Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00338


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CHINFO Award Winner USS Philippine SeaVisits Turkey Pages 4-5 Get ShipShapeThe Health Promotion 8 Week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on April 1 from 9-11 a.m. Open to active duty, adult dependents, and retirees. Call 270-5251. Det Mayport SailorNamed FRCSE SOY Page 10 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com USS GettysburgBy Vice Adm. Bill MoranChief of Naval PersonnelEarlier this week the Presidents proposed Defense budget for fiscal year 2015 was unveiled during a number of press events here in DC. The Navys portion of the proposal prioritizes deployed operations, seeks to maintain Sailor Quality of Service and pro vides for building our future Fleet. There has already been much written and dis cussed about ship numbers, types of aircraft, and new capabilities funded, along with the difference in money proposed this year compared to years past. My goal here is to help put Navy budget decisions affecting manpower and personnel in context, dis cuss issues that affect your monthly LES and hope fully answer some of the questions that may be on your mind. First off, the size of our Navy will remain stable between 323K and 324K Sailors for the foreseeable future. This stability means that we can continue our efforts to fill gaps at sea, focus on retaining Sailors with needed skills and maintain advancement rates at or slightly above historic norms. That said, as our Navy continues to modernize and transitions to new ships and aircraft, information dominance and other capabilities, natural shifting in advancement opportunities will occur in some rat ings. However, because of the stability we forecast in the total size of our force, Sailors who find them selves in overmanned ratings and want to stay Navy will have opportunities to transition to undermanned ratings. Beyond manning, central to Navys calculus in the development of this years budget was the belief that we must strike the right balance between adequate pay and compensation (what we refer to as Quality of Life) and providing adequate funding for tools, parts, training and equipment (Quality of Work) in order to maintain a high Quality of Service for our Sailors. Over the last 12 years, pays (including base pay, BAH and BAS) have gone up by about 60% for a typical Sailor, which has been significantly faster than the private sector during the same time. BAH out-ofpocket costs, which were 20% in 2000 are currently zero in 2013. Sailors and families have earned and deserved those bumps in pay and compensation. However, the rate of those increases is difficult to sustain over the long haul if we are to also modern ize our fleet and keep Sailors ready for operations around the globe. With only a finite amount of money available and with many competing interests, tough choices had to be made. Here is a look at some of those decisions: A 1% base pay increase has been recommended for all service members, except general and flag offi --Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Robert White, talks with Fund Drive coor dinators from around the base about the importance of Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) during a fund drive kick off held March 4 at Building One. The annual NMCRS fund drive will be held between March 15-April 15. By MC1Michael WissNPASE Detachment SEMaking a difference for Sailors, Marines and their fami lies was the underlining mes sage as the Naval Station Mayport Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) held their organization meeting March 4 with the Active-Duty Fund Drive set to kick off March 15. The NMCRS is a nonprofit organization that offers interestfree loans and grants for emer gencies and tuition assistance. According to Naval Station Mayport NMCRS Director retired Navy Capt. Bill Kennedy the organization is here to help those in need. It is vital that families know that there is an organization to help them if they have a financial crisis, he said. All the money we receive is donations from active duty personnel which go back to any family or Sailor who needs assistance. It is shipmates helping shipmates. Another of the major services the NMCRS provides is educa tion, learning to live within your financial household. Everyone who comes for assistance must fill out a budget. According to Kennedy, education is the key to assuming financial responsibility. We provide financial aid, but the big part is to provide finan cial education, he said. Our professional volunteer case workers teach Sailors and their fami lies to understand their leave and Earnings statement, and live within their means. We take a look at what money is coming in and whats is going out and provide the assistance needed to balance a budget. The need for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society was recog nized long before it was orga nized. Our newly formed nation couldnt afford to provide a benefits package for its armed forces. There were no medical benefits for service families, no retirement annuities or survivors benefits for families of deceased personnel. Sailors and Marines would pass the hat to collect funds to help their shipmates widows and orphans. In 1904, several Naval officers, wives of Naval officers, and civil ian friends saw the need for more formal and organized assistance. The Society was incorporated on January 23 of that year. Initial funding came from the proceeds of the 1903 Army-Navy Football Game held at Franklin Field in Philadelphia.. In its first year, the Society gave $9,500 to wid ows and families of enlisted men. The society has evolved over the years to cover many other finan cial crisis criteria than just help ing pay for vehicle repairs or emergency plane tickets. NMCRS loans and grants can be used for and lodging) expenses tary pay is delayed (example: co-pays) In 2013 Naval Station Mayport ships and commands raised over $215,000 for NMCRS. The society helped out over 1,500 families with over $800,000 in grant money. Much of this money was given out through Quick Assist Loans (QAL). Payday lenders often use slo gans such as, Got a job? Get a loan to lure people tight on cash with promises of money, no questions asked. But people Navys FY15 Budget More Than Just NumbersMayport NMCRS Kicks Off Annual Fund Drive See Story, Page 11 IsSee NMCRS, Page 7 See See Budget, Page 9

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ............................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Chapel Offers Marriage, Personal RetreatsAnd God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good workNow he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness. You will be made rich in every way so that you can be gen erous on every occa sion, and through us your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God. This service that you perform is not only supplying the needs of Gods people but is also overflowing in many expressions of thanks to God. Because of the ser vice by which you have proved yourselves, men will praise God for the obedience that accom panies your confession of the gospel of Christ, and for your generos ity in sharing with them and with everyone else. And in their prayers for you their hearts will go out to you, because of the surpassing grace God has given you. Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift! (2 Corinthians 9:8,1015, New International Version). In 2 Corinthians, Paul is instructing the church at Corinth on the bless ings they will receive through their generosity. To use a contemporary maxim, We get as good as we give. Here at NS Mayport Chapel by the Sea, we have truly been blessed; God has more than exceeded our expecta tions, and in return we are able to give back to our Sailors and their families numerous opportunities to grow and prosper. Id like to take this opportunity to share a few of these things with you, just in case you havent heard. Lets start with the chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation, better known as CREDO. Through CREDO, we offer military, depen dents, retirees, DoD per sonnel, and Reservists classes, workshops and retreats. We just had our first Marriage Enrichment class, called PREP, where couples learn better commu nication skills in order to strengthen their relationship. We also offer Personal Growth Retreats, which are great if you are at a crossroads in your life or career and want to take some time to focus on what your next path in life will be, we offer Family Enrichment Retreats, obviously designed for the whole family where the focus is on strength ening those fam ily bonds, and our most popular the Marriage Enrichment Retreats, for those couples that want to strengthen and enrich their marriage. One of the greatest things about the CREDO programs is that they are all FREE! I dont know about you, but that is my favorite price. And there is more. Do you have teenag ers in Middle School or High School? Come by the chapel and ask Kevin Burgess, our Youth Director, about Club Beyond, a community focused ecumeni cal program for military youth. They have bible study on Tuesday eve nings, fun and games on Thursday, along with other fun things to do. Both the Middle School and High School youth already have their sum mer camps lined up. If you have small chil dren, you may already been wondering if there will be an Easter Egg Hunt on base this year, and the answer is Yes. April 19th, the cha pel will be hosting its annual Spring Festival to include an Easter egg hunt. Come join us for hamburgers, hotdogs, nachos, cotton candy, bouncy houses and other games for a day of fun and adventure, and meet the Easter Bunny. We are no ordinary chapel. God has provided Chapel by the Sea with an astounding staff and an awesome con gregation. It is a bless ing for us to be able to pay that forward to our families. We arent just about Sunday services; we are about community and serving our Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines, and their fami lies, because you deserve the best. If you would like more information give us a call at (904)2705212, or visit us on Facebook at http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/may port/InstallationGuide/ FacilitiesAndResources/ ReligiousPrograms/ index.htm. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Karen Rector CREDOImPACT Concussion Management ModelHas your child suf fered a concussion while participating in football, cheerleading, karate, or even a physical activity such as dance? If you answered, No, are you sure? First Coast News anchor Jeannie Blaylock presented a story on February 26 linking reduced academic per formance in school to a concussion. Her story featured Mark Brunell who stated, . .our chil drens health and their academic futures should be top priority. He said, If a concussion isnt addressed properly, who cares about what hap pens on the field. As head football coach as Episcopal he has seen first-hand examples of students with concus sions who have watched their grades drop from, in some cases, honor roll level to Cs and Ds. Neurologist Dr. Daniel Kantor puts it this way: You wouldnt take a kid whos injured his knee and make him run on it. Same thing with the brain. But how does a parent know if their child has suffered a concus sion? Dr. Kantor added that too often concus sions are never discov ered. However this news story did have a solution. Schools and organiza tions are being encour aged to provide baseline concussion testing. Dr. Kantor says the key to recovery and to avoid long lasting academic problems is making sure you know if your childs had a concussion. As part of the First Coast News story Dr. Kantor and Jaguars Hall of Fame member Mark Brunell advocated for schools and organiza tions to join the ImPACT program. This baseline testing program is a 30-minute test on a com puter which gives a base line of what the individ uals normal brain activ ity is. The individuals KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerSecDef Hagel Statement On Release Of FY2015 Budget and 2014 QDRToday (March 4) the president released his Fiscal Year 2015 budget request for the Department of Defense. This defense budget contains the recom mendations I announced last week and is responsible, bal anced and realistic. It matches our strategy to our resources. This budget also supports and is informed by our updated defense strategy out lined in the recently completed 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), which is also being released today. This QDR defines the historic transition unfolding throughout our defense enterprise. As we move off the longest continu ous war footing in our nations history, this QDR explains how we will adapt, reshape, and rebalance our military for the challenges and opportuni ties of the future. The QDR prioritizes Americas highest security interests by focusing on three strategic pillars: defending the homeland against all threats; building security globally by project ing U.S. influence and deter ring aggression; and remain ing prepared to win decisively against any adversary should deterrence fail. The QDR outlines key mis sions of our strategy includ ing the rebalance to the AsiaPacific, sustaining our security commitments in the Middle East and Europe, and building partnership capacity through out the world. The QDR highlights the criti cal capabilities enduring and emerging the military will need to operate across the full spectrum of conflict including special operations, space, cyber, missile defense as well as certain conventional, high-intensity capabilities we should emphasize in todays fast moving security environ ment. It also recognizes the emerging technological capa bilities of adversaries that will present new threats and chal lenges to the United States. This years QDR also consid ers resource constraints. These continued fiscal constraints cannot be ignored. It would be dishonest and irresponsible to present a QDR articulating a strategy disconnected from the reality of resource constraints. A strategy must have the resources for its implementa tion. Todays world requires a strategy that is neither budget driven nor budget blind. We need a strategy that can be imple mented with a realistic level of resources, and that is what this QDR provides. This QDR clearly articulates the consequences and risks of budgetary constraints. In particular, it shows that sequestration-level cuts would result in unacceptable risks to our national security if they are re-imposed in Fiscal Year 2016, as is currently the law. The QDR shows that contin ued sequestration requires dangerous reductions to readi ness and modernization. It would mean that DoD would be unable to fulfill its defense strategy, and it would put at risk Americas traditional role as a guarantor of global security. Thats why the presidents budget plan adds $115 billion above sequestration levels. These additional resources will be required to meet the presidents defense strat egy, although we will still be assuming higher risk for cer tain military missions because of continued fiscal constraints. It would have been irrespon sible not to request these addi tional resources. No strategy or budget is riskfree. Even the largest defense budgets have limits as does our knowledge and ability to predict the future. But the strategy articulated by the QDR is one that department leaders and I believe is the right strategy given the reality we face. There are difficult decisions ahead, but there are also opportunities. We have an opportunity to reshape our defense enterprise to be bet ter prepared, positioned, and equipped to secure Americas interests in the years ahead memory is tested using a series of words, such as apple and record which appear in a long list of words. Then the program asks if apple or knife was in that list. The test results are maintained in case the individual receives another blow to the head. If that happens, the tests are repeat ed to look for changes. All Duval and Nassau county high school and middle school athletes, including cheerleaders, are provided ImPACT testing thanks to a grant from the Jacksonville Sports Medicine Program (JSMP). The problem is that since the programs inception in 2012, only 3,309 athletes out of 16,000 in the Duval County Public Schools have been tested. This is according to Robert Sefcik of JSMP. A doc tor could access the stored information from a baseline concussion test to decide if an ath lete should have further concussion testing after another head injury to help determine treat ment and when the ath lete is eventually ready to return to play. In the interview with Jeanne Blalock Mark Brunell said parents should demand that their schools join in the ImPACT program. The JSMP test givers will come to the school to help at no charge. Brunell said at See ImPACT, Page 3

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Episcopal, hes seen what a benefit the base line testing can be. Episcopal student Tatum Thompson said in the interview that shes extremely thankful for the ImPACT testing because she would not have known she had a concussion due to cheer leading. As part of the program she was allowed to freeze her grades until the doctor cleared her to fully return to her activities. Now because of the concussion she has switched to rowing. Dr. Kantor says, Concussion is traumat ic brain injury. Period. And, yes, he says, it can cause bad grades. Students with concus sions have watched their grades drop in some cases several let ter grades. Dr. Kantor added that the concus sion literally shakes up your head and shakes the circuitry that gets these good grades. Thats why proper recov ery is critical. But you cant recover if you dont know you have a concussion. JSPM employees will begin the next round of ImPACT testing in April. The First Coast News story provided additional information on testing in St. Johns and Clay Counties. In St. Johns County, schools handle baseline testing on a school-by-school basis. In Clay County, Director of Secondary Education, Michael Wingate, said, ...we would like to pro vide the ImPACT service to all of our student/ athletes, but that is not financially feasible. However, funding from Orange Park Medical Center provides free test ing to male and female soccer and football play ers. The story also reported that if your child is a stu dent in either Duval or Nassau school districts, then you can contact the childs high school or middle school to ask about ImPACT testing. The test is normed for ages 10-59. Before talking to your school or coach or train er, you might want to do additional research on this timely topic. For more information on the ImPACT Concussion Management Model, go to www.impacttest.com/ about/?ConcessionManagement-Model-3. And while some schools only test con tact sports based on the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, you may come to a dif ferent conclusion after doing some research into the problem. Remember, concussions can occur in any sport or physical activity. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2ImPACTNavy Releases New Mobile Game Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Vicent Sicilia who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Sicilia Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870.From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) Office released a mobile game March 3 as part of the Keep What Youve Earned campaign. Pier Pressure was designed to promote responsible drinking among Sailors by incorporating real-life choic es in an entertaining work-and-play scenario. The app also enables all Sailors to have important alcohol-related resources at their fingertips 24/7, including a blood alcohol content (BAC) calculator and local taxi search. During the devel opment of the Keep What Youve Earned Campaign, we heard from young, enlisted Sailors that the best way to reach them was through their mobile phones, said Dorice Favorite, Director of NADAP. Pier Pressure will help Sailors under stand how responsible drinking can keep their careers on track, and alternatively, how abus ing alcohol can lead to serious consequences. Favorite said the idea for the game came from the Sailors themselves, and NADAP engaged more than 110 Sailors in the testing process to make sure the app was both entertaining and educational. She explained that the goal of the game is to advance ones career, but play ers must make the right choices to be successful. In the game, the choices you make at the bar affect your skill level at work the next day, which in turn affects your players evalua tion reports, said Mike Aukerman, Alcohol Program Manager at NADAP. Just like in real life, smart drink ing choices help advance your career, while poor choices can get you sep arated from the Navya.k.a. game over. Pier Pressure also features leaderboards, enabling players to compete with friends and shipmates. In addition to the game, the app pro vides resources to help Sailors drink responsibly in real life. The BAC cal culator can help remind Sailors when they have had too much to drive, and the local taxi search can help them find a safe ride home. You can download the app now at the Apple iTunes (https://itunes. apple.com/us/app/pierpressure/id816367909? ls=1&mt=8) or Google Play (https://play. google.com/store/apps/ details?id=com.KWYE. PierPressure) app stores. For more information and to help promote responsible drinking within your command, you can access materi als and resources from NADAPs Keep What Youve Earned cam paign, available at www. nadap.navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Philippine Sea Arrives In TurkeyBy MC3 Abe McNattUSS Philippine Sea Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), attached to the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWBCSG), arrived in Aksaz, Turkey March 9, for a scheduled port call. The visit is the sec ond port call for the Philippine Sea this deployment. Im very excited to be in Turkey, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Steven Mestres-Junque. Im really looking forward trying the local food. I love trying new food, and want to try different things from all around the world. While in port Philippine Sea will take on fuel and supplies and Sailors will have an opportunity to take liberty. Tours will be provid ed by the ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office. Philippine Sea will also be hosting 10 Turkish officers for a luncheon, and tour of the ship including an SH-60R Seahawk helicopter demonstration. We look forward to meeting our Turkish counterparts and sharing a meal with good conversation, said Lt. Cmdr. Randolph Chestang, the ships executive officer. The luncheon will serve as an opportunity to strengthen partnerships and build camaraderie. Philippine Sea and other ships of the GHWBSCSG are on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet area of respon sibility. -Photos by MC3 Abe McNattElectronics Technician 2nd Class Sarah Parrish stands phone talker watch aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit. Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Aric Summers and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Kendal Clawson raise the ensign aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Aric Summers and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Kendal Clawson prepare for colors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece for a scheduled liberty port visit. Sailors man the rails aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a sched uled four-day liberty port visit. The guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece for a scheduled lib erty port visit. Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Joel Lafferty handles line aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece. Seaman Recruit Martin Miles stands look out watch as USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit. Sailors hold a safety brief before setting sea and anchor to pull into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 Seaman Apprentice Omar Olivier, from New York, handles line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Boatswain's Mate Seaman Damaris Urena signals away a helicopter from the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Sailors handle mooring line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it pulls in to Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Sailors prepare to moor in Athens, Greece, aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Fire Controlman 3rd Class Stephen Ray mans the rails as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Kevin Smith inspects a fuel sample on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Quartermaster 3rd Class Blayne Nation, from Hereford, Texas, stands look out watch as USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece.

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Work Is Booming At EOD MayportBy Paige GnannThe Mirror editorWhen the phone rings at Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six Detachment Mayport, you can pretty much bet that there is going to be an interesting story on the other end. You know, like the time some divers found a World War II bomb lodged on the sea floor off the coast of Vero Beach and they had to dispose of it a mile off shore. Or the one about the unsuspecting kayak ers who stumbled upon an illumination hand grenade on a deserted beach. Then theres the time that a rusting 70 mm rocket was discovered in the Ogeechee River around Savannah. They have also headed down to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) to help the installation safely dis pose of unusable ammu nition. The mission of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team is to eliminate hazards from ordnance, which jeopardize operations conducted in support of the national security strategy by providing combat-ready EOD forc es to the fleet. OIC Lt. Matthew Grove said the team goes to GTMO around once a month to perform routine disposal of degraded ammunition or when a hapless person stumbles upon practice bombs buried in the sand. The team of EOD tech nicians at Detachment Mayport are on call for ordnance response issues from Tallahassee eastward and down to the Bahamas, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay and Puerto Rico. On average the detach ment receives around 100 calls a year, and deploys approximately 60 times. It definitely helps keep our skills honed, said Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Ryan Waller. It allows you to accomplish a wide vari ety of missions timely and safely. Recently, the team responded to the dis covery of a 1,000-pound World War II practice bomb and a smaller 500-pound bomb in the waters off of Vero Beach. The team spent almost a week carefully excavat ing, and then disposing of, the bombs with the help of local emergency crews and law enforce ment. Navy EOD is the only EOD service that can handle ordnance in the water, because of div ing, said Senior Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Jonah Toy. Down in the Ocala National Forest is the Navys Pinecastle Impact Range. Owned by Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville, the range is a live ord nance impact area and is used by all services as a training area to teach pilots how to drop bombs. The range site has been utilized by all ser vices since the 1940s and it is not unusual for a World War II or Vietnam-era bomb to be uncovered on a windy or rainy day. When an old bomb pops up, or when a bomb fails to detonate on impact during cur rent day training, EOD is called in for disposal. Unless it is an emergency, EOD usually goes down to Pinecastle once a quarter. Their last trip down in February was to dispose of an old British MK1 bomb and 500 pound dud Mark 82 dropped during a recent training exercise. Retired Senior Chief Boatswains Mate (EOD) Chris Townsend retired from NS Mayport 13 years ago and now works at Pinecastle. He said he is grateful for the ser vice EOD Detachment Mayport provides to the site. By utilizing Mayport instead of a contractor to dispose of the ord nance, Pinecastle is able to quickly eliminate hazardous material, as well as provide additional training for the EOD techs. EOD mission sup port includes general ordnance handling, transportation, storage, disposal and/or safety missions, live fire train ing, range clearance and underwater ordnance testing. -Photos by Paige GnannExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Gabriel Cantu of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six Detachment Mayport, prepares his equipment during a planned disposal of ordnance at Pinecastle Impact Range. -Photos by Paige GnannSenior Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Jonah Toy and a civilian at Pinecastle Impact Range wire charges to old Vietnam era dummy bombs found at the range. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS New York Plots CourseUSS Taylor Departs SamsunFrom U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsUSS Taylor (FFG 50) departed the Turkish port of Samsun, March 7, for Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, for repairs fol lowing the Feb. 12 grounding incident. The ship was moved with the assistance of a tug from Donjon Towing Company. NSA Souda Bay was chosen as the closest location with the most robust U.S. Navy support and logistics infrastruc ture. Repairs to Taylor will include replacement of the propeller blades and propeller hub. Repairs are expected to take sev eral weeks. Following completion of repairs, Taylor will continue its scheduled deployment in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. -Photos by MC2 Cyrus RosonQuarter Master Seaman Bryan Elam, left, observes Quarter Master Seaman Apprentice Natasha M. Rowell, right, charts a heading aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). New York is under way conducting routine training exercise. Seaman Apprentice Justinne Ivanitskiy looks through the big eyes for surface and air contacts aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). New York is underway conducting routine training exercise.who use these services usually end up in whats commonly referred to as a debt trap. And despite each military service having agencies to financially help service members, there was a time when many of those caught in the debt trap were active-duty mem bers. As a way of pre venting service members from being caught in the payday loan debt trap, the NMCRS launched the Quick Assist Loan program for active-duty members. With the relief societys QAL program, the service member can forgo the budget pro cess and select repay ment terms of three to 10 months. While the maximum amount that could be taken out was $300 when it first started, that amount increased to $500 this past February. Although the society would like all to donate money to the fund drive, the goal is for 100 per cent contact to allow per sonnel the opportunity to help out Sailors and Marines and their fami lies in need. When Sailors and Marines fall on hard times, Society volun teers are there to help them get back on their feet, and you make that happen, said NMCRS President and Chief Executive Officer Admiral United States Navy (Ret.) Steve Abbot. From Page 1NMCRS THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

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Roosevelt Arrives In Split For Port VisitBy MC2 Justin WolpertUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroy er USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) arrived in Split, Croatia for a routine, regularly scheduled port visit, March 8. The port visit is designed to continue Naval Forces EuropeAfricas efforts to strengthen maritime partnerships with European countries. In addi tion these visits improve maritime safety and security in the region. During the visit, Sailors will have the opportunity to meet with the people of Croatia and experience the rich culture and history the country has to offer. The entire crew is looking forward to our port visit in Split, Croatia, said Cmdr. Jay Clark, USS Roosevelts com manding officer. It is uncom mon to have port visits so close after each other, but the crew is ready to see the beau tiful sights in Split. We are always proud to share the cul ture and tradition of the U.S. Navy with our partner coun tries and we plan to be gra cious guests as we enjoy the sights, food, and Croatian culture. Roosevelt is on a sched uled deployment as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. Sailors man the rails aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) during a routine port visit to Koper, Slovenia before heading to Split, Croatia on March 8. Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment en route to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Justin Wolpert 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS Simpson Arrives in CasablancaBy MC2 Tim D. GodbeeUSS Simpson Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Casablanca, Morocco, for a scheduled port visit, March 6. Simpsons visit serves to strengthen the exist ing partnership between Morocco and the U.S., and provide each other with opportunities for cultural exchanges. I am excited Simpson has been given anoth er opportunity to visit Casablanca and oper ate with the Royal Moroccan Navy, said Cmdr Christopher Follin, Simpsons command ing officer. Its not very often that one of our ships has the opportu nity to re-visit friends we made on a previous deployment. We are looking forward to build ing upon the cooperative efforts and interoperabil ity in training that both of our Navies strength ened during our last visit. When we share ideas and learn to oper ate together, we become twice as strong a force to improve maritime safety and security for all nations in the region. During the visit, Simpson is sched uled to conduct a pass ing exercise with the Royal Moroccan Navy, hold office calls and gift exchanges with a num ber of Moroccan officials, host a reception, and conduct a community relations event with the Bennani Center Girls School. Every time we go out and do something for the communities we visit, we have a great time, said Ships Serviceman 1st Class Manuel Dulucgomez, Simpsons community relations event coordinator. The location we chose for this port visit gives us an opportunity to make a great impression on the youth of Morocco and hopefully well make a difference in their lives. As a part of the visit, Simpson Sailors will also have an opportuni ty to go on a number of tours through the ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation department, most notably a tour of the Hassan II Mosque, one of the largest mosques in the world. The ship stopped here on its last deployment, and Ive heard nothing but good things about it, said Yeoman Seaman Luis Burks. The culture here is very rich, and every corner you turn theres a piece of histo ry waiting to be learned about. Hopefully Ill be able to see it all while Im here. Simpson is on a sched uled deployment sup porting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. -Photo by MC2 Tim D. GodbeeA member of the visit, board, search and seizure team assigned to the Royal Moroccan Navy Floreal-class frigate Hassan II, left, searches a Sailor playing the role of a cargo ship crew member during a passing exercise aboard the guid ed-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). cers who will not see an increase. This Budget does not propose to cut the pay or benefits for any active duty personnel. However, over the next five years the growth rates of base pay, BAH and other allowances will slow down. BAH while not being nominally cut, will slow in inflationary terms until it covers 95% of the average service members housing costs in 2017 and this will have the effect of reducing your purchasing power. Despite rumors over the last few months, no plans are in place to close a single commis sary. Locations overseas will continue to receive direct subsidies, and all commissaries will con tinue to operate rent free, paying no taxes and therefore providing taxfree groceries to custom ers. A reduction in the subsidy may cause price increases at locations in metropolitan areas, but still result in savings of roughly 15% compared to shopping in other grocery establishments. In regards to TRICARE costs, all active duty person nel will still have access to free health care and remain exempt from any fee increases. Those who wish to opt for private care will still be able to choose between mili tary treatment facilities, in-network, or out-ofnetwork care. They will however be asked to pay a little bit more in their deductibles and co-pays, but their benefits will still stay affordable and generous. The savings from these proposals will fund ini tiatives to ensure you are well-equipped, welltrained and compensat ed for future sea going challenges. Put another way-this money will go back into Quality of Life and Work initiatives to help maintain our cur rent Quality of Service. In our planning for post-war deployment practices, it was clear we needed to address sea duty incentives and compensation. Since 2001, Career Sea Pay has lost significant purchasing power, despite its importance to Sailors when deciding to stay Navy or take orders back to sea. To ensure we maintain the right skills in rigor ous sea-going billets, we updated our sea pay tables beginning this year (FY14) and includ ed money in next years budget to up Sea Pay and Sea Pay Premium, for eligible personnel: -A 25% increase in Career Sea Pay for all pay grades with at least 3 years of cumulative sea dutyin recognition of the greater than normal rigors of assignment to a ship. Sea Pay Premium will double to $200 per month for Sailors who serve more than 36 months of continuous sea duty. Also in this budget is money to fund Fleet Quality of Work initia tives. This includes funding for upgrades to berthing and barracks, additional funding for training, and money for purchase of tools and parts to improve readi ness, reduce mainte nance time, and decrease the necessity to crossdeck spares from one deploying unit to the next. In short, the Presidents Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2015 capitalizes on efforts to stabilize per sonnel costs while pro viding you the incentives and resources necessary to serve with a high level of success and satisfac tion. Please keep your questions coming-see you in the Fleet.From Page 1Budget THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

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FRCSE Announces Sailor Of The YearBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsAviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch has been selected as the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY). He is currently attached to FRCSE Detachment (DET) Mayport Ground Support Equipment (900) division where he works as division pro duction control super visor, main production control supervisor and quality assurance (QA) leading petty officer (LPO). It is an honor to have represented FRCSE DET Mayport among Jacksonville and DET Key West, said Opdenbosch. However, the greatest honor is to have been selected as FRCSE Sailor of the Year. This accomplish ment serves as recogni tion of the hard work and performance of the entire detachment. Opdenbosch was selected as SOY for expertly managing the daily production efforts of 39 work centers in six divisions culminating in the training and qualifi cation of four production controllers. He spear headed the DETs Naval Aviation Maintenance program (NAMP) base line system ensuring directive adherence through the detachment bringing 11 programs back to on-track status. He continually audits and monitors the divi sions and 42 NAMPs analyzing trends and implementing controls for compliance. He also acts as a collateral duty inspector and provides mentoring and guidance to the QA supervisor on QA and NAMP programs and procedures. A native of Barranquilla, Columbia, Opdenbosch moved to North Bergen, N.J. after graduating high school and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in April 1999. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill., he attended Aviation Support Equipment A School in Pensacola, Fla. Opdenbosch report ed to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in January 2000 where he was advanced to third and second class petty offi cer. In January 2004, he transferred to the Center of Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as a C school instructor. Two years later, Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE where he was selected Sailor of the Third Quarter. In January 2008, he transferred to Patrol Squadron TWO SIX (VP26) where he served as line division LPO, QA representative and main tenance control coor dinator/safe-for-flight supervisor. He advanced to first class petty officer. Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE Detachment Mayport in 2012. During his tour, he led four first class petty officers and one chief petty officer in completing produc tion control qualifica tion, provided techni cal and NAMP support to the civilian mainte nance detachment at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Andros Island, Bahamas. At DET Mayport, Opdenboschs collat eral duties include First Class Petty Officers Association president organizing events to raise money for the commands children holiday party and coordinating Adopt-A-Highway cleanups; command lead financial specialist; and AIRSpeed representative facilitating/instructing AIRSpeed and Lean Six Sigma concepts (Yellow/ Green Belt) to 76 officers and enlisted Sailors. While off duty, he enjoys spending time with his family, building and flying remote con trol airplanes, playing guitar and fishing. He is also currently working on his bachelors degree in technical manage ment with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. -Photo by Victor Pitts Aviation Machinist Mater 1st Class (AW) Christopher Chinery (left) and Aviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch verify a serial number on a cold section module that contains the compres sor of a T700 helicopter engine assembly at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (DET) Mayport Feb. 6. Opdenbosch, the Ground Support Equipment (900) division production control supervisor and Quality Assurance leading petty officer, is the FRCSE 2013 Sailor of the Year. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS Gettysburg Wins Gold AnchorBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) were awarded the fis cal year 2013 Retention Excellence Award Feb. 16. The Retention Excellence Award, or Golden Anchor Award, is presented to ships that demonstrate exem plary performance in command, program, procedures and policies throughout the fiscal year. Winning the Golden Anchor Award indicates that our Sailors have a good grasp on our career development program, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker, CMC aboard Gettysburg. This is a very proud moment for myself and the entire crew because it shows we are meeting the Navys standard of growth and development for Sailors. To be eligible for the Golden Anchor Award, per instruction, ships are required to meet multiple criteria. Some of the requirements include achieving 85 points or better on the annual career informa tion program review (CIPR), achieving 100 percent C-WAY on-time submission for eligible Sailors, and maintain ing 100 percent Navy wide advancement exam validations for results released during the fiscal year. We were able to achieve 100 percent on many of the award requirements which shows how much pride and dedication the crew takes in the career devel opment of each Sailor, said Navy Counselor 1st Class (SW) Raymond Wiemer. Winning this award shows that we are taking care of our Sailors and setting them up for success. Ceremonially, ships that are recognized for winning the Golden Anchor Award paint their anchors gold and are permitted to fly the retention excellence award pennant as a symbol of their accomplish ments. Since Gettysburgs anchors are painted gold from winning the award the previous fiscal year, plans have been set to add a fresh coat, said Wiemer. Winning this award two years straight is a great accomplishment for Gettysburg and the crew, said Wiemer. Im confident that we can continue this trend going into the next fiscal year. Wiemer said he looks forward to returning to homeport displaying the ships painted gold anchors and hoisting the retention excellence award flag. Its going to be a exciting moment when we are able to show our family and friends the accomplishment of the ship when we return to homeport, said Wiemer. This award makes me proud to be on board serving the Gettysburg crew during deploy ment. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.100 Gettysburg Sailors Newly ESWS Qualified By MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) reached 100 enlisted surface warfare specialists (ESWS) qualifications while on deployment March 5. This achievement more than doubles the ships original goal of qualifying 50 Sailors during Gettysburgs 2013-2014 deployment in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors dedicat ing the time and effort to become ESWS qualified is an amazing achieve ment for the entire ship, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker, CMC aboard Gettysburg. Im incred ibly proud of each of them for the hard work they put forth to better themselves and their careers. To prepare sailors to acquire their ESWS pin, daily training focusing on various departmen tal topics is conducted throughout the ship, said Ships Serviceman (SW) 1st Class Trent Ramsey, an ESWS board member aboard Gettysburg. Ramsey said the training helps build confidence in Sailors shipboard knowledge. As deployed Sailors, it is important that we all know the capabilities of our ship, said Ramsey. It is our job to give junior Sailors the infor mation we know to bet ter inform them and help them move to the next level of achievement. Becoming an enlisted surface warfare special ist requires Sailors to obtain prerequisite qual ifications prior to a preboard conducted by 1st class petty officers, and a final board conducted by chief petty officers, said Ramsey. The boards are in place to ensure sailors are retaining the infor mation they are receiv ing in training, said Ramsey. Its our job as board members to get them to the point where they are confident in their answers. Once they complete the boards and prove their knowledge, then they can train other junior Sailors. Ramsey said pinning 50 more Sailors is the goal aboard Gettysburg for the remainder of deployment. Our ultimate goal is to have every E-4 and senior Sailor return to Naval Station Mayport ESWS qualified, said Ramsey. The 100 Sailors who have taken the step to receive their pin shows that Gettysburg has a lot of hard working ambitious Sailors that care about their careers as well as their ship. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) receive their enlisted surface warfare specialist pins during an awards ceremony on the mess decks. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 2707205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a brack et for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transpor tation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hir ing process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judg ing experience and skills and much more. This program is highly rec ommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID) -Photo by Paige GnannEnsign Jacklynn Bush and members of the NS Mayport Public Affairs team judge photos taken by the kids at the Youth Activities Center as part of the annual 2014 Image Makers Photography Exhibit. The winning photos will be submitted for the regional competition.The Art Of Photography THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

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Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annu al Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxu sochilicookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. Lt. Dan Band Gary Sinise and The Lt. Dan Band will be performing at Deweys at NAS Jacksonville on Friday, March 28. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. This is a free concert. Please bring chairs and blankets. No outside food or drink permitted however, there will be concessions avail able. The kids zone will open at 6 p.m. For more information, call (904) 542-3491. A Salute To Women In The Military: Past & Present FestivalFriday, March 28 The Greater Jacksonville Area USO will be hosting a FREE festival honoring women in the military. The festival will be Friday, March 28 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Navy Federal across from the Yorktown Gate. There will be live music, appearances by Morgan Frazier and A&Es Rodeo Girls, jump houses, and much more includ ing a presentation by Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, (Ret.). This festival is free an open to the public. Country Concert At MavericksTribute To Women In The Military Join us at Mavericks on Saturday, March 29 for a trib ute to women in the military hosted by A&Es Rodeo Girls. See Morgan Frazier, Jamie Davis, Rionn Page and concert headliner DARRYL WORLEY at Mavericks. See the attached flyer for more info. Tickets are on sale now at www.maverick satthelanding.com. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $25.00 for VIP. Active Duty, Retirees, and dependents receive $5 off with presenta tion of valid military I.D. card. Adventure Landing FunRaiser Mark your calendars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is hosting a FUNraiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per person ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be pur chased at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retir ees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be participating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique communitybased fundraising initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encourage you to visit www.birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportuni ty to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2014 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an additional $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-breaker question will be used to determine the win ner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 7. There is a computer resource center available to all service members with email, Internet and word pro cessing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, sup port groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projec tor are available for use. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSLearn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presenta tion on transition here, on March 31, from 8:3011 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The presentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environ The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presentation to teach the latest trends in transi tion to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and mar keting yourself. It also educates lead ers in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subor dinate, especially dur ing these times of force reductions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a deputy director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national head quarters in Alexandria, Virginia. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the FFSC at 270-6600, x1701. FFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more informa tion about the classes or to reg ister call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. March 13, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 17, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 17, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 March 18, 2 p.m.-3 p.m., PFM Forum Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 19, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 20, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 Mar 24, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., IA (Individual Augmentee) Family Connection Group, USO March 24, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 24, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 24, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 March 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center March 26, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 26, 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Capstone Event (All Pay Grades), Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 26, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 27, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 27, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 31, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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CHINFO Award Winner USS Philippine SeaVisits Turkey Pages 4-5 Get ShipShapeThe Health Promotion 8 Week Nutrition and Weight Management Class will start on April 1 from 9-11 a.m. Open to active duty, adult dependents, and retirees. Call 270-5251. Det Mayport SailorNamed FRCSE SOY Page 10 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com USS GettysburgBy Vice Adm. Bill MoranChief of Naval PersonnelEarlier this week the Presidents proposed Defense budget for fiscal year 2015 was unveiled during a number of press events here in DC. The Navys portion of the proposal prioritizes deployed operations, seeks to maintain Sailor Quality of Service and provides for building our future Fleet. There has already been much written and dis cussed about ship numbers, types of aircraft, and new capabilities funded, along with the difference in money proposed this year compared to years past. My goal here is to help put Navy budget decisions affecting manpower and personnel in context, dis cuss issues that affect your monthly LES and hope fully answer some of the questions that may be on your mind. First off, the size of our Navy will remain stable between 323K and 324K Sailors for the foreseeable future. This stability means that we can continue our efforts to fill gaps at sea, focus on retaining Sailors with needed skills and maintain advancement rates at or slightly above historic norms. That said, as our Navy continues to modernize and transitions to new ships and aircraft, information dominance and other capabilities, natural shifting in advancement opportunities will occur in some rat ings. However, because of the stability we forecast in the total size of our force, Sailors who find themselves in overmanned ratings and want to stay Navy will have opportunities to transition to undermanned ratings. Beyond manning, central to Navys calculus in the development of this years budget was the belief that we must strike the right balance between adequate pay and compensation (what we refer to as Quality of Life) and providing adequate funding for tools, parts, training and equipment (Quality of Work) in order to maintain a high Quality of Service for our Sailors. Over the last 12 years, pays (including base pay, BAH and BAS) have gone up by about 60% for a typical Sailor, which has been significantly faster than the private sector during the same time. BAH out-ofpocket costs, which were 20% in 2000 are currently zero in 2013. Sailors and families have earned and deserved those bumps in pay and compensation. However, the rate of those increases is difficult to sustain over the long haul if we are to also modernize our fleet and keep Sailors ready for operations around the globe. With only a finite amount of money available and with many competing interests, tough choices had to be made. Here is a look at some of those decisions: A 1% base pay increase has been recommended for all service members, except general and flag offi--Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Robert White, talks with Fund Drive coor dinators from around the base about the importance of Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) during a fund drive kick off held March 4 at Building One. The annual NMCRS fund drive will be held between March 15-April 15. By MC1Michael WissNPASE Detachment SEMaking a difference for Sailors, Marines and their fami lies was the underlining mes sage as the Naval Station Mayport Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) held their organization meeting March 4 with the Active-Duty Fund Drive set to kick off March 15. The NMCRS is a nonprofit organization that offers interestfree loans and grants for emer gencies and tuition assistance. According to Naval Station Mayport NMCRS Director retired Navy Capt. Bill Kennedy the organization is here to help those in need. It is vital that families know that there is an organization to help them if they have a financial crisis, he said. All the money we receive is donations from active duty personnel which go back to any family or Sailor who needs assistance. It is shipmates helping shipmates. Another of the major services the NMCRS provides is education, learning to live within your financial household. Everyone who comes for assistance must fill out a budget. According to Kennedy, education is the key to assuming financial responsibility. We provide financial aid, but the big part is to provide finan cial education, he said. Our professional volunteer case workers teach Sailors and their fami lies to understand their leave and Earnings statement, and live within their means. We take a look at what money is coming in and whats is going out and provide the assistance needed to balance a budget. The need for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society was recog nized long before it was orga nized. Our newly formed nation couldnt afford to provide a benefits package for its armed forces. There were no medical benefits for service families, no retirement annuities or survivors benefits for families of deceased personnel. Sailors and Marines would pass the hat to collect funds to help their shipmates widows and orphans. In 1904, several Naval officers, wives of Naval officers, and civilian friends saw the need for more formal and organized assistance. The Society was incorporated on January 23 of that year. Initial funding came from the proceeds of the 1903 Army-Navy Football Game held at Franklin Field in Philadelphia.. In its first year, the Society gave $9,500 to wid ows and families of enlisted men. The society has evolved over the years to cover many other financial crisis criteria than just help ing pay for vehicle repairs or emergency plane tickets. NMCRS loans and grants can be used for and lodging) expenses tary pay is delayed (example: co-pays) In 2013 Naval Station Mayport ships and commands raised over $215,000 for NMCRS. The society helped out over 1,500 families with over $800,000 in grant money. Much of this money was given out through Quick Assist Loans (QAL). Payday lenders often use slo gans such as, Got a job? Get a loan to lure people tight on cash with promises of money, no questions asked. But people Navys FY15 Budget More Than Just NumbersMayport NMCRS Kicks Off Annual Fund Drive See Story, Page 11 IsSee NMCRS, Page 7 See See Budget, Page 9

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ...............................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Chapel Offers Marriage, Personal RetreatsAnd God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good workNow he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness. You will be made rich in every way so that you can be gen erous on every occa sion, and through us your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God. This service that you perform is not only supplying the needs of Gods people but is also overflowing in many expressions of thanks to God. Because of the service by which you have proved yourselves, men will praise God for the obedience that accom panies your confession of the gospel of Christ, and for your generos ity in sharing with them and with everyone else. And in their prayers for you their hearts will go out to you, because of the surpassing grace God has given you. Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift! (2 Corinthians 9:8,1015, New International Version). In 2 Corinthians, Paul is instructing the church at Corinth on the bless ings they will receive through their generosity. To use a contemporary maxim, We get as good as we give. Here at NS Mayport Chapel by the Sea, we have truly been blessed; God has more than exceeded our expecta tions, and in return we are able to give back to our Sailors and their families numerous opportunities to grow and prosper. Id like to take this opportunity to share a few of these things with you, just in case you havent heard. Lets start with the chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation, better known as CREDO. Through CREDO, we offer military, depen dents, retirees, DoD personnel, and Reservists classes, workshops and retreats. We just had our first Marriage Enrichment class, called PREP, where couples learn better communication skills in order to strengthen their relationship. We also offer Personal Growth Retreats, which are great if you are at a crossroads in your life or career and want to take some time to focus on what your next path in life will be, we offer Family Enrichment Retreats, obviously designed for the whole family where the focus is on strength ening those fam ily bonds, and our most popular the Marriage Enrichment Retreats, for those couples that want to strengthen and enrich their marriage. One of the greatest things about the CREDO programs is that they are all FREE! I dont know about you, but that is my favorite price. And there is more. Do you have teenag ers in Middle School or High School? Come by the chapel and ask Kevin Burgess, our Youth Director, about Club Beyond, a community focused ecumeni cal program for military youth. They have bible study on Tuesday eve nings, fun and games on Thursday, along with other fun things to do. Both the Middle School and High School youth already have their sum mer camps lined up. If you have small children, you may already been wondering if there will be an Easter Egg Hunt on base this year, and the answer is Yes. April 19th, the cha pel will be hosting its annual Spring Festival to include an Easter egg hunt. Come join us for hamburgers, hotdogs, nachos, cotton candy, bouncy houses and other games for a day of fun and adventure, and meet the Easter Bunny. We are no ordinary chapel. God has provided Chapel by the Sea with an astounding staff and an awesome con gregation. It is a bless ing for us to be able to pay that forward to our families. We arent just about Sunday services; we are about community and serving our Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines, and their families, because you deserve the best. If you would like more information give us a call at (904)2705212, or visit us on Facebook at http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/may port/InstallationGuide/ FacilitiesAndResources/ ReligiousPrograms/ index.htm. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Karen Rector CREDOImPACT Concussion Management ModelHas your child suf fered a concussion while participating in football, cheerleading, karate, or even a physical activity such as dance? If you answered, No, are you sure? First Coast News anchor Jeannie Blaylock presented a story on February 26 linking reduced academic per formance in school to a concussion. Her story featured Mark Brunell who stated, . .our childrens health and their academic futures should be top priority. He said, If a concussion isnt addressed properly, who cares about what hap pens on the field. As head football coach as Episcopal he has seen first-hand examples of students with concus sions who have watched their grades drop from, in some cases, honor roll level to Cs and Ds. Neurologist Dr. Daniel Kantor puts it this way: You wouldnt take a kid whos injured his knee and make him run on it. Same thing with the brain. But how does a parent know if their child has suffered a concus sion? Dr. Kantor added that too often concussions are never discov ered. However this news story did have a solution. Schools and organiza tions are being encour aged to provide baseline concussion testing. Dr. Kantor says the key to recovery and to avoid long lasting academic problems is making sure you know if your childs had a concussion. As part of the First Coast News story Dr. Kantor and Jaguars Hall of Fame member Mark Brunell advocated for schools and organiza tions to join the ImPACT program. This baseline testing program is a 30-minute test on a computer which gives a baseline of what the individ uals normal brain activ ity is. The individuals KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerSecDef Hagel Statement On Release Of FY2015 Budget and 2014 QDRToday (March 4) the president released his Fiscal Year 2015 budget request for the Department of Defense. This defense budget contains the recommendations I announced last week and is responsible, bal anced and realistic. It matches our strategy to our resources. This budget also supports and is informed by our updated defense strategy out lined in the recently completed 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), which is also being released today. This QDR defines the historic transition unfolding throughout our defense enterprise. As we move off the longest continu ous war footing in our nations history, this QDR explains how we will adapt, reshape, and rebalance our military for the challenges and opportuni ties of the future. The QDR prioritizes Americas highest security interests by focusing on three strategic pillars: defending the homeland against all threats; building security globally by project ing U.S. influence and deter ring aggression; and remain ing prepared to win decisively against any adversary should deterrence fail. The QDR outlines key mis sions of our strategy includ ing the rebalance to the AsiaPacific, sustaining our security commitments in the Middle East and Europe, and building partnership capacity through out the world. The QDR highlights the criti cal capabilities enduring and emerging the military will need to operate across the full spectrum of conflict including special operations, space, cyber, missile defense as well as certain conventional, high-intensity capabilities we should emphasize in todays fast moving security environ ment. It also recognizes the emerging technological capa bilities of adversaries that will present new threats and chal lenges to the United States. This years QDR also consid ers resource constraints. These continued fiscal constraints cannot be ignored. It would be dishonest and irresponsible to present a QDR articulating a strategy disconnected from the reality of resource constraints. A strategy must have the resources for its implementa tion. Todays world requires a strategy that is neither budget driven nor budget blind. We need a strategy that can be implemented with a realistic level of resources, and that is what this QDR provides. This QDR clearly articulates the consequences and risks of budgetary constraints. In particular, it shows that sequestration-level cuts would result in unacceptable risks to our national security if they are re-imposed in Fiscal Year 2016, as is currently the law. The QDR shows that contin ued sequestration requires dangerous reductions to readiness and modernization. It would mean that DoD would be unable to fulfill its defense strategy, and it would put at risk Americas traditional role as a guarantor of global security. Thats why the presidents budget plan adds $115 billion above sequestration levels. These additional resources will be required to meet the presidents defense strat egy, although we will still be assuming higher risk for cer tain military missions because of continued fiscal constraints. It would have been irrespon sible not to request these additional resources. No strategy or budget is riskfree. Even the largest defense budgets have limits as does our knowledge and ability to predict the future. But the strategy articulated by the QDR is one that department leaders and I believe is the right strategy given the reality we face. There are difficult decisions ahead, but there are also opportunities. We have an opportunity to reshape our defense enterprise to be bet ter prepared, positioned, and equipped to secure Americas interests in the years ahead memory is tested using a series of words, such as apple and record which appear in a long list of words. Then the program asks if apple or knife was in that list. The test results are maintained in case the individual receives another blow to the head. If that happens, the tests are repeated to look for changes. All Duval and Nassau county high school and middle school athletes, including cheerleaders, are provided ImPACT testing thanks to a grant from the Jacksonville Sports Medicine Program (JSMP). The problem is that since the programs inception in 2012, only 3,309 athletes out of 16,000 in the Duval County Public Schools have been tested. This is according to Robert Sefcik of JSMP. A doctor could access the stored information from a baseline concussion test to decide if an ath lete should have further concussion testing after another head injury to help determine treat ment and when the ath lete is eventually ready to return to play. In the interview with Jeanne Blalock Mark Brunell said parents should demand that their schools join in the ImPACT program. The JSMP test givers will come to the school to help at no charge. Brunell said at See ImPACT, Page 3

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Episcopal, hes seen what a benefit the base line testing can be. Episcopal student Tatum Thompson said in the interview that shes extremely thankful for the ImPACT testing because she would not have known she had a concussion due to cheerleading. As part of the program she was allowed to freeze her grades until the doctor cleared her to fully return to her activities. Now because of the concussion she has switched to rowing. Dr. Kantor says, Concussion is traumat ic brain injury. Period. And, yes, he says, it can cause bad grades. Students with concus sions have watched their grades drop in some cases several let ter grades. Dr. Kantor added that the concus sion literally shakes up your head and shakes the circuitry that gets these good grades. Thats why proper recovery is critical. But you cant recover if you dont know you have a concussion. JSPM employees will begin the next round of ImPACT testing in April. The First Coast News story provided additional information on testing in St. Johns and Clay Counties. In St. Johns County, schools handle baseline testing on a school-by-school basis. In Clay County, Director of Secondary Education, Michael Wingate, said, ...we would like to pro vide the ImPACT service to all of our student/ athletes, but that is not financially feasible. However, funding from Orange Park Medical Center provides free testing to male and female soccer and football play ers. The story also reported that if your child is a student in either Duval or Nassau school districts, then you can contact the childs high school or middle school to ask about ImPACT testing. The test is normed for ages 10-59. Before talking to your school or coach or trainer, you might want to do additional research on this timely topic. For more information on the ImPACT Concussion Management Model, go to www.impacttest.com/ about/?ConcessionManagement-Model-3. And while some schools only test con tact sports based on the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, you may come to a dif ferent conclusion after doing some research into the problem. Remember, concussions can occur in any sport or physical activity. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 2706289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2ImPACTNavy Releases New Mobile Game Resident of the Week-Photo courtesy BBCBeatty Communities would like to congratulate Vicent Sicilia who is the Resident of the Week! We appreciate the Sicilia Family and all of our residents who live with Balfour Beatty Communities! Will you be the next Resident of the Week? For more details about the program, please call 904-270-8870.From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) Office released a mobile game March 3 as part of the Keep What Youve Earned campaign. Pier Pressure was designed to promote responsible drinking among Sailors by incorporating real-life choices in an entertaining work-and-play scenario. The app also enables all Sailors to have important alcohol-related resources at their fingertips 24/7, including a blood alcohol content (BAC) calculator and local taxi search. During the development of the Keep What Youve Earned Campaign, we heard from young, enlisted Sailors that the best way to reach them was through their mobile phones, said Dorice Favorite, Director of NADAP. Pier Pressure will help Sailors under stand how responsible drinking can keep their careers on track, and alternatively, how abus ing alcohol can lead to serious consequences. Favorite said the idea for the game came from the Sailors themselves, and NADAP engaged more than 110 Sailors in the testing process to make sure the app was both entertaining and educational. She explained that the goal of the game is to advance ones career, but play ers must make the right choices to be successful. In the game, the choices you make at the bar affect your skill level at work the next day, which in turn affects your players evaluation reports, said Mike Aukerman, Alcohol Program Manager at NADAP. Just like in real life, smart drink ing choices help advance your career, while poor choices can get you sep arated from the Navya.k.a. game over. Pier Pressure also features leaderboards, enabling players to compete with friends and shipmates. In addition to the game, the app pro vides resources to help Sailors drink responsibly in real life. The BAC calculator can help remind Sailors when they have had too much to drive, and the local taxi search can help them find a safe ride home. You can download the app now at the Apple iTunes (https://itunes. apple.com/us/app/pierpressure/id816367909? ls=1&mt=8) or Google Play (https://play. google.com/store/apps/ details?id=com.KWYE. PierPressure) app stores. For more information and to help promote responsible drinking within your command, you can access materi als and resources from NADAPs Keep What Youve Earned campaign, available at www. nadap.navy.mil. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Philippine Sea Arrives In TurkeyBy MC3 Abe McNattUSS Philippine Sea Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), attached to the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWBCSG), arrived in Aksaz, Turkey March 9, for a scheduled port call. The visit is the sec ond port call for the Philippine Sea this deployment. Im very excited to be in Turkey, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Steven Mestres-Junque. Im really looking forward trying the local food. I love trying new food, and want to try different things from all around the world. While in port Philippine Sea will take on fuel and supplies and Sailors will have an opportunity to take liberty. Tours will be provided by the ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office. Philippine Sea will also be hosting 10 Turkish officers for a luncheon, and tour of the ship including an SH-60R Seahawk helicopter demonstration. We look forward to meeting our Turkish counterparts and sharing a meal with good conversation, said Lt. Cmdr. Randolph Chestang, the ships executive officer. The luncheon will serve as an opportunity to strengthen partnerships and build camaraderie. Philippine Sea and other ships of the GHWBSCSG are on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet area of respon sibility. -Photos by MC3 Abe McNattElectronics Technician 2nd Class Sarah Parrish stands phone talker watch aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit. Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Aric Summers and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Kendal Clawson raise the ensign aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Aric Summers and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Kendal Clawson prepare for colors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece for a scheduled liberty port visit. Sailors man the rails aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. The guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece for a scheduled liberty port visit. Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Joel Lafferty handles line aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece. Seaman Recruit Martin Miles stands look out watch as USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit. Sailors hold a safety brief before setting sea and anchor to pull into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled liberty port visit aboard USS Philippine Sea (CG 58).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 Seaman Apprentice Omar Olivier, from New York, handles line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Boatswain's Mate Seaman Damaris Urena signals away a helicopter from the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Sailors handle mooring line aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as it pulls in to Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Sailors prepare to moor in Athens, Greece, aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Fire Controlman 3rd Class Stephen Ray mans the rails as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece, for a scheduled four-day liberty port visit. Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Kevin Smith inspects a fuel sample on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Quartermaster 3rd Class Blayne Nation, from Hereford, Texas, stands look out watch as USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) is piloted into Athens, Greece.

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Work Is Booming At EOD MayportBy Paige GnannThe Mirror editorWhen the phone rings at Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six Detachment Mayport, you can pretty much bet that there is going to be an interesting story on the other end. You know, like the time some divers found a World War II bomb lodged on the sea floor off the coast of Vero Beach and they had to dispose of it a mile off shore. Or the one about the unsuspecting kayak ers who stumbled upon an illumination hand grenade on a deserted beach. Then theres the time that a rusting 70 mm rocket was discovered in the Ogeechee River around Savannah. They have also headed down to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) to help the installation safely dis pose of unusable ammunition. The mission of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team is to eliminate hazards from ordnance, which jeopardize operations conducted in support of the national security strategy by providing combat-ready EOD forc es to the fleet. OIC Lt. Matthew Grove said the team goes to GTMO around once a month to perform routine disposal of degraded ammunition or when a hapless person stumbles upon practice bombs buried in the sand. The team of EOD technicians at Detachment Mayport are on call for ordnance response issues from Tallahassee eastward and down to the Bahamas, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay and Puerto Rico. On average the detachment receives around 100 calls a year, and deploys approximately 60 times. It definitely helps keep our skills honed, said Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Ryan Waller. It allows you to accomplish a wide vari ety of missions timely and safely. Recently, the team responded to the discovery of a 1,000-pound World War II practice bomb and a smaller 500-pound bomb in the waters off of Vero Beach. The team spent almost a week carefully excavat ing, and then disposing of, the bombs with the help of local emergency crews and law enforce ment. Navy EOD is the only EOD service that can handle ordnance in the water, because of div ing, said Senior Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Jonah Toy. Down in the Ocala National Forest is the Navys Pinecastle Impact Range. Owned by Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville, the range is a live ord nance impact area and is used by all services as a training area to teach pilots how to drop bombs. The range site has been utilized by all ser vices since the 1940s and it is not unusual for a World War II or Vietnam-era bomb to be uncovered on a windy or rainy day. When an old bomb pops up, or when a bomb fails to detonate on impact during cur rent day training, EOD is called in for disposal. Unless it is an emergency, EOD usually goes down to Pinecastle once a quarter. Their last trip down in February was to dispose of an old British MK1 bomb and 500 pound dud Mark 82 dropped during a recent training exercise. Retired Senior Chief Boatswains Mate (EOD) Chris Townsend retired from NS Mayport 13 years ago and now works at Pinecastle. He said he is grateful for the ser vice EOD Detachment Mayport provides to the site. By utilizing Mayport instead of a contractor to dispose of the ord nance, Pinecastle is able to quickly eliminate hazardous material, as well as provide additional training for the EOD techs. EOD mission sup port includes general ordnance handling, transportation, storage, disposal and/or safety missions, live fire training, range clearance and underwater ordnance testing. -Photos by Paige GnannExplosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class Gabriel Cantu of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Six Detachment Mayport, prepares his equipment during a planned disposal of ordnance at Pinecastle Impact Range. -Photos by Paige GnannSenior Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Jonah Toy and a civilian at Pinecastle Impact Range wire charges to old Vietnam era dummy bombs found at the range. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS New York Plots CourseUSS Taylor Departs SamsunFrom U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public AffairsUSS Taylor (FFG 50) departed the Turkish port of Samsun, March 7, for Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, for repairs fol lowing the Feb. 12 grounding incident. The ship was moved with the assistance of a tug from Donjon Towing Company. NSA Souda Bay was chosen as the closest location with the most robust U.S. Navy support and logistics infrastruc ture. Repairs to Taylor will include replacement of the propeller blades and propeller hub. Repairs are expected to take several weeks. Following completion of repairs, Taylor will continue its scheduled deployment in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. -Photos by MC2 Cyrus RosonQuarter Master Seaman Bryan Elam, left, observes Quarter Master Seaman Apprentice Natasha M. Rowell, right, charts a heading aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). New York is underway conducting routine training exercise. Seaman Apprentice Justinne Ivanitskiy looks through the big eyes for surface and air contacts aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21). New York is underway conducting routine training exercise.who use these services usually end up in whats commonly referred to as a debt trap. And despite each military service having agencies to financially help service members, there was a time when many of those caught in the debt trap were active-duty mem bers. As a way of pre venting service members from being caught in the payday loan debt trap, the NMCRS launched the Quick Assist Loan program for active-duty members. With the relief societys QAL program, the service member can forgo the budget pro cess and select repay ment terms of three to 10 months. While the maximum amount that could be taken out was $300 when it first started, that amount increased to $500 this past February. Although the society would like all to donate money to the fund drive, the goal is for 100 per cent contact to allow personnel the opportunity to help out Sailors and Marines and their fami lies in need. When Sailors and Marines fall on hard times, Society volun teers are there to help them get back on their feet, and you make that happen, said NMCRS President and Chief Executive Officer Admiral United States Navy (Ret.) Steve Abbot. From Page 1NMCRS THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

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Roosevelt Arrives In Split For Port VisitBy MC2 Justin WolpertUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe guided-missile destroy er USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) arrived in Split, Croatia for a routine, regularly scheduled port visit, March 8. The port visit is designed to continue Naval Forces EuropeAfricas efforts to strengthen maritime partnerships with European countries. In addi tion these visits improve maritime safety and security in the region. During the visit, Sailors will have the opportunity to meet with the people of Croatia and experience the rich culture and history the country has to offer. The entire crew is looking forward to our port visit in Split, Croatia, said Cmdr. Jay Clark, USS Roosevelts com manding officer. It is uncommon to have port visits so close after each other, but the crew is ready to see the beau tiful sights in Split. We are always proud to share the culture and tradition of the U.S. Navy with our partner coun tries and we plan to be gra cious guests as we enjoy the sights, food, and Croatian culture. Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. Sailors man the rails aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) during a routine port visit to Koper, Slovenia before heading to Split, Croatia on March 8. Roosevelt is on a scheduled deployment en route to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th fleet areas of responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Justin Wolpert 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS Simpson Arrives in CasablancaBy MC2 Tim D. GodbeeUSS Simpson Public AffairsThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Casablanca, Morocco, for a scheduled port visit, March 6. Simpsons visit serves to strengthen the exist ing partnership between Morocco and the U.S., and provide each other with opportunities for cultural exchanges. I am excited Simpson has been given anoth er opportunity to visit Casablanca and oper ate with the Royal Moroccan Navy, said Cmdr Christopher Follin, Simpsons command ing officer. Its not very often that one of our ships has the opportu nity to re-visit friends we made on a previous deployment. We are looking forward to building upon the cooperative efforts and interoperability in training that both of our Navies strength ened during our last visit. When we share ideas and learn to oper ate together, we become twice as strong a force to improve maritime safety and security for all nations in the region. During the visit, Simpson is sched uled to conduct a pass ing exercise with the Royal Moroccan Navy, hold office calls and gift exchanges with a num ber of Moroccan officials, host a reception, and conduct a community relations event with the Bennani Center Girls School. Every time we go out and do something for the communities we visit, we have a great time, said Ships Serviceman 1st Class Manuel Dulucgomez, Simpsons community relations event coordinator. The location we chose for this port visit gives us an opportunity to make a great impression on the youth of Morocco and hopefully well make a difference in their lives. As a part of the visit, Simpson Sailors will also have an opportuni ty to go on a number of tours through the ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation department, most notably a tour of the Hassan II Mosque, one of the largest mosques in the world. The ship stopped here on its last deployment, and Ive heard nothing but good things about it, said Yeoman Seaman Luis Burks. The culture here is very rich, and every corner you turn theres a piece of histo ry waiting to be learned about. Hopefully Ill be able to see it all while Im here. Simpson is on a scheduled deployment sup porting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. -Photo by MC2 Tim D. GodbeeA member of the visit, board, search and seizure team assigned to the Royal Moroccan Navy Floreal-class frigate Hassan II, left, searches a Sailor playing the role of a cargo ship crew member during a passing exercise aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56). cers who will not see an increase. This Budget does not propose to cut the pay or benefits for any active duty personnel. However, over the next five years the growth rates of base pay, BAH and other allowances will slow down. BAH while not being nominally cut, will slow in inflationary terms until it covers 95% of the average service members housing costs in 2017 and this will have the effect of reducing your purchasing power. Despite rumors over the last few months, no plans are in place to close a single commis sary. Locations overseas will continue to receive direct subsidies, and all commissaries will con tinue to operate rent free, paying no taxes and therefore providing taxfree groceries to customers. A reduction in the subsidy may cause price increases at locations in metropolitan areas, but still result in savings of roughly 15% compared to shopping in other grocery establishments. In regards to TRICARE costs, all active duty person nel will still have access to free health care and remain exempt from any fee increases. Those who wish to opt for private care will still be able to choose between mili tary treatment facilities, in-network, or out-ofnetwork care. They will however be asked to pay a little bit more in their deductibles and co-pays, but their benefits will still stay affordable and generous. The savings from these proposals will fund ini tiatives to ensure you are well-equipped, welltrained and compensat ed for future sea going challenges. Put another way-this money will go back into Quality of Life and Work initiatives to help maintain our cur rent Quality of Service. In our planning for post-war deployment practices, it was clear we needed to address sea duty incentives and compensation. Since 2001, Career Sea Pay has lost significant purchasing power, despite its importance to Sailors when deciding to stay Navy or take orders back to sea. To ensure we maintain the right skills in rigor ous sea-going billets, we updated our sea pay tables beginning this year (FY14) and includ ed money in next years budget to up Sea Pay and Sea Pay Premium, for eligible personnel: -A 25% increase in Career Sea Pay for all pay grades with at least 3 years of cumulative sea dutyin recognition of the greater than normal rigors of assignment to a ship. Sea Pay Premium will double to $200 per month for Sailors who serve more than 36 months of continuous sea duty. Also in this budget is money to fund Fleet Quality of Work initia tives. This includes funding for upgrades to berthing and barracks, additional funding for training, and money for purchase of tools and parts to improve readiness, reduce mainte nance time, and decrease the necessity to crossdeck spares from one deploying unit to the next. In short, the Presidents Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2015 capitalizes on efforts to stabilize personnel costs while pro viding you the incentives and resources necessary to serve with a high level of success and satisfaction. Please keep your questions coming-see you in the Fleet.From Page 1Budget THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

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FRCSE Announces Sailor Of The YearBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsAviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch has been selected as the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY). He is currently attached to FRCSE Detachment (DET) Mayport Ground Support Equipment (900) division where he works as division production control super visor, main production control supervisor and quality assurance (QA) leading petty officer (LPO). It is an honor to have represented FRCSE DET Mayport among Jacksonville and DET Key West, said Opdenbosch. However, the greatest honor is to have been selected as FRCSE Sailor of the Year. This accomplish ment serves as recognition of the hard work and performance of the entire detachment. Opdenbosch was selected as SOY for expertly managing the daily production efforts of 39 work centers in six divisions culminating in the training and qualifi cation of four production controllers. He spearheaded the DETs Naval Aviation Maintenance program (NAMP) base line system ensuring directive adherence through the detachment bringing 11 programs back to on-track status. He continually audits and monitors the divi sions and 42 NAMPs analyzing trends and implementing controls for compliance. He also acts as a collateral duty inspector and provides mentoring and guidance to the QA supervisor on QA and NAMP programs and procedures. A native of Barranquilla, Columbia, Opdenbosch moved to North Bergen, N.J. after graduating high school and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in April 1999. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill., he attended Aviation Support Equipment A School in Pensacola, Fla. Opdenbosch report ed to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in January 2000 where he was advanced to third and second class petty offi cer. In January 2004, he transferred to the Center of Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as a C school instructor. Two years later, Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE where he was selected Sailor of the Third Quarter. In January 2008, he transferred to Patrol Squadron TWO SIX (VP26) where he served as line division LPO, QA representative and maintenance control coor dinator/safe-for-flight supervisor. He advanced to first class petty officer. Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE Detachment Mayport in 2012. During his tour, he led four first class petty officers and one chief petty officer in completing production control qualifica tion, provided techni cal and NAMP support to the civilian maintenance detachment at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Andros Island, Bahamas. At DET Mayport, Opdenboschs collat eral duties include First Class Petty Officers Association president organizing events to raise money for the commands children holiday party and coordinating Adopt-A-Highway cleanups; command lead financial specialist; and AIRSpeed representative facilitating/instructing AIRSpeed and Lean Six Sigma concepts (Yellow/ Green Belt) to 76 officers and enlisted Sailors. While off duty, he enjoys spending time with his family, building and flying remote con trol airplanes, playing guitar and fishing. He is also currently working on his bachelors degree in technical manage ment with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. -Photo by Victor Pitts Aviation Machinist Mater 1st Class (AW) Christopher Chinery (left) and Aviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch verify a serial number on a cold section module that contains the compres sor of a T700 helicopter engine assembly at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (DET) Mayport Feb. 6. Opdenbosch, the Ground Support Equipment (900) division production control supervisor and Quality Assurance leading petty officer, is the FRCSE 2013 Sailor of the Year. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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USS Gettysburg Wins Gold AnchorBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) were awarded the fis cal year 2013 Retention Excellence Award Feb. 16. The Retention Excellence Award, or Golden Anchor Award, is presented to ships that demonstrate exem plary performance in command, program, procedures and policies throughout the fiscal year. Winning the Golden Anchor Award indicates that our Sailors have a good grasp on our career development program, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker, CMC aboard Gettysburg. This is a very proud moment for myself and the entire crew because it shows we are meeting the Navys standard of growth and development for Sailors. To be eligible for the Golden Anchor Award, per instruction, ships are required to meet multiple criteria. Some of the requirements include achieving 85 points or better on the annual career informa tion program review (CIPR), achieving 100 percent C-WAY on-time submission for eligible Sailors, and maintain ing 100 percent Navy wide advancement exam validations for results released during the fiscal year. We were able to achieve 100 percent on many of the award requirements which shows how much pride and dedication the crew takes in the career development of each Sailor, said Navy Counselor 1st Class (SW) Raymond Wiemer. Winning this award shows that we are taking care of our Sailors and setting them up for success. Ceremonially, ships that are recognized for winning the Golden Anchor Award paint their anchors gold and are permitted to fly the retention excellence award pennant as a symbol of their accomplish ments. Since Gettysburgs anchors are painted gold from winning the award the previous fiscal year, plans have been set to add a fresh coat, said Wiemer. Winning this award two years straight is a great accomplishment for Gettysburg and the crew, said Wiemer. Im confident that we can continue this trend going into the next fiscal year. Wiemer said he looks forward to returning to homeport displaying the ships painted gold anchors and hoisting the retention excellence award flag. Its going to be a exciting moment when we are able to show our family and friends the accomplishment of the ship when we return to homeport, said Wiemer. This award makes me proud to be on board serving the Gettysburg crew during deploy ment. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.100 Gettysburg Sailors Newly ESWS Qualified By MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonUSS Gettysburg Public AffairsSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) reached 100 enlisted surface warfare specialists (ESWS) qualifications while on deployment March 5. This achievement more than doubles the ships original goal of qualifying 50 Sailors during Gettysburgs 2013-2014 deployment in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Sailors dedicat ing the time and effort to become ESWS qualified is an amazing achieve ment for the entire ship, said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Daniel Hacker, CMC aboard Gettysburg. Im incredibly proud of each of them for the hard work they put forth to better themselves and their careers. To prepare sailors to acquire their ESWS pin, daily training focusing on various departmen tal topics is conducted throughout the ship, said Ships Serviceman (SW) 1st Class Trent Ramsey, an ESWS board member aboard Gettysburg. Ramsey said the training helps build confidence in Sailors shipboard knowledge. As deployed Sailors, it is important that we all know the capabilities of our ship, said Ramsey. It is our job to give junior Sailors the infor mation we know to bet ter inform them and help them move to the next level of achievement. Becoming an enlisted surface warfare special ist requires Sailors to obtain prerequisite qualifications prior to a preboard conducted by 1st class petty officers, and a final board conducted by chief petty officers, said Ramsey. The boards are in place to ensure sailors are retaining the infor mation they are receiv ing in training, said Ramsey. Its our job as board members to get them to the point where they are confident in their answers. Once they complete the boards and prove their knowledge, then they can train other junior Sailors. Ramsey said pinning 50 more Sailors is the goal aboard Gettysburg for the remainder of deployment. Our ultimate goal is to have every E-4 and senior Sailor return to Naval Station Mayport ESWS qualified, said Ramsey. The 100 Sailors who have taken the step to receive their pin shows that Gettysburg has a lot of hard working ambitious Sailors that care about their careers as well as their ship. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonSailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) receive their enlisted surface warfare specialist pins during an awards ceremony on the mess decks. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 2707205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transpor tation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hir ing process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judg ing experience and skills and much more. This program is highly rec ommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID) -Photo by Paige GnannEnsign Jacklynn Bush and members of the NS Mayport Public Affairs team judge photos taken by the kids at the Youth Activities Center as part of the annual 2014 Image Makers Photography Exhibit. The winning photos will be submitted for the regional competition.The Art Of Photography THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

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Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annu al Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxu sochilicookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. Lt. Dan Band Gary Sinise and The Lt. Dan Band will be performing at Deweys at NAS Jacksonville on Friday, March 28. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. This is a free concert. Please bring chairs and blankets. No outside food or drink permitted however, there will be concessions available. The kids zone will open at 6 p.m. For more information, call (904) 542-3491. A Salute To Women In The Military: Past & Present FestivalFriday, March 28 The Greater Jacksonville Area USO will be hosting a FREE festival honoring women in the military. The festival will be Friday, March 28 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Navy Federal across from the Yorktown Gate. There will be live music, appearances by Morgan Frazier and A&Es Rodeo Girls, jump houses, and much more including a presentation by Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, (Ret.). This festival is free an open to the public. Country Concert At MavericksTribute To Women In The Military Join us at Mavericks on Saturday, March 29 for a trib ute to women in the military hosted by A&Es Rodeo Girls. See Morgan Frazier, Jamie Davis, Rionn Page and concert headliner DARRYL WORLEY at Mavericks. See the attached flyer for more info. Tickets are on sale now at www.maverick satthelanding.com. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $25.00 for VIP. Active Duty, Retirees, and dependents receive $5 off with presenta tion of valid military I.D. card. Adventure Landing FunRaiser Mark your calendars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is hosting a FUNraiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per person ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be purchased at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retir ees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. 2014 Players Championships Birdies For Charity Your Greater Jacksonville Area USO is pleased to be participating in the 2014 PLAYERS Championship Birdies for Charity program. This unique communitybased fundraising initiative is held in conjunction with THE PLAYERS Championship at TPC Sawgrass, May 5-11, 2014. We encourage you to visit www.birdiesforcharity.play erschampionship.com, where you will have the opportuni ty to make a donation to your Greater Jacksonville Area USO AND to become eligible to win a fabulous grand prize! Upon making your donation, you will be asked to guess the total number of birdies that will be made during the competition rounds of the tournament. The individual who guesses the exact number of birdies made (or closet thereto) at the 2014 PLAYERS will win $5,000. In addition, the charity that the individual supports with their entry, will receive an additional $5,000 bonus. In the event of a tie, a tie-breaker question will be used to determine the win ner. Deadline for all entries is Wednesday, May 7. There is a computer resource center available to all service members with email, Internet and word pro cessing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, sup port groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projec tor are available for use. For more information about activities or meeting availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWSLearn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presentation on transition here, on March 31, from 8:3011 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The presentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environ The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presentation to teach the latest trends in transi tion to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and mar keting yourself. It also educates lead ers in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subor dinate, especially dur ing these times of force reductions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a deputy director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national head quarters in Alexandria, Virginia. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the FFSC at 270-6600, x1701. FFSC Classes Help Manage Navy LifeFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. March 13, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 17, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 17, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 March 18, 2 p.m.-3 p.m., PFM Forum, Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 19, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 20, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 Mar 24, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., IA (Individual Augmentee) Family Connection Group, USO March 24, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 24, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 24, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 March 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center March 26, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 26, 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Capstone Event (All Pay Grades), Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 26, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 27, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 27, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 31, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 31, 10 a.m.-Noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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