46 Detachment Eight, returned to her Naval Station Mayport, Fla. homeport March 20 after a six-month deploy ment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. While deployed, the crew conducted more than 700 flight hours in support of regional and maritime security, more than 200 drills to increase overall pre paredness and qualified more than 80 Sailors as Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists (ESWS). Im the luckiest CO on the waterfront. I am proud of my Sailors accomplishments and humbled to be their Captain. I cant say enough about the resil ience of this crew, said Cmdr. Christopher Follin, Simpsons Commanding Officer. These Sailors ensured we deployed ready for any tasking in all of our warfare areas. Their ability to maintain their equipment throughout the entire deployment provided the Operational Commander a reliable asset that was vital to our national security and diplomatic relations, Follin added. Since her September departure, Simpson trav eled more than 35,000 miles and made 10 port visits to eight different countries, providing the crew opportunities to strengthen regional ties through exercises and opportunities to experi ence Mediterranean cul ture. Over the past six months I have been honored to watch this crew perform daily to success fully complete the mis sion, said Command Senior Chief Terry Parker. Attaining new pay grades, ESWS qualifications and experienc ing new countries and their cultures were just some of the items that highlighted this deploy ment. During two of the ships port visits, numer ous Sailors volunteered to help others through community relations events. Sailors made renovations to a shelter for domestic violence victims in Malta and participated in learn ing, sports, and grounds keeping activities at a school for disadvantaged girls in Morocco. Looking back on this deployment, knowing we were able to help a lit tle bit is a great feeling, said Personal Specialist 1st Class Anthony Petry. Even though time restraints limited how much we could get done, just seeing all the smiles on the faces of the people we helped made every thing worth it; it was definitely a moment Ill always remember. Simpson closed its deployment with a tiger cruise from Charleston, S.C. to Mayport, during which crewmembers family and friends were able to experience firsthand, life aboard a Navy ship. -Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Julie Rosa kisses her husband, Lt.j.g. John Rosa of ATG Mayport, after returning to Naval Station Mayport on March 20 with USS Simpson. Simpson and embarked HSM 46 Detachment Eight, returned after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. On Page 1, MC2 Salt Cebe captures the moment that Electronics Technician 3rd Class Spencer Greer, kisses his wife, after the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) returns to its homeport of Mayport, Fla. While deployed Simpson conducted more than 700 flight hours and traveled more than 35,000 nautical miles in support of regional and maritime secutiry. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissA Sailor from USS Simpson hugs a family member after returning to NS Mayport last week from a sixmonth deployment.-Photo by MC1 Michael WissNew dad Hospital Corpsman Apprentice Bernard Hutchinson kisses his wife Ashleey. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissAviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Scott OToole of HSM-46 Detachment Eight holds his 7-year-old daughter, Hailey after returning last week with USS Simpson.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFamily and friends at Naval Station Mayport welcomed home Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannHospital Corpsman Recruit Jeff Prescott gets a welcome home kiss from his wife, Jessica, after returning to NS Mayport on March 20. The crew of USS Simpson disembarks the ship after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility on March 20.-Photo by Paige Gnann

PAGE 5

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 5 -Photo by Paige GnannNew dad Engineman 3rd Class Oyeyemi is reunited with his family pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment with USS Simpson.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeChief Boatswain's Mate Alex Velez, embraces his fiance for the traditional first kiss, after the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) returned to its homeport of Mayport, Fla. from a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannElectricians Mate 3rd Class Dodson hugs his Son, Tyler, after disembarking USS Simpson. Tyler won the First Hug raffle hosted by the ships family readiness group. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissFriends and family members of USS Simpson wait for the ship to pull pierside during its homecoming cel ebrate March 20. The ship was deployed for six months to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFamily and friends at Naval Station Mayport welcomed home Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Simpson man the rails as the ship pulls pierside on March 20.-Photo by Paige GnannA mother and child wait pierside for their Sailor to return home with USS Simpson. Simpson returned to NS Mayport on March 20 after a six-month deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Raul Hernandez of HSM-46 Detachment Eight gets big hugs welcoming him home from his children, Christopher, 8, Elizabeth, 6, and Aydan, 18 months old.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Simpson look for loved ones on the pier as they wait for the brow to be placed after returning to NS Mayport on March 20.

PAGE 6

Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scaven ger hunt and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 5: Take Me Out to the Ballgame 4 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Celebrate the beginning of base ball season. Whiffleball challenge, drink spe cials, snacks and prizes. 270-7205 April 7: NCAA National Basketball Championship Watch the game and see if you won the bracket. 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 4: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. April 9: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and transportation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. April 23: CSADD Color Run 5K Run/3K Walk Sign ups start 7 a.m. Run starts 8 a.m. Must bring eye protection. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Sign up deadline April 24. ntramural SportsApril 8: Spring Forward 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. April 8: Womens Basketball Meeting. 5 p.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Child and Youth Programs March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 4: Teen Movie Trip: Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Ages 13+. Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; per mission slip required. 246-0347 April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn. 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. Greybeard Basketball Champions-Photo courtesy of Rita HammerstadFourth Fleet takes All for Greybeard Basketball. The team went 10-2 for the league and swept the Playoffs. Kids dont get enough art these days. For Ten Simple Ways to get more art in kids lives, visit AmericansForTheArts.org. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 7

PAGE 8

USS Philippine Sea Turns 25From USS Philippine Sea (CG) Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea celebrated its 25th anniversary with a spe cial birthday dinner on the mess decks, March, 23. Commissioned in March, 1989, she is named for the Battle of the Philippine Sea dur ing World War II and is the second ship to bear the name. For one crew mem ber, the Philippine Sea has become a very familiar place. Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Terzian, the ships chief engineer, first came to the ship as an engineman 3rd class petty officer in 1996 and left four years later as a 1st class petty officer. This ship really molded my career, said Terzian. This is where I decided to go all out in the Navy, give it every thing I have and to try and become a limited duty officer (LDO). I couldnt wish for any where else to do my final sea tour. Despite a quarter century of use, Philippine Sea is still as ready for action as the day she entered the Fleet. We take pride in the engineering world that were whats called seven-up, said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Allan Layne, the ships main propulsion assistant. Meaning, all four main engines and all three gas-turbine engines are available and ready for tasking. Maximum power, 30 plus knots, whatever the command ing officer deems neces sary. Its been a great plea sure and honor to serve on the Philippine Sea, said Layne, who will be retiring in the coming month. The hard work by the young men and women aboard prove that this 25-year-old ship, can still sail with any of your newer model ships out there and be a formidable force. Philippine Sea is cur rently on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility. -Photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattThe engineering department poses for a picture with Chief Warrant Officer 4 Allan Layne, center left, who is retiring, aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in sup port of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 9

Its Not Delivery!By MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaHeres a riddle from the culinary specialists (CS) aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58): What day falls between hamburger day and taco day? The answer is just a Sailor away, because anyone who has ever served aboard a ship in the Navy will know right away. Pizza Saturdays have become such a Navy institution that some Sailors will tally their time at sea, not by weeks or months, but by the number of pizza nights. The CSs of the Philippine Sea have taken this crusty tradi tion and turned the oven knob to 11. In November, Philippine Sea started serving pizzas on fresh made French bread crusts. Pizzas have tradi tionally been served on Saturdays to give the crew something to look forward to during the week, said Chief Culinary Specialist Michael Vira, the ships leading CS. We just wanted to break the monotony of the same standard premade circle looking pizza. The Navy uses a stan dard core menu that works on a rotation, said Vira. This helps the Navy keep hundreds of thousands of Sailors all over the world fed. Its a way of handling the logistics of shipping and storing food at sea and ensuring Sailors are getting the nutritional variety they need and want. Making pizza on French bread is a winwin, said Vira. Since its a twice-baked crust, the texture is a lot bet ter. From the crew, they love it because its a great quality product, and from the cooks, its a lot easier for them to prepare. It gives the night bakers an oppor tunity to be a part of the pizza night meal, and the supply officer likes it because it takes up less storage space. Only eight servings of traditional round pizza can fit on a baking sheet, but the same size sheet can fit 16 to 18 servings of French bread pizza, said Culinary Specialist 1st Class Prince Benton. Fewer trays mean less time and faster service. The French bread gets made the night before from scratch. There is no mistaking the olfactory bouquet of yeast, flour and shortening rising in the oven. That sweet twinge of sugar being broken down into carbon dioxide that makes peo ple want to be nicer to strangers. Sailors would be clever to submit spe cial requests to their chiefs while the aroma of baking bread is hanging in the air. The next afternoon the loafs are cut in half, opened down the mid dle, topped with sauce, cheese and a variety of other toppings, then placed in the oven. Shortly thereafter, the hot crunchy melty slice of Heaven is slid out of the oven and direct ly onto the plate of a sweaty, tired and hungry (and sometimes grumpy) Sailor. Nothing out here is more important than good chow, said Seaman Jessica Moffit, who has been watch standing and work ing since the wee hours of the morning. When youve had a bad day and youre coming through the chow line and you see French bread pizza, your day instantly gets 10 times better. We have a hard job; youve got to have the love for what you do, said Benton. The best part about being a CS is being able to be creative and knowing that what we make is the founda tion for our shipmates day. While there are no hints to what the Philippine Sea galley will come up with next, its always looking for ways to give the crew something a little different while still staying within the Navy guidelines, said Vira. Currently Philippine Sea is six pizza nights into its scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattCulinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza, from El Paso, Texas, shows off a tray of French bread pizza right out of the oven aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Rain Doesnt Slow Down Phil Sea -Photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattAbove, Sailors heave an anchor chain across the deck of the guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Left, Sailors man a line aboard USS Philippine Sea. Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 9

PAGE 10

From USS Hu City Public AffairsMore than 300 Sailors from USS Hu City (CG 66) joined thousands of party-goers in celebrat ing St. Patricks Day in the city of Savannah, Georgia last Monday. Roughly 300,000 visitors came to the city this year to celebrate St. Patricks Day. Hu Citys participation in the St. Patricks Day festivities began even before the ship moored in Savannah. As the crew manned the rails during their transit up the Savannah River, military veterans presented a cannon salute from old Fort Jackson. That evening the ship hosted a party for the Savannah chapter of the Navy League and numerous dignitaries from the city. Savannah Mayor Edna Branch Jackson presented Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Wyatt Chidester, with a Key to the City and thanked the crew for its service to the coun try. To show his gra ciousness for Savannahs welcoming, Chidester in turn presented a framed photo of the ship to Mayor Jackson. The city of Savannah truly has shown the Southern hospital ity its known for by having us here, Chidester remarked. Later in the weekend, several Hu City Sailors took part in the Jasper Green Ceremony, an event in which the Irish American Community of Savannah gathers in front of the citys monu ment of William Jasper to honor military vet erans past and present. Sergeant William Jasper was a Revolutionary War hero and a son of Irish immigrants who lost his life during the British Siege of Savannah in 1779. While inclem ent weather pushed the ceremony indoors, the reception still was a resounding success and featured guest speakers from several branches of the United States Armed Forces and dignitar ies from the Republic of Ireland itself. As an Irish American currently serving, the ceremony was especial ly moving for me, said Lt.j.g. Colin Ryan. Some of the things I learned were astounding, too: 55 percent of all Medal of Honor recipients were of Irish heritage. It makes me very proud and humbled to realize in whose foot steps I am follow ing. To cap off the week end, dozens of Hu City Sailors marched in the citys 190th Annual St. Patricks Day Parade. The parade is one of the most prestigious of its kind in the country, and the parade organizers seemed thrilled to have USS Hue City Sailors Go To Savannah For St. Patricks Day` See Hu City, Page 11 A Sailor from the USS Hue City (CG 66) receives a kiss as the crew of the guided missile cruiser marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. Giving kisses to parading service members, police and fireman is a parade tradition.-Photos by MC2 Marcus StanleyThe crew of the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. Savannah Mayor Edna Branch Jackson presented Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Wyatt Chidester, with a Key to the City and thanked the crew for its service to the country. -Photo courtesy of USS Hu City 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 11

HU Sailors partake in the event. The hospitality and appreciation for service members I saw during the parade was outstand ing, claimed Damage Controlman 3rd Class (SW) Anthony Lacey, who marched in the parade. It was a great experience! Otherwise, the ships crew spent their time exploring the city and taking in everything Savannah has to offer. I took a river boat din ner cruise, and it was great! said Electronics Technician 3rd Class (SW) Justin Freno. Added Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Cliff Milton, This port was a lot of fun. Our crew really deserved to have the opportunity to come here during Savannahs most festive time of the year. From Page 10Hu City Sailors from USS Hue City (CG 66) pose for a photo with one of the many people dressed as leprechauns around the city of Savannah, Ga., while the crew of the guided-missile cruiser was in town to participate in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. USS USS Hue City (CG 66) Command Master Chief Jimmie L. Carter Jr. shakes a boys hand as the crew of the guide-missile cruiser marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 11

PAGE 12

Security Practices Safe Traffic Stop Manuevers-Photos by MC1 Michael WissAbove, Officer Jose Ocasio appoaches suspect Officer Bill Gray during a traffic stop simulation, part of Securitys Felony Traffic Stops training held last week behind Building One. Right, Patrolman Steve Ries follows commands from MA3 Kyle Lindner and holds his hands up during a Security traffic stop training. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 13

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 13 Enjoying Spring Break, Eighties StyleFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeLearn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presenta tion on transition here, on March 31, from 8:3011 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The presentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environ The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presentation to teach the latest trends in transi tion to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and mar keting yourself. It also educates lead ers in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subor dinate, especially dur ing these times of force reductions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a deputy director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national head quarters in Alexandria, Virginia. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the FFSC at 270-6600, x1701. Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Mr. Berteska who is the Resident of the Week! We appre ciate the Berteska Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. March 27, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keep ing your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify bar riers to effective com munication. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. March 27, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 31, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are discussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include: self and your child, behavior, character in your child, tening to your child, cooperate, sense Each week a dif ferent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 ses sions is requiredMidway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speak er is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be pur chased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tick ets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol.com Dont crush the gro ceries! I yelled as my teenage son smashed the car top carrier lid closed. With everything for our family spring break trip packed, we piled into our salt-hazed minivan and hit the road. I wondered if all this rigmarole was worth it for a few days of socalled vacation Id worked myself into a pre-trip frenzy, making lists, doing laundry, kenneling the dog, getting the oil changed, packing, double checking, and packing some more. All that hassle just to spend military leave time stuffing ourselves like sardines into our minivan for eleven long hours. And once we get there, well be unpack ing, making beds, cook ing, cleaning and managing the kids just like we always do. Same work, different location. Is Spring Break really worth all this hassle? As we passed through the Naval Station Newport base gate and headed south, I recalled an easier time. It was 1986, and I used my new credit card to buy a Spring Break trip with my college room mates. I was broke, but all those Citibank sign up ads around campus promised a $1,000 cred it limit, and all I had to do was pay a little bit off each month. Wow, what a great deal! I thought in my youthful igno rance. After curling our bangs, my roommates and I boarded a bus, chartered by Sigma Epsilon Fraternity, head ed from chilly Ohio to sunny Daytona Beach, Florida. The frat broth ers thoughtfully includ ed a six-pack of Little Kings Cream Ale in the trip package price, just in case the passengers got thirsty on the fourteenhour ride south. Ohmigod, my room mate exclaimed halfway through Tennessee, like, I totally cant find Lisa anywhere! No way! Way! They didnt know that Id crawled up in the overhead luggage com partment to sleep off those Little Kings. On the day of our arrival, I promptly burned myself to a crisp laying out on the beach. Later at a Bud Light Belly Flop contest at the motel pool, I tried to hide the pain, sipping wine coolers with my roommates while danc ing to Ill stop the world and melt with you a la Molly Ringwald in The Breakfast Club -in our stone washed denim and Wayfarers. We took note of one particular col lege boy moonwalking in checkered Vans, red Birdwell Beach Britches, and a blonde mullet. He was the kind of cool guy who probably drove a Camero. The loudspeaker blared as he climbed the high dive, Next we have Mad [expletive deleted] Mike from University of Maryland! We cheered with the crowd, but in the end, his svelte torso was no match for the linebacker from Mississippi State with a gut tinged pink from multiple flawless flops. By the time we board ed the bus for our return to Ohio a week later, I had sloughed off the first three layers of my skin, lost my Jellies shoes, survived on happy hour nachos, been totally ignored by Mad [exple tive deleted] Mike, and maxed out my $1,000 credit limit, totally unaware that I would be paying off the debt for the next eight years. And it was totally worth it. There was some thing special about the Eighties. Was it the big hair? Orange Julius? Hackey Sacks? Mr. T? New Wave music? Shoulder pads? Hawaiian pizza? The Cosby Show? McDLTs? The Sprinkler Dance? Tri-color pasta salad? Parachute pants? Boom boxes? Frosted eye shadow? Deely-bobbers? Alf? Fried potato skins? A carefree state of mind? Whatever it was, the Eighties was fun. A lot of fun. Honey, I asked my husband as we entered the New Jersey Turnpike, find that Eighties radio station, would you? The kids groaned, and began arguing over whether we were getting lunch at Wendys or Chick-fil-A, but I leaned back in my seat, put on my sunglasses and said, I think this might turn out to be our best Spring Break trip ever. Like, totally. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFE

PAGE 14

USS New York Grinds Down INSURV Prep -Photos by MC2 Cyrus RosonLeft, Seaman Darrell Ellis conducts preservation in preparation for INSURV aboard amphibious trans port dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). Above, Electronic Technician 2nd Class Michael Gygax, left, and Gunners Mate Seaman Kevin Love, right, conduct preservation in preparation for INSURV. Below, Sailors conduct preservation in preparation for INSUR. 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 15

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 15

PAGE 16

From Page 1MayportThere is no plan today to change retirement, Greenert said. If you wear the uniform today, todays retirement sys tem is your retirement system. Another question on many Sailors in attendance minds was the future of the tuition assistance program. Greenert put those wor ries to bed when he announced that the Tuition Assistance (TA) program will contin ue to pay 100 percent of Sailors tuition and enrollment fees in fiscal year 15 (FY15), This deci sion modifies a proposal for FY15, which origi nally included a payment split for TA where the program would pay 75 percent of tuition costs and 25 percent of that would be the responsibil ity of the Sailor. This is important to me because I want an educated Sailor, and I want you to leave with all the certifications you can, so you can get a good job when you leave the Navy and fall right into a career, said Greenert. Weve accel erated your life, as we like to say. Greenert contin ued by talking about the future of Mayport and the importance of the development of the Amphibious Ready Group. With USS New York (LPD-21) already homeported at naval Station Mayport and the other two ships, USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD-45) slated to arrive as early later on this year.., According to Greenert, the devel opment of Mayport is important for the defense of the East Coast. This first phase of the ARG move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strate gic dispersal of assets; a strategy that your con gressman Crenshaw has long advocated on Capitol Hill, he said. The strategic dispersal of aircraft carriers on the east coast is impor tant. As for the home porting of an aircraft carrier at Naval Station Mayport, we still want to see that come to frui tion, but we dont have the money right now. In the meantime, were almost there to making sure the Mayport facili ties are fully aircraft carrier capable. In closing during a press conference follow ing the All Hands Call, Greenert praised every one who is a part of the Mayport family. I want to thank every one who is a part of what makes this base great, he said. The community is great, they really embrace us, and this is what makes this such a popular place to be assigned to. you wear the uniform today, todays retirement system is your retirement system. Pushing back on recent retire ment articles, Greenert told Sailors in Mayport, There is no plan today to change retirement. Greenert said the rumors of retirement changes stem from the Department of Defense recommen dations to the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission reviewing military retire ment for Congress. The President established the com mission to conduct a review of military compensation and retirement systems. The commission is tasked to submit a report of its findings, along with its members recommendations, by Feb. 1, 2015 to the President and Congress. Any retirement change that would take place is quite a ways down the road, said Greenert. When asked about the possibility of a new retirement system, Greenert said Its going to be a few years before we get one put together, studied, voted on and implemented. An overhaul to military retirement is being considered to ensure fiscal sustainability for the Armed Forces as well as ensure quality of life for service members who choose to make the military a career. Greenert said if there are changes, service members will have the option to transition to a new system but will still have the option to stay in the current retirement system they signed up under. Watch a replay of the entire Mayport All Hands Call: http://www.livestream.com/usna vy/video?clipId=pla_5c41519e-2a90456c-908e-2c087f58747a&utm_ source=lslibrary&utm_medium=uithumbFrom Page 1RetirementTA where the program would pay 75 percent of tuition costs and 25 percent of that would be the responsibility of the Sailor. This is important to me because I want an educated Sailor, and I want you to leave with all the certifications you can, so you can get a good job when you leave the Navy and fall right into a career, said Greenert. Weve accelerated your life, as we like to say. The CNO added that he is focusing on a way to ensure that Sailors using tuition assis tance take courses that will benefit both the Navy and the Sailor and lead to a market able degree in the civilian sec tor. The split-pay proposal was designed primarily to improve the effectiveness of the pro gram by increasing Sailors investment in their educa tion. Usage analysis of Tuition Assistance suggests that when Sailors weigh personal cost as a factor, course completion rates increase. Eventually, we may have to ask you to put a little skin in the game, as they say, but again I wanted FY15 to be at 100 percent, said Greenert. TA was created after the switch from a draft military to an all-volunteer military. It provided an incentive for peo ple to volunteer, and operated as a cost share program for more than 30 years. In 2002, in response to retention and recruiting chal lenges, the TA reimbursement rate was increased from 75 percent to a full 100 percent. The current tuition assis tance policy pays up front the tuition and fees for course enrollments. There is an FY credit limit of 16 Semester Hours, 24 Quarter Hours, or 240 clock hours per individual per fiscal year. Payments for tuition/fees will not exceed: a. $250.00 per Semester Hour b. $166.67 per Quarter Hour c. $16.67 per Clock Hour If you are considering taking courses, now is the best time to submit your TA application. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) recently announced that the expenditure rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels. Usage is trend ing upward, and its expected to increase to normal levels over the next few month, but currently, theres more fund ing available than usual at this time of the year.From Page 1TuitionTRICARE Service Centers Go VirtualFrom TRICAREWalk-in service at TRICARE service centers in the United States is ending April 1. TRICARE officials said the change reflects the always growing number of TRICARE beneficiaries who most often now turn to a laptop or cell phone when they have ques tions about their health care. TRICARE patients have a wide variety of secure, elec tronic customer service options available through the TRICARE website at http:// www.tricare.mil, officials said. The I want to ... feature puts everything beneficiaries want to do online right on the web sites front page, they added. For many years now, TRICARE beneficiaries have been taking advantage of our convenient, 24/7 online customer service options, said Army Maj. Gen. (Dr.) Richard Thomas, director of the Defense Health Agencys health care operations direc torate. All of the services they received at their local [TRICARE service center] are available either online or through our toll-free call cen ters in the convenience of their own homes. We are committed to providing the highest level of support to all of our benefi ciaries. With the end of walk-in ser vice on April 1, beneficiaries who want get personal assis tance can call their regional health care contractor for enrollment and benefit help, officials said. All health care, pharmacy, dental and claims contact information is locat ed at http://www.tricare.mil/ contactus. Beneficiaries can get 24/7 TRICARE benefit information at the TRICARE website, and they can make enrollment, primary care manager and other changes at http://www.tricare.mil/enroll ment. Rather than driving to an installation service cen ter, TRICARE beneficiaries can even combine high-tech with low-tech by download ing health care forms online and sending them through the mail, officials noted. Pointing out that walk-in service is the most expensive customer-service option, offi cials said eliminating walk-in service at the centers will save the Defense Department an estimated $250 million over five years. The change does not affect TRICARE benefits or health care delivery, they emphasized.ER or Urgent Care: Making The DecisionFrom TRICAREWhen were in pain or sick, were anxious and it can be hard to think straight. We want relief as soon as possible. When a child is hurt or ill, the anxiety can be even greater. In those moments, it is can be hard to determine if you need to go to the emer gency room, an emergency center, or if an urgent care center will do. Its important to make that distinction because mak ing the wrong choice will cost both time and money. Generally, if a condi tion is threatening to life, limb or eyesight, or causes the beneficiary to require relief from pain, it is considered an emergency and calls for a trip to the emer gency room. TRICARE defines an emergency department as an orga nized, hospital-based facility available 24 hours a day providing emergency services to patients who need immediate medical attention. Emergency departments affiliated with a hospital are most likely TRICARE-authorized providers. Beneficiaries and their families will get the appropriate level of care and save money by having urgent care needs met in urgent care facili ties. Over the last two decades, over 9,000 urgent care centers have emerged across the country and this may lead to more urgent care facilities in an area than emergency rooms. However, beneficiaries who seek care at emer gency centers need to ask if it is affiliated with a hospital-based emergen cy department. If it isnt, the beneficiary will need to make a decision about getting care elsewhere or being responsible for those facility charges. Beneficiaries can check if a provider is TRICARE-authorized by calling their region al contractor. Contact information for regional contractors is available at www.tricare.mil/callus. Learn more about emergency care under TRICARE at www.tri care.mil/emergency.Walk-in service for TRICARE ends April 1. Beneficiaries can get 24/7 TRICARE benefit information at www.tricare.mil 16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 17

They said, Weve done our best, and we think were ready, but dont pull any punches, and we certainly didnt, Flint said. The inspection teams report to the fleet included several recommendations for improvement, as well as praise for good work. Before the inspection, U.S. 4th Fleet leaders conducted a critical self-assessment, Flint said. Determining that a com puter system in their Maritime Operations Center was no lon ger needed, they eliminated it. Besides reducing your vul nerability footprint, it allowed your team to focus on what does matter to you: improving your information assurance posture and making it sustain able, he said. Capt. Steve Shinego, the U.S. 4th Fleet chief of staff, accepted the inspection teams report. As you walked from build ing to building, I hope you found the same desire to do what was right not just be inspection-ready, he said. The real goal is to learn what good habits and what good practices we should be using to safeguard ourselves against adversaries so were keeping Sailors and Marines safer downrange. Passing the inspection was a win for U.S. 4th Fleet, but the right type of winner has humility and a desire for con stant improvement, he said. U.S. 4th Fleets communica tions and information systems directorate is led by Cmdr. Bradley Maas, who expressed thanks to his Navy colleagues, including other fleet commu nications and information sys tems directors, and to his staff for their support. Within the U.S. 4th Fleet directorate, We really had to ramp it up, Maas said. These guys did it, and I really cant say enough about that team. He is especially proud of the members of his team achiev ing 100 percent completion of its Cyber Security Work Force training certification, Maas said. Those are difficult certifi cations to accomplish, espe cially with the mix of ratings we have in our shop, he said. Among the missions of the Fort Meade, Md.-based U.S. Fleet Cyber Command is to direct, operate, maintain, secure and defend the Navys portion of the global informa tion grid. In 2011, it estab lished the inspection program with the goal of minimizing vulnerabilities to attacks.From Page 1CyberElrod, HSL-60 Assume Escort Duty For Morning Glory Tanker ShipBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press ServiceThe U.S. Navys USS Elrod, with embarked NS Mayport-based HSL60 Detachment Two, relieved USS Stout of its escort duties for the Morning Glory tanker ship March 19, Army Col. Steven Warren, a Defense Department spokesman, told Pentagon reporters. The Navy initially took control of the commer cial tanker in interna tional waters by request of the governments of Libya and Cyprus follow ing its seizure earlier this month by three armed Libyans. The Morning Glory, according to a DOD statement, is carrying cargo of oil owned by the Libyan government National Oil Company, and was illicitly obtained from the Libyan port of As-Sidra. Warren said 34 sail ors from the USS Elrod are aboard the Morning Glory and all USS Stout personnel have departed the ship. Were going to hand over the Morning Glory to Libyan naval authori ties within the next day or two in international waters just outside of the territorial water line, he said. Everything will be turned over to the government of Libya, Warren noted, including the three armed Libyans, the entire 21-member organic crew of the Morning Glory, the ship and all of its contents. The change of escorts was for administra tive reasons, Warren said. The USS Stout is assigned to the U.S. European Command area of operations, while the USS Elrod has the U.S. Africa Command area of operations. The USS Elrod, an Oliver Hazard Perryclass frigate, is home ported in Norfolk, Va., and deployed Jan. 14 to the 6th Fleet area of operations. USS Roosevelt In View-Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertEnsign Nicholas Wood from Warsw, Ind., takes a bearing during a passing exercise with the Albanian military aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 17

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 19

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014



PAGE 2

2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Karen Rector Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Ross A. Cramer ................................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: To Everything There Is A SeasonAccording to the Holman Bible Dictionary, the English word lent (stems from an Anglo-Saxon word for spring and is related to the English word lengthen) refers to the peni tential period preceding Easter. Early Christians felt that the magnitude of the Easter celebration called for special prepa ration. As early as the second century, many Christians observed several days of fasting as part of that prepara tion. Over the next few centuries, perhaps in remembrance of Jesus fasting for 40 days in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-2), 40 days became the accepted length of the Lenten season. In the early centuries, the season before Easter was also the usual period of intense training for new Christians. During this period, the catechumens (those learning what it meant to be Christians) went through the final stages of preparation for baptism, which usu ally occurred at dawn on Easter Sunday. In Western Christianity, Ash Wednesday marks the first day, or the start of the season of Lent, which begins 40 days prior to Easter. Lent is a time when many Christians prepare for Easter by observing a period of fasting, repentance, moderation and spiritual discipline. The purpose is to set aside time for reflection on Jesus Christ his suffering and his sacrifice, his life, death, burial and resurrection. Although the custom ary forms of Lent do not appear in scripture, the spirit of Lent is biblically supported through repentance and mourn ing in ashes (2 Samuel 13:19; Esther 4:1; Job 2:8; Daniel 9:3; Matthew 11:21). One of the primary reasons we celebrate non-sectarian special days such as birthdays, veterans/ memorial days, and wedding anni versaries is to set aside a period of time to give honor to people and to let them know we care. Likewise, Lent is a time to commemorate, reflect, give attention to, and recognize the sacrifice, life and work of Jesus Christ. Those of us who participate in some sort of spiritual discipline during the Lenten season ought not to think we are more spiritual than those who choose not to. Nonetheless, we should all understand that just as there are health benefits for physical exercise. There are also spiritual benefits for those who practice spiritual disciplines. Whether you partici pant in Lent or not, the daily intake of Gods Holy Word is essential to your spiritual well being. Scripture teaches and Christ confirmed that a person cannot live by bread alone (Matt. 4:4a). To this end, I leave you with this modern trans lation (Message Bible) of Romans 12:1-2: So heres what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your everyday, ordinary lifeyour sleeping, eating, goingto-work, and walkingaround lifeand place it before God as an offer ing. Embracing what God does for you is the best thing you can do for him. Dont become so well-adjusted to your culture that you fit into it without even thinking. Instead, fix your attention on God. Youll be changed from the inside out. Readily recognize what he wants from you, and quickly respond to it. Unlike the culture around you, always dragging you down to its level of immaturity, God brings the best out of you, develops wellformed maturity in you. Now go back and Read this passage out loud. Think about the ideas and commands in this verse. Pray about what you hear God saying to you. Live out what you learn in your every day, ordinary life. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Calvin B. Gardner, Sr. CNSL Ministry CenterSchool Counselor Can Ease End-of-School WoesAll students can learn. However, a student who is troubled cannot learn as easily. Dealing with physical illness, divorce, abuse, or poverty, for example places students at-risk of educational failure and maybe drop ping out of school. Military students have the added social stressor of deployment: transi tions, family relocations, and extended separa tions. Students and parents report mobility as the most challenging aspect of the military. Most young people report the greatest stress is anticipation of the move and then the first month of the move. Add to that academic adjust ment and peer accep tance throughout the first year of the move and a family may be left with a sense of little control over their environment. NS Mayport is cur rently experiencing the movement of families onto and off of the base with homeport changes and PCSing moves. Students have begun to stress about leaving friends they have made this year to making new friends in a new school. Some of those students are here in Jacksonville looking to move to Austin, San Diego, and even to Japan. Other students are in the Norfolk area wondering what it will be like to live 3 hours north of Disney World and blocks from the beach. And they are both worrying about new schools. Their school counselors can help. These counselors have unique qualifications and skills to address all students academic, personal/ social, and career development needs. They are trained to advocate, mediate, coor dinate, refer, lead and collaborate with teach ers, administrators and parents to help students be successful. They provide services to military students in need through specialized groups, such as the Student2Student program which helps students deal with tran sitions. Another important program at this time is the Military Family Life Counselor (MFLC) program which I have recently described in another article. But right now these counselors along with the schools counsel or may be the perfect response for those tran sition worries that so many of NS Mayports students or soon to be NS Mayports stu dents are experiencing. Locally, the counselors are available at Finegan, Mayport, and Jax Beach Elementary Schools and Mayport Middle School. An MFLC is also avail able at NS Mayports Youth Activity Center. You can also contact Dr. Mia Wilson at (904) 7383657 or mia.wilson@ healthnet.com. Another resource for coping with transition stress is NS Mayports Youth Sponsorship Program. Part of the Navys Child and Youth Programs, Youth Sponsorship will connect your child or Teen to positive peer groups and KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer social activities at their new duty station. To get your child connected to our Youth Sponsorship Program go to www. mayport_youthsponsorship@yahoo.com In approximately two weeks, the 3rd quarter report card will go home. If your child is struggling academically or behav iorally as a response to an impending transition or deployment, it may be time to connect with the school counselor or the MFLC. Depending on the grade your child is in, whether he is in a spe cial program, a magnet school, or on a special diploma track, now is the perfect time to determine what needs to happen and when. It is not too late to craft positive changes to be implemented for the rest of the school year. Consider scheduling a conference to discuss your childs concerns about the upcoming move or deployment. As a parent, you know your child best. However, these counselors can offer options for dealing with concerns, includ ing better ways to com municate with your child and with the childs teacher(s). By sharing informa tion with each other, you establish a helping relationship which can turn problems around. You will find that these counselors are excellent resources; however, they do not provide therapy or long-term counsel ing. Referrals to outside agencies may be initiated at the school. But remember that parent-counselor collaboration may take some time to work. This collaboration requires tenacity because things dont always go perfectly at first. But when par ents work with counsel ors, their children tend to have greater social adjustment. They get along better with fellow students and teachers. They commu nicate more effectively, and believe it or not, sometimes they do their homework more will ingly. By taking advan tage of all these coun selors have to offer, you can help your child fin ish this school year on a positive note. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at Judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.CorrectionIn the March 19 edi tion of The Mirror, the second to the last para graph of the article titled, Team Effort to Conserve Energy at NS Mayport indicates that an ener gy billing program has not happened yet at NS Mayport Base Housing. Base Housing estab lished the Resident Conservation Program (RECP) in 2012 and introduced live billing in spring 2013. The program involves charging residents if over, and reimburses if under, their long term goal with respect to energy consumption. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused.

PAGE 3

UF Midshipmen Visit NS MayportBy Midshipman 3rd Class Adam CampbellUniversity of Florida NROTCMidshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) unit in Gainesville, Fla., traveled to Naval Station Mayport, March 14. While there, the group toured the Ticonderogaclass cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and was able to practice conning a ship in a full mission bridge simulator. As part of the NROTC program, the midship men submit their preferences for which warfare community they would like to enter upon commissioning. This group of midshipmen was a mix of seniors, juniors, sophomores, and fresh men who have expressed interest in being a sur face warfare officer. The goal of this visit was to show the midshipmen an active duty warship, and related duties that sur face warfare officers perform, so they can make a more informed decision. While aboard Vicksburg, the midship men were shown vari ous areas of the ship, including the bridge, combat information center (CIC), flight deck, and officers country, where officer staterooms are located. During the tour, Fire Control Officer, Lt. Derek Cribbs, and Weapons Officer, Lt. Doug Ivey, discussed the responsibilities, duties, and general life of a surface warfare officer. The midshipmen said the experience and advice provided to them by Cribbs and Ivey was invaluable, as they could potentially fill those same positions in just a few years. While at the full mis sion bridge simulator, the midshipmen spoke with junior officers from the USS Somerset (LPD 25) who were finishing up a week of training in the simulator. The mid shipmen watched as the officers ran through different scenarios, and some performed as helmsmen for the scenarios. After the officers from Somerset complet ed their training, retired Navy Capt. Earl Yerger and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Kevin King had the midshipmen each take the CONN, or control of a simulat ed cruiser, driving the ship through simulated smoke floats, a pyro technic device dropped from an aircraft that emits smoke while float ing on top of the water. The midshipmen then gave the orders to move alongside an oiler for an underway replenish ment. Not only touring the ship but getting to see the daily functions and preparations that go into getting underway was highly rewarding, said Midshipman 2nd Class Kaylan King, from Jacksonville, Fla., on how the day proved to be a very valuable experience. Today the NROTC program is overseen by Rear Adm. Dee L. Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC) headquartered at Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill. The NROTC program was established to develop mid shipmen mentally, mor ally and physically and to imbue them with the highest ideals of duty, loyalty and Navy core values. Those ideals and values are the backbone of all NROTC midshipmen as they work toward becoming college gradu ates and commission as Navy and Marine Corps officers who pos sess a basic professional background, are moti vated toward careers in the Naval service and have a potential for future development in mind and charac ter so as to assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizen ship and government. Mewbourne and his NSTC staff oversee 98 percent of initial officer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. This includes NROTC at more than 160 col leges and universities, Officer Training Command (OTC) on Naval Station Newport, R.I.; Recruit Training Command (RTC), the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill.; and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) and Navy National Defense Cadet Corps (NNDCC) citizen ship development programs at more than 600 high schools worldwide. For more information about NROTC, visit https://www.nrotc.navy. mil/. For more infor mation about NSTC, visit http://www.netc. navy.mil/nstc/ or visit the NSTC Facebook pages at https:// www.facebook.com/ NavalServiceTraining/. -Photo courtesy of University of Florida NROTC unit Lt. Derek Cribbs, USS Vicksburg (CG 69) fire control officer, shows midship men from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) unit the forward Vertical Launching System (VLS) during a tour of the Ticonderoga-Class Cruiser for the midshipmen on March 16. Midshipmen from the University of Florida Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) unit learn about the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CWIS) on board USS Vicksburg (CG 69) during a tour of the Ticonderoga-Class Cruiser here, March 16. The goal of this visit was to show the midship men an active duty warship, and related duties that surface warfare officers perform, so they can make a more informed decision. ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JOIN TODAY! Continental Conservation: You Make it HappenA CFC participant provided as a public service THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 USS Simpson Returns HomeStory by USS Simpson Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56), and embarked HSM-46 Detachment Eight, returned to her Naval Station Mayport, Fla. homeport March 20 after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. While deployed, the crew conducted more than 700 flight hours in support of regional and maritime security, more than 200 drills to increase overall pre paredness and qualified more than 80 Sailors as Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists (ESWS). Im the luckiest CO on the waterfront. I am proud of my Sailors accomplishments and humbled to be their Captain. I cant say enough about the resil ience of this crew, said Cmdr. Christopher Follin, Simpsons Commanding Officer. These Sailors ensured we deployed ready for any tasking in all of our warfare areas. Their ability to maintain their equipment throughout the entire deployment provided the Operational Commander a reliable asset that was vital to our national security and diplomatic relations, Follin added. Since her September departure, Simpson traveled more than 35,000 miles and made 10 port visits to eight different countries, providing the crew opportunities to strengthen regional ties through exercises and opportunities to experi ence Mediterranean cul ture. Over the past six months I have been honored to watch this crew perform daily to successfully complete the mis sion, said Command Senior Chief Terry Parker. Attaining new pay grades, ESWS qualifications and experiencing new countries and their cultures were just some of the items that highlighted this deploy ment. During two of the ships port visits, numerous Sailors volunteered to help others through community relations events. Sailors made renovations to a shelter for domestic violence victims in Malta and participated in learn ing, sports, and grounds keeping activities at a school for disadvantaged girls in Morocco. Looking back on this deployment, knowing we were able to help a lit tle bit is a great feeling, said Personal Specialist 1st Class Anthony Petry. Even though time restraints limited how much we could get done, just seeing all the smiles on the faces of the people we helped made every thing worth it; it was definitely a moment Ill always remember. Simpson closed its deployment with a tiger cruise from Charleston, S.C. to Mayport, during which crewmembers family and friends were able to experience firsthand, life aboard a Navy ship. -Photo by Paige GnannLt.j.g. Julie Rosa kisses her husband, Lt.j.g. John Rosa of ATG Mayport, after returning to Naval Station Mayport on March 20 with USS Simpson. Simpson and embarked HSM 46 Detachment Eight, returned after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. On Page 1, MC2 Salt Cebe captures the moment that Electronics Technician 3rd Class Spencer Greer, kisses his wife, after the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) returns to its homeport of Mayport, Fla. While deployed Simpson conducted more than 700 flight hours and traveled more than 35,000 nautical miles in support of regional and maritime secutiry. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissA Sailor from USS Simpson hugs a family member after returning to NS Mayport last week from a sixmonth deployment.-Photo by MC1 Michael WissNew dad Hospital Corpsman Apprentice Bernard Hutchinson kisses his wife Ashleey. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissAviation Machinists Mate 1st Class Scott OToole of HSM-46 Detachment Eight holds his 7-year-old daughter, Hailey after returning last week with USS Simpson.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFamily and friends at Naval Station Mayport welcomed home Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannHospital Corpsman Recruit Jeff Prescott gets a welcome home kiss from his wife, Jessica, after returning to NS Mayport on March 20. The crew of USS Simpson disembarks the ship after returning to Naval Station Mayport from a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility on March 20.-Photo by Paige Gnann

PAGE 5

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 5 -Photo by Paige GnannNew dad Engineman 3rd Class Oyeyemi is reunited with his family pierside after returning to Naval Station Mayport after a six-month deployment with USS Simpson.-Photo by MC2 Salt CebeChief Boatswain's Mate Alex Velez, embraces his fiance for the traditional first kiss, after the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) returned to its homeport of Mayport, Fla. from a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannElectricians Mate 3rd Class Dodson hugs his Son, Tyler, after disembarking USS Simpson. Tyler won the First Hug raffle hosted by the ships family readiness group. -Photo by MC1 Michael WissFriends and family members of USS Simpson wait for the ship to pull pierside during its homecoming celebrate March 20. The ship was deployed for six months to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Salt CebeFamily and friends at Naval Station Mayport welcomed home Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) after a six-month deployment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Simpson man the rails as the ship pulls pierside on March 20.-Photo by Paige GnannA mother and child wait pierside for their Sailor to return home with USS Simpson. Simpson returned to NS Mayport on March 20 after a six-month deployment.-Photo by Paige GnannAviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Raul Hernandez of HSM-46 Detachment Eight gets big hugs welcoming him home from his children, Christopher, 8, Elizabeth, 6, and Aydan, 18 months old.-Photo by Paige GnannSailors aboard USS Simpson look for loved ones on the pier as they wait for the brow to be placed after returning to NS Mayport on March 20.

PAGE 6

Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 April Special: 10% off open stall fee. 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 April 18: Easter Bingo. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Double payouts all hard cards, cupcake contest, Easter bonnet contest, scaven ger hunt and more. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 5: Take Me Out to the Ballgame 4 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Celebrate the beginning of base ball season. Whiffleball challenge, drink spe cials, snacks and prizes. 270-7205 April 7: NCAA National Basketball Championship Watch the game and see if you won the bracket. 270-7205 April 25: Foosball Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Give our new foosball table a try for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 April 26: UFC 172Jones vs. Texiera 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 4: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. April 9: Ping-Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 11: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. April 14: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 16: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! April 19-20: Busch Gardens Trip. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 Patron, $60 Guest. Trip includes hotel and transportation only; Waves of Honor ticket Free, 1-day pass $77. Sign up by April 16 April 21: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. April 22: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline April 21. April 23: CSADD Color Run 5K Run/3K Walk Sign ups start 7 a.m. Run starts 8 a.m. Must bring eye protection. April 24: Barracks Bash. 4-7:30 pm behind barracks bldg. 1586 and 1587. Come for food, prizes, DJ, games and more. FREE! April 26: Zoo Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. Cost $12. Sign up deadline April 24. ntramural SportsApril 8: Spring Forward 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. April 8: Womens Basketball Meeting. 5 p.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 April 15-18: Spring Sports Challenge. Sign up deadline is April 8. 270-5452. April 25: Dusk til Dawn Softball Tournament. Sign up by April 15. 270-5451 April 28: Women Basketball Begins. Season Ends June 19. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $18. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Child and Youth Programs March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 4: Teen Movie Trip: Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Ages 13+. Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; per mission slip required. 246-0347 April 11: Freedom Friday. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 April 25: Operation Megaphone Worldwide LockIn. 7 p.m.-7 a.m. at the Teen Center. $18 advanced sign up, $20 day of if space permits. Permission slip required. Greybeard Basketball Champions-Photo courtesy of Rita HammerstadFourth Fleet takes All for Greybeard Basketball. The team went 10-2 for the league and swept the Playoffs. Kids dont get enough art these days. For Ten Simple Ways to get more art in kids lives, visit AmericansForTheArts.org. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 7

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 7

PAGE 8

USS Philippine Sea Turns 25From USS Philippine Sea (CG) Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea celebrated its 25th anniversary with a special birthday dinner on the mess decks, March, 23. Commissioned in March, 1989, she is named for the Battle of the Philippine Sea dur ing World War II and is the second ship to bear the name. For one crew mem ber, the Philippine Sea has become a very familiar place. Lt. Cmdr. Christopher Terzian, the ships chief engineer, first came to the ship as an engineman 3rd class petty officer in 1996 and left four years later as a 1st class petty officer. This ship really molded my career, said Terzian. This is where I decided to go all out in the Navy, give it everything I have and to try and become a limited duty officer (LDO). I couldnt wish for any where else to do my final sea tour. Despite a quarter century of use, Philippine Sea is still as ready for action as the day she entered the Fleet. We take pride in the engineering world that were whats called seven-up, said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Allan Layne, the ships main propulsion assistant. Meaning, all four main engines and all three gas-turbine engines are available and ready for tasking. Maximum power, 30 plus knots, whatever the command ing officer deems necessary. Its been a great pleasure and honor to serve on the Philippine Sea, said Layne, who will be retiring in the coming month. The hard work by the young men and women aboard prove that this 25-year-old ship, can still sail with any of your newer model ships out there and be a formidable force. Philippine Sea is cur rently on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattThe engineering department poses for a picture with Chief Warrant Officer 4 Allan Layne, center left, who is retiring, aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 9

Its Not Delivery!By MC3 Abraham Loe McNattUSS Philippine SeaHeres a riddle from the culinary specialists (CS) aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58): What day falls between hamburger day and taco day? The answer is just a Sailor away, because anyone who has ever served aboard a ship in the Navy will know right away. Pizza Saturdays have become such a Navy institution that some Sailors will tally their time at sea, not by weeks or months, but by the number of pizza nights. The CSs of the Philippine Sea have taken this crusty tradition and turned the oven knob to 11. In November, Philippine Sea started serving pizzas on fresh made French bread crusts. Pizzas have tradi tionally been served on Saturdays to give the crew something to look forward to during the week, said Chief Culinary Specialist Michael Vira, the ships leading CS. We just wanted to break the monotony of the same standard premade circle looking pizza. The Navy uses a stan dard core menu that works on a rotation, said Vira. This helps the Navy keep hundreds of thousands of Sailors all over the world fed. Its a way of handling the logistics of shipping and storing food at sea and ensuring Sailors are getting the nutritional variety they need and want. Making pizza on French bread is a winwin, said Vira. Since its a twice-baked crust, the texture is a lot bet ter. From the crew, they love it because its a great quality product, and from the cooks, its a lot easier for them to prepare. It gives the night bakers an oppor tunity to be a part of the pizza night meal, and the supply officer likes it because it takes up less storage space. Only eight servings of traditional round pizza can fit on a baking sheet, but the same size sheet can fit 16 to 18 servings of French bread pizza, said Culinary Specialist 1st Class Prince Benton. Fewer trays mean less time and faster service. The French bread gets made the night before from scratch. There is no mistaking the olfactory bouquet of yeast, flour and shortening rising in the oven. That sweet twinge of sugar being broken down into carbon dioxide that makes peo ple want to be nicer to strangers. Sailors would be clever to submit spe cial requests to their chiefs while the aroma of baking bread is hanging in the air. The next afternoon the loafs are cut in half, opened down the mid dle, topped with sauce, cheese and a variety of other toppings, then placed in the oven. Shortly thereafter, the hot crunchy melty slice of Heaven is slid out of the oven and directly onto the plate of a sweaty, tired and hungry (and sometimes grumpy) Sailor. Nothing out here is more important than good chow, said Seaman Jessica Moffit, who has been watch standing and working since the wee hours of the morning. When youve had a bad day and youre coming through the chow line and you see French bread pizza, your day instantly gets 10 times better. We have a hard job; youve got to have the love for what you do, said Benton. The best part about being a CS is being able to be creative and knowing that what we make is the founda tion for our shipmates day. While there are no hints to what the Philippine Sea galley will come up with next, its always looking for ways to give the crew something a little different while still staying within the Navy guidelines, said Vira. Currently Philippine Sea is six pizza nights into its scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattCulinary Specialist 1st Class Eber Barraza, from El Paso, Texas, shows off a tray of French bread pizza right out of the oven aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Rain Doesnt Slow Down Phil Sea -Photos by MC3 Abraham Loe McNattAbove, Sailors heave an anchor chain across the deck of the guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Left, Sailors man a line aboard USS Philippine Sea. Philippine Sea is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 9

PAGE 10

From USS Hu City Public AffairsMore than 300 Sailors from USS Hu City (CG 66) joined thousands of party-goers in celebrat ing St. Patricks Day in the city of Savannah, Georgia last Monday. Roughly 300,000 visitors came to the city this year to celebrate St. Patricks Day. Hu Citys participation in the St. Patricks Day festivities began even before the ship moored in Savannah. As the crew manned the rails during their transit up the Savannah River, military veterans presented a cannon salute from old Fort Jackson. That evening the ship hosted a party for the Savannah chapter of the Navy League and numerous dignitaries from the city. Savannah Mayor Edna Branch Jackson presented Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Wyatt Chidester, with a Key to the City and thanked the crew for its service to the country. To show his graciousness for Savannahs welcoming, Chidester in turn presented a framed photo of the ship to Mayor Jackson. The city of Savannah truly has shown the Southern hospitality its known for by having us here, Chidester remarked. Later in the weekend, several Hu City Sailors took part in the Jasper Green Ceremony, an event in which the Irish American Community of Savannah gathers in front of the citys monu ment of William Jasper to honor military vet erans past and present. Sergeant William Jasper was a Revolutionary War hero and a son of Irish immigrants who lost his life during the British Siege of Savannah in 1779. While inclem ent weather pushed the ceremony indoors, the reception still was a resounding success and featured guest speakers from several branches of the United States Armed Forces and dignitar ies from the Republic of Ireland itself. As an Irish American currently serving, the ceremony was especial ly moving for me, said Lt.j.g. Colin Ryan. Some of the things I learned were astounding, too: 55 percent of all Medal of Honor recipients were of Irish heritage. It makes me very proud and humbled to realize in whose foot steps I am follow ing. To cap off the week end, dozens of Hu City Sailors marched in the citys 190th Annual St. Patricks Day Parade. The parade is one of the most prestigious of its kind in the country, and the parade organizers seemed thrilled to have USS Hue City Sailors Go To Savannah For St. Patricks Day` See Hu City, Page 11 A Sailor from the USS Hue City (CG 66) receives a kiss as the crew of the guided missile cruiser marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. Giving kisses to parading service members, police and fireman is a parade tradition.-Photos by MC2 Marcus StanleyThe crew of the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. Savannah Mayor Edna Branch Jackson presented Hu Citys Commanding Officer, Capt. Wyatt Chidester, with a Key to the City and thanked the crew for its service to the country. -Photo courtesy of USS Hu City 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 11

HU Sailors partake in the event. The hospitality and appreciation for service members I saw during the parade was outstanding, claimed Damage Controlman 3rd Class (SW) Anthony Lacey, who marched in the parade. It was a great experience! Otherwise, the ships crew spent their time exploring the city and taking in everything Savannah has to offer. I took a river boat dinner cruise, and it was great! said Electronics Technician 3rd Class (SW) Justin Freno. Added Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Cliff Milton, This port was a lot of fun. Our crew really deserved to have the opportunity to come here during Savannahs most festive time of the year. From Page 10Hu City Sailors from USS Hue City (CG 66) pose for a photo with one of the many people dressed as leprechauns around the city of Savannah, Ga., while the crew of the guided-missile cruiser was in town to participate in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. USS USS Hue City (CG 66) Command Master Chief Jimmie L. Carter Jr. shakes a boys hand as the crew of the guide-missile cruiser marches in the 190th Annual Savannah St. Patrick's Day Parade in Savannah, Ga. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 11

PAGE 12

Security Practices Safe Traffic Stop Manuevers-Photos by MC1 Michael WissAbove, Officer Jose Ocasio appoaches suspect Officer Bill Gray during a traffic stop simulation, part of Securitys Felony Traffic Stops training held last week behind Building One. Right, Patrolman Steve Ries follows commands from MA3 Kyle Lindner and holds his hands up during a Security traffic stop training. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 13

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 13 Enjoying Spring Break, Eighties StyleFFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeLearn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presentation on transition here, on March 31, from 8:3011 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The presentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environ The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presentation to teach the latest trends in transi tion to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and mar keting yourself. It also educates lead ers in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subor dinate, especially dur ing these times of force reductions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a deputy director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national head quarters in Alexandria, Virginia. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the FFSC at 270-6600, x1701. Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Mr. Berteska who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Berteska Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870. From FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. March 27, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques, which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify bar riers to effective com munication. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. March 27, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 31, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are discussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include: self and your child, behavior, character in your child, tening to your child, cooperate, sense Each week a dif ferent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is requiredMidway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speak er is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be pur chased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tick ets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol.com Dont crush the gro ceries! I yelled as my teenage son smashed the car top carrier lid closed. With everything for our family spring break trip packed, we piled into our salt-hazed minivan and hit the road. I wondered if all this rigmarole was worth it for a few days of socalled vacation Id worked myself into a pre-trip frenzy, making lists, doing laundry, kenneling the dog, getting the oil changed, packing, double checking, and packing some more. All that hassle just to spend military leave time stuffing ourselves like sardines into our minivan for eleven long hours. And once we get there, well be unpacking, making beds, cook ing, cleaning and managing the kids just like we always do. Same work, different location. Is Spring Break really worth all this hassle? As we passed through the Naval Station Newport base gate and headed south, I recalled an easier time. It was 1986, and I used my new credit card to buy a Spring Break trip with my college room mates. I was broke, but all those Citibank sign up ads around campus promised a $1,000 credit limit, and all I had to do was pay a little bit off each month. Wow, what a great deal! I thought in my youthful igno rance. After curling our bangs, my roommates and I boarded a bus, chartered by Sigma Epsilon Fraternity, headed from chilly Ohio to sunny Daytona Beach, Florida. The frat broth ers thoughtfully includ ed a six-pack of Little Kings Cream Ale in the trip package price, just in case the passengers got thirsty on the fourteenhour ride south. Ohmigod, my room mate exclaimed halfway through Tennessee, like, I totally cant find Lisa anywhere! No way! Way! They didnt know that Id crawled up in the overhead luggage com partment to sleep off those Little Kings. On the day of our arrival, I promptly burned myself to a crisp laying out on the beach. Later at a Bud Light Belly Flop contest at the motel pool, I tried to hide the pain, sipping wine coolers with my roommates while danc ing to Ill stop the world and melt with you a la Molly Ringwald in The Breakfast Club -in our stone washed denim and Wayfarers. We took note of one particular col lege boy moonwalking in checkered Vans, red Birdwell Beach Britches, and a blonde mullet. He was the kind of cool guy who probably drove a Camero. The loudspeaker blared as he climbed the high dive, Next we have Mad [expletive deleted] Mike from University of Maryland! We cheered with the crowd, but in the end, his svelte torso was no match for the linebacker from Mississippi State with a gut tinged pink from multiple flawless flops. By the time we board ed the bus for our return to Ohio a week later, I had sloughed off the first three layers of my skin, lost my Jellies shoes, survived on happy hour nachos, been totally ignored by Mad [exple tive deleted] Mike, and maxed out my $1,000 credit limit, totally unaware that I would be paying off the debt for the next eight years. And it was totally worth it. There was some thing special about the Eighties. Was it the big hair? Orange Julius? Hackey Sacks? Mr. T? New Wave music? Shoulder pads? Hawaiian pizza? The Cosby Show? McDLTs? The Sprinkler Dance? Tri-color pasta salad? Parachute pants? Boom boxes? Frosted eye shadow? Deely-bobbers? Alf? Fried potato skins? A carefree state of mind? Whatever it was, the Eighties was fun. A lot of fun. Honey, I asked my husband as we entered the New Jersey Turnpike, find that Eighties radio station, would you? The kids groaned, and began arguing over whether we were getting lunch at Wendys or Chick-fil-A, but I leaned back in my seat, put on my sunglasses and said, I think this might turn out to be our best Spring Break trip ever. Like, totally. Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFE

PAGE 14

USS New York Grinds Down INSURV Prep -Photos by MC2 Cyrus RosonLeft, Seaman Darrell Ellis conducts preservation in preparation for INSURV aboard amphibious trans port dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). Above, Electronic Technician 2nd Class Michael Gygax, left, and Gunners Mate Seaman Kevin Love, right, conduct preservation in preparation for INSURV. Below, Sailors conduct preservation in preparation for INSUR. 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 15

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 15

PAGE 16

From Page 1MayportThere is no plan today to change retirement, Greenert said. If you wear the uniform today, todays retirement sys tem is your retirement system. Another question on many Sailors in attendance minds was the future of the tuition assistance program. Greenert put those worries to bed when he announced that the Tuition Assistance (TA) program will contin ue to pay 100 percent of Sailors tuition and enrollment fees in fiscal year 15 (FY15), This decision modifies a proposal for FY15, which origi nally included a payment split for TA where the program would pay 75 percent of tuition costs and 25 percent of that would be the responsibility of the Sailor. This is important to me because I want an educated Sailor, and I want you to leave with all the certifications you can, so you can get a good job when you leave the Navy and fall right into a career, said Greenert. Weve accel erated your life, as we like to say. Greenert contin ued by talking about the future of Mayport and the importance of the development of the Amphibious Ready Group. With USS New York (LPD-21) already homeported at naval Station Mayport and the other two ships, USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD-45) slated to arrive as early later on this year.., According to Greenert, the devel opment of Mayport is important for the defense of the East Coast. This first phase of the ARG move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strate gic dispersal of assets; a strategy that your con gressman Crenshaw has long advocated on Capitol Hill, he said. The strategic dispersal of aircraft carriers on the east coast is impor tant. As for the home porting of an aircraft carrier at Naval Station Mayport, we still want to see that come to frui tion, but we dont have the money right now. In the meantime, were almost there to making sure the Mayport facili ties are fully aircraft carrier capable. In closing during a press conference following the All Hands Call, Greenert praised everyone who is a part of the Mayport family. I want to thank every one who is a part of what makes this base great, he said. The community is great, they really embrace us, and this is what makes this such a popular place to be assigned to. you wear the uniform today, todays retirement system is your retirement system. Pushing back on recent retire ment articles, Greenert told Sailors in Mayport, There is no plan today to change retirement. Greenert said the rumors of retirement changes stem from the Department of Defense recommen dations to the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission reviewing military retire ment for Congress. The President established the com mission to conduct a review of military compensation and retirement systems. The commission is tasked to submit a report of its findings, along with its members recommendations, by Feb. 1, 2015 to the President and Congress. Any retirement change that would take place is quite a ways down the road, said Greenert. When asked about the possibility of a new retirement system, Greenert said Its going to be a few years before we get one put together, studied, voted on and implemented. An overhaul to military retirement is being considered to ensure fiscal sustainability for the Armed Forces as well as ensure quality of life for service members who choose to make the military a career. Greenert said if there are changes, service members will have the option to transition to a new system but will still have the option to stay in the current retirement system they signed up under. Watch a replay of the entire Mayport All Hands Call: http://www.livestream.com/usna vy/video?clipId=pla_5c41519e-2a90456c-908e-2c087f58747a&utm_ source=lslibrary&utm_medium=uithumbFrom Page 1RetirementTA where the program would pay 75 percent of tuition costs and 25 percent of that would be the responsibility of the Sailor. This is important to me because I want an educated Sailor, and I want you to leave with all the certifications you can, so you can get a good job when you leave the Navy and fall right into a career, said Greenert. Weve accelerated your life, as we like to say. The CNO added that he is focusing on a way to ensure that Sailors using tuition assistance take courses that will benefit both the Navy and the Sailor and lead to a market able degree in the civilian sector. The split-pay proposal was designed primarily to improve the effectiveness of the pro gram by increasing Sailors investment in their educa tion. Usage analysis of Tuition Assistance suggests that when Sailors weigh personal cost as a factor, course completion rates increase. Eventually, we may have to ask you to put a little skin in the game, as they say, but again I wanted FY15 to be at 100 percent, said Greenert. TA was created after the switch from a draft military to an all-volunteer military. It provided an incentive for people to volunteer, and operated as a cost share program for more than 30 years. In 2002, in response to retention and recruiting chal lenges, the TA reimbursement rate was increased from 75 percent to a full 100 percent. The current tuition assis tance policy pays up front the tuition and fees for course enrollments. There is an FY credit limit of 16 Semester Hours, 24 Quarter Hours, or 240 clock hours per individual per fiscal year. Payments for tuition/fees will not exceed: a. $250.00 per Semester Hour b. $166.67 per Quarter Hour c. $16.67 per Clock Hour If you are considering taking courses, now is the best time to submit your TA application. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) recently announced that the expenditure rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels. Usage is trend ing upward, and its expected to increase to normal levels over the next few month, but currently, theres more fund ing available than usual at this time of the year.From Page 1TuitionTRICARE Service Centers Go VirtualFrom TRICAREWalk-in service at TRICARE service centers in the United States is ending April 1. TRICARE officials said the change reflects the always growing number of TRICARE beneficiaries who most often now turn to a laptop or cell phone when they have ques tions about their health care. TRICARE patients have a wide variety of secure, elec tronic customer service options available through the TRICARE website at http:// www.tricare.mil, officials said. The I want to ... feature puts everything beneficiaries want to do online right on the websites front page, they added. For many years now, TRICARE beneficiaries have been taking advantage of our convenient, 24/7 online customer service options, said Army Maj. Gen. (Dr.) Richard Thomas, director of the Defense Health Agencys health care operations directorate. All of the services they received at their local [TRICARE service center] are available either online or through our toll-free call cen ters in the convenience of their own homes. We are committed to providing the highest level of support to all of our beneficiaries. With the end of walk-in service on April 1, beneficiaries who want get personal assis tance can call their regional health care contractor for enrollment and benefit help, officials said. All health care, pharmacy, dental and claims contact information is locat ed at http://www.tricare.mil/ contactus. Beneficiaries can get 24/7 TRICARE benefit information at the TRICARE website, and they can make enrollment, primary care manager and other changes at http://www.tricare.mil/enroll ment. Rather than driving to an installation service cen ter, TRICARE beneficiaries can even combine high-tech with low-tech by download ing health care forms online and sending them through the mail, officials noted. Pointing out that walk-in service is the most expensive customer-service option, offi cials said eliminating walk-in service at the centers will save the Defense Department an estimated $250 million over five years. The change does not affect TRICARE benefits or health care delivery, they emphasized.ER or Urgent Care: Making The DecisionFrom TRICAREWhen were in pain or sick, were anxious and it can be hard to think straight. We want relief as soon as possible. When a child is hurt or ill, the anxiety can be even greater. In those moments, it is can be hard to determine if you need to go to the emer gency room, an emergency center, or if an urgent care center will do. Its important to make that distinction because making the wrong choice will cost both time and money. Generally, if a condi tion is threatening to life, limb or eyesight, or causes the beneficiary to require relief from pain, it is considered an emergency and calls for a trip to the emer gen cy room. TRICARE defines an emergency department as an organized, hospital-based facility available 24 hours a day providing emergency services to patients who need immediate medical attention. Emergency departments affiliated with a hospital are most likely TRICARE-authorized providers. Beneficiaries and their families will get the appropriate level of care and save money by having urgent care needs met in urgent care facilities. Over the last two decades, over 9,000 urgent care centers have emerged across the country and this may lead to more urgent care facilities in an area than emergency rooms. However, beneficiaries who seek care at emergency centers need to ask if it is affiliated with a hospital-based emergency department. If it isnt, the beneficiary will need to make a decision about getting care elsewhere or being responsible for those facility charges. Beneficiaries can check if a provider is TRICARE-authorized by calling their region al contractor. Contact information for regional contractors is available at www.tricare.mil/callus. Learn more about emergency care under TRICARE at www.tri care.mil/emergency.Walk-in service for TRICARE ends April 1. Beneficiaries can get 24/7 TRICARE benefit information at www.tricare.mil 16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 17

They said, Weve done our best, and we think were ready, but dont pull any punches, and we certainly didnt, Flint said. The inspection teams report to the fleet included several recommendations for improvement, as well as praise for good work. Before the inspection, U.S. 4th Fleet leaders conducted a critical self-assessment, Flint said. Determining that a computer system in their Maritime Operations Center was no longer needed, they eliminated it. Besides reducing your vul nerability footprint, it allowed your team to focus on what does matter to you: improving your information assurance posture and making it sustainable, he said. Capt. Steve Shinego, the U.S. 4th Fleet chief of staff, accepted the inspection teams report. As you walked from building to building, I hope you found the same desire to do what was right not just be inspection-ready, he said. The real goal is to learn what good habits and what good practices we should be using to safeguard ourselves against adversaries so were keeping Sailors and Marines safer downrange. Passing the inspection was a win for U.S. 4th Fleet, but the right type of winner has humility and a desire for con stant improvement, he said. U.S. 4th Fleets communica tions and information systems directorate is led by Cmdr. Bradley Maas, who expressed thanks to his Navy colleagues, including other fleet commu nications and information systems directors, and to his staff for their support. Within the U.S. 4th Fleet directorate, We really had to ramp it up, Maas said. These guys did it, and I really cant say enough about that team. He is especially proud of the members of his team achiev ing 100 percent completion of its Cyber Security Work Force training certification, Maas said. Those are difficult certifi cations to accomplish, espe cially with the mix of ratings we have in our shop, he said. Among the missions of the Fort Meade, Md.-based U.S. Fleet Cyber Command is to direct, operate, maintain, secure and defend the Navys portion of the global informa tion grid. In 2011, it estab lished the inspection program with the goal of minimizing vulnerabilities to attacks.From Page 1CyberElrod, HSL-60 Assume Escort Duty For Morning Glory Tanker ShipBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press ServiceThe U.S. Navys USS Elrod, with embarked NS Mayport-based HSL60 Detachment Two, relieved USS Stout of its escort duties for the Morning Glory tanker ship March 19, Army Col. Steven Warren, a Defense Department spokesman, told Pentagon reporters. The Navy initially took control of the commer cial tanker in interna tional waters by request of the governments of Libya and Cyprus following its seizure earlier this month by three armed Libyans. The Morning Glory, according to a DOD statement, is carrying cargo of oil owned by the Libyan government National Oil Company, and was illicitly obtained from the Libyan port of As-Sidra. Warren said 34 sail ors from the USS Elrod are aboard the Morning Glory and all USS Stout personnel have departed the ship. Were going to hand over the Morning Glory to Libyan naval authori ties within the next day or two in international waters just outside of the territorial water line, he said. Everything will be turned over to the government of Libya, Warren noted, including the three armed Libyans, the entire 21-member organic crew of the Morning Glory, the ship and all of its contents. The change of escorts was for administra tive reasons, Warren said. The USS Stout is assigned to the U.S. European Command area of operations, while the USS Elrod has the U.S. Africa Command area of operations. The USS Elrod, an Oliver Hazard Perryclass frigate, is home ported in Norfolk, Va., and deployed Jan. 14 to the 6th Fleet area of operations. USS Roosevelt In View-Photo by MC2 Justin WolpertEnsign Nicholas Wood from Warsw, Ind., takes a bearing during a passing exercise with the Albanian military aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 17

PAGE 18

18 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014

PAGE 19

THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 27, 2014