Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00098614:00335


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CHINFO Award Winner Phil Sea, RooseveltDeploy with Bush CSG Pages 4-5 Return ToCarney Nation Page 11 Gettysburg Marks15,000 Check-Ins Page 8 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the Edward Waters College Concert Choir perform at NS Mayports Black History Month celebration held on Feb. 13 at the Base Chapel. The choir sang traditional hymnals, as well as songs from Motown artists. Members of Mayports Multicultural Committee also performed a skit highlighting many of the African Americans who have influenced the United States starting with the American Revolution up to current times. NS Mayport Celebrates Black History Month DOD To Mandate Attestation For Lost, Stolen CAC CardsBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceLater this year, the Defense Department will begin fully enforcing a previously optional policy regarding the reissuance of lost or stolen common access cards, a defense official said Feb. 11. Sam Yousef, a program manager for identity and benefits policy at the Defense Human Resources Activity, discussed an update to the current CAC issuance policy during an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. Beginning in late March [or] early April of this year, we are going to begin fully enforcing current common access card policy, which will require individuals to bring supporting documentation if they have had their ID cards lost or stolen, he said. If you have your card lost or stolen, you should work with your local security office or the individual sponsoring you for that ID card. People requesting a replacement card will need to produce a document on component or agency let terhead that explains that the card has been lost or stolen, he added. Yousef noted the document should be signed, and individuals must bring it with them to have a new card issued. If the card has been stolen, he said, they may also bring in the police report that accounts for that, he added. This will not only get the department in -Photo by MC2 Cyrus RosonCapt. Jon C. Kreitz, outgoing commanding officer amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) gives welcome remarks during change of command ceremony aboard New York.USS New York Holds Change of CommandBy MC3 Angus BecklesUSS New York Public AffairsAmphibious transport dock USS New York held the ships third change of command ceremony on Feb. 14. Capt. Christopher Brunett, New Yorks outgoing executive officer, relieved Capt. Jon Kreitz as commanding officer. Thank you for being the best executive officer I could have asked for, you have been a great sidekick, trusted advisor and a good friend. Relinquishing command to you is akin to being the father of the bride and giving someone you love away, said Kreitz. I couldnt think of a better person to be turning com mand over to. I have all the trust and confidence that you will do everything to take care of my girl and her crew. You are going to love your new job. Kreitz added. Kreitz who assumed command of the New York 20 months ago was the ships third commanding offi cer. Under his command the ship completed its successful maiden deployment a major Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) planned maintenance availability and the majority of her pre-deployment basic train ing phase and certifications. This warships great crew, from See New York, Page 3 See CAC, Page 12

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ...............................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Now that second semester is in full swing having begun January 21 and students have their second quarter report card, is your child settling into the school routine? Or is he is still reluctant to get back into any kind of routine? Is he still forgetting that weekly spell ing/vocabulary test? Is it hard to get him up in the morning for school like it was back in August? Are the number of tardies and absences increasing? Are you at your wits end? You just dont know if you can deal with this! Of course, as a parent, you recognize the value and importance of edu cation to your childs future. But no amount of lecturing, pleading, or disciplining has gotten your child excited about the return to school. There are some positive steps you can take: 1. Determine if he is getting enough rest to be successful in school. Students today are involved in a myriad of activities in addition to school, including youth sports, dance, music, or karate classes; cheerlead ing, band, or JROTC practice; faith-based youth activities; and home computer games. Older stu dents work many hours a week to assist with car and insurance payments. With physical tired ness comes a weariness that makes it hard to stay awake at school to deal with assignments, home work, and time manage ment. 2. Talk to your child about his busy schedule. Try to determine wheth er it is due to homework requirements, activities, or work. Can something be eliminated. Would putting together a study plan actually give him more time. 3. Then map out a plan to insure that he gets the sleep he needs. A rested student is a more interested and engaged student. 4. Look over that sec ond quarter report card. Report cards were sent home the last week in January so you should have it in hand by now. Students making Ds and Fs no matter how hard they have studied or how many extra credit assignments they turned in are more apt to tune out and stop trying. If this continues for any length of time, it can lead to failure. Their somewhat positive attitude at the begin ning of the school year turns to frustration after a semester of really try ing, but getting the same grade over and over. 5. Engage your child in some quiet dialogue about what he believes is the problem. Dont add to his frustration by piling on saying, Why dont you study harder? Why dont you ask for help? when that may be exactly what he thought he was doing. During the discussion you will probably hear many of these excuses: tired ness, boredom, and frus tration. Be an active lis tener. Genuinely express sympathy for the causes. 6. Now map out an academic plan which could include you getting him help or him getting help for himself. Joining a study group or getting tutoring are two ways to receive help. Middle and High schools have clubs and organizations which offer tutoring. Elementary students can also plug into this tutor ing as well. For example, Fletcher High School has several clubs and organi zations which offer tutor ing. For active duty mili tary dependents, www. TUTOR.com/military provides professional tutors to help with all math, science, social studies, and English subjects from elementary to advanced levels. The tutor will work with your child in a one-to-one secure online classroom where everything is anonymous. The tutors use an interactive whiteboard, file sharing, and instant messaging to work through the prob lem. Because of this, I frequently advise parents that students younger than 3rd grade may need parental assistance to work with the tutor. Older students should have no problem working with the tutor, and each tutor is screened, certified, and background-checked. No personal information is ever shared between tutor and student. Not sure about this? Go to youtube and search tutor. com/military to view sev eral good examples of students working with a tutor. 7. If the problem is more behavioral than academic, make a clearcut list of unacceptable behaviors and result ing consequences. For instance, continually forgetting to complete homework in a class might result in the loss of a favorite privilege until the resulting lower grade is raised. Resist the temptation to ground your child indefinitely or to take away all prized pos sessions. However, if you do not follow through on the promised conse quences, your child will quickly realize that you are not serious about school success, and he will remain unchanged. Students do want to succeed, but as children they arent always able to figure out by themselves what the actual problem is. With patience and understanding, you can take these suggested actions to help your child figure out how he can achieve academic suc cess. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Steps For School Success For 2nd SemesterJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingTHE ROPES Proverbs Teaches Wisdom From AboveTheres a story about a proud young man who came to Socrates asking for knowledge. He walked up to the muscular phi losopher and said, O great Socrates, I come to you for knowledge. Socrates recognized a pompous numbskull when he saw one. He led the young man through the streets, to the sea, and chest deep into water. Then he asked, What do you want? Knowledge, O wise Socrates, said the young man with a smile. Socrates put his strong hands on the mans shoulders and pushed him under. Thirty seconds later Socrates let him up. What do you want? he asked again. Wisdom, the young man sputtered, O great and wise Socrates. Socrates crunched him under again. Thirty sec onds passed, thirty-five. Forty. Socrates let him up. The man was gasping. What do you want, young man? Between heavy, heav ing breaths the fellow wheezed, Knowledge, O wise and wonderful... Socrates jammed him under again Forty sec onds passed. Fifty. What do you want? Air! the young man screeched. I need air! When you want knowledge as you have just wanted air, then you will have knowledge. I am glad the young fella in the above antidote finally got it right. I am not sure if he could have taken another plunge. And to think all he wanted was a little wisdom and knowledge. The con clusion of his meeting appears to be the thesis of this story. Did you catch it? When you want knowledge as you have just wanted air, then you will have knowledge. Nestled just a little over half way in the Old Testament is the book Proverbs. According to ancient Hebrew literature, this book is a part of what is known as the writings. This book along with Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs are considered wisdom lit erature. Inspired by God (2 Tim. 3:16), the sages of Israel penned Proverbs as they reflected on life and about how one ought to live. Proverbs contain a wide variety of aspects about life. For instance, in Proverbs 22:19, we are told that a wise person puts their trust in God. Certainly this is easier said than done but the wise come to understand that trusting in God will always ensure Gods best for their lives. Proverbs 20:11 reads, Even a child makes himself known by his acts, by whether his conduct is pure and upright. The main point here is not the child but that ones character is not revealed in what they say but in what they do. Inspirational Speaker, Steven Covey expands this concept by reminding us that you cant talk your way out of what youve behaved yourself into. Finally, Proverbs 20:19 remind us about the danger of slander and gossip. First this passage paints for us a powerful word picture and then com mands us not to associate with such a person. Can you imagine how much emotional pain can be avoided simply by obey ing this Proverb? I hope I have provoked you to take some time to study the Book of Proverbs. If you read one chapter a day, you can complete it is 31 days. If you cannot commit to this study plan then take a look at Proverbs 6:6-11. In this passage God uses an ant to teach us about the importance of prepa ration, planning, and hard work. Blessings! Chaplain Calvin B. Gardner Sr. CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNERWhat ever happened to that older lady that used to be here every week? I overheard the girl in front of me ask her friend after our Pump & Sweat class ended at the base gym. She looked to be about 27 or so, with a youthful high ponytail and a purple spandex tank top with a built in shelf bra. You remember, the older lady -petite, short hair, lifted light weights, and was, well, real prim about it. The girls friend, also twenty-something in a cute strappy tank top, shrugged her shoulders and carried on putting her equipment away. But the girl persisted. You remember, she used to stand right up front, the girl pestered. Cmon! You know, the OLDER LADY. I minded my own business, wiping down my yoga mat and racking my weights. I had learned months prior that the girls were not interested in socializing with the mid dle-aged women in class. I tried Whew, those squats were brutal, huh? but was always met with awkwardly reluctant nods, which clearly conveyed the message, Listen maam, youd better stick with your own kind. But on this day, I couldnt help but realize that I knew the older lady this girl was asking about. She was in my social circle on base. But acknowledg ing my association with the older lady in question would then brand me an older lady too. So I hesi tated. When I was in my early 30s and we were sta tioned in Virginia Beach, I relished my advanced step classes at the Mt. Trashmore YMCA and struck up lasting relation ships with my group exercise classmates. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, we shared the locker room with the Water Aerobics ladies. They would hobble into the showers from the pool The Old Ladies At Gym May Creak, But They RockLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEin their floral skirted bathing suits and cackle while changing into elasticwasted pants and sensible shoes. Where were you last month, Phyllis? Well, my hip was act ing up something ter rible, so the doctor has me on Glucosamine and Chondroitin . . Do you get coverage? My goodness those pills are expensive! While I eavesdropped on their locker room banter about orthopedics, vitamin supplements and irregularity, I chuckled to myself, never realizing that Id be just like them one day. Just like the rest of the older ladies at the gym, I now disappear for a week or month when I hurt my wrist or knee or back, then show up to class again wearing one of those braces you can buy at CVS. I do the modifi cations suggested by the fitness instructors, like squatting without weights or doing push ups on my knees. I look ridiculous in a high ponytail, and I certainly cant wear tank tops with shelf bras anymore. Ive become one of them. But is it so bad to be an older lady at the gym? In society, older women are respected for their vast wealth of life expe-See Gym, Page 3

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riences, and nowhere is that reverence more prevalent than amongst military wives. Spouses who are new to the wellknown hardships of mili tary life generally admire those of us who have been doing this for a couple of decades. Then why is it that, at the gym, youth and joint flexibility trump maturity and life experience? As we dropped our dumbbells into the bin, I thought of the older lady these girls were trying to remember. She had two kids who were off at col lege. Her husband had a long successful Navy career. They lived on their boat, which was docked in Newport. She was attractive, accomplished, and a very nice person. I know the lady you are talking about, I finally admitted to the girl in the ponytail. She hurt her knee, but shes okay. She and her husband live on their yacht, and they travel a lot to visit their kids at the Naval Academy and UNC. Shell be back here soon enough. The girl stared for a second or two, then mut tered, Oh . wow. But I knew my message came across loud and clear. We older ladies rule. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2GymNavy And Marine Corps Commendation Medal CWO4 Wanda Trammell, NS Mayport Navy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal MM1 Bryan Pentlin, NS Mayport AC2 Shavon Armstrong, NS Mayport MA2 Durel Dennis, NS Mayport MA2 Benjamin Iverson, NS Mayport SH2 Antoine Mathews, NS Mayport AC3 Beret Dunn, NS Mayport AC3 Juan Serret, NS Mayport ACAN Jillian Bass, NS Mayport Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal CSC Wayne Rickerson, NS Mayport MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport MA2 Alesha Kearse, NS Mayport Letter Of Commendation SH2 Antoine Mathews, NS Mayport Good Conduct Award ET3 Derek Greenwalt, NS Mayport ET3 Ryan Levalley, NS Mayport ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport ET3 James Ussery, NS Mayport Senior Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MA1 Joseph Hayes, NS Mayport Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr SH2 Adrian Smith, NS Mayport Junior Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MA3 Ruth Weart, NS Mayport Bluejacket Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MASA Nathan Rollins, NS Mayport MILESTONESAT NS MAYPORT -Photos by AC2 Shavon Armstrong Above, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, stands with nominees for the Civilian Supervisor of the Year 2013. This years winner was MWRs John Aimone. Pictured from left is Thomas Douget of Air Ops, Edward Namyslowski of Fire and Emergency Services, Emerita Lewis of NEX Mayport, McCall, Aimone and Bob Meury with SJA.Mayport Awards Top Supervisor, EmployeeNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, presents letters of appreciations to the nominees for the Employee of the Quarter, First Quarter 2014. Pictured from left is Robert Garis of Air Ops, Jacob Neith of Public Works, McCall and winner, Steven Ames of Fire and Emergency Services. Not pictured is nominees Rebecca Klink of MWR and Charles Smith of Security.an outstanding wardroom to a superb chiefs mess and all the blue shirts has accomplished every single mission and task thrown at them, said Kreitz. I couldnt be more impressed with or proud of them. Brunett who is from Buffalo, NY has served as the New Yorks execu tive officer for the past 18 months. He graduated from the naval academy in 1989 and was designated a naval aviator in 1991. His previous assignments range from Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Eight (HC-8) to commander of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 (HSC-25). I can think of no other ship in the fleet that I would want to be a part of its crew more than the New York. As a son of New York growing up in Buffalo and Rochester, this ship means a lot to New Yorkers and to me, said Brunett. Capt. Kreitz has gotten us on a great trajectory for continued excellence in everything that we do and my job will be to continue on that path. I am very excited to take command and I cannot wait for the next chapter. Brunett added. New York recently shifted homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., as part of a larger move of an amphibious ready group homeport change in sup port of strategic maritime dispersal.From Page 1New York THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) man the rails as the ship departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Phil Sea, Roosevelt Deploy With Bush CSGFrom U.S. Fleet ForcesApproximately 6,000 Sailors of Carrier Strike Group 2 (CSG 2) depart ed their homeports in Norfolk, Va. and Mayport, Fla. Feb. 15. The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) commanded by Capt. Andrew J. Loiselle, departed Naval Station Norfolk along with guid ed missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), while guided missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) and guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departed Naval Station Mayport. Commanded by Rear Admiral John C. Aquilino, CSG 2 is comprised of USS George H.W. Bush with embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 consist ing of USS Truxtun, USS Roosevelt and USS Philippine Sea. This team has worked hard in preparation for this deployment and is ready to go, said Rear Children look on and wave goodbye from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) sets sail for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. See Deploy, Page 5A little boy waves goodbye to the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as the ship departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Family and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departs for deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 Adm. John C. Aquilino, Commander of GHWB CSG. The dedication and commitment shown by our Sailors will serve the country well in support of our global national inter ests. Aircraft squadrons include strike fight er squadrons VFA 213 Fighting Black Lions, VFA 31 Tomcatters, VFA 15 Valions and VFA 87 Golden Warriors; tactical electronics war fare squadron VAQ 134 Garudas; carrier air borne early warning squadron VAW 124 Bear Aces; fleet logistics sup port squadron VRC 40 Rawhides; helicopter maritime strike squad ron HSM 70 Spartans and helicopter sea com bat squadron HSC 9 Tridents. While deployed, the strike group will serve in the 5th and 6th U.S. Fleet areas of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, the ater security coopera tion efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.From Page 4Deploy The guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. A young girl looks on from the pier as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The "DONT TREAD ON ME" flag is brought down aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) as the ship prepares to depart Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Family and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) prepares to set sail for deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation.

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Auto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all others; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 24. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. March 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up dead line March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transportation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Turn It Up @ the Teen Center. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Music, movies, food, drinks, a fire pit and more as we welcome new teens to the center. 246-0347 Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This ori entation is highly rec ommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for any one interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 3-6: Pre-Season Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 2705451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for priz es. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) -Photo by Sandra BarrettThe SMART Southeast Regional Director Larry Shields presents the 2013 #1 RV park award to the Pelican Roost RV Park on Feb.6 SMART is a recreational vehicle social club for active, retired, and honorably discharged military veterans and their spouses. Pelican Roost has long been recognized as one of the best RV facilities in the Navy. Also attending were local SMART RV members, current RV Park residents, Lisa Wolfe, Community Activities Director, Lonnie Kenney, MWR Director, and Cmdr. Pat Pickard, executive officer of Naval Station Mayport. Pelican Roost Is A SMART Park 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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TRICARE Services Available Online, By PhoneBy Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs OfficerWhile TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still avail able online and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www.humana-military. com, or call (800) 4445445. Beneficiaries can change their primary care manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with permanent change of station orders, its even possible to request a PCM change before leaving the cur rent command. And for patients already residing in the Mayport area, PCMs are now available at Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport, thanks to the return of staff from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care has improved, with primary care clinics staying open until 6 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and noon on Saturdays. Patients can securely email their PCM, by signing up at www. relayhealth.com. Patients can also meet BHC Mayports PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax by clicking on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port Gray, Orange and Pink teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the website or phone, patients can also call or visit TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) to discuss options. HBAs work for the branch health clinic, unlike the website and phone staff who work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). So patients need to make any chang es at www.tricare.mil, www.humana-military. com or (800) 444-5445. Unfortunately, HBAs are unable to do this on patients behalf. HBAs can be reached at (904) 270-4255. -Photo by Jacob Sippel A Sailor logs onto www.tricare.mil, in preparation for a permanent change of station move. American Heart Month: The Fight Against Heart Disease Question: Why should I be concerned if my blood pressure is high? Answer: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a direct contribu tor to heart disease. Many people unfortunately do not have any signs or symptoms but may still be at risk. Some risk fac tors are a family history of hypertension, smok ing, diabetes, high cholesterol or being overweight. Exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables and lowering salt intake in your diet may help, but sometimes this is not enough and medication is needed. Talk with your Primary Care Manager to see if you haveor are at risk forhypertension. Ask the Doc is writ ten by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was writ ten by Laura Kyer, a cer tified physician assistant from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, please send it to jaxpublicaffairs@med.navy.mil. ASK THEDOC-Photo by Jacob Sippel Leslie Fiala, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, discusses healthy eating tips during a diabetes class. Patients can take diabetes nutrition to help with meal planning and controlling their blood sugar. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing heart disease. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterFebruary is American Heart Monthan impor tant month in the fight against heart disease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, causing narrowing and blood flow restriction. It remains the nations number one killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans every yearapproximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in seri ous illness, disability and decreased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is preventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles direc tor for public health. Controllable risk fac tors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physical inactivity, diabetes mel litus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other controllable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease (including heart disease and stroke) costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each year to include the costs of healthcare services, medications and lost produc tivity. Making healthy choices such as good nutri tion, weight manage ment and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart dis ease, said Chamberlain. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active chil dren are also at risk for heart disease, Research has proven that children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. I addition to American Heart Month, National Wear Red Day a day to raise awareness for the fight against heart disease in womenwill be recognized on Feb. 7. National Wear Red Day was began in 2003, when the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer com bined. As a result of their efforts, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 per cent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport Health Promotions offer health related classes to its active duty, retiree and dependents 17 years of age or older. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pressure man agement; ShipShape, an eight-week nutrition and weight management program; tobacco cessa tion counselling, to assist smokers with quitting; body fat assessments; and nutrition counseling. For more information, call NBHC Mayport Health Promotions at 904270-5251. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sail ors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. -Photo by Jacob Sippel Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jose Ramirez, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, fixes himself a healthy meal for lunch at the hospitals galley. February is Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

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USS Gettysburg Marks 15,000 Check-inBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonPublic Affairs, USS Gettysburg (CG 64)Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) reached 15,000 aircraft inflight check-ins, Feb. 11. The milestone signi fies the number of air craft that have checked in with the cruiser since the beginning of its 2013-2014 deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR). 15,000 check-ins is another indicator of the amount of hard work our Sailors have put forth this entire deployment, said Lt. Jimmy Drennan, operations officer, USS Gettysburg. This is a proud moment that Im thankful to be a part of, and a huge achievement for the entire crew. An in-flight check in is conducted through com munications with U.S. and allied aircraft provid ing information in sup port of their mission, said Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Antwain McGee. McGee communicated with the 15,000th checkin which was the pilot of a C-17A supporting mis sions in Afghanistan, while standing watch as an air intercept controller (AIC) in the combat information center aboard Gettysburg. We provide pilots with information including airspace, altitude, bearing and emergency support, said McGee. Whether they are U.S., British, Air Force or Marine pilots, our job is to communicate the information necessary to help them complete their mission. McGee said Gettysburgs combat information center began recording the number of in-flight check-ins in August 2013. Many manhours were put forth to reach the mark. The amount of checkins vary, but on any given day we can support more than one-hundred air craft, said McGee. We have reached this point with zero safety advi sories which indicates a vigilant watch. We have to remain vigilant on watch throughout the remainder of deployment and pro vide support where it is needed. McGee is proud to be a part of the Gettysburg crew during this achieve ment. Its a great feeling to be an AIC, deployed in the 5th fleet AOR and sup porting aircraft, because this is what we train for, said McGee. Having 15,000 check-ins shows how Gettysburg sets the standard of excellence. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility.-Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonOperations Specialist First Class Antwain McGee communicates with a pilot during a watch as an Air intercept controller in the combat information center onboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportTickets are on sale for the Navy League of Mayport Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program on June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical dis plays. For tickets call Bob Price at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@comcast.net 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Gettysburg Embarked Helicopter Detachment Completes 1000th Flight Hour On DeploymentBy Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Public AffairsHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74, Det. 2, embarked aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), successfully conducted its 1,000th flight hour of the current deployment, Jan. 17. One-thousand flight hours is an incredible feat, and it would not be possible without the dedication of the aircrew and the skill of our maintainers, said Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, the detachments officer in charge. Without their atten tion to detail, precision and many long nights, we would not have been able to reach this point, Clark said. Behind the flight hours are two sides of operation, the maintainers and the operators. The air main tenance crew completes approximately ten hours of maintenance for every hour of flight. Our birds fly nightly, so maintaining their systems is an absolute priority, said Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class William Winistorfer. Boatswains mates, damage controlmen, hos pital corpsmen, ships servicemen and the pilots and officers control ling the landing all come together to make flight operations a priority for the ship. Part of that support continues within the air craft. Flying every hour with the pilots are avia tion warfare systems operators, controlling all of the mission equip ment. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical) 2nd Class Britt Turner V has flown 275 hours this deployment. It has been a busy deployment, said Turner. Being able to operate daily has been an incred ible experience and opportunity. Inside the ship the combat information cen ter plays a large role and logs just as many hours as the pilots. Operations specialists serve as the anti-subsurface tactical controllers (ASTAC) and have worked alongside the pilots for the duration of the deployment. Being in an opera tional environment is one of the most rewarding parts of my job, said Operations Specialist 1st Class Ronald Wierzbic, one of the ASTAC controllers. I love tasking the heli copter pilots to identify contacts. I love controlling aircraft, he added. In addition to reaching the 1,000th flight hour, this deployment has seen several milestones reached for the detach ment: they completed six maintenance inspec tions and functional check flights, achieved more than 2,000 deck hits in 2013, three pilots earned qualifications as helicopter aircraft com manders (HAC) and two more pilots are on a path to qualify before the end of deployment. This HAC qualifica tion is complex and it often takes pilots several months to feel confident before they begin the final boarding process, said pilot, Lt. j.g. Joe Granata. It is about feeling comfortable enough with the regulations, procedures and equipment to oper ate the helicopter safely, Granata added. In the end that is a HACs prior ity. HSM 74 Det. 2 will remain aboard Gettysburg until the ship returns to homeport. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC3 Karl AndersonAn MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter, assigned to the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7, flies over the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) en route to the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a replenishment-at-sea. Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, supporting theater security cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

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Balance Key To Fiscal 2015 Budget ReductionsBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceBalance is the key to handling budget reductions for the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Feb. 7. Hagel has to cut $41 billion from the presidents planned fiscal 2015 budget request, scheduled to be released March 4, and Pentagon planners are working with the White House and the Office of Management and Budget on the submission. You have to come at all these things from a holistic point of view, Hagel told reporters at a Pentagon news conference. The secretary noted that the major parts of the budget fund readiness, modernization and capabilities. As you assess your resources and you match your resources to mission, he added, those are three priorities that always must be in front of everything else. Because it is impossible to cut $41 billion from just one aspect of the budget, Hagel said, you assess the strategic interest and guidance and the mission to defend your country, what its going to take to do that, and then you start working through that. Will there be cuts across the board? Of course there will, he said. You cant do it any other way. Are there going to be adjustments across the board? Of course, he continued. But you must preserve readi ness and modernization and the capability and the capac ity in order to do the job of protecting this country within the framework of the resources you have. Well do that. Hagel said he is satisfied that the proposed Defense Department budget will protect the United States today and in the future. I think its a very good plan. I think its an effective plan, he said. FFSC Workshop Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more infor mation about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Wellness Center Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 719CNP To Hold All-Hands Call To Answer Sailors QuestionsBy MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) is scheduled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live March 5 at 2 p.m. EST. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that affect them and their families and open the floor to live questions from fleet via satellite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin sending in questions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@ gmail.com. The programs and policies under the office of the chief of naval personnel directly impact Sailors and include the following: -Pay and allowances -Advancements -Uniforms -Education and training -Family Support Policies -Sexual Assault Prevention and Response -Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions -21st Century Sailor Initiatives -Total Sailor Fitness -Personnel Programs and Polices More than just asking questions, Moran and Beldo encourage Sailors to use this opportunity to share their feedback-whats working in the fleet, what isnt and what ideas do they have to make our existing policies better. The event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network (AFN), Direct to Sailor (DTS) and The Pentagon Channel (TPC). Online streaming will be available on the following websites: www.navy.mil www.pentagonchannel. mil www.defense.govClean Audit Confirms DeCA 2013 Fiscal ExcellenceBy Kevin L. RobinsonDeCA public affairs specialist The Defense Commissary Agencys fis cal 2013 financial state ments have received a clean audit opinion from independent auditors, an evaluation that certi fies the credibility of the benefit for its patrons, the agencys director said. Receiving a clean audit opinion validates the hard work of our DeCA team in delivering a commis sary benefit while being responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. This is the 12th straight year that DeCAs financial state ments have received this level of certification. A clean or unqualified audit opinion is the high est possible ruling and reflects the agencys use of appropriated funds to deliver the commissary benefit. The agency gen erates nearly $6 billion in annual sales and receives $1.4 billion in appropri ated funding. During fiscal 2013, DeCA processed nearly 94 million transactions in its stores and deliv ered nearly $2.6 billion in savings to its custom ers. Commissaries also redeemed nearly 100 million coupons in fiscal 2013 for customer savings of about $91 million. This type of indepen dent and objective examination increases the value and credibility of the agencys financial state ments, said Larry Bands, DeCAs chief financial executive. It demon strates to our stakehold ers and patrons that our reports are presented fairly, and that were accountable for all finan cial transactions. The road to DeCAs clean audit opinion began in January 2013 as the agency and the auditing firm laid the groundwork for a process that ended in December, said DeCAs director of accounting, Cynthia Morgan. Preparing for the audit is an ongoing and continuous effort, said Morgan of actions that include monthly meetings of DeCAs financial audit advisory committee agency, a group that keeps the agency on course by working closely with the auditor, internal director ates, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service and the DOD IG. To be truly successful, you must have cooperation and commitment from all lev els of your organization. During quarterly reporting periods, agen cy accountants prepare for the annual audit by collecting finan cial data. Auditors from CliftonLarsonAllen, one of the 10 largest CPA firms in the country, later review DeCAs financial statements along with internal controls over financial processes. The auditors check DeCAs reports for effi ciency and accuracy in the following key areas: accounts payable and undelivered orders treasury, payroll, prop erty, revenue accounts, appropriations and bud getary accounts as well as the financial reporting and compilation process and regulations resale stocks, equipment inventories, property accountability ogy that support financial information Each year brings about its own unique set of challenges; but through it all, the DeCA team manages to put the agencys best financial foot forward, Morgan said. As part of delivering an efficient commissary benefit, we are charged with being fiscally responsible. This clean audit puts a stamp on that effort. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Former CO Returns To Carney NationBy Ensign Marina NanartowichUSS Carney Public AffairsCapt. Glenn Kuffel, Deputy Commodore of the First Combined Destroyer Squadron (1-CDS), made a threeday visit to USS Carney (DDG-64) the first week of February. For Captain Kuffel, a prior Carney Commanding Officer, and who cur rently wears two hats as Deputy Commodore for 1-CDS as well as Deputy Commodore for Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 back in Mayport, the visit was like coming home. The Deputy Commodore made vis its to USS Mason (DDG87) and USS Hopper (DDG-70) before stop ping by Carney. All three ships form under 1-CDS as part of Carrier Strike Group 10 in the Arabian Gulf. 1-CDS is a multinational squadron led by Commodore Steven Holt of the Royal Navy and serves as an experiment for possible future combined strike groups by. Kuffel command ed Carney from May 2007-November 2008. Since that time, Carney has been upgraded, her mission has changed and her crew is new, but sev eral Carney Nation tradi tions prevail. A little of the old is kept, but there is new growth as well so she does not stay stagnant, he said. The spirit of Lanny King, Carneys first command ing officer is alive still today. Carney embraces this spirit and the crew has been very successful throughout deployment, working hard to achieve the mission at hand, although that mission has evolved over the years. During command, Kuffel led Carney through a seven-month Fifth Fleet deployment, taking her to the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and the Gulf of Oman primarily in an anti-piracy and antihuman smuggling mission. During that deploy ment Carney spent a mere 42 hours in the Arabian Gulf a striking difference from Carneys current Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) and Maritime Security Operations (MSO) missions, keeping her bound to the Arabian Gulf. In 2015, Carneys mission will have her change homeport to Rota, Spain. Mayport has been home to Carney since her com missioning in 1996. The crew is going to have a blast in Europe, but I am sad to see her leave Mayport, he added. Kuffel said he was grateful to have the chance to visit Carney. I am really glad this opportunity opened up, Kuffel commented. Not very many former com manding officers get the opportunity to come back to their ship when she is forward deployed. He went on to explain that he will take his experience with 1-CDS back to DESRON 14. He said that no matter the years of service one may have, you remain a Sailor at heart: you like going out to sea; you like pulling into new ports. As Carney approaches the halfway point in her Arabian Gulf deploy ment, the crew welcomed the visit from the Deputy Commodore. While I appreciated Capt. Kuffels visit, I think the crew enjoyed it more, said Cmdr. Eddie Crossman, Carneys com manding officer. They loved hearing the genesis of the Carney Nation and the Carney traditions. If I did not know better, from the crews excitement I would have thought we had a movie star visiting! Everyone wanted a pic ture with him. The bright spirits of Carney Nation were noticed by the Deputy Commodore, who com mented the camarade rie that has always made Carney special is still here. You can see it in the Sailors eyes. It is this camaraderie among the Carney fam ily that makes the Carney Nation so unique. CO past and CO present: Capt. Glenn Kuffel and Cmdr. Eddie Crossman stand together on Carneys starboard bridge wing in the mid dle of the Arabian Gulf. -Photos courtesy of USS CarneyCapt. Glenn Kuffel stands proudly with the rest of Carney Nation on Carneys flight deck after addressing the crew and awarding Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist pins to Carney Sailors. Kuffel is a prior Carney commanding officer, and who currently wears two hats as Deputy Commodore for 1-CDS as well as Deputy Commodore for Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 back in Mayport. Left, Gunners Mate Seaman Recruit Andrew Luebbert conducts a maintenance spot check with Capt. Glenn Kuffel in the armory during the Deputy Commodores visit. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

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full compliance with our policy, but it will also create better accountability for individuals who have had their cards lost or stolen. Though this has been a part of the current policy, Yousef noted, it was not mandated at CAC cardissuing locations. Previously, in the last couple of years, we have actually updated the sys tem to capture this docu mentation on an optional basis, he said. So what will happen in late March [or] early April is it will be required as part of that reissuance to bring sup porting documentation with you. The support ing documentation will be scanned and stored in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, he added. This will affect all com mon access card-eligible individuals, both military and civilian, Yousef said. In addition to being an additional security pre caution, Yousef said this measure will help to pre vent people from replac ing their cards just as a matter of personal convenience. It creates better awareness with our local secu rity offices [and] our individuals that are sponsor ing our contractors for common access cards, he said. So this way, they have full oversight if someone is losing multi ple ID cards. Following the update in requirements this spring, Yousef emphasized, it will be important for people to ensure they bring this documentation with them to have a card reissued, noting that most ID cardissuing sites already have been requiring it for quite some time.From Page 1CACReservists Work Towards Quals Aboard CoronadoBy MC1 Jacob SippelU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th FleetNavy Reservists from units in Florida, Georgia and Texas provided much-needed mainte nance assistance to the crew of USS Coronado (LCS 4) last week while continuing to complete training that will qualify them to serve with the fleet. Reservists will play piv otal parts throughout the deployment cycles of lit toral combat ships, said Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Galka, the operations officer aboard Coronado. Not only are the reserve elements used in specific missions, but they play a key role in assist ing the ships force with maintenance, he said. The integration of the reserve LCS team allows the core crew of the ship to share the preventative maintenance workload. By taking on preventa tive maintenance duties, reservists allow a ships crew to focus on mission planning and execution, Galka said. In addition, while completing mis sion-essential mainte nance, reservists will work closely with crewmem bers and become more familiar with LCS-class ships. Finally, the reserv ists will hone their main tenance proficiencies and skill sets. Its a win across the board for all entities, Galka said. Reservists participat ing in the recent train ing included members of the Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasures Mission Module unit at Mayport; Littoral Combat Ship-Surface Warfare Mission Module Atlanta; Littoral Combat Ship-Countermeasures Mission Module Fort Worth, Texas; and Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe Mayport. Many could serve on littoral combat ships that are scheduled to be homeported here over the next several years. They want to contribute to the LCS community but must complete the Train to Qualify process first. Were taking this opportunity to stand watches and get our qualifications done, said Boatswains Mate 1st Class Stephen Lovinggood, of LSC SUW Atlanta. For us prior active-duty Sailors, we are getting recertified in these areas, standing underinstruction watches and learning as much as pos sible. A lot of the watch standing, you think you forget, he said. Then, once you assume your UI watch, you realize you remember everything. Watchstanding is very important; its something that always stays with you. Littoral combat ships are innovative surface combatants designed to operate in littoral seas and shallow water to counter mines, submarines and fast-surfacecraft threats in coastal regions. They are designed to be reconfigured for various roles by changing mission modules, including weapons systems, sensors, car ried craft and mission crews for anti-submarine warfare, mine counter measures and surface warfare, with other mis sion sets forthcoming. The reconfigurations were envisioned to allow a single littoral combat ship to change roles in a matter of hours at any commercial port, permit ting a group of ships to rapidly optimize its effec tiveness against a devel oping threat. Coronado, an Independence-class LCS, is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep. It will address a critical capa bilities gap in the littorals and conduct the Navys mission to enhance maritime security by deterring hostile acts, maintaining a forward presence, pro jecting power and main taining sea control. The third Navy ship to be named after the city of Coronado, Calif., it will be commissioned April 5. Susan Keith will christen the Coronado, just as her mother christened its predecessor in 1996. -Photo by MC1 Jacob SippelChief Operations Specialist Jeremy Baltushis, a Sailor attached to USS Coronado (LCS 4) salutes a shipmate aboard as three Navy reservists stand under instruction watch with him. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Stephen Lovinggood, Mineman 1st Class Michael Gunter, and Gunners Mate 2nd Class Terrance Rudd are continuing to complete training that will qualify them to serve with the fleet. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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CHINFO Award Winner Phil Sea, RooseveltDeploy with Bush CSG Pages 4-5 Return ToCarney Nation Page 11 Gettysburg Marks15,000 Check-Ins Page 8 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannMembers of the Edward Waters College Concert Choir perform at NS Mayports Black History Month celebration held on Feb. 13 at the Base Chapel. The choir sang traditional hymnals, as well as songs from Motown artists. Members of Mayports Multicultural Committee also performed a skit highlighting many of the African Americans who have influenced the United States starting with the American Revolution up to current times. NS Mayport Celebrates Black History Month DOD To Mandate Attestation For Lost, Stolen CAC CardsBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceLater this year, the Defense Department will begin fully enforcing a previously optional policy regarding the reissuance of lost or stolen common access cards, a defense official said Feb. 11. Sam Yousef, a program manager for identity and benefits policy at the Defense Human Resources Activity, discussed an update to the current CAC issuance policy during an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. Beginning in late March [or] early April of this year, we are going to begin fully enforcing current common access card policy, which will require indi viduals to bring supporting documentation if they have had their ID cards lost or stolen, he said. If you have your card lost or stolen, you should work with your local security office or the individual spon soring you for that ID card. People requesting a replacement card will need to produce a document on component or agency let terhead that explains that the card has been lost or stolen, he added. Yousef noted the document should be signed, and individuals must bring it with them to have a new card issued. If the card has been stolen, he said, they may also bring in the police report that accounts for that, he added. This will not only get the department in -Photo by MC2 Cyrus RosonCapt. Jon C. Kreitz, outgoing commanding officer amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) gives welcome remarks during change of command ceremony aboard New York.USS New York Holds Change of CommandBy MC3 Angus BecklesUSS New York Public AffairsAmphibious transport dock USS New York held the ships third change of command ceremony on Feb. 14. Capt. Christopher Brunett, New Yorks outgoing executive officer, relieved Capt. Jon Kreitz as com manding officer. Thank you for being the best executive officer I could have asked for, you have been a great sidekick, trusted advisor and a good friend. Relinquishing command to you is akin to being the father of the bride and giving someone you love away, said Kreitz. I couldnt think of a better person to be turning com mand over to. I have all the trust and confidence that you will do everything to take care of my girl and her crew. You are going to love your new job. Kreitz added. Kreitz who assumed command of the New York 20 months ago was the ships third commanding offi cer. Under his command the ship completed its successful maiden deployment a major Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) planned maintenance availability and the majority of her pre-deployment basic train ing phase and certifications. This warships great crew, from See New York, Page 3 See CAC, Page 12

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ............................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: Now that second semester is in full swing having begun January 21 and students have their second quarter report card, is your child settling into the school routine? Or is he is still reluctant to get back into any kind of routine? Is he still for getting that weekly spell ing/vocabulary test? Is it hard to get him up in the morning for school like it was back in August? Are the number of tardies and absences increasing? Are you at your wits end? You just dont know if you can deal with this! Of course, as a parent, you recognize the value and importance of edu cation to your childs future. But no amount of lecturing, pleading, or disciplining has gotten your child excited about the return to school. There are some positive steps you can take: 1. Determine if he is getting enough rest to be successful in school. Students today are involved in a myriad of activities in addition to school, including youth sports, dance, music, or karate classes; cheerlead ing, band, or JROTC prac tice; faith-based youth activities; and home com puter games. Older stu dents work many hours a week to assist with car and insurance payments. With physical tired ness comes a weariness that makes it hard to stay awake at school to deal with assignments, home work, and time manage ment. 2. Talk to your child about his busy schedule. Try to determine wheth er it is due to homework requirements, activities, or work. Can something be eliminated. Would putting together a study plan actually give him more time. 3. Then map out a plan to insure that he gets the sleep he needs. A rested student is a more interest ed and engaged student. 4. Look over that sec ond quarter report card. Report cards were sent home the last week in January so you should have it in hand by now. Students making Ds and Fs no matter how hard they have studied or how many extra credit assignments they turned in are more apt to tune out and stop trying. If this continues for any length of time, it can lead to fail ure. Their somewhat posi tive attitude at the begin ning of the school year turns to frustration after a semester of really try ing, but getting the same grade over and over. 5. Engage your child in some quiet dialogue about what he believes is the problem. Dont add to his frustration by piling on saying, Why dont you study harder? Why dont you ask for help? when that may be exactly what he thought he was doing. During the discussion you will probably hear many of these excuses: tired ness, boredom, and frus tration. Be an active lis tener. Genuinely express sympathy for the causes. 6. Now map out an academic plan which could include you getting him help or him getting help for himself. Joining a study group or getting tutoring are two ways to receive help. Middle and High schools have clubs and organizations which offer tutoring. Elementary students can also plug into this tutor ing as well. For example, Fletcher High School has several clubs and organi zations which offer tutor ing. For active duty mili tary dependents, www. TUTOR.com/military provides professional tutors to help with all math, science, social studies, and English subjects from elementary to advanced levels. The tutor will work with your child in a one-to-one secure online classroom where everything is anonymous. The tutors use an interactive whiteboard, file sharing, and instant messaging to work through the prob lem. Because of this, I frequently advise parents that students younger than 3rd grade may need parental assistance to work with the tutor. Older students should have no problem working with the tutor, and each tutor is screened, certified, and background-checked. No personal information is ever shared between tutor and student. Not sure about this? Go to youtube and search tutor. com/military to view sev eral good examples of students working with a tutor. 7. If the problem is more behavioral than academic, make a clearcut list of unacceptable behaviors and result ing consequences. For instance, continually forgetting to complete homework in a class might result in the loss of a favorite privilege until the resulting lower grade is raised. Resist the temp tation to ground your child indefinitely or to take away all prized pos sessions. However, if you do not follow through on the promised conse quences, your child will quickly realize that you are not serious about school success, and he will remain unchanged. Students do want to succeed, but as children they arent always able to figure out by themselves what the actual problem is. With patience and understanding, you can take these suggested actions to help your child figure out how he can achieve academic suc cess. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Steps For School Success For 2nd SemesterJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingTHE ROPES Proverbs Teaches Wisdom From AboveTheres a story about a proud young man who came to Socrates asking for knowledge. He walked up to the muscular phi losopher and said, O great Socrates, I come to you for knowledge. Socrates recognized a pompous numbskull when he saw one. He led the young man through the streets, to the sea, and chest deep into water. Then he asked, What do you want? Knowledge, O wise Socrates, said the young man with a smile. Socrates put his strong hands on the mans shoulders and pushed him under. Thirty seconds later Socrates let him up. What do you want? he asked again. Wisdom, the young man sputtered, O great and wise Socrates. Socrates crunched him under again. Thirty sec onds passed, thirty-five. Forty. Socrates let him up. The man was gasping. What do you want, young man? Between heavy, heav ing breaths the fellow wheezed, Knowledge, O wise and wonderful... Socrates jammed him under again Forty sec onds passed. Fifty. What do you want? Air! the young man screeched. I need air! When you want knowledge as you have just wanted air, then you will have knowledge. I am glad the young fella in the above antidote finally got it right. I am not sure if he could have taken another plunge. And to think all he wanted was a little wisdom and knowledge. The con clusion of his meeting appears to be the thesis of this story. Did you catch it? When you want knowledge as you have just wanted air, then you will have knowledge. Nestled just a little over half way in the Old Testament is the book Proverbs. According to ancient Hebrew literature, this book is a part of what is known as the writings. This book along with Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs are considered wisdom lit erature. Inspired by God (2 Tim. 3:16), the sages of Israel penned Proverbs as they reflected on life and about how one ought to live. Proverbs contain a wide variety of aspects about life. For instance, in Proverbs 22:19, we are told that a wise person puts their trust in God. Certainly this is easier said than done but the wise come to understand that trusting in God will always ensure Gods best for their lives. Proverbs 20:11 reads, Even a child makes himself known by his acts, by whether his conduct is pure and upright. The main point here is not the child but that ones character is not revealed in what they say but in what they do. Inspirational Speaker, Steven Covey expands this concept by reminding us that you cant talk your way out of what youve behaved yourself into. Finally, Proverbs 20:19 remind us about the dan ger of slander and gossip. First this passage paints for us a powerful word picture and then com mands us not to associate with such a person. Can you imagine how much emotional pain can be avoided simply by obey ing this Proverb? I hope I have provoked you to take some time to study the Book of Proverbs. If you read one chapter a day, you can complete it is 31 days. If you cannot commit to this study plan then take a look at Proverbs 6:6-11. In this passage God uses an ant to teach us about the importance of prepa ration, planning, and hard work. Blessings! Chaplain Calvin B. Gardner Sr. CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSCORNERWhat ever happened to that older lady that used to be here every week? I overheard the girl in front of me ask her friend after our Pump & Sweat class ended at the base gym. She looked to be about 27 or so, with a youthful high ponytail and a purple spandex tank top with a built in shelf bra. You remember, the older lady -petite, short hair, lifted light weights, and was, well, real prim about it. The girls friend, also twenty-something in a cute strappy tank top, shrugged her shoulders and carried on putting her equipment away. But the girl persisted. You remember, she used to stand right up front, the girl pestered. Cmon! You know, the OLDER LADY. I minded my own business, wiping down my yoga mat and racking my weights. I had learned months prior that the girls were not interested in socializing with the mid dle-aged women in class. I tried Whew, those squats were brutal, huh? but was always met with awkwardly reluctant nods, which clearly conveyed the message, Listen maam, youd better stick with your own kind. But on this day, I couldnt help but realize that I knew the older lady this girl was asking about. She was in my social circle on base. But acknowledg ing my association with the older lady in question would then brand me an older lady too. So I hesi tated. When I was in my early 30s and we were sta tioned in Virginia Beach, I relished my advanced step classes at the Mt. Trashmore YMCA and struck up lasting relation ships with my group exer cise classmates. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, we shared the locker room with the Water Aerobics ladies. They would hobble into the showers from the pool The Old Ladies At Gym May Creak, But They RockLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEin their floral skirted bathing suits and cackle while changing into elasticwasted pants and sensible shoes. Where were you last month, Phyllis? Well, my hip was act ing up something ter rible, so the doctor has me on Glucosamine and Chondroitin . . Do you get coverage? My goodness those pills are expensive! While I eavesdropped on their locker room ban ter about orthopedics, vitamin supplements and irregularity, I chuckled to myself, never realizing that Id be just like them one day. Just like the rest of the older ladies at the gym, I now disappear for a week or month when I hurt my wrist or knee or back, then show up to class again wearing one of those braces you can buy at CVS. I do the modifi cations suggested by the fitness instructors, like squatting without weights or doing push ups on my knees. I look ridiculous in a high ponytail, and I cer tainly cant wear tank tops with shelf bras anymore. Ive become one of them. But is it so bad to be an older lady at the gym? In society, older women are respected for their vast wealth of life expe -See Gym, Page 3

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riences, and nowhere is that reverence more prevalent than amongst military wives. Spouses who are new to the wellknown hardships of mili tary life generally admire those of us who have been doing this for a couple of decades. Then why is it that, at the gym, youth and joint flexibility trump maturity and life experience? As we dropped our dumbbells into the bin, I thought of the older lady these girls were trying to remember. She had two kids who were off at col lege. Her husband had a long successful Navy career. They lived on their boat, which was docked in Newport. She was attractive, accomplished, and a very nice person. I know the lady you are talking about, I finally admitted to the girl in the ponytail. She hurt her knee, but shes okay. She and her husband live on their yacht, and they trav el a lot to visit their kids at the Naval Academy and UNC. Shell be back here soon enough. The girl stared for a second or two, then mut tered, Oh . wow. But I knew my message came across loud and clear. We older ladies rule. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2GymNavy And Marine Corps Commendation Medal CWO4 Wanda Trammell, NS Mayport Navy And Marine Corps Achievement Medal MM1 Bryan Pentlin, NS Mayport AC2 Shavon Armstrong, NS Mayport MA2 Durel Dennis, NS Mayport MA2 Benjamin Iverson, NS Mayport SH2 Antoine Mathews, NS Mayport AC3 Beret Dunn, NS Mayport AC3 Juan Serret, NS Mayport ACAN Jillian Bass, NS Mayport Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal CSC Wayne Rickerson, NS Mayport MA2 Tyler Farmer, NS Mayport MA2 Alesha Kearse, NS Mayport Letter Of Commendation SH2 Antoine Mathews, NS Mayport Good Conduct Award ET3 Derek Greenwalt, NS Mayport ET3 Ryan Levalley, NS Mayport ET3 Jordan Queen, NS Mayport ET3 James Ussery, NS Mayport Senior Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MA1 Joseph Hayes, NS Mayport Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr SH2 Adrian Smith, NS Mayport Junior Sailor Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MA3 Ruth Weart, NS Mayport Bluejacket Of The Quarter, 4th Qtr MASA Nathan Rollins, NS Mayport MILESTONESAT NS MAYPORT -Photos by AC2 Shavon Armstrong Above, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, stands with nominees for the Civilian Supervisor of the Year 2013. This years winner was MWRs John Aimone. Pictured from left is Thomas Douget of Air Ops, Edward Namyslowski of Fire and Emergency Services, Emerita Lewis of NEX Mayport, McCall, Aimone and Bob Meury with SJA.Mayport Awards Top Supervisor, EmployeeNS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, presents letters of appreciations to the nominees for the Employee of the Quarter, First Quarter 2014. Pictured from left is Robert Garis of Air Ops, Jacob Neith of Public Works, McCall and winner, Steven Ames of Fire and Emergency Services. Not pictured is nominees Rebecca Klink of MWR and Charles Smith of Security.an outstanding ward room to a superb chiefs mess and all the blue shirts has accomplished every single mission and task thrown at them, said Kreitz. I couldnt be more impressed with or proud of them. Brunett who is from Buffalo, NY has served as the New Yorks execu tive officer for the past 18 months. He graduated from the naval academy in 1989 and was designat ed a naval aviator in 1991. His previous assignments range from Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Eight (HC-8) to commander of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 (HSC-25). I can think of no other ship in the fleet that I would want to be a part of its crew more than the New York. As a son of New York growing up in Buffalo and Rochester, this ship means a lot to New Yorkers and to me, said Brunett. Capt. Kreitz has gotten us on a great trajectory for continued excellence in everything that we do and my job will be to continue on that path. I am very excited to take command and I cannot wait for the next chapter. Brunett added. New York recently shift ed homeport to Naval Station Mayport, Fla., as part of a larger move of an amphibious ready group homeport change in sup port of strategic maritime dispersal.From Page 1New York THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) man the rails as the ship departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Phil Sea, Roosevelt Deploy With Bush CSGFrom U.S. Fleet ForcesApproximately 6,000 Sailors of Carrier Strike Group 2 (CSG 2) depart ed their homeports in Norfolk, Va. and Mayport, Fla. Feb. 15. The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) commanded by Capt. Andrew J. Loiselle, departed Naval Station Norfolk along with guid ed missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), while guided missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) and guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departed Naval Station Mayport. Commanded by Rear Admiral John C. Aquilino, CSG 2 is comprised of USS George H.W. Bush with embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 consist ing of USS Truxtun, USS Roosevelt and USS Philippine Sea. This team has worked hard in preparation for this deployment and is ready to go, said Rear Children look on and wave goodbye from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) sets sail for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. See Deploy, Page 5A little boy waves goodbye to the guided-missile cruis er USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) as the ship departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security opera tions, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval pres ence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. Family and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departs for deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater secu rity cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 Adm. John C. Aquilino, Commander of GHWB CSG. The dedication and commitment shown by our Sailors will serve the country well in support of our global national inter ests. Aircraft squadrons include strike fight er squadrons VFA 213 Fighting Black Lions, VFA 31 Tomcatters, VFA 15 Valions and VFA 87 Golden Warriors; tactical electronics war fare squadron VAQ 134 Garudas; carrier air borne early warning squadron VAW 124 Bear Aces; fleet logistics sup port squadron VRC 40 Rawhides; helicopter maritime strike squad ron HSM 70 Spartans and helicopter sea com bat squadron HSC 9 Tridents. While deployed, the strike group will serve in the 5th and 6th U.S. Fleet areas of responsibil ity conducting maritime security operations, the ater security coopera tion efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.From Page 4Deploy The guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater secu rity cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. A young girl looks on from the pier as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) departs Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of mari time security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The "DONT TREAD ON ME" flag is brought down aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) as the ship prepares to depart Naval Station Mayport for a deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Family and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) prepares to set sail for deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security cooperation and forward naval presence in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation.

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Auto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 March 15: UFC 171Hendricks vs. Lawler 10 p.m. at Castaways. 2707205 March 14: St. Patricks Day Party 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Wear you best green outfit and enjoy DJ entertainment, drink specials, and more. 270-7205 Beginning March 16: March Madness Watch all your favorite teams at Castaways Lounge! Fill out a bracket for a chance at great prizes! 270-7205 March 28: Call of Duty: Ghost Tournament 8 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. FREE! Try your luck on the PS4 for a chance at great prizes. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT March 8: MWR Travel Expo 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at MWR Fitness Center Gymnasium. 60 vendors, food samples, giveaways and more. 270-5228 Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all others; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 24. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. March 1: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 7: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 9: St. Augustine Day Trip. Van departs 10 a.m. FREE. Sign up dead line March 6. March 10: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by March 13. March 17: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! March 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline March 17. March 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 6 p.m. Transportation only. March 22-23: Megacon in Orlando. Van departs 8 a.m. $40 for hotel and transportation only; $30 per day at the door. Sign up by March 19 March 24: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. March 29: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Transportation only. March 31: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Turn It Up @ the Teen Center. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Music, movies, food, drinks, a fire pit and more as we welcome new teens to the center. 246-0347 Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 March 12: Teen Employment Orientation. 5-6 p.m. at the Youth Center. This orientation will provide you an overview of the employment program, hiring process, resume help, and more. This ori entation is highly rec ommended to any teen interested in our Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 14: Freedom FridayDecades Dance. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 March 18-19: Teen Career Launch. 1-5 pm at the Youth Center. Teens will learn the ins and outs of the hiring process including how to write a resume, mock interviews, judging experience and skills and much more. This program is highly recommended for any one interested in the Teen Employment Program. Open to all active duty dependents ages 15-17 by Apr. 30, 2014. 270-5680 March 20: Teen Art Walk Field Trip. 4:309 p.m.; Meet at the Teen Center. Bring your own money; permission slip required. 246-0347 March 28: Freedom FridayLets Go to the Drive In! Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $10 advanced sign-up and $12 day of, space permit ting. 270-5680 Intramural Sports March 3-6: Pre-Season Softball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 25. 2705451 March 10: Mens Captains Cup Softball Begins. Season Ends May. 8. 270-5451 March 11: Catch a Leprechaun 5K Run/3K Walk. 8:10 a.m. in front of the Fitness Center. March 14-16: March Madness Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 28. 270-5451 March 25: Mens Captains Cup Kickball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for priz es. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents (Must provide proper ID) -Photo by Sandra BarrettThe SMART Southeast Regional Director Larry Shields presents the 2013 #1 RV park award to the Pelican Roost RV Park on Feb.6 SMART is a recreational vehicle social club for active, retired, and honorably dis charged military veterans and their spouses. Pelican Roost has long been recognized as one of the best RV facilities in the Navy. Also attending were local SMART RV members, current RV Park residents, Lisa Wolfe, Community Activities Director, Lonnie Kenney, MWR Director, and Cmdr. Pat Pickard, executive officer of Naval Station Mayport. Pelican Roost Is A SMART Park 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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TRICARE Services Available Online, By PhoneBy Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs OfficerWhile TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still avail able online and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www.humana-military. com, or call (800) 4445445. Beneficiaries can change their primary care manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with per manent change of station orders, its even possible to request a PCM change before leaving the cur rent command. And for patients already residing in the Mayport area, PCMs are now available at Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Mayport, thanks to the return of staff from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care has improved, with primary care clinics staying open until 6 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and noon on Saturdays. Patients can securely email their PCM, by signing up at www. relayhealth.com. Patients can also meet BHC Mayports PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax by click ing on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port Gray, Orange and Pink teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the website or phone, patients can also call or visit TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) to discuss options. HBAs work for the branch health clinic, unlike the website and phone staff who work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). So patients need to make any chang es at www.tricare.mil, www.humana-military. com or (800) 444-5445. Unfortunately, HBAs are unable to do this on patients behalf. HBAs can be reached at (904) 270-4255. -Photo by Jacob Sippel A Sailor logs onto www.tricare.mil, in preparation for a permanent change of sta tion move. American Heart Month: The Fight Against Heart Disease Question: Why should I be concerned if my blood pressure is high? Answer: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a direct contribu tor to heart disease. Many people unfortunately do not have any signs or symptoms but may still be at risk. Some risk fac tors are a family history of hypertension, smok ing, diabetes, high choles terol or being overweight. Exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables and lowering salt intake in your diet may help, but sometimes this is not enough and medication is needed. Talk with your Primary Care Manager to see if you haveor are at risk forhypertension. Ask the Doc is writ ten by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was writ ten by Laura Kyer, a cer tified physician assistant from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. If you have a question for a phy sician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, please send it to jaxpublicaffairs@med.navy.mil. ASK THEDOC-Photo by Jacob Sippel Leslie Fiala, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, discusses healthy eating tips during a diabetes class. Patients can take diabetes nutrition to help with meal planning and controlling their blood sugar. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing heart disease. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterFebruary is American Heart Monthan impor tant month in the fight against heart disease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, causing narrowing and blood flow restriction. It remains the nations number one killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans every yearapproximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in seri ous illness, disability and decreased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is preventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles direc tor for public health. Controllable risk fac tors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physical inactivity, diabetes mel litus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other controllable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease (including heart disease and stroke) costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each year to include the costs of healthcare services, medi cations and lost produc tivity. Making healthy choic es such as good nutri tion, weight manage ment and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart dis ease, said Chamberlain. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active chil dren are also at risk for heart disease, Research has proven that children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. I addition to American Heart Month, National Wear Red Day a day to raise awareness for the fight against heart disease in womenwill be recog nized on Feb. 7. National Wear Red Day was began in 2003, when the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer com bined. As a result of their efforts, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 per cent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport Health Promotions offer health related classes to its active duty, retiree and dependents 17 years of age or older. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pressure man agement; ShipShape, an eight-week nutrition and weight management program; tobacco cessa tion counselling, to assist smokers with quitting; body fat assessments; and nutrition counseling. For more information, call NBHC Mayport Health Promotions at 904270-5251. NBHC Mayport is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sail ors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. -Photo by Jacob Sippel Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jose Ramirez, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, fixes himself a healthy meal for lunch at the hospitals galley. February is Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exer cise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat .Fight deadly childhood diseases. 800-8 22-6344 stjude.org THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

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USS Gettysburg Marks 15,000 Check-inBy MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonPublic Affairs, USS Gettysburg (CG 64)Sailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) reached 15,000 aircraft inflight check-ins, Feb. 11. The milestone signi fies the number of air craft that have checked in with the cruiser since the beginning of its 2013-2014 deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR). 15,000 check-ins is another indicator of the amount of hard work our Sailors have put forth this entire deployment, said Lt. Jimmy Drennan, operations officer, USS Gettysburg. This is a proud moment that Im thankful to be a part of, and a huge achievement for the entire crew. An in-flight check in is conducted through com munications with U.S. and allied aircraft provid ing information in sup port of their mission, said Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW) Antwain McGee. McGee communicated with the 15,000th checkin which was the pilot of a C-17A supporting mis sions in Afghanistan, while standing watch as an air intercept controller (AIC) in the combat infor mation center aboard Gettysburg. We provide pilots with information including air space, altitude, bearing and emergency support, said McGee. Whether they are U.S., British, Air Force or Marine pilots, our job is to communicate the information necessary to help them complete their mission. McGee said Gettysburgs combat information center began recording the number of in-flight check-ins in August 2013. Many manhours were put forth to reach the mark. The amount of checkins vary, but on any given day we can support more than one-hundred air craft, said McGee. We have reached this point with zero safety advi sories which indicates a vigilant watch. We have to remain vigilant on watch throughout the remainder of deployment and pro vide support where it is needed. McGee is proud to be a part of the Gettysburg crew during this achieve ment. Its a great feeling to be an AIC, deployed in the 5th fleet AOR and sup porting aircraft, because this is what we train for, said McGee. Having 15,000 check-ins shows how Gettysburg sets the standard of excellence. Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of respon sibility.-Photo by MC3 Lorenzo J. BurlesonOperations Specialist First Class Antwain McGee communicates with a pilot during a watch as an Air inter cept controller in the combat information center onboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). Gettysburg is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Midway Dinner Tickets On SaleFrom Navy League of MayportTickets are on sale for the Navy League of Mayport Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program on June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. This is an All Service event featuring a joint Color Guard, All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the Service Songs, and numerous historical dis plays. For tickets call Bob Price at 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 or email bpricex4@comcast.net 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Gettysburg Embarked Helicopter Detachment Completes 1000th Flight Hour On DeploymentBy Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Public AffairsHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74, Det. 2, embarked aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64), successfully conducted its 1,000th flight hour of the current deployment, Jan. 17. One-thousand flight hours is an incredible feat, and it would not be possible without the dedication of the aircrew and the skill of our maintainers, said Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, the detachments officer in charge. Without their atten tion to detail, precision and many long nights, we would not have been able to reach this point, Clark said. Behind the flight hours are two sides of operation, the maintainers and the operators. The air main tenance crew completes approximately ten hours of maintenance for every hour of flight. Our birds fly nightly, so maintaining their systems is an absolute priority, said Aviation Electricians Mate 1st Class William Winistorfer. Boatswains mates, damage controlmen, hos pital corpsmen, ships servicemen and the pilots and officers control ling the landing all come together to make flight operations a priority for the ship. Part of that support continues within the air craft. Flying every hour with the pilots are avia tion warfare systems operators, controlling all of the mission equip ment. Naval Aircrewman (Tactical) 2nd Class Britt Turner V has flown 275 hours this deployment. It has been a busy deployment, said Turner. Being able to operate daily has been an incred ible experience and opportunity. Inside the ship the combat information cen ter plays a large role and logs just as many hours as the pilots. Operations specialists serve as the anti-subsurface tactical controllers (ASTAC) and have worked alongside the pilots for the duration of the deployment. Being in an opera tional environment is one of the most rewarding parts of my job, said Operations Specialist 1st Class Ronald Wierzbic, one of the ASTAC controllers. I love tasking the heli copter pilots to identify contacts. I love controlling aircraft, he added. In addition to reaching the 1,000th flight hour, this deployment has seen several milestones reached for the detach ment: they completed six maintenance inspec tions and functional check flights, achieved more than 2,000 deck hits in 2013, three pilots earned qualifications as helicopter aircraft com manders (HAC) and two more pilots are on a path to qualify before the end of deployment. This HAC qualifica tion is complex and it often takes pilots several months to feel confident before they begin the final boarding process, said pilot, Lt. j.g. Joe Granata. It is about feeling com fortable enough with the regulations, procedures and equipment to oper ate the helicopter safely, Granata added. In the end that is a HACs prior ity. HSM 74 Det. 2 will remain aboard Gettysburg until the ship returns to homeport. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC3 Karl AndersonAn MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter, assigned to the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7, flies over the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) en route to the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) during a replenishment-at-sea. Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting mari time security operations, supporting theater security cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

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Balance Key To Fiscal 2015 Budget ReductionsBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceBalance is the key to handling budget reductions for the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Feb. 7. Hagel has to cut $41 billion from the presidents planned fiscal 2015 budget request, scheduled to be released March 4, and Pentagon planners are working with the White House and the Office of Management and Budget on the submission. You have to come at all these things from a holistic point of view, Hagel told reporters at a Pentagon news conference. The secretary noted that the major parts of the budget fund readiness, modernization and capabilities. As you assess your resources and you match your resources to mission, he added, those are three priorities that always must be in front of everything else. Because it is impossible to cut $41 billion from just one aspect of the budget, Hagel said, you assess the strategic interest and guidance and the mission to defend your country, what its going to take to do that, and then you start working through that. Will there be cuts across the board? Of course there will, he said. You cant do it any other way. Are there going to be adjustments across the board? Of course, he continued. But you must preserve readi ness and modernization and the capability and the capac ity in order to do the job of pro tecting this country within the framework of the resources you have. Well do that. Hagel said he is satisfied that the proposed Defense Department budget will protect the United States today and in the future. I think its a very good plan. I think its an effective plan, he said. FFSC Workshop Schedule SetFrom FFSCThe following classes and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more infor mation about the classes or to register call 2706600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management, FFSC Room 702 Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting, Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Stress Management, Wellness Center Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication, FFSC Room 719CNP To Hold All-Hands Call To Answer Sailors QuestionsBy MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) is scheduled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live March 5 at 2 p.m. EST. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that affect them and their families and open the floor to live questions from fleet via satellite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin sending in ques tions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@ gmail.com. The programs and policies under the office of the chief of naval personnel directly impact Sailors and include the following: -Pay and allowances -Advancements -Uniforms -Education and training -Family Support Policies -Sexual Assault Prevention and Response -Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions -21st Century Sailor Initiatives -Total Sailor Fitness -Personnel Programs and Polices More than just asking questions, Moran and Beldo encourage Sailors to use this opportunity to share their feedback-whats working in the fleet, what isnt and what ideas do they have to make our existing policies better. The event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network (AFN), Direct to Sailor (DTS) and The Pentagon Channel (TPC). Online streaming will be available on the following websites: www.navy.mil www.pentagonchannel. mil www.defense.govClean Audit Confirms DeCA 2013 Fiscal ExcellenceBy Kevin L. RobinsonDeCA public affairs specialist The Defense Commissary Agencys fis cal 2013 financial state ments have received a clean audit opinion from independent auditors, an evaluation that certi fies the credibility of the benefit for its patrons, the agencys director said. Receiving a clean audit opinion validates the hard work of our DeCA team in delivering a commis sary benefit while being responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. This is the 12th straight year that DeCAs financial state ments have received this level of certification. A clean or unqualified audit opinion is the high est possible ruling and reflects the agencys use of appropriated funds to deliver the commissary benefit. The agency gen erates nearly $6 billion in annual sales and receives $1.4 billion in appropri ated funding. During fiscal 2013, DeCA processed nearly 94 million transactions in its stores and deliv ered nearly $2.6 billion in savings to its custom ers. Commissaries also redeemed nearly 100 million coupons in fiscal 2013 for customer savings of about $91 million. This type of indepen dent and objective exami nation increases the value and credibility of the agencys financial state ments, said Larry Bands, DeCAs chief financial executive. It demon strates to our stakehold ers and patrons that our reports are presented fairly, and that were accountable for all finan cial transactions. The road to DeCAs clean audit opinion began in January 2013 as the agency and the auditing firm laid the groundwork for a process that ended in December, said DeCAs director of accounting, Cynthia Morgan. Preparing for the audit is an ongoing and continuous effort, said Morgan of actions that include monthly meetings of DeCAs financial audit advisory committee agency, a group that keeps the agency on course by working closely with the auditor, internal director ates, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service and the DOD IG. To be truly successful, you must have cooperation and commitment from all lev els of your organization. During quarterly reporting periods, agen cy accountants prepare for the annual audit by collecting finan cial data. Auditors from CliftonLarsonAllen, one of the 10 largest CPA firms in the country, later review DeCAs financial statements along with internal controls over financial processes. The auditors check DeCAs reports for effi ciency and accuracy in the following key areas: accounts payable and undelivered orders treasury, payroll, prop erty, revenue accounts, appropriations and bud getary accounts as well as the financial reporting and compilation process and regulations resale stocks, equipment inventories, property accountability ogy that support financial information Each year brings about its own unique set of challenges; but through it all, the DeCA team manages to put the agencys best financial foot forward, Morgan said. As part of delivering an efficient commissary benefit, we are charged with being fiscally responsible. This clean audit puts a stamp on that effort. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Former CO Returns To Carney NationBy Ensign Marina NanartowichUSS Carney Public AffairsCapt. Glenn Kuffel, Deputy Commodore of the First Combined Destroyer Squadron (1-CDS), made a threeday visit to USS Carney (DDG-64) the first week of February. For Captain Kuffel, a prior Carney Commanding Officer, and who cur rently wears two hats as Deputy Commodore for 1-CDS as well as Deputy Commodore for Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 back in Mayport, the visit was like coming home. The Deputy Commodore made vis its to USS Mason (DDG87) and USS Hopper (DDG-70) before stop ping by Carney. All three ships form under 1-CDS as part of Carrier Strike Group 10 in the Arabian Gulf. 1-CDS is a multinational squadron led by Commodore Steven Holt of the Royal Navy and serves as an experiment for possible future combined strike groups by. Kuffel command ed Carney from May 2007-November 2008. Since that time, Carney has been upgraded, her mission has changed and her crew is new, but sev eral Carney Nation tradi tions prevail. A little of the old is kept, but there is new growth as well so she does not stay stagnant, he said. The spirit of Lanny King, Carneys first command ing officer is alive still today. Carney embraces this spirit and the crew has been very successful throughout deployment, working hard to achieve the mission at hand, although that mission has evolved over the years. During command, Kuffel led Carney through a seven-month Fifth Fleet deployment, taking her to the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and the Gulf of Oman primarily in an anti-piracy and antihuman smuggling mission. During that deploy ment Carney spent a mere 42 hours in the Arabian Gulf a striking difference from Carneys current Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) and Maritime Security Operations (MSO) missions, keeping her bound to the Arabian Gulf. In 2015, Carneys mis sion will have her change homeport to Rota, Spain. Mayport has been home to Carney since her com missioning in 1996. The crew is going to have a blast in Europe, but I am sad to see her leave Mayport, he added. Kuffel said he was grate ful to have the chance to visit Carney. I am really glad this opportunity opened up, Kuffel commented. Not very many former com manding officers get the opportunity to come back to their ship when she is forward deployed. He went on to explain that he will take his expe rience with 1-CDS back to DESRON 14. He said that no matter the years of ser vice one may have, you remain a Sailor at heart: you like going out to sea; you like pulling into new ports. As Carney approaches the halfway point in her Arabian Gulf deploy ment, the crew welcomed the visit from the Deputy Commodore. While I appreci ated Capt. Kuffels visit, I think the crew enjoyed it more, said Cmdr. Eddie Crossman, Carneys com manding officer. They loved hearing the genesis of the Carney Nation and the Carney traditions. If I did not know better, from the crews excitement I would have thought we had a movie star visiting! Everyone wanted a pic ture with him. The bright spirits of Carney Nation were noticed by the Deputy Commodore, who com mented the camarade rie that has always made Carney special is still here. You can see it in the Sailors eyes. It is this camaraderie among the Carney fam ily that makes the Carney Nation so unique. CO past and CO pres ent: Capt. Glenn Kuffel and Cmdr. Eddie Crossman stand together on Carneys starboard bridge wing in the mid dle of the Arabian Gulf. -Photos courtesy of USS CarneyCapt. Glenn Kuffel stands proudly with the rest of Carney Nation on Carneys flight deck after addressing the crew and awarding Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist pins to Carney Sailors. Kuffel is a prior Carney commanding officer, and who currently wears two hats as Deputy Commodore for 1-CDS as well as Deputy Commodore for Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 14 back in Mayport. Left, Gunners Mate Seaman Recruit Andrew Luebbert con ducts a maintenance spot check with Capt. Glenn Kuffel in the armory during the Deputy Commodores visit. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

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full compliance with our policy, but it will also cre ate better accountability for individuals who have had their cards lost or sto len. Though this has been a part of the current policy, Yousef noted, it was not mandated at CAC cardissuing locations. Previously, in the last couple of years, we have actually updated the sys tem to capture this docu mentation on an optional basis, he said. So what will happen in late March [or] early April is it will be required as part of that reissuance to bring sup porting documentation with you. The support ing documentation will be scanned and stored in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, he added. This will affect all com mon access card-eligible individuals, both military and civilian, Yousef said. In addition to being an additional security pre caution, Yousef said this measure will help to pre vent people from replac ing their cards just as a matter of personal convenience. It creates better aware ness with our local secu rity offices [and] our indi viduals that are sponsor ing our contractors for common access cards, he said. So this way, they have full oversight if someone is losing multi ple ID cards. Following the update in requirements this spring, Yousef emphasized, it will be important for people to ensure they bring this documentation with them to have a card reissued, noting that most ID cardissuing sites already have been requiring it for quite some time.From Page 1CACReservists Work Towards Quals Aboard CoronadoBy MC1 Jacob SippelU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th FleetNavy Reservists from units in Florida, Georgia and Texas provided much-needed mainte nance assistance to the crew of USS Coronado (LCS 4) last week while continuing to complete training that will qualify them to serve with the fleet. Reservists will play piv otal parts throughout the deployment cycles of lit toral combat ships, said Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Galka, the operations officer aboard Coronado. Not only are the reserve elements used in specific missions, but they play a key role in assist ing the ships force with maintenance, he said. The integration of the reserve LCS team allows the core crew of the ship to share the preventative maintenance workload. By taking on preventa tive maintenance duties, reservists allow a ships crew to focus on mission planning and execution, Galka said. In addition, while completing mis sion-essential mainte nance, reservists will work closely with crewmem bers and become more familiar with LCS-class ships. Finally, the reserv ists will hone their main tenance proficiencies and skill sets. Its a win across the board for all entities, Galka said. Reservists participat ing in the recent train ing included members of the Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasures Mission Module unit at Mayport; Littoral Combat Ship-Surface Warfare Mission Module Atlanta; Littoral Combat Ship-Countermeasures Mission Module Fort Worth, Texas; and Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe Mayport. Many could serve on littoral combat ships that are scheduled to be homeported here over the next several years. They want to contribute to the LCS community but must complete the Train to Qualify process first. Were taking this opportunity to stand watches and get our qualifications done, said Boatswains Mate 1st Class Stephen Lovinggood, of LSC SUW Atlanta. For us prior active-duty Sailors, we are getting recertified in these areas, standing underinstruction watches and learning as much as pos sible. A lot of the watch standing, you think you forget, he said. Then, once you assume your UI watch, you realize you remember everything. Watchstanding is very important; its something that always stays with you. Littoral combat ships are innovative surface combatants designed to operate in littoral seas and shallow water to counter mines, submarines and fast-surfacecraft threats in coastal regions. They are designed to be reconfigured for various roles by changing mission modules, including weapons systems, sensors, car ried craft and mission crews for anti-submarine warfare, mine counter measures and surface warfare, with other mis sion sets forthcoming. The reconfigurations were envisioned to allow a single littoral combat ship to change roles in a matter of hours at any commercial port, permit ting a group of ships to rapidly optimize its effec tiveness against a devel oping threat. Coronado, an Independence-class LCS, is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep. It will address a critical capa bilities gap in the littorals and conduct the Navys mission to enhance maritime security by deterring hostile acts, maintaining a forward presence, pro jecting power and main taining sea control. The third Navy ship to be named after the city of Coronado, Calif., it will be commissioned April 5. Susan Keith will christen the Coronado, just as her mother christened its predecessor in 1996. -Photo by MC1 Jacob SippelChief Operations Specialist Jeremy Baltushis, a Sailor attached to USS Coronado (LCS 4) salutes a shipmate aboard as three Navy reservists stand under instruc tion watch with him. Boatswains Mate 1st Class Stephen Lovinggood, Mineman 1st Class Michael Gunter, and Gunners Mate 2nd Class Terrance Rudd are continuing to complete training that will qualify them to serve with the fleet. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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