Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00336


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CHINFO Award Winner USS De WertWorks With Habitat For Humanity Page 7 Separating From Navy?FFSC Is Here To Help You Navigate Page 16 New HospitalPatient Guides Available Page 12 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Clinic Gets Gold Seal For CareBy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterOn the heels of its recent Joint Commission reaccreditation and Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection, Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Feb. 14. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of recognition for patientcentric care, was awarded to all primary care clinics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilleits hospital and all five of its branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. The Navys approach to the Patient-Centered Medical Home is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of care giversfrom doctors to nurses and case manag ersled by the primary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-for-profit organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval during its reaccreditation process in January, NBHC Mayport was recognized for its continuing compliance with The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art, national standards of care. Offering A Helping HandUSS Gettysburg Assists MarinersSee Story Page 4 Citizen Sailor Takes Command Of HSL-60By Daniel MeshelNavy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC)Cmdr. Oscar Toledo assumed command from Cmdr. William Maske of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 60 (HSL-60) during a change of com mand ceremony Feb. 21. Family, friends and Jaguars of HSL-60 attended the ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport, where Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun served as guest speaker for the event. Since Cmdr. Maske took over HSL-60, his focus has been on the three Ps, said Braun. Those three Ps are people, purpose and professionalism. I love it, and this focus has proven essential to the Jaguars success. By concentrating on people and fostering a positive command climate in which all can succeed, HSL-60 has truly soared. Maske, a native of Washington, D.C., attended the United States Naval Academy and graduated in 1995 before reporting to Pensacola, Fla., for flight training. He was designated a Naval Aviator in October 1997 and has served within numer ous squadrons and shore installa tions during his more than 20-year Naval career. Maske reported to HSL-60 as commanding officer in January 2013, where he successfully led more than 200 Sailors through multiple high-visibility missions. Youve done a tremendous job as a commanding officer, said Braun, highlighting his many achievements -Photo by Paige GnannCmdr. Oscar Toledo, left, salutes Cmdr. William Maske as he assumes command of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 as CHSMWL Commodore, Capt. Clayton Conley watches the exchange during a change of command ceremony on Feb. 21 at the squadron hangar. See HSL-60, Page 7Dempsey Seeks Feedback On BudgetBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceArmy Gen. Martin E. Dempsey wants feedback from service members on the fiscal year 2015 defense budget request that he and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel outlined to reporters at the Pentagon on Feb. 24. In an interview in his Pentagon office posted on Facebook, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff asked service members to contact him about their feelings on the budget in general and the pay, com pensation and health care portion of the proposal, in particular. Dempsey said the bud get proposal is one step in the ongoing effort to bring some stability and cer tainty to our budget. The fiscal 2014 budget now in effect and the fiscal 2015 request do give the Defense Department some certainty, as the Bipartisan Budget Act passed last year gave some relief from sequestration. But beyond fiscal 2015, sequestration still looms. Because of that -it is the law -weve had to do some planning on force structure, readiness [and] modernization, as well as changes to pay, compensa tion and health care, the general said. The chairman set aside any discussion on mili tary retirement for the time being. Any changes to retirement will be proposed by a commission that will render its review some time in the next six to nine months, he said. Even then, its been the posi tion of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that any changes to retirement will be grandfathered. That term means any changes would affect only those people who join the military on or after the effective date. Balance is the key word for the process that led to the budget request, Dempsey said. What we are really trying to do here is find the right balance for our manpower costs in the context of the other things weve got to do, he explained. Weve got to buy new equipment, weve got to reset from 10 years of war, weve got to train, weve got to send men and women to school, weve got to provide health care, weve got to pay for the infrastructure we have. The budget request includes proposals to make adjustments. The request asks Congress to authorize a base realignment and closure process in fiscal 2017 so DOD can shed excess and costly infrastructure. See Clinic, Page 13 See Budget, Page 16

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ...............................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A St Valentines Day Celebrates LoveEach February we have a day in our society when we celebrate LOVE. It is called Valentines Day. Have you ever wondered how Valentines Day got started? Who started this day of Love and why? Beginnings are always interesting because you usually discover something you didnt expect to find. So I began surfing the internet to see what I could find about Valentines Day. Huffington Posts and Wikipedias articles on Valentines Day prob ably capture the essence of the beginnings of this most romantic of days. As the legend is recounted, there was a priest named Valentine or Valentinus during the third cen tury A.D. under Emperor Claudius II. The Emperor decided that unmarried soldiers fought better than married ones, so he made the unpopular decision to ban marriages among young people. In response, Valentine began secretly officiating marriages. His newly expanded ministry to these young couples who desperately wanted to be married, however, was eventually discovered and he was imprisoned. One interesting aspect of this story says that supposedly Valentine wore a ring with the image of Cupid on it, a symbol legal in the Roman Empire at the time, so soldiers could recognize him and secretly ask to be married. The story continues that Valentine was persecuted as a Christian while in prison and questioned person ally by Roman Emperor Claudius. Claudius attempted to convert him to paganism, but failed. Not to be outdone, Valentine tried to convert Claudius to Christianity, but he also failed. Before his execu tion, the story says that he performed a miracle by healing the blind daugh ter of his jailer Asterius. As a result of this healing, the jailers daughter Julia, and 44 members of his household converted to Christianity and were bap tized. The Wikipedia article adds to the unfolding story, according to Henry Ansgar Kellythat on the evening before Valentine was to be executed, he would have written the first valentine card himself, addressed to the daughter of his jailer Asterius, who was no longer blind, sign ing as Your Valentine. The expression From Your Valentine was later adopt ed by modern Valentine letters. This legend has been published by both American Greetings and The History Channel. At the end of the fifth century, Pope Galasius I declared Feb. 14 to be Saint Valentines Day. Valentines Day has been celebrated for 1500 years! Both Chaucer and Shakespeare link Valentines Day and romance in their works. In the United States, Esther Howland of Worcester, Massachusetts, designed the first massproduced valentines made from embossed paper in 1847. As we all know, it has grown from there to include not only Valentine cards, but roses, choco lates and now even jewelry. Since 2001, the Greeting Card Association has pre sented the Esther Howland Award for a Greeting Card Visionary. The Greeting Card Association estimates that 190 million Valentines are sent each year. If you include valentineexchanged cards in school, the number jumps to over 1 billion with teachers receiving the most valentines. Only LOVE. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Steven Souders CNSL Ministry CenterMayport Elementary Presents Bullying Prevention Resources to ParentsMayport Elementary hosted their Mid-Year Stakeholders meeting on Tuesday, February 11th in the schools media cen ter. Parents, community representatives, faculty, and administration were present. After a report by Principal Yvonne DiMattia on the schools aca demic progress, Melissa Hammond, school coun selor, and Susan Schanen, Military Family Life Counselor presented the program Bullies Are a Pain in the Brain. This PowerPoint was followed by a group discus sion of ways to manage bullying and to resolve conflicts. Discussion points included the follow ing: What to do when older sibling bullies you. dent). strategies practice at home/ at school. conflict. instead of You state ments. Summary: Learn the skill of positive, productive communication. What to do if there is a threat of more hurt if the bullied person tells. KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerSkiing on Hot Air Still Makes For Good StoriesDo I ski? Well, of course, Ive dismissed such questions with a pre tentious chuckle. I grew up skiing, Id say, hop ing my haughty response conjured up images of me slaloming between moguls, skidding to snow-spray ing stops, and mingling in Nordic sweaters around cozy lodge fireplaces. They dont need to know that my first skiing experiences were behind the YMCA in my rural Pennsylvania hometown. Two dollars provided my brother and I with merci lessly gouged rental equip ment and unlimited rides on the slopes only lift -a rudimentary rope tow with a sputtering motor that sounded as if it had been pirated from a lawn mower. My 100 percent acrylic mittens not only failed to keep out the cold, but they made it nearly impossible to grip the ice-glazed rope tow. When I managed to clamp down hard enough, my body lurched forward unexpectedly, sometimes loosening my precarious grip and causing annoyed The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFELisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse ColumnistAsh Wednesday At Base ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel has announced its Protestant and Catholic Lenten Schedule. On Ash Wednesday, March 5, there will be a service at 11 a.m. in the small Chapel and a 6 p.m. service in the main Chapel for Protestant worshipers. Catholic Mass will be held at 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the main Chapel on March 5. Stations of the Cross will be held on Fridays of Lent at 6:30 p.m. in the small chapel. There will be a potluck supper following in the Fellowship Hall. For more information about the Chapel schedules and services, call 270-5212. kids to stack up behind me like dominoes. Eventually, our par ents took my brother and I to the various local ski resorts: Hidden Valley, Seven Springs, Blue Knob, Laurel Valley. Having never heard of brand names such as Rossignol and K2, our family of four rented equipment and wore whatever we had in our closets, much of which was fluorescent orange or emblazoned with Pittsburgh Steelers insignia. If we made it out of the slushy, clattering equip ment rental rigmarole intact, we still had to get our skis on without mak ing complete fools out of ourselves. Despite witness ing the experienced skiers pop their boots into bind ings with minimal effort, I always seemed to find myself doing the splits right there in front of all the cool people. It wasnt pretty, but I persevered, getting up and falling down over and over again putting on skis, getting on and off lifts, snow plowing, and sometimes, just standing there doing nothing. Besides knocking strangers over and forc ing lift operators to stop the motors to clear my sprawled body off the exits and entrances, all that fall ing served to desensitize me to embarrassment over time. One Christmas, my father outfitted our entire family in new ski paraphernalia. At first I couldnt wait to finally be legit, but with the proper equip ment and apparel came something I hadnt antici pated: expectations. In my brothers old parka, no one batted an eye when I plowed into someone in the T-bar line. However, in my white the bully; make it transparent. This program was a response to concerns about bullying at school and in the neighborhood. You also read about it in the national media and see it reported on television. You probably remember some bullying that took place at some time during your school days. You may even have experienced some level of bullying or maybe a friend did. As an adult you may have experienced or witnessed bullying in the workplace. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity that has existed since the beginning of recorded his tory and is present in most cultures. It is enacted by both males and females. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. Bullying is about power. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or the indi vidual in the office with the least experience on the job. Whether it happened to you during school or on the job, you had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more powerful than you. And this power can take different forms. In terms of school, Florida law defines bullying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psychological distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimidation, stalk ing, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harassment, public humiliation, or destruction of property. To be officially identified as bulling, the mistreatment must psychological), and Indirect bullying behav iors include the following: lating relationships, a peer group, rassing, nasty and malicious rumors and lies about someone, and/or Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer soft ware; or written, verbal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or damage to his property; has the effect of substan tially interfering with a students educational per formance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohibits bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 educational institution. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a public K 12 school. See Bully, Page 3 See Skiing, Page 16

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DoD CAPS Off Work Barriers With ProgramFrom DoDRecognizing the poten tial of its workforce, the Department of Defense (DoD) established the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP) to eliminate employment barriers for people with disabilities. CAPs mission, since its inception in 1990, is to provide assistive technology and accommodations to ensure people with disabilities and wounded Services members have equal access to the information environment and opportunities in the DoD and throughout the Federal Government. Today, CAP has expand ed beyond the DoD to partner with 68 federal agencies making it the largest provider of reasonable accommodations in the world. The programs vision is to increase employment of people with disabilities and disabled veterans by ensuring they have access to accommodations through out the DoD and Federal Government. Through CAPs Wounded Service Member (WSM) Initiative, CAP provides needs assess ments, assistive technol ogy and training to support wounded, ill and injured Service members through out all phases of recovery and transition to employ ment, directly impacting their rehabilitation pro cess. By implementing DoD Instruction 6025.22, AT for Wounded Service Members, CAP partners with Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs) to inte grate AT into the recovery and seamless transition process. CAP does this by paying for and providing a wide variety of assistive technology for people with hear ing, visual, dexterity, cog nitive, and communication disabilities. While CAP mainly focuses on purchasing assistive technology for employees with disabili ties, it also supports fed eral employees throughout the employment lifecycle, including; coming to work, staying at work, and returning to work to help ensure the Federal Government is the model employer of people with disabilities and wounded Service members. Frequently requested accommodation solutions include videophones, per sonal amplification devices, screen magnification soft ware, screen readers, cue ing/memory aids, literacy software, alternative key boards, pointing devices, and speech recognition software. The process for WSM and federal employees customers to identify and request accommo dations through CAP is simple. Customers that already know what accommodations they need can request them through our online request form avail able at www.cap.mil/ wsm (Wounded Service Members) www.cap.mil (Federal Employees). For customers that need solu tions identified there are a number of options. The WSM team also visits a number of military instal lations throughout the year and conducts on-site needs assessments. CAPTEC, located at the Pentagon room 2D1049, will conduct in-person, phone, and video tele conference needs assess ments. For customers not located in the Washington, DC metro area that need an on-site assessment, one can be requested through the online request form at www.cap.mil/ wsm (Wounded Service Members) www.cap. mil (Federal Employees). Once solutions have been identified, all requests can be made through the same online request form. The CAP office is avail able to answer any disability or accommodation related questions. The CAP staff works with individuals to ensure the federal community complies with federal laws and assists in creat ing a more accessible information environment. CAP is committed to giv ing Service members the tools to prepare them for employment opportunities in the public or private sectors by allowing them to maximize their abilities. CAP offers a number of online tools to help our customers, including: series of online training modules to help federal employers understand how simple and beneficial hiring employees with disabilities can be. Videos: A series of short videos to demonstrate available assistive technol ogy. up to date on new assis tive technology, disability events and more on the go. connected with CAP on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube! For further information and to use our online tools, please visit www.cap.mil, contact CAP at 703-6148416 (Voice) or via email at cap.wsm@mail.mil (wounded Service mem ber) cap@mail.mil (Federal Employees). The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying pol icy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bul lied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trusted adult. This report can be done anonymously. Call the Bullying Hotline at (904) 390-HELP. An investiga tion will be conducted at the school level by the principal or his/her desig nee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the follow ing tips to deter and diminish bullying at your childs school: schools designated admin istrator your concerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of students. a social safety network, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. anti-bullying campaign website at www.stopbul lyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bullied? Possible warning signs include the following: missing belongings, bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, or bad dreams, and/or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the problem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school officials to find a solution. For more information: The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act is a memorial to Jeffrey Johnston, son of Debbie and Robert Johnston. Jeffreys story can now be found, with other bullycide stories, in the book, Bullycide in America: Moms speak out about the bullying/suicide connection. The book can be ordered at www.bully cide.org. Stop Cyberbullying www.stopcyberbullying. org Available in schools: Pay It Forward (HS Character Education Library) 2000 Pocket Catherine Ryan Hyde Sarah and the Naked Truth (MS Character Education Library) 2002 Yearling Patricia MacLachlan Stand Tall Molly Lou Mellon (ES Character Education Library) 2001 G.P. Putnam and Sons Patty Lovell Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2Bully THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Gettysburg Assists Mariners in DistressBy Lt. Ryan de VeraHarry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provided humanitarian assistance to three Iranian mariners on an adrift dhow in the Gulf of Oman, Feb. 16. Gettysburg stopped to ren der assistance at approximately 7:30 a.m. after being signaled by the mariners aboard the vessel, approximately 45 miles north of Muscat, Oman. According to the mariners, they had run out of food and drinking water, and had an inoperable engine. Gettysburg Sailors initially provided food and water for the mariners using a rigid-hull inflatable boat. Our ability to help our fellow mariners is absolutely vital, said Ensign James Barksdale, boat officer. In this case, we were able to provide food and water to allow these mariners to return home safely. For that crew to know that they can trust us and that we are here to help means that we did our job today. At approximately 5:30 p.m., the mariners were transferred to Gettysburg and seen by medi cal professionals to ensure their health and safety. The mariners were assessed as being dehy drated and given food and water. They were also provided facilities to shower and were given fresh clothing. Capt. Brad Cooper, USS Gettysburg commanding offi cer, led the on-scene assistance efforts. Today is another great exam ple of what U.S. Navy forward presence does to add to the stability of the region, said Cooper. We are so pleased to have been in a position to help our fellow mariners who would otherwise have been in a potentially lifethreatening situation. The mariners will remain on Gettysburg overnight while arrangements for their safe return ashore are being made. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, commended Gettysburg for their efforts. This is another example of why U.S. naval presence in this region is so vitally important, said Sweeney. Through humanitarian acts like this one executed so professionally by the crew of the Gettysburg, we continue to build trust and confidence throughout the Gulf region. Gettysburg is currently deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security opera tions and theater security coop eration in the U. S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) prepare to provide humanitarian assistance to a stranded fishing vessel. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson A Sailor assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), foreground, provides humanitarian assistance to a stranded fishing vessel. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by CS3 Kyle Bartlett Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provide humanitarian assistance to stranded mariners. -Photo courtesy of USS GettysburgUSS Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 USS Halyburton Busy At Sea Sailors study for their Enlisted Surface Warfare (ESWS) pins aboard USS Halyburton. Lt j.g. Jeff Bland (right) creates a navy cash account for Seaman Apprentice Brandon Guitierrez (left) aboard USS Halyburton. -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettMachinists Mate 2nd class Tim Golden repairs the trash pulper aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Pilots prepare for flight operations in flight control aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. MWD Handler Apprenticeship Now AvailableBy Darryl OrrellCenter for Security Forces Public AffairsThe Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced the release of its 10th and newest apprenticeship trade that is specific to military working dog han dlers. Military working dogs and their handlers are a highly trained, highly skilled formidable duo. These teams are deployed throughout the world to perform duties of law enforcement and support a wide range of security operations. The United States Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) works closely with the Department of Labor to provide nationally rec ognized apprenticeships that result in journeymanlevel Certifications of Completion for service members. Enrollment for the Working Dog Handler apprenticeship is open to both Sailors and Marines. Enrollees must be assigned to a formal unit/activity where they perform appro priate duties with a military working dog. Sailors must serve in the Master-at-Arms (MA) rate and have completed MA A School. They must also hold the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) for working dog handler (NEC 2005) or kennel master (NEC 2006). Marines must be in the military occupa tional specialty for working dog handlers (MOS 5812). The apprenticeship requires a total of 2500hours of documented experience. The needed skills range from the administra tion and training of work ing dogs to maintaining kennels, dogs and safety. MAs can also select from nine other available apprenticeships that are listed below. Computer Operator Office Manager/ Administrative Services Police Office I (Government Service) Correction Officer (Government Service) Security Specialist Master Homeland Security Specialist Protective Security Specialist Armory Technician Navy Criminal Investigator For more information visit https://usmap.cnet. navy.mil/usmapss.

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4th Feet Doctors Talk Global HealthBy Lt. Sonny LorriusCOMUSNAVSO/4thFltNavy doctors of U.S 4th Fleet and Naval Hospital Jacksonville partici pated in the 2014 Florida International Summit Global Health and Medical Diplomacy: Haiti and Florida, Feb. 12. Navy Capt. Christine E. Dorr, Fleet Surgeon of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet and Navy Capt. William E. Todd Director of Surgical Services Naval Hospital Jacksonville, were invited by the Florida Network for Global Studies to speak at this years event to bring not only their professional background, but their experience as well. Haiti was ravaged by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake on January 10, 2010, leav ing most of the countrys infrastructure, hospitals and facilities diminished or inoperable which dis placed over 1.3 million people. More than 147,000 Haitians still remain living in tents in scattered camps. As a surgeon, being called upon to assist those in need is a great and rewarding opportunity, said Todd who was an orthopedic surgeon on the USNS Comfort during the Haiti disaster response mission. This years Florida International Summit is an event produced by the Florida Network for Global Studies established in 2003, which is a combined effort of Florida Universities dedicated to fostering activi ties that strengthen exper tise and interest in global issues. The keynote speaker was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti Pamela A. White who was appointed July 2012 and had previously served in Haiti from 1985 to 1990. How can we begin to help the people of Haiti unless we know what they have been through, not just from the time they received their initial care, but from the time the walls came down, said Todd. He opened the Health Challenges Facing Haiti and Florida panel by sharing a touching story of one of his patients who had to have her hand amputated. I knew my patient would no longer have a hand to clap with at her first birthday party but I also knew that due to our efforts she would still be able to have a smile from the joy of living. What we do as individuals, matter, said Todd. In the afternoon Dorr spoke as an ObstetricianGynecologist on the Womens Health Postdisaster panel capitalizing on her experiences while deployed on USNS Mercy for Operation Unified Assistance in 2005. Here in the United States, the average moth er receives 14-16 prena tal visits during her preg nancy. However, in Haiti that number is only one to two for 75 percent of the women, said Dorr. Four visits of care will help mitigate perinatal risks and reduce the maternal mortality rate. As the Fleet Surgeon she discussed the current state of maternal health chal lenges in Haiti along with some possible interventions to be taken now in preparation for the future. The Florida Network for Global Studies is a state wide consortium sponsored by Florida International University, Florida State University, the University of Central Florida, the University of Florida, the University of North Florida and the University of South Florida. The schools have con tinued for over ten years to advance the exchange of information exchange and analyses of economic, political, social, and tech nological exchanges. The Florida International Summit rotates locations annually and the 2015 summit is currently scheduled to be held in Orlando Fla. at the University of Central Florida. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in cooperative maritime security opera tions in order to maintain access, enhance interoper ability, and build endur ing partnerships that fos ter regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Sonny Lorrius US Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti, Pamela A. White (left), listens as guest speaker and panelist Capt. Christine E. Dorr Fleet Surgeon of COMUSNAVSO/C4F speaks at the 2014 Florida International Summit, held at the University of North Florida, located in Jacksonville Fla. Feb. 12. The overall event is focused on global health and medical diplomacy between Haiti and Florida. Some topics included roles of Non-Government Organizations, disaster relief, health challenges, and post-disaster womens health. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Chief of Navy Reserve Meets With, Recognizes Sailors In Jacksonville-area UnitsBy MCC Elizabeth ThompsonU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Chief of Navy Reserve spoke with Sailors about issues facing the Reserves and recognized personnel for their accom plishments during a visit to Jacksonville from Feb. 20 to Feb. 22. During her visit, Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun met with command ing officers from Navy Operational Support Center Jacksonville, held an allhands call and visited dif ferent commands to learn about the needs of locally drilling Sailors. While in the area, she met with Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, and with Reserve Sailors supporting the command on Naval Station Mayport. She also spoke at the change of command ceremony for Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 (HSL60) on Naval Station Mayport. Ways to improve training, unit and overall Reserve force manning, and mission capabilities were top areas of discus sion throughout the visit. More than 150 Sailors attended the all-hands call at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserve, to exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. I always value the information and recom mendations I get from the deckplate Sailors as they are working with the fleet and have first-hand knowl edge of todays issues and challenges, Braun told participants. In a meeting with com manding officers, Braun received reports on how units support the active component in NOSC Jacksonvilles area of responsibility and on how Reserve billets are manned. Two commands highlighted at the meeting were Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe and Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasure Mission Module Mayport, which provided pre-commission ing availability support aboard the USS Coronado (LCS 4) from Jan. 31 to Feb. 12. Over that time period, 37 Reserve Sailors assisted their active duty counterparts with AntiTerrorism Force Protection watch standing, comple tion of 602 Planned Maintenance System checks in five work centers, and 145 equipment valida tions. Braun praised the work aboard the Coronado and stressed the importance of supporting the LCS com munity as the Navy con tinues to consider Naval Station Mayport as the future homeport for about 1,000 Sailors and 14 new LCS ships estimated to join the fleet by 2020. The work you are doing is proof of concept that this program is the right way to go, said Braun. I com mend you on the excellent work you are doing. While on NAS Jacksonville, Braun toured spaces at Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During a pin ning ceremony at the command, she recognized two Reserve Sailors for their completion of the Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist Program. Braun also traveled to Blount Island in the St. Johns River, where she toured the spaces of the 4th Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment (NELR), recognized three Sailors for their com pletion of the Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist Program, partic ipated in advanced cargo simulator training, and asked about issues facing personnel assigned to the command. 4th NELR serves as the headquarters element for two Navy cargo han dling battalions and one expeditionary communi cations detachment com prised of about 660 Full Time Support and Selected Reserve Sailors from 10 bases throughout Navy Region Southeast. Yeoman 1st Class (EXW/ AW) Keith Henley, one of the Sailors pinned Feb. 22, said he appreciated the time Braun took to interact with Reserve Sailors and see some of the training 4th NELR does onsite. To have Vice Adm. Braun take time out of her schedule to visit a small er command and have the cargo handlers get some one-on-one time with her is always nice, Henley said. NOSC Jacksonville pro vides support to approxi mately 2,000 Sailors in 66 units at seven loca tions including NAS Jacksonville; Naval Station Mayport; Blount Island; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy; Stuttgart Army Airfield, Germany; and Royal Air Force Molesworth, England. -Photo by MC2 Daniel MeshelBraun serves as guest speaker during a change of command ceremony for Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60. Cmdr. Oscar Toledo assumed command of HSL-60 from Cmdr. William Maske. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun poses for a group photo after an all-hands call held at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonBraun answers questions during an informal all-hands call at Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment at Blount Island, located in the St. Johns River. The all-hands call was part of a visit by Braun to local units assigned to Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, so Sailors could hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges reservists face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Below, Braun speaks to Sailors at COMUSNAVSO during her visit to NS Mayport. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Phil Sea Sets Sail With CSGBy SHSN Matthew MuhlUSS Philippine SeaUSS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departed Feb. 15 attached to Carrier Strike Group TWO (CSG 2) for an extended deployment. Following on the heels of a recent change of command in October 2013, the guided-missile cruiser is supporting USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) with Maritime Security Operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Philippine Sea, recipi ent of the 2012 Battle E Award, will join three ships and eight aircraft squadrons to defend the Nimitz-class nuclear powered carrier as these operations, as well as theater security cooperation efforts supporting regional stability, are carried out. The deployment will be the 2nd for George H.W. Bush, the Navys newest aircraft carrier and, along with Carrier Strike Group (CSG 2), the carriers strike group staff also consists of Carrier Air Wing (CVW 8) and a Destroyer Squadron (CDS 22). In addition, USS Philippine Sea boasts a newly remodeled ship store a 40K+ renovation entirely funded by MWR profits which is providing all hands aboard the ves sel both extra variety and morale as they seek to complete the deployments mission. -Photo by MC2 Carlos M. Vazquez IIThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), right, fires a 5-inch gun during a live fire exercise with the guided-missile destroyers USS Truxton (DDG 103) and USS Arleigh Burke, not shown, as they transit in formation while underway in the Atlantic Ocean. Philippine Sea, Truxton and Arleigh Burke are part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 and are deploying in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Looking For A Navy Career Challenge?From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAre you looking for a new career challenge? Do you want an opportunity to receive $450 extra a month in Special Duty Assignment Pay? Consider applying for recruiting duty and take advantage of the many bonuses and opportunities available with these assignments. To qualify, Sailors in pay grades E-5 E-8 with a good service record should first take the Recruiter Aptitude Battery assess ment at https://militaps. nmci.mil/rab. Next, Sailors should call their detailer to request to be released to special programs for recruiting. Some ratings are not eligible, but others have a great chance of selec tion. Finally, once a Sailor is nominated they have 30 days to complete screening requirements and submit. Special Programs detail ers advise that any Sailor applying for recruiting duty to apply for and obtain a secret clearance at least 18 months prior to their Projected Rotation Date. Security clearances are mandatory for any special assignments. For more information, visit the Recuiting Duty Page of the NPC website at www.npc.navy.mil/enlisted/ detailing/shorespecialpro grams/recruiting/Pages/ Recruiting%20Duty.aspx. A CFC participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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DOD Stresses Cutting Debt, Saving More in Military Saves WeekBy Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceBecause Defense Department leaders believe personal financial readiness equals mission readiness, officials want service members to set a goal, make a plan and save automatically in the Military Saves Week campaign that started Feb. 24, a senior Pentagon official said. Military Saves is a yearlong campaign with DOD partner the Consumer Federation of America as part of the larger America Saves effort, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments office of family policy and children and youth. DOD over last 10 years has had a very robust financial readiness campaign, Thompson said of the total-force program, which began in 2003. Military Saves encour ages service members and their families to take a pledge to reduce debt and set up automatic savings programs for necessities such as retirement, emer gency and contingency savings. The first step in attain ing financial security is making a commitment to changing personal spend ing and savings habits, Thompson noted. Financial readiness is equated with mission readiness within DOD, she added, because when a service member has financial difficulty, it can affect job performance. DOD feels so strongly about [financial readiness], every major installation and family support center will have personal finan cial managers to provide counseling and education to service members and their families, Thompson said, adding that instal lation banks and credit unions also are committed to increasing financial lit eracy. Taking a pledge to reduce debt and save money has become a tradition for service members, families and DOD civil ians to make a commitment to themselves, Thompson said. The pledge can be taken online or publicly during a major installation event during Military Saves Week. Last year, we had over 29,000 [people] take the pledge, and thats exciting, she noted. Thompson said pledg ing to save and developing plans to do so are individual. Some people might save a set amount of money each payday, while others devote a percentage, for example. Thompson also empha sized that developing a financial readiness plan is a family affair, and said the sooner children are intro duced to the habit of sav ing and spending wisely, the earlier they will learn sound financial skills. Everyone needs to have financial education, she said. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan and its Roth IRA TSP counterpart offer painless avenues to auto matically save, and the TSP plans are among DODs pillars of its military fam ily readiness campaign, Thompson said. The TSP gives you an opportunity to think about your long-term future ... [such as] retirement, because we think its far away, but its not, she said. Every day, you need to start thinking about saving for retirement. Offering resources such as TSP shows how serious DOD is about its troops saving and reducing debt for their successes in life, Thompson added. In the past 10 years, the numbers of service mem bers and their families enrolling in the [traditional] TSP and the new Roth TSP have increased, Thompson said, calling that develop ment very exciting. The Military OneSource website is another resource for help with financial planning, offering online financial tools and up to 12 sessions per monetary issue for face-to-face or tele phone financial counseling, she said. About 65 percent of troops and families have emergency savings plans, Thompson said. Thats important. Our message is getting across about how important savings is, she added. Overall, having a fam ily financial preparedness plan is something service members and their fami lies should have first and foremost on their minds, Thompson emphasized. Your financial stability is going to make sure your family is secure, and that you dont have to worry unnecessarily about some thing you do have control over, she said. -Photo courtesy of Beaches Division of the JAX ChamberGroup photo of mayors from the Jacksonville Beaches cities after the Beaches Division of the JAX Chamber Status of the Beaches Communities held on Feb 13 at Casa Marina Hotel. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wesley McCall, left, was one of the speakers since NS Mayport is considered the 4th Beaches city. The mayors spoke about recent successes and some of the challenges facing the Beaches communities and Naval Station Mayport. A Part Of The CommunityLocal Community Center Seeks Photos Of WWII VetsFrom The Cultural CenterThe Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II, written and photographed by Thomas Sanders, is a special exhibit that has traveled across America bringing to life stories of valor and horror from World War II veterans. The exhibit will be on display at the Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Feb. 28 through April 4. To add a local viewpoint and coincide with this powerful national exhibit, The Cultural Center will create a local heroes exhibition in their community gallery and exhibit photographs of the World War II veterans from families in the Jacksonville community. Local residents are asked to drop off a framed 8x10 military photograph of someone in their family who served during World War II. Frames must have a notch or hanging wire attached on the back of the frame. Be sure to clearly identify who the sub ject is and what branch of the service they served and perhaps where they were stationed. Securely attach your name and phone number to the back of the frame. Drop the framed photograph off at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. by Feb. 17. Photographs can be picked up April 7. For more information, call Judy Hixenbaugh at 904-280-0614, Ext. 202 or email jhixenbaugh@ccpvb.org. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11

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2014 Patient Guide Now AvailableBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now instock and available at all of its facilitiesits hospital and branch health clinics and at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax. The Guide provides patients with current infor mation on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expect ing and new parent ser vices, pharmacy and the many other services, pro grams and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/ user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy. mil to sign up for email updates. Image of 2014 Patient Guide coverTRICARE For Life Begins Notifications For Pharmacy PilotFrom a Tricare News ReleaseTRICARE For Life ben eficiaries soon will receive letters guiding them to TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery or a mili tary pharmacy for some prescriptions as part of a congressionally mandated pilot program, officials of the military health care plan said. TRICARE For Life is secondary coverage for TRICARE beneficiaries who have both Medicare Parts A and B in the United States and U.S. territories. Starting this week, offi cials will send letters to affected TRICARE For Life beneficiaries notifying them of the pilot program. The pilot program starts March 15, and it requires beneficiaries who use TRICARE For Life to get certain medications through Home Delivery or at a military pharmacy. The pro gram applies to refills of maintenance medications taken regularly for chronic conditions, officials said. As part of the pilot pro gram, officials added, TRICARE will stop paying for these medications from a retail pharmacy. But they noted that the program does not apply to medications for acute conditions taken for a limited time, such as antibiotics or pain medica tions or any generic medi cations. At this time, they said, it also does not apply to generic drugs. Congress mandated the pilot program in the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act. It will last for five years, but beneficiaries may choose to opt out after filling an affected prescription under the pilot program through Home Delivery for one year. Beneficiaries will be notified if they are taking a medication covered under the program. They will have two courtesy fills available through a retail pharmacy before they are responsible for the entire cost of their medication. Beneficiaries may call the TRICARE pharmacy contractor, Express Scripts, at 1-877-882-3335 or visit the Express Scripts web site to switch to Home Delivery or with questions about their medications. To switch a prescription to a military pharmacy, ben eficiaries may need to get a new prescription from their doctor, officials said. Some people are exempt, including people with another prescription drug plan or people living over seas. People living in a nursing home may contact Express Scripts to request a waiver from the pilot program. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers ben eficiaries a 90-day sup ply of their medication with no copays for generic drugs and $13 for brandname drugs. Switching from a retail pharmacy to Home Delivery can save TRICARE beneficiaries up to $152 every year for each prescription, officials said. Beneficiaries also can save by asking their doc tor to write them a prescription for a generic version of their medication, they added. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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NMC Health Center Releases Healthy Living PSAFrom Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC) announced the release of a Healthy Living Public Service Announcement (PSA), Feb. 19. The Healthy Living PSA is part of NMCPHCs ongoing Health Promotion and Wellness (HPW) Campaign, and walks viewers through a day in the life of a male and female Sailor making healthy choices in order to facilitate readiness and resilience, prevent ill ness and injury, hasten recovery, and promote lifelong healthy behaviors. Sailors and Marines face a variety of everyday lifestyle decisions, whether its finding the right exer cise routine, such as Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS), to better meet operational duties, making healthy food choices, or choosing not to use tobacco for optimal performance, said Cmdr. Connie Scott, registered dietician and NMCPHC HPW department head. Its those concerns that led us to develop the Healthy Living PSA. Its important that Sailors and Marines maintain a healthy body weight and body fat percentage, get the recommended amount of physical activity and exer cise, live tobacco free, and consume the recommended nutrients from food so they can stay fit for service. The PSA features Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Anna Rodriguez and Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Neil Mendoza, both command fitness leaders (CFLs), who shared their perspective on the importance of active living and proper nutrition to encourage other Sailors to make healthy lifestyle decisions that help combat the heightened obesity rates among active duty service members, improve perfor mance, and support resil ience and readiness. I spend the day run ning up and down, any where from the eighth deck to 04 level, 05 level, up to the mast and Windbirds. If Im not healthy, if Im not in shape, Im not going to make it through the day. So I definitely need to keep healthy to reach my full potential, said Rodriguez. When I eat breakfast, not only do I feel better, but my day goes better, added Mendoza. There are two versions, a 60-second PSA and a 2-minute PSA. Check out and share these videos and others on NMCPHCs YouTube channel: http:// www.youtube.com/user/ NMCPHC. To learn more about the HPW campaign and access and download materials, visit the NMCPHC Health Promotion and Wellness homepage, www.med.navy. mil/sites/nmcphc/healthpromotion. DOD Focuses On Healthy, Active KidsBy Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith the national rate of childhood obesity increas ing, the Defense Department wants to ensure children in military families lead healthy and active lifestyles, the Defense Departments director of the office of family policy and children and youth said. In a recent interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson said that nationally, 12.5 million children and adoles cents from age 2 to 19 are overweight a figure thats tripled since 1980. Military children are a microcosm of that group, she noted. Todays generation of children is the first one at risk of dying before their parents, she added. Facing such risks, families should set goals for healthy food choices and more physical activities for their children, Thompson said. Its important for children to see the most important models in their lives doing the same things they should do, she said. Its of critical importance that children start healthy habits at a very early age. The bottom line is [that] obesity is preventable. DODs message for young children and adolescents is called 5-2-1, Thompson said. It calls for five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, two hours or less of screen time, one hour of moderate to vigorous exercise and zero sweetened drinks, which is a plan that can be used at home and in school. She defined screen time as any activity involving television, computers, video games, movies and other devices that lead to a sedentary life style. Obesity also can lead to serious diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure, Thompson said. Children without healthy diets and routine exercise start at early ages to build plaque in their arteries, and are at risk for future health issues, she added. And national security can become an issue when peo ple cannot enter military service because of their weight and health-related diseases, Thompson said. Resources for setting dietary and exercise goals are abundant for military families, Thompson said. One way to begin children on a path to healthy eat ing and routine exercise is to have meals as families, she said. Cutting sugar and salt, reducing overall fat and cooking in a healthy manner such as steaming certain foods rather than fat-frying them also are necessary to a better lifestyle, she noted. After dinner, families can take walks together and make plans for weekend bike rides and other physi cal activities, Thompson suggested. Health and nutrition help is available from numerous resources, she said, noting that First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move! ini tiative includes a website that provides a variety of healthy recipes and ways to add activity into childrens everyday lives. While school districts have begun to offer healthy food choices, parents should become involved with the Parent-Teacher Association and similar groups if their childrens schools do not deliver healthy food choices or provide inadequate exer cise time and activities, she said. The Military OneSource website offers a health and wellness coach program thats good for goal setting for cardiovascular health and nutrition habits, Thompson said. Child and youth develop ment centers and morale, welfare, and recreation pro grams on military installa tions offer emphasis on eat ing healthy foods and pur suing active lifestyles, she said. Help also is available to advise families on how to shop for groceries and pre pare meals in a healthy manner, she said. The earlier children ingrain specific [habits], the more they will stay with them whether its brushing their teeth before bed, washing their hands, or [remem bering] to drink water and eat fruits and vegetables, Thompson said. In achieving Joint Commission accreditation, Naval Hospital Jacksonville has dem onstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients, says Mark G. Pelletier, The Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certification Operations chief operating officer. The Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accredit ing body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. Through sequestration, reduced budgets and civilian furloughs this past year, Naval Hospital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding offi cer. This recognition and accreditation demonstrates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive difference in the lives of our patients. The MEDIG team, after reviewing 60 programs (from research ethics to patient access) in January, offered a resounding endorsement of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax.From Page 1Clinic THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double pay outs on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your gen eral trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green out fit and enjoy DJ enter tainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-youcan-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. March 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up dead line March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transportation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an over view of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for any one interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 3-6: Pre-Season Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 2705451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, AllYou-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowl ing for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Improving lives. Curing type 1 diabetes (T1D). ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS ducks.org 800-45DUCKS Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. 13 MILLION ACRESAND COUNTING 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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DOD To Preserve Historic ImagesBy Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Imagery Management Operations Center recently signed a $5 million agreement to digitize, store and provide access to hundreds of thousands of historical images. DIMOC is the Defense Departments central repository for visual imagery. It exists to preserve visual records first for the DOD, and then for other agencies and members of the pub lic, said Mike Edrington, DIMOC director. Those images are then made available via defenseimag ery.mil. But, in addition to its digital archive, the agency has a massive backlog of images on physical, ana log media that ranges from photographic negatives and slides to films and VHS tapes. That material is deteriorating faster than we can offer it to the National Archives and we need to get it into a digital form Edrington said. In addition, DIMOCs climate-con trolled automated storage facility at March Air Base in Riverside, Calif., is running out of space, he said. The Riverside facility is where analog visual imag ery assets are shipped and processed. Those assets werent always being stored in ideal conditions before they were sent to DIMOC, Edrington said. The images are often found in obscure places on bases as they close down or as offices move, he said. Theyve found it in cor ners of warehouses, and sometimes we dont know exactly where the stuffs found, but it comes deliv ered to us, it shows up on a pallet ... and sometimes the stuff says box of stuff. Regardless of condition, images sent to Riverside are never simply destroyed, Edrington noted, because theyre federal records. Everything is assessed, barcoded and stored for later digitization. We want the material. If they find it, we want it, Edrington said, noting that DOD personnel can contact DIMOC customer service if they have images they want to accession. They can be reached by email at askdi moc@dma.mil or by phone at 1-888-PH-DIMOC (7434662). The images in DIMOCs digital holdings are also shared with the National Archives, he said. Theres a lot of his tory, Edrington said. Its not just celebrities such as Elvis Presley ... weve got that kind of stuff, but more importantly, weve got soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines doing what they do. A digitization and stor age study conducted in 2010 by the Defense Media Activity, DIMOCs par ent organization, found it would take up to 50 years and at least $25 million to digitize the current ana log holdings with avail able government resources, Edrington said. By taking a different approach, the new contract will shorten that period to five years at a fraction of the cost. The contract is the first of its kind in the Defense Department, Edrington said. In exchange for digi tizing the images, the con tractor, T3Media, will be granted a limited period of exclusivity during which they will be able to charge non-DOD users a fair-market fee to use the images. All DOD personnel will be able to access and download the images for free by accessing a secure website, Edrington said. In this constrained bud get environment, the department can no lon ger afford to subsidize the access of commercial media and non-government entities to DOD imagery. Changing to a fee-based system will offset the cost of digitizing, storing and providing public access to the imagery. This is a true partner ship, Edrington said. Its really in our interest that T3 succeeds. The fees are essentially a convenience fee for making accessibility to the images a matter of simply going online and searching by keywords, rather than waiting 30-60 days for a response to a Freedom of Information Act Request for images that may or may not exist, Edrington said. The arrangement is similar to the one made by the National Archives with Ancestry.com, he said, which is permitted to charge a fee for access to certain federal records in exchange for digitizing, categorizing and storing those records. Balfour Beatty Accepting Applications For ScholarshipBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities Foundations is once again offering post-secondary academic scholarships to both high school seniors and under graduate students who reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military family housing. The applica tion process is now open for scholarships that will be awarded for the 2014-2015 academic year. We are so thankful to be able to support the continuing education of our young residents through the Foundation schol arship program, said Chris Williams, presi dent of the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation. I encourage all of our residents who are planning on or currently attending a post-secondary school to apply for a Foundation Scholarship in recogni tion of their hard work and achievements. On average, Foundation scholarships are awarded in amounts up to $2,500, however larger amounts may be awarded based on the number and caliber of submissions. Applicants must be the child of an activeduty service member and reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military housing. Additional eligibility requirements and applica tion details and submittal requirements can be found on the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation website (www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org). Please note, all applications must be postmarked by April 15, 2014. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization, which was founded in 2007, is committed to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families. One of the Foundations primary goals is to support continuing education and the development of future community leaders through an annual academic schol arship program and other initiatives. Balfour Beatty Communities manages the privatized family housing at Naval Station Mayport. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality liv ing environment that sup ports the diverse interests and needs of the military families residing with us. Through the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we extend our appreciation and gratitude for the important work performed by military members and the many sacrifices their fami lies make. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 15

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Obermeyer jacket with the powder blue chevron and new Atomic Skis, people would actually expect me to know what I was doing. In high school, my best friend, Patti, and I joined the Ski Club, boarding a coach bus to the ski resorts every Friday night. Other than rumors of who was making out with whom on the bus, Patti and I con cerned ourselves only with the fake personas we would use to meet cute boys on the slopes. Even then, we understood the snob bery to which skiing lent itself. I became Brooke Taylor from a snooty town in Connecticut, and she, Claire Townsend, my rich cousin visiting from some stuck up prep school. We never got to use our alter egos, but in the process of trying to rein vent ourselves, we finally learned to ski. Recently, a friend asked me to go skiing with her in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. A middle-aged Navy wife who has moved nine times in 20 years, I had got ten rid of my ski equip ment many moves ago, and had not skied in years. Do you ski? she asked. Swallowing my panic, I chuckled my pat response, But of course, I grew up skiing. Adorned with hopelessly scratched equipment I rented from the bases Outdoor Recreation Center, I tried to quell my performance anxiety as the quad lift reached the summit. I felt out of place amongst the well-todo resort families decked to the nines, even though I knew that, based on my appearance, onlookers were surprised to see that I could ski at all. Later at the lodge, while nonchalantly sipping a plastic cup of hefewei zen and trying to look like a regular, I had a minor epiphany. Down deep beneath my faux-Nordic sweater, I knew that none of it YMCA rope tow humiliations, borrowed parkas, high school inse curities, rental equipment really mattered. Just like everyone else in the lodge telling tall tales and walking like idiots in ski boots, I could ski. Snobbery was optional. Get more wit and obser vations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesoflife. comFrom Page 2SkiingMidway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speaker is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and Veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts and those currently serv ing have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol. comFFSC Workshops Available To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Preregistration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup, USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address spe cific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communication is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and tod dlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowl edge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Anger Management, Bldg Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judg ment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recommended as well. March 3, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 3, 10 a.m.-Noon, What About The Kids, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, development and socialization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many par ents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may pro vide an additional motiva tor for ending the violence and seeking intervention. March 3, 1:30 p.m.3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 3-7, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Victim Advocate Training Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 4-5, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Million Dollar Sailor Bldg 1 Room 702 March 4, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debilitat ing effects. This program is designed to provide par ticipants with an under standing of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. March 5, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 M arch 5, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 6, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 6, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 10, 1:30 p.m.3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 10, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 10-14, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 11, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Welcome to The Military Bldg. 1 Room 702 Are you a new military spouse or new to the area, this one day workshop provides valuable informa tion on the military life style, benefits, finances and resources. Guest speak ers from the military and civilian communities will present useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. March 12, 11 a.m.Noon, Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1 Room 719 March 12, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 12, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 13, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 Mayport Helps Release Retiring Sailors Back To The Civilian WorldBy MC1 Michael WissNPASE Det SoutheastThe day-to-day life of the military is a regular routine. Everything is laid out; when to go to work; what uniform to wear; when to eat and when to do physical training. So what happens when your duty to your country comes to an end after 20 years? For many who havent known anything except being a Sailor, the transition can be a daunting task. Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Service Center has a program to make sure no one is left out in the cold. The redesigned TAP or Transition GPS (Goals, Plans, Success) program is a five-day workshop that ensures Sailors are ready to make the transition to civilian life. The program is mandatory, which was created in response to the Veterans Opportunity to Work Act. According to Mayport Fleet and Family Service Center Transition Program Manager Terri Johnson-Salter, the new program is a work in progress, but is helping to get retiring Sailors better equipped to continue their careers in the civilian world. The mandatory program forces the member to attend the classes instead of being able to skip the courses, she said. With the redesigned plan we make sure the Sailor is career ready and able to adjust to being in the civilian world. The programs main goal is to stan dardize the transition support that Sailors receive in order to make them as employment ready as possible. The program includes pre-separation counsel ing, a military to civilian skills review, a VA benefits briefing and application sign-up, financial planning support, job search skills building, and individual transition plan preparation. According to Johnson-Salter, the program is much more than just finding a new job or career. Most Sailors think about this course as getting ready for civilian employ ment, we want to assist them in career and family preparation for the civilian community, she said. Getting a job is a big part of the program, but there are many other aspects retiring military members need to plan for. Before attending the program all military members must complete the Individual Transition Plan (TIP) checklist (DD form 2958). Points discussed include: checklist DD Form 2648 budget reflecting personal and family goals and obligations. Crosswalk military skill set to civilian skills, to include an evaluation for the demand for those civilian skills within the potential relocation destinations. Although there are many tools to help transition for retiring military members, according to Johnson-Salter, it is there responsibility to utilize them. The family service center is not just providing the program, we are passionate about it, she said. Sailors have to take GPS in a timely manner, to plan well in advance of their separation date. We want to make sure military members have a smooth easy transition into civilian life. The budget looks to retire some weapon systems no longer needed and to slow growth in pay, compensa tion and health care costs. These changes have been examined and dis cussed over the past year at every level, to include the service chiefs and at monthly sessions, Dempsey said. The chiefs looked for a balanced package addressing direct and indirect compensation, the general said, looking to minimize disruption for service members in personnel accounts while finding the money to bring personnel accounts into balance with readiness and modernization accounts. This was to make absolutely sure that whenever we send you in harms way, we can ensure that you are the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped force on the planet, Dempsey said. The chairman said he thinks the chiefs did a good job under difficult fiscal circumstances. But were also going to want to hear from you, he said. As this budget is dropped next week on Capitol Hill and the debate begins, I encourage you to let us know what you think about the totality of the budget. Arguing to maintain the status quo is not realistic, the chairman said. Weve got to make changes, so you cant just dig in and say, No change, he said. We want to make sure were making the right changes, and we only want to do it once. This is just my initial engagement with you, the chairman continued. This discussion is just begin ning, and Ill need your help in order to figure out which are right.From Page 1Budget

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CHINFO Award Winner USS De WertWorks With Habitat For Humanity Page 7 Separating From Navy?FFSC Is Here To Help You Navigate Page 16 New HospitalPatient Guides Available Page 12 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Clinic Gets Gold Seal For CareBy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterOn the heels of its recent Joint Commission reaccreditation and Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection, Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Feb. 14. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of recognition for patientcentric care, was awarded to all primary care clinics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilleits hospital and all five of its branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. The Navys approach to the Patient-Centered Medical Home is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of care giversfrom doctors to nurses and case manag ersled by the primary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-for-profit organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval during its reaccreditation process in January, NBHC Mayport was recognized for its con tinuing compliance with The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art, national standards of care. Offering A Helping HandUSS Gettysburg Assists MarinersSee Story Page 4 Citizen Sailor Takes Command Of HSL-60By Daniel MeshelNavy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC)Cmdr. Oscar Toledo assumed command from Cmdr. William Maske of Helicopter AntiSubmarine Squadron Light 60 (HSL-60) during a change of com mand ceremony Feb. 21. Family, friends and Jaguars of HSL-60 attended the ceremony aboard Naval Station Mayport, where Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun served as guest speaker for the event. Since Cmdr. Maske took over HSL-60, his focus has been on the three Ps, said Braun. Those three Ps are people, purpose and professionalism. I love it, and this focus has proven essential to the Jaguars success. By concentrating on people and fostering a positive command climate in which all can succeed, HSL-60 has truly soared. Maske, a native of Washington, D.C., attended the United States Naval Academy and graduated in 1995 before reporting to Pensacola, Fla., for flight training. He was des ignated a Naval Aviator in October 1997 and has served within numer ous squadrons and shore installa tions during his more than 20-year Naval career. Maske reported to HSL-60 as commanding officer in January 2013, where he successfully led more than 200 Sailors through multiple high-visibility missions. Youve done a tremendous job as a commanding officer, said Braun, highlighting his many achievements -Photo by Paige GnannCmdr. Oscar Toledo, left, salutes Cmdr. William Maske as he assumes command of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 as CHSMWL Commodore, Capt. Clayton Conley watches the exchange during a change of command ceremony on Feb. 21 at the squadron hangar. See HSL-60, Page 7Dempsey Seeks Feedback On BudgetBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceArmy Gen. Martin E. Dempsey wants feedback from service members on the fiscal year 2015 defense budget request that he and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel outlined to reporters at the Pentagon on Feb. 24. In an interview in his Pentagon office posted on Facebook, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff asked service members to contact him about their feelings on the budget in general and the pay, com pensation and health care portion of the proposal, in particular. Dempsey said the bud get proposal is one step in the ongoing effort to bring some stability and cer tainty to our budget. The fiscal 2014 budget now in effect and the fiscal 2015 request do give the Defense Department some certainty, as the Bipartisan Budget Act passed last year gave some relief from sequestra tion. But beyond fiscal 2015, sequestration still looms. Because of that -it is the law -weve had to do some planning on force structure, readiness [and] modernization, as well as changes to pay, compensa tion and health care, the general said. The chairman set aside any discussion on mili tary retirement for the time being. Any changes to retirement will be proposed by a commission that will render its review some time in the next six to nine months, he said. Even then, its been the posi tion of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that any changes to retirement will be grandfa thered. That term means any changes would affect only those people who join the military on or after the effective date. Balance is the key word for the process that led to the budget request, Dempsey said. What we are really trying to do here is find the right balance for our manpower costs in the context of the other things weve got to do, he explained. Weve got to buy new equipment, weve got to reset from 10 years of war, weve got to train, weve got to send men and women to school, weve got to provide health care, weve got to pay for the infrastructure we have. The budget request includes proposals to make adjustments. The request asks Congress to authorize a base realignment and clo sure process in fiscal 2017 so DOD can shed excess and costly infrastructure. See Clinic, Page 13 See Budget, Page 16

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ............................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A St Valentines Day Celebrates LoveEach February we have a day in our society when we celebrate LOVE. It is called Valentines Day. Have you ever wondered how Valentines Day got started? Who started this day of Love and why? Beginnings are always interesting because you usually discover something you didnt expect to find. So I began surfing the internet to see what I could find about Valentines Day. Huffington Posts and Wikipedias articles on Valentines Day prob ably capture the essence of the beginnings of this most romantic of days. As the legend is recounted, there was a priest named Valentine or Valentinus during the third cen tury A.D. under Emperor Claudius II. The Emperor decided that unmarried soldiers fought better than married ones, so he made the unpopular decision to ban marriages among young people. In response, Valentine began secretly officiating marriages. His newly expanded ministry to these young couples who desperately wanted to be married, however, was eventually discovered and he was imprisoned. One interesting aspect of this story says that supposedly Valentine wore a ring with the image of Cupid on it, a symbol legal in the Roman Empire at the time, so soldiers could recognize him and secretly ask to be married. The story continues that Valentine was persecuted as a Christian while in prison and questioned person ally by Roman Emperor Claudius. Claudius attempted to convert him to paganism, but failed. Not to be outdone, Valentine tried to convert Claudius to Christianity, but he also failed. Before his execu tion, the story says that he performed a miracle by healing the blind daugh ter of his jailer Asterius. As a result of this heal ing, the jailers daughter Julia, and 44 members of his household converted to Christianity and were bap tized. The Wikipedia article adds to the unfolding story, according to Henry Ansgar Kellythat on the evening before Valentine was to be executed, he would have written the first valentine card himself, addressed to the daughter of his jailer Asterius, who was no longer blind, sign ing as Your Valentine. The expression From Your Valentine was later adopt ed by modern Valentine letters. This legend has been published by both American Greetings and The History Channel. At the end of the fifth century, Pope Galasius I declared Feb. 14 to be Saint Valentines Day. Valentines Day has been celebrated for 1500 years! Both Chaucer and Shakespeare link Valentines Day and romance in their works. In the United States, Esther Howland of Worcester, Massachusetts, designed the first massproduced valentines made from embossed paper in 1847. As we all know, it has grown from there to include not only Valentine cards, but roses, choco lates and now even jewelry. Since 2001, the Greeting Card Association has pre sented the Esther Howland Award for a Greeting Card Visionary. The Greeting Card Association estimates that 190 million Valentines are sent each year. If you include valentineexchanged cards in school, the number jumps to over 1 billion with teachers receiving the most valentines. Only LOVE. CHAPLAINSCORNERChaplain Steven Souders CNSL Ministry CenterMayport Elementary Presents Bullying Prevention Resources to ParentsMayport Elementary hosted their Mid-Year Stakeholders meeting on Tuesday, February 11th in the schools media cen ter. Parents, community representatives, faculty, and administration were present. After a report by Principal Yvonne DiMattia on the schools aca demic progress, Melissa Hammond, school coun selor, and Susan Schanen, Military Family Life Counselor presented the program Bullies Are a Pain in the Brain. This PowerPoint was fol lowed by a group discus sion of ways to manage bullying and to resolve conflicts. Discussion points included the follow ing: What to do when older sibling bullies you. dent). strategies practice at home/ at school. conflict. instead of You state ments. Summary: Learn the skill of positive, productive communication. What to do if there is a threat of more hurt if the bullied person tells. KNOWINGTHE ROPESJudy Cromartie School Liaison OfficerSkiing on Hot Air Still Makes For Good StoriesDo I ski? Well, of course, Ive dismissed such questions with a pre tentious chuckle. I grew up skiing, Id say, hop ing my haughty response conjured up images of me slaloming between moguls, skidding to snow-spray ing stops, and mingling in Nordic sweaters around cozy lodge fireplaces. They dont need to know that my first skiing experiences were behind the YMCA in my rural Pennsylvania hometown. Two dollars provided my brother and I with merci lessly gouged rental equip ment and unlimited rides on the slopes only lift -a rudimentary rope tow with a sputtering motor that sounded as if it had been pirated from a lawn mower. My 100 percent acrylic mittens not only failed to keep out the cold, but they made it nearly impossible to grip the ice-glazed rope tow. When I managed to clamp down hard enough, my body lurched forward unexpectedly, sometimes loosening my precarious grip and causing annoyed The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFELisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse ColumnistAsh Wednesday At Base ChapelFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport Chapel has announced its Protestant and Catholic Lenten Schedule. On Ash Wednesday, March 5, there will be a service at 11 a.m. in the small Chapel and a 6 p.m. service in the main Chapel for Protestant worshipers. Catholic Mass will be held at 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the main Chapel on March 5. Stations of the Cross will be held on Fridays of Lent at 6:30 p.m. in the small chapel. There will be a potluck supper following in the Fellowship Hall. For more information about the Chapel schedules and services, call 270-5212. kids to stack up behind me like dominoes. Eventually, our par ents took my brother and I to the various local ski resorts: Hidden Valley, Seven Springs, Blue Knob, Laurel Valley. Having never heard of brand names such as Rossignol and K2, our family of four rented equipment and wore whatever we had in our closets, much of which was fluores cent orange or emblazoned with Pittsburgh Steelers insignia. If we made it out of the slushy, clattering equip ment rental rigmarole intact, we still had to get our skis on without mak ing complete fools out of ourselves. Despite witness ing the experienced skiers pop their boots into bind ings with minimal effort, I always seemed to find myself doing the splits right there in front of all the cool people. It wasnt pretty, but I persevered, getting up and falling down over and over again putting on skis, get ting on and off lifts, snow plowing, and sometimes, just standing there doing nothing. Besides knocking strangers over and forc ing lift operators to stop the motors to clear my sprawled body off the exits and entrances, all that fall ing served to desensitize me to embarrassment over time. One Christmas, my father outfitted our entire family in new ski parapher nalia. At first I couldnt wait to finally be legit, but with the proper equip ment and apparel came something I hadnt antici pated: expectations. In my brothers old parka, no one batted an eye when I plowed into someone in the T-bar line. However, in my white the bully; make it transpar ent. This program was a response to concerns about bullying at school and in the neighborhood. You also read about it in the national media and see it reported on television. You probably remember some bullying that took place at some time during your school days. You may even have experienced some level of bullying or maybe a friend did. As an adult you may have experienced or witnessed bullying in the workplace. Bullying is an all-toocommon human activity that has existed since the beginning of recorded his tory and is present in most cultures. It is enacted by both males and females. Research suggests that somewhere between 30 percent and 60 percent of American schoolchildren report being bullied. Bullying is about power. One psychologist is quoted as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or the indi vidual in the office with the least experience on the job. Whether it happened to you during school or on the job, you had your interests and feelings unfairly damaged by someone more powerful than you. And this power can take different forms. In terms of school, Florida law defines bullying as systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psychological distress on one or more students and may involve teasing, social exclusion, threat, intimidation, stalk ing, physical violence, theft, sexual, religious, or racial harassment, public humiliation, or destruction of property. To be officially identified as bulling, the mistreatment must psychological), and Indirect bullying behav iors include the following: lating relationships, a peer group, rassing, nasty and malicious rumors and lies about someone, and/or Harassment is any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture; use of data or computer soft ware; or written, verbal or physical conduct directed against a student that places the student in reasonable fear of harm to his person or damage to his property; has the effect of substan tially interfering with a students educational per formance, opportunities, or benefits; or has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of a school. All parents of schoolage children should know the law. Florida Statute 1006.147, The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act, prohibits bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a Florida public K 12 educational institution. This law requires that each school district in Florida adopt a policy prohibiting bullying and harassment of any student or employee of a public K 12 school. See Bully, Page 3 See Skiing, Page 16

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DoD CAPS Off Work Barriers With ProgramFrom DoDRecognizing the poten tial of its workforce, the Department of Defense (DoD) established the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP) to eliminate employ ment barriers for people with disabilities. CAPs mission, since its inception in 1990, is to provide assistive technology and accommodations to ensure people with disabili ties and wounded Services members have equal access to the information environ ment and opportunities in the DoD and throughout the Federal Government. Today, CAP has expand ed beyond the DoD to partner with 68 federal agencies making it the largest provider of reasonable accommodations in the world. The programs vision is to increase employment of people with disabilities and disabled veterans by ensur ing they have access to accommodations through out the DoD and Federal Government. Through CAPs Wounded Service Member (WSM) Initiative, CAP provides needs assess ments, assistive technol ogy and training to support wounded, ill and injured Service members through out all phases of recovery and transition to employ ment, directly impacting their rehabilitation pro cess. By implementing DoD Instruction 6025.22, AT for Wounded Service Members, CAP partners with Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs) to inte grate AT into the recovery and seamless transition pro cess. CAP does this by paying for and providing a wide variety of assistive technol ogy for people with hear ing, visual, dexterity, cog nitive, and communication disabilities. While CAP mainly focuses on purchasing assistive technology for employees with disabili ties, it also supports fed eral employees throughout the employment lifecycle, including; coming to work, staying at work, and return ing to work to help ensure the Federal Government is the model employer of people with disabilities and wounded Service members. Frequently requested accommodation solutions include videophones, per sonal amplification devices, screen magnification soft ware, screen readers, cue ing/memory aids, literacy software, alternative key boards, pointing devices, and speech recognition software. The process for WSM and federal employees customers to identify and request accommo dations through CAP is simple. Customers that already know what accommodations they need can request them through our online request form avail able at www.cap.mil/ wsm (Wounded Service Members) www.cap.mil (Federal Employees). For customers that need solu tions identified there are a number of options. The WSM team also visits a number of military instal lations throughout the year and conducts on-site needs assessments. CAPTEC, located at the Pentagon room 2D1049, will conduct in-person, phone, and video tele conference needs assess ments. For customers not located in the Washington, DC metro area that need an on-site assessment, one can be requested through the online request form at www.cap.mil/ wsm (Wounded Service Members) www.cap. mil (Federal Employees). Once solutions have been identified, all requests can be made through the same online request form. The CAP office is avail able to answer any disability or accommodation related questions. The CAP staff works with individuals to ensure the federal community complies with federal laws and assists in creat ing a more accessible information environment. CAP is committed to giv ing Service members the tools to prepare them for employment opportunities in the public or private sectors by allowing them to maximize their abilities. CAP offers a number of online tools to help our cus tomers, including: series of online training modules to help federal employers understand how simple and beneficial hiring employees with disabilities can be. Videos: A series of short videos to demonstrate available assistive technol ogy. up to date on new assis tive technology, disability events and more on the go. connected with CAP on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube! For further information and to use our online tools, please visit www.cap.mil, contact CAP at 703-6148416 (Voice) or via email at cap.wsm@mail.mil (wounded Service mem ber) cap@mail.mil (Federal Employees). The Duval County School Board has adopt ed an anti-bullying pol icy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bul lied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trusted adult. This report can be done anonymously. Call the Bullying Hotline at (904) 390-HELP. An investiga tion will be conducted at the school level by the principal or his/her desig nee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Now that you know the law, consider the follow ing tips to deter and dimin ish bullying at your childs school: schools designated admin istrator your concerns about bullying, such as issues with supervision and monitoring of students. a social safety network, and encourage them to travel via the buddy system. anti-bullying campaign website at www.stopbul lyingnow.hrsa.gov to find ideas to prevent bullying to share with your children. What about your chil dren? Are they being bullied? Possible warning signs include the following: missing belongings, bruises, excuses to avoid attending school, school, stomachaches, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, or bad dreams, and/or esteem. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the problem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school officials to find a solution. For more information: The Jeffrey Johnston Stand Up for All Students Act is a memorial to Jeffrey Johnston, son of Debbie and Robert Johnston. Jeffreys story can now be found, with other bullycide stories, in the book, Bullycide in America: Moms speak out about the bullying/suicide connection. The book can be ordered at www.bully cide.org. Stop Cyberbullying www.stopcyberbullying. org Available in schools: Pay It Forward (HS Character Education Library) 2000 Pocket Catherine Ryan Hyde Sarah and the Naked Truth (MS Character Education Library) 2002 Yearling Patricia MacLachlan Stand Tall Molly Lou Mellon (ES Character Education Library) 2001 G.P. Putnam and Sons Patty Lovell Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. From Page 2Bully THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Gettysburg Assists Mariners in DistressBy Lt. Ryan de VeraHarry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provided humanitarian assistance to three Iranian mariners on an adrift dhow in the Gulf of Oman, Feb. 16. Gettysburg stopped to ren der assistance at approximately 7:30 a.m. after being signaled by the mariners aboard the vessel, approximately 45 miles north of Muscat, Oman. According to the mariners, they had run out of food and drinking water, and had an inoperable engine. Gettysburg Sailors initially provided food and water for the mariners using a rigid-hull inflat able boat. Our ability to help our fellow mariners is absolutely vital, said Ensign James Barksdale, boat officer. In this case, we were able to provide food and water to allow these mariners to return home safely. For that crew to know that they can trust us and that we are here to help means that we did our job today. At approximately 5:30 p.m., the mariners were transferred to Gettysburg and seen by medi cal professionals to ensure their health and safety. The mariners were assessed as being dehy drated and given food and water. They were also provided facilities to shower and were given fresh clothing. Capt. Brad Cooper, USS Gettysburg commanding offi cer, led the on-scene assistance efforts. Today is another great exam ple of what U.S. Navy forward presence does to add to the stabil ity of the region, said Cooper. We are so pleased to have been in a position to help our fellow mariners who would otherwise have been in a potentially lifethreatening situation. The mariners will remain on Gettysburg overnight while arrangements for their safe return ashore are being made. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, commended Gettysburg for their efforts. This is another example of why U.S. naval presence in this region is so vitally important, said Sweeney. Through humanitarian acts like this one executed so professionally by the crew of the Gettysburg, we continue to build trust and confidence throughout the Gulf region. Gettysburg is currently deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security opera tions and theater security coop eration in the U. S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) prepare to provide humanitarian assistance to a stranded fishing vessel. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson A Sailor assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), foreground, provides humanitarian assistance to a stranded fishing vessel. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. -Photo by CS3 Kyle Bartlett Sailors assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provide human itarian assistance to stranded mariners. -Photo courtesy of USS GettysburgUSS Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group sup porting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 USS Halyburton Busy At Sea Sailors study for their Enlisted Surface Warfare (ESWS) pins aboard USS Halyburton. Lt j.g. Jeff Bland (right) creates a navy cash account for Seaman Apprentice Brandon Guitierrez (left) aboard USS Halyburton. -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettMachinists Mate 2nd class Tim Golden repairs the trash pulper aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Pilots prepare for flight operations in flight control aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of respon sibility. MWD Handler Apprenticeship Now AvailableBy Darryl OrrellCenter for Security Forces Public AffairsThe Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced the release of its 10th and newest apprentice ship trade that is specific to military working dog han dlers. Military working dogs and their handlers are a highly trained, highly skilled formidable duo. These teams are deployed throughout the world to perform duties of law enforcement and support a wide range of security operations. The United States Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) works closely with the Department of Labor to provide nationally rec ognized apprenticeships that result in journeymanlevel Certifications of Completion for service members. Enrollment for the Working Dog Handler apprenticeship is open to both Sailors and Marines. Enrollees must be assigned to a formal unit/activity where they perform appro priate duties with a military working dog. Sailors must serve in the Master-at-Arms (MA) rate and have completed MA A School. They must also hold the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) for working dog handler (NEC 2005) or kennel master (NEC 2006). Marines must be in the military occupa tional specialty for working dog handlers (MOS 5812). The apprenticeship requires a total of 2500hours of documented experience. The needed skills range from the administra tion and training of work ing dogs to maintaining kennels, dogs and safety. MAs can also select from nine other available apprenticeships that are listed below. Computer Operator Office Manager/ Administrative Services Police Office I (Government Service) Correction Officer (Government Service) Security Specialist Master Homeland Security Specialist Protective Security Specialist Armory Technician Navy Criminal Investigator For more information visit https://usmap.cnet. navy.mil/usmapss.

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4th Feet Doctors Talk Global HealthBy Lt. Sonny LorriusCOMUSNAVSO/4thFltNavy doctors of U.S 4th Fleet and Naval Hospital Jacksonville partici pated in the 2014 Florida International Summit Global Health and Medical Diplomacy: Haiti and Florida, Feb. 12. Navy Capt. Christine E. Dorr, Fleet Surgeon of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet and Navy Capt. William E. Todd Director of Surgical Services Naval Hospital Jacksonville, were invited by the Florida Network for Global Studies to speak at this years event to bring not only their professional background, but their experience as well. Haiti was ravaged by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake on January 10, 2010, leav ing most of the countrys infrastructure, hospitals and facilities diminished or inoperable which dis placed over 1.3 million people. More than 147,000 Haitians still remain living in tents in scattered camps. As a surgeon, being called upon to assist those in need is a great and rewarding opportunity, said Todd who was an orthopedic surgeon on the USNS Comfort during the Haiti disaster response mis sion. This years Florida International Summit is an event produced by the Florida Network for Global Studies established in 2003, which is a combined effort of Florida Universities ded icated to fostering activi ties that strengthen exper tise and interest in global issues. The keynote speaker was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti Pamela A. White who was appointed July 2012 and had previously served in Haiti from 1985 to 1990. How can we begin to help the people of Haiti unless we know what they have been through, not just from the time they received their initial care, but from the time the walls came down, said Todd. He opened the Health Challenges Facing Haiti and Florida panel by shar ing a touching story of one of his patients who had to have her hand amputated. I knew my patient would no longer have a hand to clap with at her first birthday party but I also knew that due to our efforts she would still be able to have a smile from the joy of living. What we do as individuals, matter, said Todd. In the afternoon Dorr spoke as an ObstetricianGynecologist on the Womens Health Postdisaster panel capitalizing on her experiences while deployed on USNS Mercy for Operation Unified Assistance in 2005. Here in the United States, the average moth er receives 14-16 prena tal visits during her preg nancy. However, in Haiti that number is only one to two for 75 percent of the women, said Dorr. Four visits of care will help mitigate perinatal risks and reduce the maternal mortal ity rate. As the Fleet Surgeon she discussed the current state of maternal health chal lenges in Haiti along with some possible interventions to be taken now in prepara tion for the future. The Florida Network for Global Studies is a state wide consortium sponsored by Florida International University, Florida State University, the University of Central Florida, the University of Florida, the University of North Florida and the University of South Florida. The schools have con tinued for over ten years to advance the exchange of information exchange and analyses of economic, political, social, and tech nological exchanges. The Florida International Summit rotates locations annually and the 2015 sum mit is currently scheduled to be held in Orlando Fla. at the University of Central Florida. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ mar itime forces in cooperative maritime security opera tions in order to maintain access, enhance interoper ability, and build endur ing partnerships that fos ter regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Sonny Lorrius US Ambassador to the Republic of Haiti, Pamela A. White (left), listens as guest speaker and panelist Capt. Christine E. Dorr Fleet Surgeon of COMUSNAVSO/C4F speaks at the 2014 Florida International Summit, held at the University of North Florida, located in Jacksonville Fla. Feb. 12. The overall event is focused on global health and medical diplomacy between Haiti and Florida. Some topics included roles of Non-Government Organizations, disaster relief, health challenges, and post-disaster womens health. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Chief of Navy Reserve Meets With, Recognizes Sailors In Jacksonville-area UnitsBy MCC Elizabeth ThompsonU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Chief of Navy Reserve spoke with Sailors about issues facing the Reserves and recognized personnel for their accom plishments during a visit to Jacksonville from Feb. 20 to Feb. 22. During her visit, Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun met with command ing officers from Navy Operational Support Center Jacksonville, held an allhands call and visited dif ferent commands to learn about the needs of locally drilling Sailors. While in the area, she met with Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, the commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, and with Reserve Sailors supporting the command on Naval Station Mayport. She also spoke at the change of command ceremony for Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 60 (HSL60) on Naval Station Mayport. Ways to improve training, unit and overall Reserve force manning, and mission capabilities were top areas of discus sion throughout the visit. More than 150 Sailors attended the all-hands call at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserve, to exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. I always value the information and recom mendations I get from the deckplate Sailors as they are working with the fleet and have first-hand knowl edge of todays issues and challenges, Braun told participants. In a meeting with com manding officers, Braun received reports on how units support the active component in NOSC Jacksonvilles area of responsibility and on how Reserve billets are manned. Two commands highlighted at the meeting were Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe and Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasure Mission Module Mayport, which provided pre-commission ing availability support aboard the USS Coronado (LCS 4) from Jan. 31 to Feb. 12. Over that time period, 37 Reserve Sailors assisted their active duty counterparts with AntiTerrorism Force Protection watch standing, comple tion of 602 Planned Maintenance System checks in five work centers, and 145 equipment valida tions. Braun praised the work aboard the Coronado and stressed the importance of supporting the LCS com munity as the Navy con tinues to consider Naval Station Mayport as the future homeport for about 1,000 Sailors and 14 new LCS ships estimated to join the fleet by 2020. The work you are doing is proof of concept that this program is the right way to go, said Braun. I com mend you on the excellent work you are doing. While on NAS Jacksonville, Braun toured spaces at Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During a pin ning ceremony at the command, she recognized two Reserve Sailors for their completion of the Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist Program. Braun also traveled to Blount Island in the St. Johns River, where she toured the spaces of the 4th Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment (NELR), recognized three Sailors for their com pletion of the Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist Program, partic ipated in advanced cargo simulator training, and asked about issues facing personnel assigned to the command. 4th NELR serves as the headquarters element for two Navy cargo han dling battalions and one expeditionary communi cations detachment com prised of about 660 Full Time Support and Selected Reserve Sailors from 10 bases throughout Navy Region Southeast. Yeoman 1st Class (EXW/ AW) Keith Henley, one of the Sailors pinned Feb. 22, said he appreciated the time Braun took to interact with Reserve Sailors and see some of the training 4th NELR does onsite. To have Vice Adm. Braun take time out of her schedule to visit a small er command and have the cargo handlers get some one-on-one time with her is always nice, Henley said. NOSC Jacksonville pro vides support to approxi mately 2,000 Sailors in 66 units at seven loca tions including NAS Jacksonville; Naval Station Mayport; Blount Island; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy; Stuttgart Army Airfield, Germany; and Royal Air Force Molesworth, England. -Photo by MC2 Daniel MeshelBraun serves as guest speaker during a change of command ceremony for Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 60. Cmdr. Oscar Toledo assumed command of HSL-60 from Cmdr. William Maske. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun poses for a group photo after an all-hands call held at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on chal lenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonBraun answers questions during an informal all-hands call at Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment at Blount Island, located in the St. Johns River. The all-hands call was part of a visit by Braun to local units assigned to Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, so Sailors could hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges reservists face in maintain ing unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Below, Braun speaks to Sailors at COMUSNAVSO during her visit to NS Mayport. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Phil Sea Sets Sail With CSGBy SHSN Matthew MuhlUSS Philippine SeaUSS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departed Feb. 15 attached to Carrier Strike Group TWO (CSG 2) for an extended deployment. Following on the heels of a recent change of command in October 2013, the guided-missile cruiser is supporting USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) with Maritime Security Operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Philippine Sea, recipi ent of the 2012 Battle E Award, will join three ships and eight aircraft squadrons to defend the Nimitz-class nuclear powered carrier as these operations, as well as theater security cooperation efforts supporting regional stability, are carried out. The deployment will be the 2nd for George H.W. Bush, the Navys newest aircraft carrier and, along with Carrier Strike Group (CSG 2), the carriers strike group staff also consists of Carrier Air Wing (CVW 8) and a Destroyer Squadron (CDS 22). In addition, USS Philippine Sea boasts a newly remodeled ship store a 40K+ renovation entirely funded by MWR profits which is providing all hands aboard the ves sel both extra variety and morale as they seek to com plete the deployments mission. -Photo by MC2 Carlos M. Vazquez IIThe guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), right, fires a 5-inch gun during a live fire exercise with the guided-missile destroyers USS Truxton (DDG 103) and USS Arleigh Burke, not shown, as they transit in formation while underway in the Atlantic Ocean. Philippine Sea, Truxton and Arleigh Burke are part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 and are deploying in support of maritime security operations, theater secu rity cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Looking For A Navy Career Challenge?From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAre you looking for a new career challenge? Do you want an opportunity to receive $450 extra a month in Special Duty Assignment Pay? Consider applying for recruiting duty and take advantage of the many bonuses and opportunities available with these assignments. To qualify, Sailors in pay grades E-5 E-8 with a good service record should first take the Recruiter Aptitude Battery assess ment at https://militaps. nmci.mil/rab. Next, Sailors should call their detailer to request to be released to special programs for recruiting. Some ratings are not eligible, but others have a great chance of selec tion. Finally, once a Sailor is nominated they have 30 days to complete screening requirements and submit. Special Programs detail ers advise that any Sailor applying for recruiting duty to apply for and obtain a secret clearance at least 18 months prior to their Projected Rotation Date. Security clearances are mandatory for any special assignments. For more information, visit the Recuiting Duty Page of the NPC website at www.npc.navy.mil/enlisted/ detailing/shorespecialpro grams/recruiting/Pages/ Recruiting%20Duty.aspx. A CFC participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases.800-822-6344 stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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DOD Stresses Cutting Debt, Saving More in Military Saves WeekBy Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceBecause Defense Department leaders believe personal financial readiness equals mission readiness, officials want service mem bers to set a goal, make a plan and save automatically in the Military Saves Week campaign that started Feb. 24, a senior Pentagon official said. Military Saves is a yearlong campaign with DOD partner the Consumer Federation of America as part of the larger America Saves effort, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments office of family policy and children and youth. DOD over last 10 years has had a very robust finan cial readiness campaign, Thompson said of the total-force program, which began in 2003. Military Saves encour ages service members and their families to take a pledge to reduce debt and set up automatic savings programs for necessities such as retirement, emer gency and contingency savings. The first step in attain ing financial security is making a commitment to changing personal spend ing and savings habits, Thompson noted. Financial readiness is equated with mission readiness within DOD, she added, because when a ser vice member has financial difficulty, it can affect job performance. DOD feels so strongly about [financial readiness], every major installation and family support center will have personal finan cial managers to provide counseling and education to service members and their families, Thompson said, adding that instal lation banks and credit unions also are committed to increasing financial lit eracy. Taking a pledge to reduce debt and save money has become a tradi tion for service members, families and DOD civil ians to make a commitment to themselves, Thompson said. The pledge can be taken online or publicly during a major installation event during Military Saves Week. Last year, we had over 29,000 [people] take the pledge, and thats exciting, she noted. Thompson said pledg ing to save and developing plans to do so are individu al. Some people might save a set amount of money each payday, while others devote a percentage, for example. Thompson also empha sized that developing a financial readiness plan is a family affair, and said the sooner children are intro duced to the habit of sav ing and spending wisely, the earlier they will learn sound financial skills. Everyone needs to have financial education, she said. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan and its Roth IRA TSP counterpart offer painless avenues to auto matically save, and the TSP plans are among DODs pillars of its military fam ily readiness campaign, Thompson said. The TSP gives you an opportunity to think about your long-term future ... [such as] retirement, because we think its far away, but its not, she said. Every day, you need to start thinking about saving for retirement. Offering resources such as TSP shows how serious DOD is about its troops saving and reducing debt for their successes in life, Thompson added. In the past 10 years, the numbers of service mem bers and their families enrolling in the [traditional] TSP and the new Roth TSP have increased, Thompson said, calling that develop ment very exciting. The Military OneSource website is another resource for help with financial planning, offering online financial tools and up to 12 sessions per monetary issue for face-to-face or tele phone financial counseling, she said. About 65 percent of troops and families have emergency savings plans, Thompson said. Thats important. Our message is getting across about how important savings is, she added. Overall, having a fam ily financial preparedness plan is something service members and their fami lies should have first and foremost on their minds, Thompson emphasized. Your financial stability is going to make sure your family is secure, and that you dont have to worry unnecessarily about some thing you do have control over, she said. -Photo courtesy of Beaches Division of the JAX ChamberGroup photo of mayors from the Jacksonville Beaches cities after the Beaches Division of the JAX Chamber Status of the Beaches Communities held on Feb 13 at Casa Marina Hotel. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wesley McCall, left, was one of the speakers since NS Mayport is considered the 4th Beaches city. The mayors spoke about recent successes and some of the challenges facing the Beaches communities and Naval Station Mayport. A Part Of The CommunityLocal Community Center Seeks Photos Of WWII VetsFrom The Cultural CenterThe Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II, written and photographed by Thomas Sanders, is a special exhibit that has traveled across America bringing to life stories of valor and horror from World War II veterans. The exhibit will be on display at the Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Feb. 28 through April 4. To add a local viewpoint and coincide with this powerful national exhibit, The Cultural Center will create a local heroes exhibition in their community gallery and exhibit photographs of the World War II veterans from families in the Jacksonville community. Local residents are asked to drop off a framed 8x10 military photograph of someone in their family who served dur ing World War II. Frames must have a notch or hanging wire attached on the back of the frame. Be sure to clearly identify who the sub ject is and what branch of the service they served and perhaps where they were stationed. Securely attach your name and phone number to the back of the frame. Drop the framed photograph off at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. by Feb. 17. Photographs can be picked up April 7. For more information, call Judy Hixenbaugh at 904-280-0614, Ext. 202 or email jhixenbaugh@ccpvb.org. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11

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2014 Patient Guide Now AvailableBy Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now instock and available at all of its facilitiesits hospital and branch health clinics and at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax. The Guide provides patients with current infor mation on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expect ing and new parent ser vices, pharmacy and the many other services, pro grams and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/ user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy. mil to sign up for email updates. Image of 2014 Patient Guide coverTRICARE For Life Begins Notifications For Pharmacy PilotFrom a Tricare News ReleaseTRICARE For Life ben eficiaries soon will receive letters guiding them to TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery or a mili tary pharmacy for some prescriptions as part of a congressionally mandated pilot program, officials of the military health care plan said. TRICARE For Life is secondary coverage for TRICARE beneficiaries who have both Medicare Parts A and B in the United States and U.S. territories. Starting this week, offi cials will send letters to affected TRICARE For Life beneficiaries notifying them of the pilot program. The pilot program starts March 15, and it requires beneficiaries who use TRICARE For Life to get certain medications through Home Delivery or at a mili tary pharmacy. The pro gram applies to refills of maintenance medications taken regularly for chronic conditions, officials said. As part of the pilot pro gram, officials added, TRICARE will stop paying for these medications from a retail pharmacy. But they noted that the program does not apply to medications for acute conditions taken for a limited time, such as antibiotics or pain medica tions or any generic medi cations. At this time, they said, it also does not apply to generic drugs. Congress mandated the pilot program in the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act. It will last for five years, but beneficiaries may choose to opt out after filling an affected prescription under the pilot program through Home Delivery for one year. Beneficiaries will be notified if they are taking a medication covered under the program. They will have two courtesy fills available through a retail pharmacy before they are responsible for the entire cost of their medication. Beneficiaries may call the TRICARE pharmacy contractor, Express Scripts, at 1-877-882-3335 or visit the Express Scripts web site to switch to Home Delivery or with questions about their medications. To switch a prescription to a military pharmacy, ben eficiaries may need to get a new prescription from their doctor, officials said. Some people are exempt, including people with another prescription drug plan or people living over seas. People living in a nursing home may contact Express Scripts to request a waiver from the pilot pro gram. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers ben eficiaries a 90-day sup ply of their medication with no copays for generic drugs and $13 for brandname drugs. Switching from a retail pharmacy to Home Delivery can save TRICARE beneficiaries up to $152 every year for each prescription, officials said. Beneficiaries also can save by asking their doc tor to write them a prescrip tion for a generic version of their medication, they added. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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NMC Health Center Releases Healthy Living PSAFrom Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC) announced the release of a Healthy Living Public Service Announcement (PSA), Feb. 19. The Healthy Living PSA is part of NMCPHCs ongoing Health Promotion and Wellness (HPW) Campaign, and walks viewers through a day in the life of a male and female Sailor making healthy choices in order to facilitate readiness and resilience, prevent ill ness and injury, hasten recovery, and promote life long healthy behaviors. Sailors and Marines face a variety of everyday lifestyle decisions, whether its finding the right exer cise routine, such as Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS), to better meet operational duties, making healthy food choices, or choosing not to use tobacco for optimal performance, said Cmdr. Connie Scott, registered dietician and NMCPHC HPW department head. Its those concerns that led us to develop the Healthy Living PSA. Its important that Sailors and Marines maintain a healthy body weight and body fat percentage, get the recommended amount of physical activity and exer cise, live tobacco free, and consume the recommended nutrients from food so they can stay fit for service. The PSA features Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Anna Rodriguez and Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Neil Mendoza, both command fitness leaders (CFLs), who shared their perspective on the importance of active living and proper nutrition to encourage other Sailors to make healthy lifestyle decisions that help combat the heightened obesity rates among active duty service members, improve perfor mance, and support resil ience and readiness. I spend the day run ning up and down, any where from the eighth deck to 04 level, 05 level, up to the mast and Windbirds. If Im not healthy, if Im not in shape, Im not going to make it through the day. So I definitely need to keep healthy to reach my full potential, said Rodriguez. When I eat breakfast, not only do I feel better, but my day goes better, added Mendoza. There are two versions, a 60-second PSA and a 2-minute PSA. Check out and share these videos and others on NMCPHCs YouTube channel: http:// www.youtube.com/user/ NMCPHC. To learn more about the HPW campaign and access and download materials, visit the NMCPHC Health Promotion and Wellness homepage, www.med.navy. mil/sites/nmcphc/healthpromotion. DOD Focuses On Healthy, Active KidsBy Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith the national rate of childhood obesity increas ing, the Defense Department wants to ensure children in military families lead healthy and active lifestyles, the Defense Departments director of the office of family policy and children and youth said. In a recent interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson said that nationally, 12.5 million children and adoles cents from age 2 to 19 are overweight a figure thats tripled since 1980. Military children are a microcosm of that group, she noted. Todays generation of children is the first one at risk of dying before their parents, she added. Facing such risks, families should set goals for healthy food choices and more physical activities for their children, Thompson said. Its important for children to see the most important models in their lives doing the same things they should do, she said. Its of critical importance that children start healthy habits at a very early age. The bottom line is [that] obesity is preventable. DODs message for young children and adolescents is called 5-2-1, Thompson said. It calls for five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, two hours or less of screen time, one hour of moderate to vigorous exercise and zero sweetened drinks, which is a plan that can be used at home and in school. She defined screen time as any activity involving television, computers, video games, movies and other devices that lead to a sedentary life style. Obesity also can lead to serious diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure, Thompson said. Children without healthy diets and routine exercise start at early ages to build plaque in their arteries, and are at risk for future health issues, she added. And national security can become an issue when peo ple cannot enter military ser vice because of their weight and health-related diseases, Thompson said. Resources for setting dietary and exercise goals are abundant for military families, Thompson said. One way to begin children on a path to healthy eat ing and routine exercise is to have meals as families, she said. Cutting sugar and salt, reducing overall fat and cooking in a healthy manner such as steaming certain foods rather than fat-frying them also are necessary to a better lifestyle, she noted. After dinner, families can take walks together and make plans for weekend bike rides and other physi cal activities, Thompson suggested. Health and nutrition help is available from numerous resources, she said, noting that First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move! ini tiative includes a website that provides a variety of healthy recipes and ways to add activity into childrens everyday lives. While school districts have begun to offer healthy food choices, parents should become involved with the Parent-Teacher Association and similar groups if their childrens schools do not deliver healthy food choices or provide inadequate exer cise time and activities, she said. The Military OneSource website offers a health and wellness coach program thats good for goal setting for cardiovascular health and nutrition habits, Thompson said. Child and youth develop ment centers and morale, welfare, and recreation pro grams on military installa tions offer emphasis on eat ing healthy foods and pur suing active lifestyles, she said. Help also is available to advise families on how to shop for groceries and pre pare meals in a healthy manner, she said. The earlier children ingrain specific [habits], the more they will stay with them whether its brushing their teeth before bed, washing their hands, or [remem bering] to drink water and eat fruits and vegetables, Thompson said. In achieving Joint Commission accredita tion, Naval Hospital Jacksonville has dem onstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients, says Mark G. Pelletier, The Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certification Operations chief operating officer. The Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accredit ing body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. Through sequestration, reduced budgets and civilian furloughs this past year, Naval Hospital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding offi cer. This recognition and accreditation dem onstrates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive difference in the lives of our patients. The MEDIG team, after reviewing 60 pro grams (from research ethics to patient access) in January, offered a resounding endorsement of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax.From Page 1Clinic THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13

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Auto Skills Center March Special: Tire Balance: Buy 3, get the 4th FREE and 4-wheel brake job $140 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 March 17: St. Patricks Day Bingo Special. 12:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. Costume contests, cup cakes contest, double pay outs on hard cards, Lucky leprechauns Pot of Gold Game and more. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your gen eral trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green out fit and enjoy DJ enter tainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-youcan-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a two-piece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. March 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up dead line March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transportation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an over view of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This orientation is highly recommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for any one interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 3-6: Pre-Season Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 2705451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, AllYou-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowl ing for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) Improving lives. Curing type 1 diabetes (T1D). ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS ducks.org 800-45DUCKS Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. 13 MILLION ACRESAND COUNTING 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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DOD To Preserve Historic ImagesBy Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Imagery Management Operations Center recently signed a $5 million agreement to digitize, store and provide access to hundreds of thou sands of historical images. DIMOC is the Defense Departments central repository for visual imagery. It exists to preserve visual records first for the DOD, and then for other agencies and members of the pub lic, said Mike Edrington, DIMOC director. Those images are then made available via defenseimag ery.mil. But, in addition to its digital archive, the agency has a massive backlog of images on physical, ana log media that ranges from photographic negatives and slides to films and VHS tapes. That material is deteriorating faster than we can offer it to the National Archives and we need to get it into a digital form Edrington said. In addition, DIMOCs climate-con trolled automated storage facility at March Air Base in Riverside, Calif., is run ning out of space, he said. The Riverside facility is where analog visual imag ery assets are shipped and processed. Those assets werent always being stored in ideal conditions before they were sent to DIMOC, Edrington said. The images are often found in obscure places on bases as they close down or as offices move, he said. Theyve found it in cor ners of warehouses, and sometimes we dont know exactly where the stuffs found, but it comes deliv ered to us, it shows up on a pallet ... and sometimes the stuff says box of stuff. Regardless of condition, images sent to Riverside are never simply destroyed, Edrington noted, because theyre federal records. Everything is assessed, bar coded and stored for later digitization. We want the material. If they find it, we want it, Edrington said, noting that DOD personnel can contact DIMOC customer service if they have images they want to accession. They can be reached by email at askdi moc@dma.mil or by phone at 1-888-PH-DIMOC (7434662). The images in DIMOCs digital holdings are also shared with the National Archives, he said. Theres a lot of his tory, Edrington said. Its not just celebrities such as Elvis Presley ... weve got that kind of stuff, but more importantly, weve got sol diers, sailors, airmen and Marines doing what they do. A digitization and stor age study conducted in 2010 by the Defense Media Activity, DIMOCs par ent organization, found it would take up to 50 years and at least $25 million to digitize the current ana log holdings with avail able government resources, Edrington said. By taking a different approach, the new contract will shorten that period to five years at a fraction of the cost. The contract is the first of its kind in the Defense Department, Edrington said. In exchange for digi tizing the images, the con tractor, T3Media, will be granted a limited period of exclusivity during which they will be able to charge non-DOD users a fair-mar ket fee to use the images. All DOD personnel will be able to access and down load the images for free by accessing a secure website, Edrington said. In this constrained bud get environment, the department can no lon ger afford to subsidize the access of commercial media and non-government entities to DOD imagery. Changing to a fee-based system will offset the cost of digitizing, storing and providing public access to the imagery. This is a true partner ship, Edrington said. Its really in our interest that T3 succeeds. The fees are essentially a convenience fee for making accessibility to the images a matter of simply going online and searching by keywords, rather than waiting 30-60 days for a response to a Freedom of Information Act Request for images that may or may not exist, Edrington said. The arrangement is similar to the one made by the National Archives with Ancestry.com, he said, which is permitted to charge a fee for access to certain federal records in exchange for digitizing, categorizing and storing those records. Balfour Beatty Accepting Applications For ScholarshipBy Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities Foundations is once again offering post-secondary academic scholarships to both high school seniors and under graduate students who reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military fam ily housing. The applica tion process is now open for scholarships that will be awarded for the 2014-2015 academic year. We are so thankful to be able to support the con tinuing education of our young residents through the Foundation schol arship program, said Chris Williams, presi dent of the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation. I encourage all of our residents who are planning on or currently attending a post-secondary school to apply for a Foundation Scholarship in recogni tion of their hard work and achievements. On average, Foundation scholarships are awarded in amounts up to $2,500, however larger amounts may be awarded based on the number and caliber of submissions. Applicants must be the child of an activeduty service member and reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military housing. Additional eligibility requirements and applica tion details and submittal requirements can be found on the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation website (www.bbcommuni tiesfoundation.org). Please note, all applications must be postmarked by April 15, 2014. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a non-profit organization, which was founded in 2007, is committed to hon oring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families. One of the Foundations primary goals is to support continuing education and the development of future community leaders through an annual academic schol arship program and other initiatives. Balfour Beatty Communities manages the privatized family housing at Naval Station Mayport. According to Williams, Balfour Beatty Communities is committed to providing a quality liv ing environment that sup ports the diverse interests and needs of the military families residing with us. Through the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, we extend our appreciation and gratitude for the impor tant work performed by military members and the many sacrifices their fami lies make. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 15

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16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Obermeyer jacket with the powder blue chevron and new Atomic Skis, people would actually expect me to know what I was doing. In high school, my best friend, Patti, and I joined the Ski Club, boarding a coach bus to the ski resorts every Friday night. Other than rumors of who was making out with whom on the bus, Patti and I con cerned ourselves only with the fake personas we would use to meet cute boys on the slopes. Even then, we understood the snob bery to which skiing lent itself. I became Brooke Taylor from a snooty town in Connecticut, and she, Claire Townsend, my rich cousin visiting from some stuck up prep school. We never got to use our alter egos, but in the process of trying to rein vent ourselves, we finally learned to ski. Recently, a friend asked me to go skiing with her in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. A middle-aged Navy wife who has moved nine times in 20 years, I had got ten rid of my ski equip ment many moves ago, and had not skied in years. Do you ski? she asked. Swallowing my panic, I chuckled my pat response, But of course, I grew up skiing. Adorned with hopelessly scratched equipment I rent ed from the bases Outdoor Recreation Center, I tried to quell my performance anxi ety as the quad lift reached the summit. I felt out of place amongst the well-todo resort families decked to the nines, even though I knew that, based on my appearance, onlookers were surprised to see that I could ski at all. Later at the lodge, while nonchalantly sipping a plastic cup of hefewei zen and trying to look like a regular, I had a minor epiphany. Down deep beneath my faux-Nordic sweater, I knew that none of it YMCA rope tow humiliations, borrowed parkas, high school inse curities, rental equipment really mattered. Just like everyone else in the lodge telling tall tales and walking like idiots in ski boots, I could ski. Snobbery was optional. Get more wit and obser vations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesoflife. comFrom Page 2SkiingMidway Dinner Tix On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportThe Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held on June 7 at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The invited keynote speak er is Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and Veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conflicts and those currently serv ing have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 1700, dinner is served at 1800. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seat ing capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from Bob Price, at 904246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or bpricex4@ comcast.net. You can also purchase tickets from Bill Dudley from the Navy League St Augustine by calling 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 or emailing anuday00@aol. comFFSC Workshops Available To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Preregistration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share par enting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites pro fessionals to address spe cific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other children their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or mar ried for 20 years, effective communication is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effec tive communication. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., New Dads Class, USO This program is designed for new Dads and Moms. The program will address, investigate, and discuss issues facing fathers in todays weird world. The attendees will look at being a father in the military, on care of newborns and tod dlers and how to grow with your child and become the Dad you really want to be. The program will increase the participants knowl edge about child development and will also address relationship changes that accompany the birth of a child. March 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Anger Management, Bldg Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judg ment are related, about irrational beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recommend ed as well. March 3, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 3, 10 a.m.-Noon, What About The Kids, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, under stand the effects of domes tic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, development and socialization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already hap pened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many par ents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may pro vide an additional motiva tor for ending the violence and seeking intervention. March 3, 1:30 p.m.3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 3-7, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Victim Advocate Training Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 4-5, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Million Dollar Sailor Bldg 1 Room 702 March 4, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management Bldg. 1 Room 702 Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debilitat ing effects. This program is designed to provide par ticipants with an under standing of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps partici pants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. March 5, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 5, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Mar 6, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Relationship Communication Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 6, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 March 10, 1:30 p.m.3 p.m., Part 2:Targeting Your Resume, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 10, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Conflict Resolution for Women, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Mar 10-14, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1 Room 1616 March 11, 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Welcome to The Military Bldg. 1 Room 702 Are you a new military spouse or new to the area, this one day workshop provides valuable informa tion on the military life style, benefits, finances and resources. Guest speak ers from the military and civilian communities will present useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. March 12, 11 a.m.Noon, Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1 Room 719 March 12, 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. Part 1:Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 12, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., Managing Anger Group, Bldg. 1 Room 702 March 13, 10 a.m.11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family, Bldg. Room 702 Mayport Helps Release Retiring Sailors Back To The Civilian WorldBy MC1 Michael WissNPASE Det SoutheastThe day-to-day life of the military is a regular routine. Everything is laid out; when to go to work; what uniform to wear; when to eat and when to do physical training. So what happens when your duty to your country comes to an end after 20 years? For many who havent known anything except being a Sailor, the tran sition can be a daunting task. Naval Station Mayport Fleet and Family Service Center has a program to make sure no one is left out in the cold. The redesigned TAP or Transition GPS (Goals, Plans, Success) program is a five-day workshop that ensures Sailors are ready to make the transition to civilian life. The program is mandatory, which was created in response to the Veterans Opportunity to Work Act. According to Mayport Fleet and Family Service Center Transition Program Manager Terri Johnson-Salter, the new program is a work in progress, but is helping to get retiring Sailors better equipped to continue their careers in the civilian world. The mandatory program forces the member to attend the classes instead of being able to skip the courses, she said. With the redesigned plan we make sure the Sailor is career ready and able to adjust to being in the civilian world. The programs main goal is to stan dardize the transition support that Sailors receive in order to make them as employment ready as possible. The program includes pre-separation counsel ing, a military to civilian skills review, a VA benefits briefing and application sign-up, financial planning support, job search skills building, and individual transition plan preparation. According to Johnson-Salter, the program is much more than just finding a new job or career. Most Sailors think about this course as getting ready for civilian employ ment, we want to assist them in career and family preparation for the civilian community, she said. Getting a job is a big part of the program, but there are many other aspects retiring military members need to plan for. Before attending the program all military members must complete the Individual Transition Plan (TIP) check list (DD form 2958). Points discussed include: checklist DD Form 2648 budget reflecting personal and family goals and obligations. Crosswalk military skill set to civilian skills, to include an evaluation for the demand for those civilian skills within the potential relocation destinations. Although there are many tools to help transition for retiring military members, according to Johnson-Salter, it is there responsibility to utilize them. The family service center is not just providing the program, we are passion ate about it, she said. Sailors have to take GPS in a timely manner, to plan well in advance of their separation date. We want to make sure military members have a smooth easy transition into civil ian life. The budget looks to retire some weapon systems no longer needed and to slow growth in pay, compensa tion and health care costs. These changes have been examined and dis cussed over the past year at every level, to include the service chiefs and at monthly sessions, Dempsey said. The chiefs looked for a balanced package addressing direct and indirect compensation, the general said, looking to minimize disruption for service members in personnel accounts while finding the money to bring personnel accounts into balance with readiness and modernization accounts. This was to make absolutely sure that whenever we send you in harms way, we can ensure that you are the best-trained, best-led, best-equipped force on the planet, Dempsey said. The chairman said he thinks the chiefs did a good job under difficult fiscal circumstances. But were also going to want to hear from you, he said. As this budget is dropped next week on Capitol Hill and the debate begins, I encour age you to let us know what you think about the totality of the budget. Arguing to maintain the status quo is not realistic, the chairman said. Weve got to make changes, so you cant just dig in and say, No change, he said. We want to make sure were making the right changes, and we only want to do it once. This is just my initial engagement with you, the chairman continued. This discussion is just begin ning, and Ill need your help in order to figure out which are right.From Page 1Budget

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