Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00337


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CHINFO Award Winner USS New YorkJudges Invention Convention Page 6 USS SimpsonMakes Stop in Spain Page 7 Phil Sea, RooseveltTransit the Straits Page 10 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Exercise Exercise Exercise NS Mayport Tests Response Skills See Story Pages 4-5TA Wants You To Spend MoneyBy Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Pro fessional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance (TA) requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education (VOLED) March 3. According to Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program direc tor, the expenditure rate for TA funding is cur rently below normal lev els, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use histori cal burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After furloughs and a govern ment shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 (FY-14) hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, direc tor of CPPD Support Site Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spend ing. He said FY-14 TA execution is currently trailing FY-13s execu tion rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things influenced our being below the TA budget right now, said Wadsorth. Our execu tion rate dropped in October with the gov ernment shutdown and thats carried through the year. The usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal budget. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased significantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benefits reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to contin ue to pursue their edu cation and submit their TA requests we work hard to allocate every TA dollar available to give Sailors the most oppor tunities to use their TA funding allotment for each fiscal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benefits so far this fiscal year and empha sized that a Sailors command is an important part of TA authorizations because theyre the first Tuition Assistance Program Funds Awaiting Sailors Use See Tuition, Page 11 -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Wyatt Chidester, left, shakes hands with Capt. Dan Uhls after relieving him as commanding officer of USS Hu City during a change of command ceremony held aboard the ship on Feb. 28. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Michael Gilday, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Eight pictured far right. Also pictured is CMDCM Jimmie Carter.New CO For USS Hue CityFrom StaffCapt. Wyatt Chidester relieved Capt. Dan Uhls as commanding officer of USS Hu City during a change of command ceremony held aboard the ship on Feb. 28. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Michael Gilday, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Eight. A native of Franklin, KY, Uhls graduated from Ole Miss in 1988 with a degree in history and was commissioned via the NROTC program. His assignments at sea include Damage Control Assistant and Machinery Officer in CG-26 Belknap (the SIXTHFLT Flagship, homeported in Gaeta Italy), Air Defense Officer in CG-71 Capt St. George, Operations Officer and Chief Engineer in DDG58 LABOON, Executive Officer in FFG-59 Kauffman, Chief Staff Officer to Commander, Destroyer Squadron SIX/ FORTY, Commanding Officer in PC-11 Whirlwind and DDG57 MITSCHER earning Battle Effectiveness Awards on both ships. Captain Uhls served as Air and Missile Defense Commander to Commander United Kingdom Carrier Strike Group (2008-2009) and Commander Carrier Strike Group EIGHT/IKESTRKGRU. He has deployed to Central, European, and Southern Command Areas of Operations 12 times. Ashore, he served as Reserve Component community Manager ,See CoC, Page 11Make Plans For MWR ExpoFrom StaffThe annual MWR Expo and Travel Show will be held on March 13 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference and Catering Center. This free, yearly event fea tures all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and services. In addition to travel and recre ation information booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and beverage sam ples from vendors as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, recre ation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attending. The MWR Expo and Travel Show is open to every one with access to Naval Station Mayport. For more information, call MWR Customer Service at 270-5228.

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ............................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Shipmates First off, I want to congratulate everyone involved in this years Exercise Citadel Shield/Solid Curtain. These exercises are designed to eval uate installation-level responses to a wide range of force protection situa tions. Over the past two weeks, representatives from on and off base have worked together to create reallife emergency scenarios to assess our responses. It takes considerable coordination and planning to bring this together and we certainly learned a lot throughout the process. I want to thank the Security Department, Personnel Support Detachment, Fire and Emergency Services and our Naval Branch Health Clinic for their partici pation in these exercises. And.special thanks to USS Vicksburg and Afloat Training Group for their help with the Solid Curtain portion of the exercise. Their participation was the highlight of this nation-wide exercise. On Tuesday, I joined Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Director Bill Kennedy and fund drive coordina tors from around the base to kick off the 2014 NMCRS Fund Drive. This amazing organization and its vol unteers have dedicated the past 110 years assisting our Navy and Marine Corps family with no interest loans and grants, financial counseling, visit ing nurse programs, Baby Boot Camps and many other services. Last year, Mayports active duty service mem bers raised $215,000 to help their shipmates in need. That is a great amount, but nowhere near the more than $837,000 loans and grants NMCRS Mayport distributed to 1,500 local families. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers hope, a chance for a rebound, and a solution to a dire situ ation without repercussions. NMCRS uses 100 percent of incoming dona tions for the benefit of its clients. The fund drive will be held between March 15-April 15. I highly encourage every one to find out more about this nonprofit organization and donate if you feel compelled. For more information about receiving help from the NMCRS, call (904) 270-5418 or visit their Web site at www.nmcrsmayport.org. For more information about the fund drive, contact RPC Hector Feliciano at 2705212 or hector.feliciano@navy.mil. I want to welcome Captain Wyatt N. Chidester and Commander Oscar Toledo to the Naval Station Mayport leadership team and wish fair winds and following seas to Captain Dan Uhls and Commander William Maske as they take on new assignments and responsibilities. Captain Chidester is returning to Mayport after serving as Director, Maritime Warfighting and Department Head Training (N73) and Director, Command-at-Sea Training (N75), Surface Warfare Officers School, Newport, Rhode Island. Welcome back to warmer weather! Commander Toledo served as HSL60s executive officer before assuming command and I look forward to the squadrons continued excellence under his leadership. The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Jonathan Greenert will be visiting Naval Station Mayport on March 18 to hold an all-hands call. The CNO is visiting to discuss the DoD bud get, reinforce ethics and get a sense of morale and fleet concerns in the Southeast Region. This is your chance to talk to the Admiral about your con cerns. I highly encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity. Another event to put on your cal endar is the annual MWR Expo and Travel Show scheduled for March 14 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Although I have not had the opportunity to attend this event, I have heard from many reliable sources that this is an event you dont want to miss. It features all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and ser vices. In addition to travel and rec reation information booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and beverage samples as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, recreation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attending. The MWR Expo and Travel Show is free and open to everyone with access to Naval Station Mayport. For more information, call MWR at 270-5228. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERReal Hope Can Be Found In Your FaithThis week many litur gical Christians have entered into the sea son of Lent with Ash Wednesday services held yesterday. For Christians, Lent is a season of thought ful reflection and humble service of Christ as we move forward towards Holy Week and culmi nate with the celebration of Christs resurrection on Easter Sunday. During Lent I like to reflect on the whole issue of hope. As a chaplain I often talk with people who have found themselves in a seemingly hopeless situation. It could be that their marriage is falling apart, or maybe a feel ing of financial hopeless ness, or possibly severe depression. There are a lot of events and situ ations that can lead someone to lose hope. However, in a strange sort of way God often uses seemingly hopeless situations to lead us to reflect on and find the only source of true hope. When I was enlisted in the army I had a room mate who was seriously depressed. His mar riage had fallen apart, he had medical issues and financial issues, and he was being discharged from service soon. It was hard for me not to get depressed being around him, and I am generally a pretty upbeat person. One day I saw him watching one of those Jerry Springer like shows on T.V. It was a so called greatest hits show and they were let ting all the people who worked behind the scenes tell their favorite scenes from the show. Well, my roommate proudly proclaimed I know that guy who worked behind the scenes. I was confused. He then told me that he had talked to him when he called the show to try to get on as a guest. He and his wife thought it would fix their marriage issues. I was flabbergasted that someone would look to the Jerry Springer show, or one like it, to save their marriage. A few days later, I got a $900 phone bill and noticed that there was over $800 in charges for calling the Psychic hotline. You guessed it. My roommate with no money had called the Psychic hotline to find out how to save his mar riage and what his future might hold. Of course, since he was leaving the military in a few days I got stuck paying most of the bill. I found myself think ing that if your only hope is Jerry Springer and the Psychic Hotline you have definitely reached the bottom of the barrel. In the end, as a Presbyterian minister, I understand that ultimate hope can only be found in Jesus Christ and not in anything that we can do for ourselves as sinful human beings. All of us have to find hope somewhere, for without hope there is little purpose to life. During this season of Lent I would challenge you to reflect on what gives you hope, and not just wishful thinking, but real, honest to good ness hope. True hope is an anchor for the soul. Dont be satisfied with anything less. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry CenterCoffee Chat At Jax Beach Elementary Supports Local Military FamiliesJacksonville Beach Gifted and Talented Magnet school hosted a Coffee Chat for par ents on Tuesday, March 4. The months topic Supporting Military Families provided prac tical information and resources for teachers and parents. An impor tant resource for the school is the U.S. Navys School Liaison Officer (SLO), Judy Cromartie. A major role of the SLO involves working with a schools counselor and teaching staff to sup port the social and emotional implications of the transitioning student: deployment and separa tion, building confidence and resiliency, and sup porting children through trauma and loss. To help bolster the SLOs role here in Duval County Public Schools, seven Military Family Life Counselors (MFLCs) were hired to work full-time with school counselors at no additional cost to the families or the school district. This free service is the result of a collab oration with The Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense Military Community and Family Policy, Duval County Public Schools, and N.S. Mayport and NAS Jax. The seven MFLCs assigned to work in area schools include the following: Finegan Elementary with school counselor Donna Davis, Mayport Elementary and Jax Beach Elementary with school counselors Melissa Hammond and Carla Forest-Crumley, at Mayport Middle with school counselor Adrienne Wakefield, Venetia Elementary and John Stockton Elementary with school counselors Natoria Campbell and Cheryle Roman, Oceanway Middle and San Mateo Elementary with school counselors Amelia Williams and Duane Monte, KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Berlin Elementary and Sheffield Elementary with school counsel ors Marisa Negron and Ginger Brown, and Enterprise Learning Academy and Chimney Lakes Elementary with school counselors Ellen Golden and Shelia Handress The MFLC services are designed to offer extra support to assist with the unique challenges which military families experience. Military Family Life counselors are licensed clinicians who have demonstrated expertise in working with children. They can provide short-term nonmedical counseling sup port in a variety of dif ferent ways: individual meetings with children, presentations about life skills issues, skillbuilding group discus sions, and meetings with parents and families at the familys request for additional counseling/ coaching support. While meeting with children, MFLCs always remain in line of sight of a teacher, staff member, or a par ent. The primary focus of the Military & Family Life Counseling Program is prevention, education, and counseling support. The services are pro vided confidentially and no case records or docu mentation is kept. The counselors do not assess or diagnose, and when they encounter more in depth issues/diagnoses, they offer to connect military families with other helping agencies avail able on the installation or in the community. Some of the common issues that CYB MFLCs help with include the following:See Support, Page 3

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Stress management and coping skills Anger management/conflict resolu tion Deployment and reintegration issues Feeling associated with separation and divorce Grief and loss reactions Leadership skills Communication skills Self-esteem and confidence All military families at these area schools are given the opportunity to consent for their children to participate in this free service or to opt-out. For more information about MFLC services at your neighborhood school, you can contact your school to request the direct number for the MFLC on cam pus. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2SupportNEX Mayport Sells NMCRS Benefit Sales Ticket To Support Fund DriveFrom NEXCOMFrom March 1 April 27, customers at select NEXs, including Naval Station Mayport and NAS Jacksonville, will be able to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) by purchasing a $5 benefit sale ticket. The benefit sales ticket will entitle customers to specific percent-off dis counts for a one-time purchase on either April 25 27. As it has been done for the past several years, the entire $5 donation will be passed onto NMCRS on behalf of customers. The ben efit sales ticket entitles customers to tiered dis counts depending on the type of merchandise with some exclusions. Merchandise storewide is 10 percent off, but excludes merchandise previously purchased, existing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alco holic beverages, elec tronics, cameras, com puters, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DVDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic. The discount also cannot be applied to purchases made on MyNavyExhange.com, any gift cards or prepaid cards, Autoport ser vices and the Exchange Catalog. The benefit sales tick et also offers 10 percent off the entire stock of fine jewelry, excluding Rolex watches, Omega watches, Maui Divers and Pandora jewelry. With the benefit ticket, customers will receive 20 percent off the entire stock of regular priced apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses. Already reduced furniture with prices ending in .94, .96 or .97 will be 30 percent off. The maximum discount for any transaction is $250. NEXs participating in this event include NEX Norfolk, Oceana, Portsmouth and Little Creek, Va.; NEX Pearl Harbor; NEX San Diego, North Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore and Monterey, Calif.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill., NEX Mayport, Pensacola, Jacksonville, Orlando, Whiting Field and Key West, Fla.; NEX Bangor, Everett, Whidbey Island and Bremerton, Wash.; NEX Newport, R.I.; NEX Gulfport, Memphis and Meridian, Miss.; NEX Patuxent River, Bethesda and Annapolis, Md.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Corpus Christi, Texas; NEX Belle Chasse New Orleans, La.; NEX Charleston, S. C.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Fallon, Nev.; NEX Mitchel Field, N.Y.; NEX Naples, Italy; NEX Sigonella, Sicily; NEX Rota, Spain; NEX Yokosuka, Sasebo and Atsugi, Japan; NEX Bahrain; and NEX Guam. Midway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous his torical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speaker is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and Veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipi ents and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emo tional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jack et optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-7182118 or bpricex4@comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or emailing anuday00@ aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyChief Master-At-Arms James Watkins plays the role of an active shooter during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week anti-terrorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated Force Protection Conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people.By MC1 Michael Wiss and Lt.j.g. John RosaNPASE Detachment Southeast and ATG MayportThe Naval Station Mayport personnel put their force protection and antiterrorism skills to the test during the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 exercise Feb. 20-28. SC/CS 14 is a Force Protection exercise con ducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy installations in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security person nel as well as establish a learning environment for security personnel to exercise functional plans and operational capabili ties. According to Naval Station Mayport Antiterrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak, this exercise showcases the Mayport team working with other tenant com mands and civilian agencies in the event of a crisis situation. We have to train our folks to be prepared for any crisis situation on short notice, he said. We need to be able to work with other tenant commands, ships and other agencies to be on the lookout for terrorist activity. We take every threat seriously, with other situations that have happened in the world, you have to be ready because you can never tell where the threat might come from. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emergency. The Citadel Shield of the Mayport exer cise involved an active shooter who killed and injured several personnel and held three people hostage. The Mayport NCIS team used nego tiation tactics to be able to overtake the assailant and defuse the situation. Solid Curtain is an exercise focused on command, control, and communication (C3) between all echelons Navy wide. The Solid Curtain por tion involved a small boat attack on USS Vicksburg (CG-69) homeproted at Naval Station Mayport. The attack was much like that of USS Cole (DDG-67) bombing which killed 17 Sailors and injured 39 others on October 12, 2000. According to USS Vicksburg Operations Officer Lt Matthew Hamm, the exercise was a great opportunity to test the readiness of the ships security team. This drill is an excel lent opportunity to test our own organization, but also working with the base security depart ment as well as with agencies off the base, he said. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for a single ship to execute a real world situation, and how to respond to a casualty that we dont Exercise Exercise Exercise -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyChief Hospital Corpsman Noel Martinez briefs Branch Medical Clinic master-at-arms before the commencement of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyBase police officers conduct a sweep of Branch Medical Clinic during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyWatkins plays the role of an active shooter dur ing Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shoot er and hostage drill at PSD aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyNaval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) agents enter the Personnel Support Detatchment office aboard Naval Station Mayport during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hos tage drill. -Photo by Paige GnannAntiterrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak talks with Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, in the emergency operation center during the Citadel Shield exercise.See SC/CS, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleySailors aboard USS Vicksburg (CG 68) respond to a training casualty after a small boat attack exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. see or train for every day. Afloat Training Group Mayport supported Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield. ATG Mayport provided small craft OPFOR sup port, while conducting Basic Phase Training for USS Vicksburg. ATG Mayport trained the ship in Damage Control and Medical Training in a multi-faceted environ ment. These training opportunities are rare and not normally inte grated within the Afloat Training organization. This was a rare opportunity to see the integra tion ATG Mayport and base medical working closely to support a mis sion, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW/ FMF) Robert Bicanovsky, Afloat Training Group Mayports Medical Lead. I believe there were multiple lessons learned in patient tracking, patient movement and triage in a multi-casualty scenar io. These events will only improve our training and ultimately improve the ships response to real world events. Damage Control training was detailed and integrated throughout the scenario, added Chief Damage Controlman (SW) Shimran Ali, Afloat Training Group Mayports Damage Control Lead. During the drills we were able to train in all aspects of firefighting, flooding and quick actions respons es. Being able to utilize recharging stations on the pier and base services in conjunction with continued shipboard firefight ing efforts was a unique training environment. Training is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department. According to Novak, year round training keeps everyone working togeth er as a team to help counter any crisis situation. We have to per form continuous train ing because the players change with Navy turn over, he said. The best thing we get out of this is to critique what we did right and what we did wrong. Hopefully we can continue to improve readiness and learn what needs to be done to han dle any crisis situation.From Page 4SC/CS -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyAfloat Training Group Mayport simulates a small boat attack during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week antiterrorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated force protection conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyHospital Corpsman from Branch Medical Clinic at Naval Station Mayport assist Sailors from USS Vicksburg (CG 68) in a mass casualty training exer cise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleySailors aboard USS Vicksburg (CG 68) respond to a training casualty after a small boat attack exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg Sailors are comforted by Chaplain Calvin Gardner at the first triage area aboard the ship during the Solid Curtain exercise on Feb. 27. Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) prepare to fight a fire during a training exercise part of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by GSM3 Hillary HicksNaval Station Mayport Fire and Emergency Services coordinates damage control efforts during the Solid Curtain Exercises.-Photo by MC2 Marcus Stanley

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USS New York Sailors Judge School Invention ConventionBy MC3 Angus BecklesUSS New York Public AffairsA group of 13 Sailors from the amphibi ous transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) judged a number of projects and inventions at Jacksonville Beach Elementary Schools Invention Convention recently. The judging is New Yorks first event as part of its Adopt-A-School Program as part of its Community Relations (COMREL) program. The program is a good opportunity for New York Sailors to be mak ing their mark in the Mayport/Jacksonville area, said Lt. Justin Bernard, the ships chaplain. Jacksonville Beach Elementary was the school that wanted New York as their ship and this was a great oppor tunity for us to reach out to the community and enjoy some of the cre ativity our young citizens are producing. A total of 24 inven tions were on display for the Sailors to judge. The young inventors ranged from kindergarten to third grade. This was fun! said Hospital Corpsman Danielle Tannous. Its just cool to see how young minds process things to come up with new ideas to make lives easier or just being cre ative and having fun with their projects. Praga Shah and Rana Shaban, members of the schools Parent Teachers Association, spearhead ed the organization of the convention. Students are asked to volunteer and to invent some thing that they feel there is need or improve on something that has been already invented. They are given guidelines and a packet to fill out. Its a great learning experience because the lower grades dont really have a science fair so this a learning experience and a step into the sci ence world where they learn some of the termi nology, said Shah. Its really exciting and a lot of work that goes into it from both kids and par ents and they are very excited to present and see their projects on dis play. This is the third con secutive year we have had Navy personnel judging and we enjoy having them here, said Shaban. They enjoy watching the new inven tions that the kids pres ent and we wanted to maintain the consisten cy. New York recently shifted homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., as part of a larger move of an amphibious ready group homeport change in support of strategic maritime dis persal. -Photos by MC3 Angus BecklesReligious programs specialist second class Jeremy Galton from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) tries out one of the inventions on display at Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. New York chose JBE as her school for its Adopt-A-School Program as part of its Community Relations (COMREL) Program. Hospital Corpsman Danielle Tannous and Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Thionta Buckner from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) reads to a group of students at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Alexander Maglaris from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) grades a project at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. Sailors from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) judges projects at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. OperationSpecialist 2nd Class Timothy Woelky from amphibi ous transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) grades a project at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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USS Simpson Arrives In CartagenaBy MC2 Tim D. GodbeeUSS Simpson Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Cartagena for a scheduled port visit, Feb. 28. Simpsons visit serves to strengthen the exist ing partnership between Spain and the U.S. and allow Sailors an oppor tunity to experience Spanish culture first hand. During the visit, the ships leadership is scheduled to meet with Spanish Navy officials and Simpson is sched uled host a reception and ship tours. This is my first visit to Spain, so Im look ing forward to experi encing Spanish culture and interacting with the Spanish Navy, said Cmdr. Kenneth Anderson, Simpsons executive officer. It will be interesting to see the differences and similarities between our two navies. Its an out standing opportunity for our counties to interact on multiple levels. With Simpson near ing the end of its deploy ment, the visit gives its crew an opportunity to see southern Spain up close and in person. Ive been to parts of Spain in the past and enjoyed every second of it, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class Justin Vasquez, a crewmember aboard Simpson. I love the culture, scenery and most of all the great weather, he added. Im excited to get another opportunity to enjoy this beautiful country. Simpson is on a sched uled six-moth deploy ment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime and theater security opera tions. U.S. 6th Fleet, head quartered in Naples, Italy, conducts a full range of maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation missions in concert with coalition, joint, inter agency, and other par ties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. -Photo by MC2 Tim D. GodbeeThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) pulls away from USS Elrod (FFG 55) after a scheduled port visit to Augusta Bay before making its current port visit in Cartegena, Spain. Simpson is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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Wardogs Rise To The OccasionBy Ensign Jennifer Penley and Ensign Dyuti DasUSS Philippine Sea Public AffairsIts been a busy week on board USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). From gun shoots to air defense exercises, the crew has been on its toes since their departure on Feb. 15. First up was a gun exercise to demon strate the remark able capabilities of the warship. Successfully shooting the 5-inch guns and the ClosedIn Weapons System, the Gunners Mates set the tone for the rest of the week. After the gun shoot, the engineers trained to sharpen their response skills with a Main Space Fire Drill, a simulated fire drill in the main space engine rooms requiring much skill and technique in order to combat the fire. The middle of the week proved to be the real test for the crew with multi ple exercises to include Anti Surface Warfare exercises, a Rescue and Assistance drill, and continued wartime readiness drills to keep combat mission ready. Philippine Sea topped off the week with anoth er fire event and sea manship drills with USS Roosevelt and USS Truxton to practice maneuvering while fir ing shipboard weapons systems. Philippine Sea set the bar high for the rest of the group by hitting the inflatable target on the first try. Immediately after, the ships gathered in formation aroun dUSNS Big Horn for a photo exercise, requiring close quarters ship han dling and communica tion between them. The Wardogs contin ued with a simulated Search and Rescue exer cise. The ship closed out the day with an Air Defense Exercise that continued to prove her excellence in Air Defense. The Wardogs also sup ported HSM-70 through multiple flight quarters and landing qualifica tions to ensure the readi ness of both the pilots and the flight crew. Finishing off the week end, Philippine Sea spent a majority of Sunday replenishing fuel at sea. Pulling alongside USNS Big Horn proved to be a challenge due to rough seas. But like always, the crew of Philippine Sea got the job done just in time for the Wardogs to enjoy their weekly Sunday night Ice Cream Social. After an arduous day filled with the replen ishment at sea, the ice cream social really topped off the day and boosted my morale, said Quartermaster Seaman Seth Dubinski. Like Dubinski, the crew is also thankful to the Culinary Specialists and Supply Department who are able to keep the morale of the crew at high levels with popcorn nights and ice cream socials. Photo by MC3 Abe McNatt Quartermaster Seaman Seth Dubinski, left, from Janesville, Wis. and Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Ontario Williams from Grambling, La. handle line during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11 Learn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presentation on transi tion here, on March 31, from 8:30-11 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The pre sentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environment with the military drawdown, budget cuts and economic uncertainty, understanding how to manage your transition is more important than ever. The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presenta tion to teach the latest trends in transition to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and marketing your self. The purpose of our once-ayear visit is to supplement the terrific work the installation is doing with transition assis tance. ALL military personnel eventually transition to civil ian life. Therefore, this pre sentation is perfect for those who are considering separa tion or retirement. It also educates leaders in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subordinate, especially dur ing these times of force reduc tions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a depu ty director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia. The presentation is given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services nationally, and is universal ly praised by audiences as, up-to-date, motivational, and sharply focused a must attend . It includes comprehensive information on the retire ment decision itself, employer perceptions, your competi tion, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benefits packages, the current job mar ket, and other relevant and important transition topics. Its never too early to begin learning about your transition. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the Fleet and Family Suport Center at 904-270-6600, x1701. FFSC Workshops Available To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 27, 9 a.m.noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites profession als to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet train ing, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keep ing your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Anger Management Bldg Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep peo ple at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many peo ple, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relation ship, career and friend ship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. March 3, 1 p.m.2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 3, 10 a.m.-Noon, What About The Kids, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unin tended victims. A wide range of child adjust ment problems has been found to be associated with exposure to domes tic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behav ior, emotion, develop ment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their chil drens growth and devel opment and may provide an additional motivator for ending the violence and seeking intervention. March 3, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 3-7, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Victim Advocate Training Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 4-5, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m. Million Dollar Sailor Bldg 1 Room 702 March 4, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and develop ment way to cope with stress and make life style changes. March 5, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 5, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 6, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 6, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 10, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 10, 1 p.m.2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 10-14, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 11, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Welcome to The Military Bldg. 1 Room 702 Are you a new mili tary spouse or new to the area, this one day work shop provides valuable information on the mili tary lifestyle, benefits, finances and resources. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will present useful information to help you have a pleas ant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. March 12, 11 a.m.Noon, Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1 Room 719 March 12, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 12, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 13, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 step in the process after a Sailor sub mits a request. Its each commands responsibility to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are com fortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and process each Sailors TA request prompt ly, said DAntonio. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mission might not per mit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding offi cers decision, said DAntonio. DAntonio also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approv er prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruction. Often when we review a TA request, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA pre requisites such as a current education counseling by a Navy College Office (NCO) or Virtual Education Center (VEC) counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on file, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constantly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to submit their TA request. In fact, a TA applica tion can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. DAntonio also stressed that Sailors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educational goals. The VOLED team is here to help, bottom line. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. According to CPPD Commanding Officer Capt. John Newcomer, Navy leaders are committed to provid ing Sailors with voluntary education opportunities. We know that educated Sailors are strong performers with well-devel oped critical thinking skills and the ability to make informed decisions, said Newcomer. A college degree is an investment in a Sailor and a contributing factor in Navy mission accomplishment.From Page 1Tuitionat the Bureau of Naval Personnel and as the head of Full Time Support Assignments in Navy Personnel com mand. Uhls holds a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies with an empha sis in Asian Security Policy from the Army Command and General Staff College where he graduated highest dis tinction. Additionally, he holds a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College where he graduated with highest distinction. Chidester is a native of Iowa and entered the Navy in July 1979, promoted to Chief Operations Specialist in 1987, commissioned as a Limited Duty Officer in 1991, and converted to Unrestricted Line in 1996. From December of 1979 to December 1990, Chidester served in Naval Air Station Fallon, NV, destroyer Leftwich (DD 984), car rier Enterprise (CVN 65), Tactical Training Group Pacific, and on the staff of Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group, Three. Following his LDO commission, he served consecutive CIC Officer tours in USS Gridley (CG 21) and USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) completing two Middle East Force deployments in support of Operation Southern Watch and as the Assistant Surface Operations and Theater Missile Defense Officer on the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, in London, England. Chidester then served consecutive Operations Officer tours in USS Carney (DDG 64) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64) completing two deploy ments in support of USS John F. Kennedy and USS Enterprise Battle Group opera tions in the Sixth Fleet Area of Responsibility. He then moved on to United States Southern Command, Miami, Florida where he served as the Executive Assistant to the Director of Operations. His next assignment was Executive Officer in USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) completing one deployment to the Fifth Fleet Area of Responsibility support ing Commander, Joint Task Force 150 opera tions and the Global War on Terror. From December 2005 to January 2008, he served as the Assistant Surface Warfare Captain Detailer (PERS 41A), Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tennessee before mov ing on to command the Arleigh Burke Guided Missile Destroyer, USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98). Following his com mand tour, Captain Chidester served as Director, Maritime Warfighting and Department Head Training (N73) and Director, Commandat-Sea Training (N75), Surface Warfare Officers School, Newport, Rhode Island. From Page 1CoC A CFC participant provided as a public service. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today.

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12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 2707205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a brack et for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transpor tation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly rec ommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hir ing process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judg ing experience and skills and much more. This program is highly rec ommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 6: PreSeason Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 270-5451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and daz zling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music vid eos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID)

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No Dough Dinner Mayport USO will host a No Dough Dinner on March 10 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. JU Baseball Military Appreciation Game Come see an exciting game as the Jacksonville University Dolphins baseball team takes on the Indian Hoosiers on Friday, March 7. The game starts at 6:30 p.m. at the John Sessions sta dium located at 2800 University Blvd. North. All military personnel will receive free admis sion for two with valid military I.D. Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annual Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxusochili cookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. A Salute To Women In The Military: Past & Present Festival The Greater Jacksonville Area USO will be hosting a FREE festival honoring women in the military. The festival will be Friday, March 28th from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Navy Federal across from the Yorktown Gate. There will be live music, appearances by Morgan Frazier and A&Es Rodeo Girls, jump houses, and much more including a presentation by Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, (Ret.). This festival is free an open to the pub lic. Country Concert At MavericksTribute To Women In The Military Join us at Mavericks on Saturday, March 29th for a tribute to women in the military hosted by A&Es Rodeo Girls. See Morgan Frazier, Jamie Davis, Rionn Page and concert headliner Darryl Worley at Mavericks. See the attached flyer for more info. Tickets are on sale now at www. mavericksatthelanding. com. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $25.00 for VIP. Active Duty, Retirees, and dependents receive $5 off with presentation of valid military I.D. card. Adventure Landing Fun-RaiserTickets On Sale Mark your calen dars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is host ing a FUN-raiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per per son ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be pur chased now at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retirees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that intro duces participants to all aspects of the mili tary lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the opportunity to estab lish a peer network, acquire knowledge and develop skills neces sary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for baby sitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old maga zines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fun draiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their spe cial day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service mem bers can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and predeployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Saturday, March 8 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Monday,March 10 Join Lavilla School of the Arts Drama Department for a day of fun and golfing with an 8:30 a.m. shot gun start at the Hidden Hills Country Club. For more information or to become a sponsor call 635-2315 or go to www. lavilladrama.org Thursday, March 13 A Jacksonville Walk to End Alzheimers Welcome Meeting will be held from 1-2 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, Davis Gallery, 300 Water St., Jacksonville 32202. Learn about Walk to End Alzheimers and find out how you can get involved! If youre inter ested in marketing, team recruitment or retentions, logistics, securing prizes, sponsorship or volunteer recruitment, we would love to hear from you! RSVP (800) 272-3900 or mdrinks@ alz.org. Thursday, March 13 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Spring Gardening Tips Workshop from 6:30 8:30 p.m. The workshop will be located at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. This workshop will cover vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and much more. This is a free workshop. Please call 904-255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@ coj.net to pre-register. Saturday, March 15 Ever dreamed of get ting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a pho tographer at 10 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn techniques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Space is limited on this pro gram to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural his tory that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. March 15-16 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Confederate Garrison event on Saturday, March 15 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, March 16 from 9 a.m.-noon. This pro gram will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1861. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per per son Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Saturday, March 22 Container Gardening, Traditional and Passive Hydroponics, Recyle in the Garden.learn how to reuse, rein vent, rethink throwaway items for the gar den, and Grow Bucket Gardening how to make a low cost, water efficient and weed free vegetable growing system; to be held at the Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:00 a.m.-noon. Cost is $5 with Pre-registration and pre-payment being required. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. COMMUNITYCALENDAROUT IN TOWN THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Reserves Looking For Few Good PilotsBy MCCS William LoveladySubmittedThe Navy Reserve is searching for a few of the best pilots who are ready to leave active duty, but still looking to fly Navy. Just about every reserve squadron needs a constant flow of high ly qualified applicants, said Cmdr. Dave Bowen, the reserve component community manager for pilot accessions. A squadron with about 25 officers aboard needs one or two new acces sions a year, but if we have a zero year that becomes a problem. Reserve pilots are recruited by holding pilot selection boards. Squadrons that have positions to fill will send out a quarterly notice announcing the conven ing of a board. A lot of the pilots that apply have known about the squadrons for a long time by word of mouth and have already rushed the squadron by coming to visit on a drill weekend and introduc ing themselves, said Bartram. Its important for new pilots to visit the squadron and meet the wardroom in order to put faces with names and see if they are a good fit or not. Because of the long and costly training pipe line, there are no direct accessions for Navy Reserve pilots. They have to come from the fleet, and their skills are incredibly perishable. Our ideal candidate is a junior officer who just finished a tactical or instructor tour, said Bowen. We want to grab that pilot and his skills that were honed in the fleet and retain it in the reserve. Pilots who have been away from active duty for a few years, even if they are flying commercially, may not have the current skill sets needed to get back in the cockpit of an F/A-18 or F-5. Were not looking for people who barely meet standards. It is our job to provide experienced and well-qualified pilots to meet fleet and opera tional support require ments, said Bowen. Our reserve pilots are highly experienced oper ators and thats what the Navy needs from uswhether flying tacti cal missions in support of combatant command ers or flying in adversary squadrons to train our junior pilots just arriving in the fleet. The other challenge Bowen faces with bring ing new pilots to the Navy Reserve is the lack of awareness of the opportunities. No commanding offi cer wants to lose his best people, so when a pilot is considering leaving active duty, there may not be a lot of resourc es forthcoming, said Bowen. For some pilots the only exposure they have to the reserve com ponent is if the squadron has a reserve squadron augment unit. Bowen, a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, spent more than 10 years on active duty as an F/A-18 Hornet pilot and a T-45 Goshawk instructor. I transitioned to the reserves eight and a half years ago and started flying the F-5 Tiger, and began my department head tour at VFC-111 in Key West, Fla., said Bowen. Now Im the commanding officer of the 3rd Fleet Maritime Operations detach ment at Las Vegas, but I still fly as a guest pilot with VFC-111. For me, I get to enjoy the best of both worldsa civilian career in aviation, as well as continuing my Navy career flying fighters part time. One pilot who recently joined the Navy Reserve is Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows in Jacksonville, Fla. After serving almost nine years on active duty in the Navy, Leeds did an interservice trans fer from the Navy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Corps where she flew the WP-3D Orion; a modi fied P-3 used for collect ing weather information. After leaving NOAA, Leeds became an air interdiction agent/ pilot for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, before she joined the Navy Reserve in 2011. I found out about the reserves through numerous sources, but mainly other pilots from work, said Leeds. I went through a recruiter at the [Navy Operational Support Center] in Jacksonville and put a pilot package together that was given to VP-62. A big lesson learned is that I wished I had put in a package sooner. I encourage anyone that was active-duty to join the reserves. It is a great way to continue to serve your country. For those aviators coming toward the end of their active-duty commitments, transition ing to a reserve compo nent squadron is easier than one might imagine. There are open billets in almost every communi ty and squadrons regu larly hold pilot selection boards. The best time for a pilot to begin the pro cess is within six months of leaving active duty. Interested aviators are encouraged to contact the squadrons they are most interested in and find out the time of its next drill weekend. We encourage any one interested in joining a reserve squadron to come to a drill weekend, meet the pilots, the commanding officer and get a feel for the commute if they arent planning to live local, Bowen said. This is a chance to talk to fellow aviators who have recently joined the squadron and get a lot of questions answered on issues like pay and ben efits, expectations, and work-life balance. Pilot selection boards are usually held at the wing-level at least twice annually. Reserve squadron commanding offi cers and senior reserve pilots typically review applicant records and make recommendations to the air wing com mander before billets are offered to the selectees. Consideration is given to officer and tactical per formance, recent experience, and willingness to meet participation expectations. Selected aviators should then contact the career transition office at the Bureau of Naval Personnel and request assistance in affiliating with the Navy Reserve. The transition office will work with reserve squadrons and manage the required paperwork for transfer to the desired reserve component. Newly selected reserve aviators can expect a short period of active duty orders to complete the basic familiarization and tactical training syl labus on their new air craft, if required. Once this is completed, partic ipation requirements will vary according to squadron and mission. Many reserve squadrons have recently seen a decline in qualified applicants because many aviators are remaining on active duty, combined with a general lack of aware ness in reserve squadron opportunities. We understand that there are a few miscon ceptions and a lot of unanswered questions concerning being a part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Were try ing to get the word out that these are some of the best opportunities to stay in the cockpit and enjoy the ready room camaraderie part time. Some of the recurring questions highlighted in recent years are: rons are out there, and how do I apply? a reserve squadron in order to be selected? airline pilot to make the commute work if I dont want to live local? month will I be expected to be at the squadron? I dont want to be away from my family for too long--thats why I left active duty. patch wearer to be considered for one of the tactical squadrons? retirement and what other benefits will I receive? The answers to these questions might sur prise you, said Bowen. The bottom line is that we have reserve aviators from a variety of civil ian professions living all over the country. There are a lot of resources available to get guys to the squadron and most are flexible with indi vidual participation con cerns. Commander, Navy Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR), has commu nity managers for the Tactical Support Wing which flies F/A-18, F-5, EA-6B/EA-18G aircraft and the Fleet Logistics Support Wing which flies the C-40A, C-37, C-20, and C-130 air craft. CNAFR also has two VP squadrons which fly P-3C and three heli copter squadrons which fly the HH-60H and the SH-60B. Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) also offers reserve avia tors and flight officers the opportunity to train aviators. If youre inter ested in flying with the Navy Reserve, reach out to one of the squadrons which can direct you to a community manager. We hope to make the entire Naval Aviation community more aware of the close support relationship that exists between the active and reserve components and let aviators know about the benefits of being part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Pilots coming off of active duty have the tactical and instructional skills that we want to retain and in return give them the enjoyment and quality of service to our country that is unmatched in any civilian job. -Photo by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinLt. Tim Berryhill, a former USMC C-130 pilot and now a reservist with the VR-62 Nomads, climbs his aircraft past Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. -Photo by MCCS William LoveladyLt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows, joined the Navy Reserves after nine years of active duty service with the Navy. Together, we will defeat deadly childhood diseases. St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott A CFC Participant provided as a public service.

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CHINFO Award Winner USS New YorkJudges Invention Convention Page 6 USS SimpsonMakes Stop in Spain Page 7 Phil Sea, RooseveltTransit the Straits Page 10 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Exercise Exercise Exercise NS Mayport Tests Response Skills See Story Pages 4-5TA Wants You To Spend MoneyBy Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance (TA) requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education (VOLED) March 3. According to Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program direc tor, the expenditure rate for TA funding is cur rently below normal lev els, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use historical burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After furloughs and a government shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 (FY-14) hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, direc tor of CPPD Support Site Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spend ing. He said FY-14 TA execution is currently trailing FY-13s execu tion rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things influenced our being below the TA budget right now, said Wadsorth. Our execu tion rate dropped in October with the gov ernment shutdown and thats carried through the year. The usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal budget. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased significantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benefits reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to contin ue to pursue their edu cation and submit their TA requests we work hard to allocate every TA dollar available to give Sailors the most oppor tunities to use their TA funding allotment for each fiscal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benefits so far this fiscal year and empha sized that a Sailors command is an important part of TA authorizations because theyre the first Tuition Assistance Program Funds Awaiting Sailors Use See Tuition, Page 11 -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Wyatt Chidester, left, shakes hands with Capt. Dan Uhls after relieving him as commanding officer of USS Hu City during a change of command ceremony held aboard the ship on Feb. 28. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Michael Gilday, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Eight pictured far right. Also pictured is CMDCM Jimmie Carter.New CO For USS Hue CityFrom StaffCapt. Wyatt Chidester relieved Capt. Dan Uhls as commanding officer of USS Hu City during a change of command ceremony held aboard the ship on Feb. 28. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Michael Gilday, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Eight. A native of Franklin, KY, Uhls graduated from Ole Miss in 1988 with a degree in history and was commissioned via the NROTC program. His assignments at sea include Damage Control Assistant and Machinery Officer in CG-26 Belknap (the SIXTHFLT Flagship, homeported in Gaeta Italy), Air Defense Officer in CG-71 Capt St. George, Operations Officer and Chief Engineer in DDG58 LABOON, Executive Officer in FFG-59 Kauffman, Chief Staff Officer to Commander, Destroyer Squadron SIX/ FORTY, Commanding Officer in PC-11 Whirlwind and DDG57 MITSCHER earning Battle Effectiveness Awards on both ships. Captain Uhls served as Air and Missile Defense Commander to Commander United Kingdom Carrier Strike Group (2008-2009) and Commander Carrier Strike Group EIGHT/IKESTRKGRU. He has deployed to Central, European, and Southern Command Areas of Operations 12 times. Ashore, he served as Reserve Component community Manager ,See CoC, Page 11Make Plans For MWR ExpoFrom StaffThe annual MWR Expo and Travel Show will be held on March 13 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference and Catering Center. This free, yearly event fea tures all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and services. In addition to travel and recre ation information booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and beverage samples from vendors as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, recre ation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attending. The MWR Expo and Travel Show is open to every one with access to Naval Station Mayport. For more information, call MWR Customer Service at 270-5228.

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ...............................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Shipmates First off, I want to congratulate everyone involved in this years Exercise Citadel Shield/Solid Curtain. These exercises are designed to eval uate installation-level responses to a wide range of force protection situa tions. Over the past two weeks, representatives from on and off base have worked together to create reallife emergency scenarios to assess our responses. It takes considerable coordination and planning to bring this together and we certainly learned a lot throughout the process. I want to thank the Security Department, Personnel Support Detachment, Fire and Emergency Services and our Naval Branch Health Clinic for their partici pation in these exercises. And.special thanks to USS Vicksburg and Afloat Training Group for their help with the Solid Curtain portion of the exercise. Their participation was the highlight of this nation-wide exercise. On Tuesday, I joined Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Director Bill Kennedy and fund drive coordina tors from around the base to kick off the 2014 NMCRS Fund Drive. This amazing organization and its vol unteers have dedicated the past 110 years assisting our Navy and Marine Corps family with no interest loans and grants, financial counseling, visit ing nurse programs, Baby Boot Camps and many other services. Last year, Mayports active duty service mem bers raised $215,000 to help their shipmates in need. That is a great amount, but nowhere near the more than $837,000 loans and grants NMCRS Mayport distributed to 1,500 local families. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers hope, a chance for a rebound, and a solution to a dire situation without repercussions. NMCRS uses 100 percent of incoming dona tions for the benefit of its clients. The fund drive will be held between March 15-April 15. I highly encourage every one to find out more about this nonprofit organization and donate if you feel compelled. For more information about receiving help from the NMCRS, call (904) 270-5418 or visit their Web site at www.nmcrsmayport.org. For more information about the fund drive, contact RPC Hector Feliciano at 2705212 or hector.feliciano@navy.mil. I want to welcome Captain Wyatt N. Chidester and Commander Oscar Toledo to the Naval Station Mayport leadership team and wish fair winds and following seas to Captain Dan Uhls and Commander William Maske as they take on new assignments and responsibilities. Captain Chidester is returning to Mayport after serving as Director, Maritime Warfighting and Department Head Training (N73) and Director, Command-at-Sea Training (N75), Surface Warfare Officers School, Newport, Rhode Island. Welcome back to warmer weather! Commander Toledo served as HSL60s executive officer before assuming command and I look forward to the squadrons continued excellence under his leadership. The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Jonathan Greenert will be visiting Naval Station Mayport on March 18 to hold an all-hands call. The CNO is visiting to discuss the DoD bud get, reinforce ethics and get a sense of morale and fleet concerns in the Southeast Region. This is your chance to talk to the Admiral about your concerns. I highly encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity. Another event to put on your cal endar is the annual MWR Expo and Travel Show scheduled for March 14 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Although I have not had the opportunity to attend this event, I have heard from many reliable sources that this is an event you dont want to miss. It features all the latest information from regional travel destinations including resorts, hotels and theme parks, along with MWR Mayport programs and services. In addition to travel and rec reation information booths, the Expo will also have popular base services on hand such as FFSC, Navy College, NEX, Commissary, Navy Lodge, The Mirror and Navy Federal Credit Union. Event participants will enjoy free food and beverage samples as they visit the various information booths. Giveaway items, to include hotel stays, theme park tickets, recreation equipment, gift cards and baskets, will be available to those attending. The MWR Expo and Travel Show is free and open to everyone with access to Naval Station Mayport. For more information, call MWR at 270-5228. Please continue sending your sug gestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERReal Hope Can Be Found In Your FaithThis week many litur gical Christians have entered into the sea son of Lent with Ash Wednesday services held yesterday. For Christians, Lent is a season of thought ful reflection and humble service of Christ as we move forward towards Holy Week and culminate with the celebration of Christs resurrection on Easter Sunday. During Lent I like to reflect on the whole issue of hope. As a chaplain I often talk with people who have found themselves in a seemingly hopeless situation. It could be that their marriage is falling apart, or maybe a feeling of financial hopelessness, or possibly severe depression. There are a lot of events and situations that can lead someone to lose hope. However, in a strange sort of way God often uses seemingly hopeless situations to lead us to reflect on and find the only source of true hope. When I was enlisted in the army I had a room mate who was seriously depressed. His mar riage had fallen apart, he had medical issues and financial issues, and he was being discharged from service soon. It was hard for me not to get depressed being around him, and I am generally a pretty upbeat person. One day I saw him watching one of those Jerry Springer like shows on T.V. It was a so called greatest hits show and they were let ting all the people who worked behind the scenes tell their favorite scenes from the show. Well, my roommate proudly proclaimed I know that guy who worked behind the scenes. I was confused. He then told me that he had talked to him when he called the show to try to get on as a guest. He and his wife thought it would fix their marriage issues. I was flabbergasted that someone would look to the Jerry Springer show, or one like it, to save their marriage. A few days later, I got a $900 phone bill and noticed that there was over $800 in charges for calling the Psychic hotline. You guessed it. My roommate with no money had called the Psychic hotline to find out how to save his marriage and what his future might hold. Of course, since he was leaving the military in a few days I got stuck paying most of the bill. I found myself think ing that if your only hope is Jerry Springer and the Psychic Hotline you have definitely reached the bottom of the barrel. In the end, as a Presbyterian minister, I understand that ultimate hope can only be found in Jesus Christ and not in anything that we can do for ourselves as sinful human beings. All of us have to find hope somewhere, for without hope there is little purpose to life. During this season of Lent I would challenge you to reflect on what gives you hope, and not just wishful thinking, but real, honest to goodness hope. True hope is an anchor for the soul. Dont be satisfied with anything less. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry CenterCoffee Chat At Jax Beach Elementary Supports Local Military FamiliesJacksonville Beach Gifted and Talented Magnet school hosted a Coffee Chat for par ents on Tuesday, March 4. The months topic Supporting Military Families provided prac tical information and resources for teachers and parents. An impor tant resource for the school is the U.S. Navys School Liaison Officer (SLO), Judy Cromartie. A major role of the SLO involves working with a schools counselor and teaching staff to sup port the social and emotional implications of the transitioning student: deployment and separa tion, building confidence and resiliency, and sup porting children through trauma and loss. To help bolster the SLOs role here in Duval County Public Schools, seven Military Family Life Counselors (MFLCs) were hired to work full-time with school counselors at no additional cost to the families or the school district. This free service is the result of a collab oration with The Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense Military Community and Family Policy, Duval County Public Schools, and N.S. Mayport and NAS Jax. The seven MFLCs assigned to work in area schools include the following: Finegan Elementary with school counselor Donna Davis, Mayport Elementary and Jax Beach Elementary with school counselors Melissa Hammond and Carla Forest-Crumley, at Mayport Middle with school counselor Adrienne Wakefield, Venetia Elementary and John Stockton Elementary with school counselors Natoria Campbell and Cheryle Roman, Oceanway Middle and San Mateo Elementary with school counselors Amelia Williams and Duane Monte, KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Berlin Elementary and Sheffield Elementary with school counsel ors Marisa Negron and Ginger Brown, and Enterprise Learning Academy and Chimney Lakes Elementary with school counselors Ellen Golden and Shelia Handress The MFLC services are designed to offer extra support to assist with the unique challenges which military families experience. Military Family Life counselors are licensed clinicians who have demonstrated expertise in working with children. They can provide short-term nonmedical counseling sup port in a variety of dif ferent ways: individual meetings with children, presentations about life skills issues, skillbuilding group discus sions, and meetings with parents and families at the familys request for additional counseling/ coaching support. While meeting with children, MFLCs always remain in line of sight of a teacher, staff member, or a par ent. The primary focus of the Military & Family Life Counseling Program is prevention, education, and counseling support. The services are provided confidentially and no case records or documentation is kept. The counselors do not assess or diagnose, and when they encounter more in depth issues/diagnoses, they offer to connect military families with other helping agencies avail able on the installation or in the community. Some of the common issues that CYB MFLCs help with include the following:See Support, Page 3

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Stress management and coping skills Anger management/conflict resolu tion Deployment and reintegration issues Feeling associated with separation and divorce Grief and loss reactions Leadership skills Communication skills Self-esteem and confidence All military families at these area schools are given the opportunity to consent for their children to participate in this free service or to opt-out. For more information about MFLC services at your neighborhood school, you can contact your school to request the direct number for the MFLC on cam pus. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.From Page 2SupportNEX Mayport Sells NMCRS Benefit Sales Ticket To Support Fund DriveFrom NEXCOMFrom March 1 April 27, customers at select NEXs, including Naval Station Mayport and NAS Jacksonville, will be able to show their support for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) by purchasing a $5 benefit sale ticket. The benefit sales ticket will entitle customers to specific percent-off dis counts for a one-time purchase on either April 25 27. As it has been done for the past several years, the entire $5 donation will be passed onto NMCRS on behalf of customers. The benefit sales ticket entitles customers to tiered dis counts depending on the type of merchandise with some exclusions. Merchandise storewide is 10 percent off, but excludes merchandise previously purchased, existing layaways, special orders, tobacco, alco holic beverages, elec tronics, cameras, com puters, video games and systems, uniforms, gas, DVDs, CDs and conces sion departments, home delivery, Keep it New and Tempurpedic. The discount also cannot be applied to purchases made on MyNavyExhange.com, any gift cards or prepaid cards, Autoport ser vices and the Exchange Catalog. The benefit sales tick et also offers 10 percent off the entire stock of fine jewelry, excluding Rolex watches, Omega watches, Maui Divers and Pandora jewelry. With the benefit ticket, customers will receive 20 percent off the entire stock of regular priced apparel, shoes, watches and sunglasses. Already reduced furniture with prices ending in .94, .96 or .97 will be 30 percent off. The maximum discount for any transaction is $250. NEXs participating in this event include NEX Norfolk, Oceana, Portsmouth and Little Creek, Va.; NEX Pearl Harbor; NEX San Diego, North Island, Port Hueneme, Lemoore and Monterey, Calif.; NEX Great Lakes, Ill., NEX Mayport, Pensacola, Jacksonville, Orlando, Whiting Field and Key West, Fla.; NEX Bangor, Everett, Whidbey Island and Bremerton, Wash.; NEX Newport, R.I.; NEX Gulfport, Memphis and Meridian, Miss.; NEX Patuxent River, Bethesda and Annapolis, Md.; NEX New London, Conn.; NEX Corpus Christi, Texas; NEX Belle Chasse New Orleans, La.; NEX Charleston, S. C.; NEX Kings Bay, Ga.; NEX Fallon, Nev.; NEX Mitchel Field, N.Y.; NEX Naples, Italy; NEX Sigonella, Sicily; NEX Rota, Spain; NEX Yokosuka, Sasebo and Atsugi, Japan; NEX Bahrain; and NEX Guam. Midway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous his torical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speaker is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and Veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emo tional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jack et optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904-246-9982 or 904-7182118 or bpricex4@comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or emailing anuday00@ aol.com THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyChief Master-At-Arms James Watkins plays the role of an active shooter during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week anti-terrorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated Force Protection Conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people.By MC1 Michael Wiss and Lt.j.g. John RosaNPASE Detachment Southeast and ATG MayportThe Naval Station Mayport personnel put their force protection and antiterrorism skills to the test during the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 exercise Feb. 20-28. SC/CS 14 is a Force Protection exercise con ducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy installations in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security personnel as well as establish a learning environment for security personnel to exercise functional plans and operational capabilities. According to Naval Station Mayport Antiterrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak, this exercise showcases the Mayport team working with other tenant com mands and civilian agencies in the event of a crisis situation. We have to train our folks to be prepared for any crisis situation on short notice, he said. We need to be able to work with other tenant commands, ships and other agencies to be on the lookout for terrorist activity. We take every threat seriously, with other situations that have happened in the world, you have to be ready because you can never tell where the threat might come from. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emergency. The Citadel Shield of the Mayport exer cise involved an active shooter who killed and injured several personnel and held three people hostage. The Mayport NCIS team used nego tiation tactics to be able to overtake the assailant and defuse the situation. Solid Curtain is an exercise focused on command, control, and communication (C3) between all echelons Navy wide. The Solid Curtain por tion involved a small boat attack on USS Vicksburg (CG-69) homeproted at Naval Station Mayport. The attack was much like that of USS Cole (DDG-67) bombing which killed 17 Sailors and injured 39 others on October 12, 2000. According to USS Vicksburg Operations Officer Lt Matthew Hamm, the exercise was a great opportunity to test the readiness of the ships security team. This drill is an excellent opportunity to test our own organization, but also working with the base security department as well as with agencies off the base, he said. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for a single ship to execute a real world situation, and how to respond to a casualty that we dont Exercise Exercise Exercise -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyChief Hospital Corpsman Noel Martinez briefs Branch Medical Clinic master-at-arms before the commencement of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyBase police officers conduct a sweep of Branch Medical Clinic during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyWatkins plays the role of an active shooter dur ing Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shoot er and hostage drill at PSD aboard Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyNaval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) agents enter the Personnel Support Detatchment office aboard Naval Station Mayport during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 active shooter and hostage drill. -Photo by Paige GnannAntiterrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak talks with Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, in the emergency operation center during the Citadel Shield exercise.See SC/CS, Page 5

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleySailors aboard USS Vicksburg (CG 68) respond to a training casualty after a small boat attack exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. see or train for every day. Afloat Training Group Mayport supported Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield. ATG Mayport provided small craft OPFOR sup port, while conducting Basic Phase Training for USS Vicksburg. ATG Mayport trained the ship in Damage Control and Medical Training in a multi-faceted environ ment. These training opportunities are rare and not normally inte grated within the Afloat Training organization. This was a rare opportunity to see the integra tion ATG Mayport and base medical working closely to support a mis sion, said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW/ FMF) Robert Bicanovsky, Afloat Training Group Mayports Medical Lead. I believe there were multiple lessons learned in patient tracking, patient movement and triage in a multi-casualty scenar io. These events will only improve our training and ultimately improve the ships response to real world events. Damage Control training was detailed and integrated throughout the scenario, added Chief Damage Controlman (SW) Shimran Ali, Afloat Training Group Mayports Damage Control Lead. During the drills we were able to train in all aspects of firefighting, flooding and quick actions respons es. Being able to utilize recharging stations on the pier and base services in conjunction with continued shipboard firefight ing efforts was a unique training environment. Training is an impor tant element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department. According to Novak, year round training keeps everyone working together as a team to help counter any crisis situation. We have to perform continuous train ing because the players change with Navy turn over, he said. The best thing we get out of this is to critique what we did right and what we did wrong. Hopefully we can continue to improve readiness and learn what needs to be done to han dle any crisis situation.From Page 4SC/CS -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyAfloat Training Group Mayport simulates a small boat attack during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week antiterrorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated force protection conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyHospital Corpsman from Branch Medical Clinic at Naval Station Mayport assist Sailors from USS Vicksburg (CG 68) in a mass casualty training exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. -Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleySailors aboard USS Vicksburg (CG 68) respond to a training casualty after a small boat attack exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. -Photo by Paige GnannUSS Vicksburg Sailors are comforted by Chaplain Calvin Gardner at the first triage area aboard the ship during the Solid Curtain exercise on Feb. 27. Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) prepare to fight a fire during a training exercise part of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 at Naval Station Mayport. -Photo by GSM3 Hillary HicksNaval Station Mayport Fire and Emergency Services coordinates damage control efforts during the Solid Curtain Exercises.-Photo by MC2 Marcus Stanley

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USS New York Sailors Judge School Invention ConventionBy MC3 Angus BecklesUSS New York Public AffairsA group of 13 Sailors from the amphibi ous transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) judged a number of projects and inventions at Jacksonville Beach Elementary Schools Invention Convention recently. The judging is New Yorks first event as part of its Adopt-A-School Program as part of its Community Relations (COMREL) program. The program is a good opportunity for New York Sailors to be mak ing their mark in the Mayport/Jacksonville area, said Lt. Justin Bernard, the ships chaplain. Jacksonville Beach Elementary was the school that wanted New York as their ship and this was a great oppor tunity for us to reach out to the community and enjoy some of the cre ativity our young citizens are producing. A total of 24 inventions were on display for the Sailors to judge. The young inventors ranged from kindergarten to third grade. This was fun! said Hospital Corpsman Danielle Tannous. Its just cool to see how young minds process things to come up with new ideas to make lives easier or just being cre ative and having fun with their projects. Praga Shah and Rana Shaban, members of the schools Parent Teachers Association, spearhead ed the organization of the convention. Students are asked to volunteer and to invent some thing that they feel there is need or improve on something that has been already invented. They are given guidelines and a packet to fill out. Its a great learning experience because the lower grades dont really have a science fair so this a learning experience and a step into the science world where they learn some of the termi nology, said Shah. Its really exciting and a lot of work that goes into it from both kids and parents and they are very excited to present and see their projects on display. This is the third con secutive year we have had Navy personnel judging and we enjoy having them here, said Shaban. They enjoy watching the new inven tions that the kids pres ent and we wanted to maintain the consisten cy. New York recently shifted homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., as part of a larger move of an amphibious ready group homeport change in support of strategic maritime dis persal. -Photos by MC3 Angus BecklesReligious programs specialist second class Jeremy Galton from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) tries out one of the inventions on display at Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. New York chose JBE as her school for its Adopt-A-School Program as part of its Community Relations (COMREL) Program. Hospital Corpsman Danielle Tannous and Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Thionta Buckner from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) reads to a group of students at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Alexander Maglaris from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) grades a project at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. Sailors from amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) judges projects at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. OperationSpecialist 2nd Class Timothy Woelky from amphibi ous transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) grades a project at the Jacksonville Beach Elementary (JBE) School Invention Convention. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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USS Simpson Arrives In CartagenaBy MC2 Tim D. GodbeeUSS Simpson Public AffairsGuided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) arrived in Cartagena for a scheduled port visit, Feb. 28. Simpsons visit serves to strengthen the exist ing partnership between Spain and the U.S. and allow Sailors an oppor tunity to experience Spanish culture first hand. During the visit, the ships leadership is scheduled to meet with Spanish Navy officials and Simpson is sched uled host a reception and ship tours. This is my first visit to Spain, so Im look ing forward to experi encing Spanish culture and interacting with the Spanish Navy, said Cmdr. Kenneth Anderson, Simpsons executive officer. It will be interesting to see the differences and similarities between our two navies. Its an outstanding opportunity for our counties to interact on multiple levels. With Simpson near ing the end of its deployment, the visit gives its crew an opportunity to see southern Spain up close and in person. Ive been to parts of Spain in the past and enjoyed every second of it, said Operations Specialist 3rd Class Justin Vasquez, a crewmember aboard Simpson. I love the culture, scenery and most of all the great weather, he added. Im excited to get another opportunity to enjoy this beautiful country. Simpson is on a scheduled six-moth deploy ment to the 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime and theater security opera tions. U.S. 6th Fleet, head quartered in Naples, Italy, conducts a full range of maritime secu rity operations and the ater security cooperation missions in concert with coalition, joint, inter agency, and other par ties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa. -Photo by MC2 Tim D. GodbeeThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) pulls away from USS Elrod (FFG 55) after a scheduled port visit to Augusta Bay before making its current port visit in Cartegena, Spain. Simpson is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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Wardogs Rise To The OccasionBy Ensign Jennifer Penley and Ensign Dyuti DasUSS Philippine Sea Public AffairsIts been a busy week on board USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). From gun shoots to air defense exercises, the crew has been on its toes since their departure on Feb. 15. First up was a gun exercise to demon strate the remark able capabilities of the warship. Successfully shooting the 5-inch guns and the ClosedIn Weapons System, the Gunners Mates set the tone for the rest of the week. After the gun shoot, the engineers trained to sharpen their response skills with a Main Space Fire Drill, a simulated fire drill in the main space engine rooms requiring much skill and technique in order to combat the fire. The middle of the week proved to be the real test for the crew with multiple exercises to include Anti Surface Warfare exercises, a Rescue and Assistance drill, and continued wartime readiness drills to keep combat mission ready. Philippine Sea topped off the week with another fire event and sea manship drills with USS Roosevelt and USS Truxton to practice maneuvering while fir ing shipboard weapons systems. Philippine Sea set the bar high for the rest of the group by hitting the inflatable target on the first try. Immediately after, the ships gathered in formation aroundUSNS Big Horn for a photo exercise, requiring close quarters ship han dling and communica tion between them. The Wardogs contin ued with a simulated Search and Rescue exer cise. The ship closed out the day with an Air Defense Exercise that continued to prove her excellence in Air Defense. The Wardogs also supported HSM-70 through multiple flight quarters and landing qualifica tions to ensure the readiness of both the pilots and the flight crew. Finishing off the weekend, Philippine Sea spent a majority of Sunday replenishing fuel at sea. Pulling alongside USNS Big Horn proved to be a challenge due to rough seas. But like always, the crew of Philippine Sea got the job done just in time for the Wardogs to enjoy their weekly Sunday night Ice Cream Social. After an arduous day filled with the replen ishment at sea, the ice cream social really topped off the day and boosted my morale, said Quartermaster Seaman Seth Dubinski. Like Dubinski, the crew is also thankful to the Culinary Specialists and Supply Department who are able to keep the morale of the crew at high levels with popcorn nights and ice cream socials. Photo by MC3 Abe McNatt Quartermaster Seaman Seth Dubinski, left, from Janesville, Wis. and Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Ontario Williams from Grambling, La. handle line during a replenishment-at-sea aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Philippine Sea is deployed as part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11 Learn How To Market Yourself From FFSCThe Mayport Fleet and Family Support Center is sponsoring a once-a-year presentation on transi tion here, on March 31, from 8:30-11 a.m. in Ocean Breeze Conference Center. The presentation entitled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career is offered by The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), and is FREE to attendees. All ranks may attend, though it is geared towards officers and senior NCOs. Spouses, civilians, and retirees are also welcome. In the current environment with the military drawdown, budget cuts and economic uncertainty, understanding how to manage your transition is more important than ever. The Transition Center at MOAA provides this presentation to teach the latest trends in transition to include resume writing, networking, use of LinkedIn, leveraging social media, and marketing your self. The purpose of our once-ayear visit is to supplement the terrific work the installation is doing with transition assis tance. ALL military personnel eventually transition to civilian life. Therefore, this pre sentation is perfect for those who are considering separa tion or retirement. It also educates leaders in the transition process in order to coach and mentor their subordinate, especially dur ing these times of force reductions, selective retirement boards, etc. The presentation will be given by Colonel John D. Sims, USA (Ret), a depu ty director at the Transition Center at MOAAs national headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia. The presentation is given annually at over 150 military installations of all Services nationally, and is universal ly praised by audiences as, up-to-date, motivational, and sharply focused a must attend . It includes comprehensive information on the retire ment decision itself, employer perceptions, your competition, resumes, cover letters, job search, networking, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benefits packages, the current job market, and other relevant and important transition topics. Its never too early to begin learning about your transition. To RSVP for the seminar or for further information, contact the Fleet and Family Suport Center at 904-270-6600, x1701. FFSC Workshops Available To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to regis ter call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 27, 9 a.m.noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet train ing, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and toddlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowledge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Anger Management Bldg Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep peo ple at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relation ship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. March 3, 1 p.m.2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 3, 10 a.m.-Noon, What About The Kids, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unin tended victims. A wide range of child adjust ment problems has been found to be associated with exposure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behav ior, emotion, develop ment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their chil drens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for ending the violence and seeking intervention. March 3, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 3-7, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Victim Advocate Training Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 4-5, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m. Million Dollar Sailor Bldg 1 Room 702 March 4, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to provide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and develop ment way to cope with stress and make life style changes. March 5, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 5, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 6, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 6, 10 a.m.-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 10, 1:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 10, 1 p.m.2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 10-14, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 11, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Welcome to The Military Bldg. 1 Room 702 Are you a new mili tary spouse or new to the area, this one day work shop provides valuable information on the mili tary lifestyle, benefits, finances and resources. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will present useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. March 12, 11 a.m.Noon, Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1 Room 719 March 12, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 12, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 13, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 step in the process after a Sailor sub mits a request. Its each commands responsibility to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are comfortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and process each Sailors TA request prompt ly, said DAntonio. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mission might not permit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding offi cers decision, said DAntonio. DAntonio also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approv er prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruction. Often when we review a TA request, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA pre requisites such as a current education counseling by a Navy College Office (NCO) or Virtual Education Center (VEC) counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on file, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constantly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to submit their TA request. In fact, a TA application can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. DAntonio also stressed that Sailors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educational goals. The VOLED team is here to help, bottom line. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. According to CPPD Commanding Officer Capt. John Newcomer, Navy leaders are committed to provid ing Sailors with voluntary education opportunities. We know that educated Sailors are strong performers with well-devel oped critical thinking skills and the ability to make informed decisions, said Newcomer. A college degree is an investment in a Sailor and a contributing factor in Navy mission accomplishment.From Page 1Tuitionat the Bureau of Naval Personnel and as the head of Full Time Support Assignments in Navy Personnel com mand. Uhls holds a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies with an empha sis in Asian Security Policy from the Army Command and General Staff College where he graduated highest dis tinction. Additionally, he holds a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College where he graduated with highest distinction. Chidester is a native of Iowa and entered the Navy in July 1979, promoted to Chief Operations Specialist in 1987, commissioned as a Limited Duty Officer in 1991, and converted to Unrestricted Line in 1996. From December of 1979 to December 1990, Chidester served in Naval Air Station Fallon, NV, destroyer Leftwich (DD 984), car rier Enterprise (CVN 65), Tactical Training Group Pacific, and on the staff of Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group, Three. Following his LDO commission, he served consecutive CIC Officer tours in USS Gridley (CG 21) and USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) completing two Middle East Force deployments in support of Operation Southern Watch and as the Assistant Surface Operations and Theater Missile Defense Officer on the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe, in London, England. Chidester then served consecutive Operations Officer tours in USS Carney (DDG 64) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64) completing two deploy ments in support of USS John F. Kennedy and USS Enterprise Battle Group opera tions in the Sixth Fleet Area of Responsibility. He then moved on to United States Southern Command, Miami, Florida where he served as the Executive Assistant to the Director of Operations. His next assignment was Executive Officer in USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) completing one deployment to the Fifth Fleet Area of Responsibility support ing Commander, Joint Task Force 150 opera tions and the Global War on Terror. From December 2005 to January 2008, he served as the Assistant Surface Warfare Captain Detailer (PERS 41A), Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tennessee before mov ing on to command the Arleigh Burke Guided Missile Destroyer, USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98). Following his com mand tour, Captain Chidester served as Director, Maritime Warfighting and Department Head Training (N73) and Director, Commandat-Sea Training (N75), Surface Warfare Officers School, Newport, Rhode Island. From Page 1CoC A CFC participant provided as a public service. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today.

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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 pay outs every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double payouts on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party. 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 2707205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity cal endar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up deadline March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transpor tation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hir ing process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly rec ommended for anyone interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 6: PreSeason Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 270-5451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and col ored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must pro vide proper ID)

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No Dough Dinner Mayport USO will host a No Dough Dinner on March 10 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. JU Baseball Military Appreciation Game Come see an exciting game as the Jacksonville University Dolphins baseball team takes on the Indian Hoosiers on Friday, March 7. The game starts at 6:30 p.m. at the John Sessions stadium located at 2800 University Blvd. North. All military personnel will receive free admission for two with valid military I.D. Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annual Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxusochili cookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. A Salute To Women In The Military: Past & Present Festival The Greater Jacksonville Area USO will be hosting a FREE festival honoring women in the military. The festival will be Friday, March 28th from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Navy Federal across from the Yorktown Gate. There will be live music, appearances by Morgan Frazier and A&Es Rodeo Girls, jump houses, and much more including a presentation by Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, (Ret.). This festival is free an open to the pub lic. Country Concert At MavericksTribute To Women In The Military Join us at Mavericks on Saturday, March 29th for a tribute to women in the military hosted by A&Es Rodeo Girls. See Morgan Frazier, Jamie Davis, Rionn Page and concert headliner Darryl Worley at Mavericks. See the attached flyer for more info. Tickets are on sale now at www. mavericksatthelanding. com. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $25.00 for VIP. Active Duty, Retirees, and dependents receive $5 off with presentation of valid military I.D. card. Adventure Landing Fun-RaiserTickets On Sale Mark your calendars for Thursday, April 10 from 5-9 p.m. The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is host ing a FUN-raiser night at Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach. Tickets are $10 per per son ($25 off the ticket price at the gate) and include unlimited laser tag, miniature golf, gokarts, wacky worm, and frog hopper. Tickets can be pur chased now at the Mayport and NAS Jax USO offices. Tickets are open to active duty, retirees, national guard, reservists, dod, and dependents. Tickets are $10 each cash only. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that intro duces participants to all aspects of the mili tary lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the opportunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowledge and develop skills neces sary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, provide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for baby sitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shredded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fun draiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center available to all service members with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service mem bers can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and predeployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 246-3481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS Saturday, March 8 Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a leisurely paced hike to discover the islands natural communities. Participants are encouraged to bring bug spray and bottled water. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Monday,March 10 Join Lavilla School of the Arts Drama Department for a day of fun and golfing with an 8:30 a.m. shot gun start at the Hidden Hills Country Club. For more information or to become a sponsor call 635-2315 or go to www. lavilladrama.org Thursday, March 13 A Jacksonville Walk to End Alzheimers Welcome Meeting will be held from 1-2 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, Davis Gallery, 300 Water St., Jacksonville 32202. Learn about Walk to End Alzheimers and find out how you can get involved! If youre interested in marketing, team recruitment or retentions, logistics, securing prizes, sponsorship or volunteer recruitment, we would love to hear from you! RSVP (800) 272-3900 or mdrinks@ alz.org. Thursday, March 13 The Duval County Extension Office is offering a Spring Gardening Tips Workshop from 6:30 8:30 p.m. The workshop will be located at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. This workshop will cover vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and much more. This is a free workshop. Please call 904-255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@ coj.net to pre-register. Saturday, March 15 Ever dreamed of get ting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photographer at 10 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn techniques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Space is limited on this program to 10 participants. Please RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. This pro gram will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. Reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Talbot Islands have a rich cultural his tory that dates back over 5,000 years. Join a Park Ranger at 2 p.m. for a look into these past culturs and the artifacts they left behind. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. March 15-16 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, will host a Confederate Garrison event on Saturday, March 15 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, March 16 from 9 a.m.-noon. This pro gram will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1861. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2.00 per person Fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Saturday, March 22 Container Gardening, Traditional and Passive Hydroponics, Recyle in the Garden.learn how to reuse, rein vent, rethink throwaway items for the gar den, and Grow Bucket Gardening how to make a low cost, water efficient and weed free vegetable growing system; to be held at the Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9:00 a.m.-noon. Cost is $5 with Pre-registration and pre-payment being required. Please con tact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. COMMUNITYCALENDAROUT IN TOWN THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Reserves Looking For Few Good PilotsBy MCCS William LoveladySubmittedThe Navy Reserve is searching for a few of the best pilots who are ready to leave active duty, but still looking to fly Navy. Just about every reserve squadron needs a constant flow of high ly qualified applicants, said Cmdr. Dave Bowen, the reserve component community manager for pilot accessions. A squadron with about 25 officers aboard needs one or two new acces sions a year, but if we have a zero year that becomes a problem. Reserve pilots are recruited by holding pilot selection boards. Squadrons that have positions to fill will send out a quarterly notice announcing the conven ing of a board. A lot of the pilots that apply have known about the squadrons for a long time by word of mouth and have already rushed the squadron by coming to visit on a drill weekend and introducing themselves, said Bartram. Its important for new pilots to visit the squadron and meet the wardroom in order to put faces with names and see if they are a good fit or not. Because of the long and costly training pipe line, there are no direct accessions for Navy Reserve pilots. They have to come from the fleet, and their skills are incredibly perishable. Our ideal candidate is a junior officer who just finished a tactical or instructor tour, said Bowen. We want to grab that pilot and his skills that were honed in the fleet and retain it in the reserve. Pilots who have been away from active duty for a few years, even if they are flying commercially, may not have the current skill sets needed to get back in the cockpit of an F/A-18 or F-5. Were not looking for people who barely meet standards. It is our job to provide experienced and well-qualified pilots to meet fleet and opera tional support require ments, said Bowen. Our reserve pilots are highly experienced oper ators and thats what the Navy needs from uswhether flying tacti cal missions in support of combatant command ers or flying in adversary squadrons to train our junior pilots just arriving in the fleet. The other challenge Bowen faces with bring ing new pilots to the Navy Reserve is the lack of awareness of the opportunities. No commanding offi cer wants to lose his best people, so when a pilot is considering leaving active duty, there may not be a lot of resourc es forthcoming, said Bowen. For some pilots the only exposure they have to the reserve component is if the squadron has a reserve squadron augment unit. Bowen, a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, spent more than 10 years on active duty as an F/A-18 Hornet pilot and a T-45 Goshawk instructor. I transitioned to the reserves eight and a half years ago and started flying the F-5 Tiger, and began my department head tour at VFC-111 in Key West, Fla., said Bowen. Now Im the commanding officer of the 3rd Fleet Maritime Operations detach ment at Las Vegas, but I still fly as a guest pilot with VFC-111. For me, I get to enjoy the best of both worldsa civilian career in aviation, as well as continuing my Navy career flying fighters part time. One pilot who recently joined the Navy Reserve is Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows in Jacksonville, Fla. After serving almost nine years on active duty in the Navy, Leeds did an interservice transfer from the Navy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Corps where she flew the WP-3D Orion; a modi fied P-3 used for collecting weather information. After leaving NOAA, Leeds became an air interdiction agent/ pilot for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, before she joined the Navy Reserve in 2011. I found out about the reserves through numerous sources, but mainly other pilots from work, said Leeds. I went through a recruiter at the [Navy Operational Support Center] in Jacksonville and put a pilot package together that was given to VP-62. A big lesson learned is that I wished I had put in a package sooner. I encourage anyone that was active-duty to join the reserves. It is a great way to continue to serve your country. For those aviators coming toward the end of their active-duty commitments, transition ing to a reserve compo nent squadron is easier than one might imagine. There are open billets in almost every communi ty and squadrons regu larly hold pilot selection boards. The best time for a pilot to begin the pro cess is within six months of leaving active duty. Interested aviators are encouraged to contact the squadrons they are most interested in and find out the time of its next drill weekend. We encourage any one interested in joining a reserve squadron to come to a drill weekend, meet the pilots, the commanding officer and get a feel for the commute if they arent planning to live local, Bowen said. This is a chance to talk to fellow aviators who have recently joined the squadron and get a lot of questions answered on issues like pay and ben efits, expectations, and work-life balance. Pilot selection boards are usually held at the wing-level at least twice annually. Reserve squadron commanding offi cers and senior reserve pilots typically review applicant records and make recommendations to the air wing com mander before billets are offered to the selectees. Consideration is given to officer and tactical per formance, recent experience, and willingness to meet participation expectations. Selected aviators should then contact the career transition office at the Bureau of Naval Personnel and request assistance in affiliating with the Navy Reserve. The transition office will work with reserve squadrons and manage the required paperwork for transfer to the desired reserve component. Newly selected reserve aviators can expect a short period of active duty orders to complete the basic familiarization and tactical training syl labus on their new air craft, if required. Once this is completed, participation requirements will vary according to squadron and mission. Many reserve squadrons have recently seen a decline in qualified applicants because many aviators are remaining on active duty, combined with a general lack of aware ness in reserve squadron opportunities. We understand that there are a few misconceptions and a lot of unanswered questions concerning being a part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Were try ing to get the word out that these are some of the best opportunities to stay in the cockpit and enjoy the ready room camaraderie part time. Some of the recurring questions highlighted in recent years are: rons are out there, and how do I apply? a reserve squadron in order to be selected? airline pilot to make the commute work if I dont want to live local? month will I be expected to be at the squadron? I dont want to be away from my family for too long--thats why I left active duty. patch wearer to be considered for one of the tactical squadrons? retirement and what other benefits will I receive? The answers to these questions might sur prise you, said Bowen. The bottom line is that we have reserve aviators from a variety of civil ian professions living all over the country. There are a lot of resources available to get guys to the squadron and most are flexible with individual participation con cerns. Commander, Navy Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR), has commu nity managers for the Tactical Support Wing which flies F/A-18, F-5, EA-6B/EA-18G aircraft and the Fleet Logistics Support Wing which flies the C-40A, C-37, C-20, and C-130 air craft. CNAFR also has two VP squadrons which fly P-3C and three heli copter squadrons which fly the HH-60H and the SH-60B. Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) also offers reserve avia tors and flight officers the opportunity to train aviators. If youre inter ested in flying with the Navy Reserve, reach out to one of the squadrons which can direct you to a community manager. We hope to make the entire Naval Aviation community more aware of the close support relationship that exists between the active and reserve components and let aviators know about the benefits of being part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Pilots coming off of active duty have the tactical and instructional skills that we want to retain and in return give them the enjoyment and quality of service to our country that is unmatched in any civilian job. -Photo by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinLt. Tim Berryhill, a former USMC C-130 pilot and now a reservist with the VR-62 Nomads, climbs his aircraft past Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. -Photo by MCCS William LoveladyLt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows, joined the Navy Reserves after nine years of active duty service with the Navy. Together, we will defeat deadly childhood diseases. St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott A CFC Participant provided as a public service.

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, March 6, 2014