Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00334


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THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Washington v. Lincoln for greatest president Page 9 West Virginia SSBN 736 returns to Kings Bay Page 6 Super fun Great Tailgate & Chili cookoff Pages 4, 5 Military Saves Week comingTools for eective nancial planning focus of programBy MC1 Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of Military Saves Week on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible nancial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. At Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 10, Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr. also signed a proclaimation in support. Knowing how to handle money is a sure way to improve the quality of life of our servicemembers and family members, and to remove stresses that could interfere with their ability to execute the mission, Guey said. We are very fortunate on this base to have a strong Fleet and Family team which provides our troops the knowledge to make nancial decisions wisely. Kings Bay Fitness Center will help you take o weight ... and keep it oBy Laura Jefferson Special to The PeriscopeLike many Americans at the start of the New Year you made a resolution to nally lose that 15 pounds and start a healthy diet. But how is that going? As Valentines Day nears, heart-shaped boxes lled with candy ood the aisles of stores tempting to you to indulge and sabotage your resolution. Its not hard to lose sight of your goals as work, your childs soccer games, and your visiting in-laws ll your busy schedule. But with the support of the sta at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation Fitness Complex you can help turn your tness resolution to a lifestyle. Its gotta be part of your lifestyle said Stephanie Baribeau, tness director of the Fitness Complex. Once it is, its much easier to nd the time to go to the gym, or if youre at home to go for a walk, jog or ride a bike. Baribeau stresses the importance of maintaining a tness regimen year round. During spring everyone is thinking about summer time, bathing suit season and being on the beach, so we get another rush at the gym, she said. But if they stayed year round, they wouldnt have the extra Registered Dietician Mary Beth Penntington observes Ansley Childree, Health Fitness Specialist ACSM, have her body composition measurement be taken using the BOD POD System.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen NBHC Kings Bay open until 6 p.m. Mondays through ursdays, until 5 p.m. FridaysBy: Naval Hospital Jacksonville Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays primary care teams are now open later to better serve patients and oer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Black and Maroon Teams) are now open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to ursday and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Patients with a primary care manager at the branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port, a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by the PCM. e team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs, including preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the branch clinics Medical Home Port teams, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure e-mail, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relayhealth.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. Patients assigned to the Medical Home Port Black or Maroon Teams, can call the appointment line at (912) 573-6450, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. After-hours nurse advice is available at (904) 542-4677 or (800) 5294677, on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax.Branch clinic extends hoursNavy photo by Jacob SippelHM3 Roseline Oriabure, a general duty corpsman at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, conducts vital sign checks on a patient during a medical visit. Volunteers work at Ronald McDonald House in JaxBy Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsGiving back to the community is nothing new to Sailors. What volunteers often discover, however, is that they receive as much as they give. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast found this to be true when they volunteered their time for a service project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 5. During the project, participants helped replace light bulbs and clean light covers on three oors of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chronically ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer eorts like this are very important to us, said Fay Weiss, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Jacksonville outreach coordinator. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small sta, so we rely heavily on the community and volunteer groups that come in to assist with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. Our volunteers are essential to serving our mission. Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Greg Johnson, CNRSE volunteer coordinator, said the project was an opportunity for Sailors to build camaraderie while having a positive eect on the local community. I think its important for the Navy to maintain a strong presence in the community because we have the people and resources to have an impact, Johnson said. When you visit a place like this, it puts into perspective how much you take for granted. e families and children here are probably going through a tougher time than most of us could imagine and this house is here to make that time a little less stressful. Hopefully our eorts contribute to that goal. e house is located about a block away from Wolfson Childrens Hospital and Nemours Childrens Clinic, where many of the children receive treatment. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, no family is turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has served more than 32,000 families. In addition to providing lodging and reduced travel expenses for families, it also facilitates an emotionally-supportive environment where families can connect with others who may be going through similar situations, Weiss said. I think spending the day out here and helping out with what we can is the very least we can do, said Religious Navy photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRP2 Abraham Dukuly replaces light bulbs during a Commander, Navy Region Southeast, volunteer effort at the Ronald McDonald House Jacksonville.Southeast Region Sailors provide helpCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Region, Page 3 See Saves, Page 7 See Fitness, Page 7 From resolution to lifestyle change Its gotta be part of your lifestyle. Stephanie Barbeau Fitness Director, Kings Bay Fitness Center

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net From National Fire Prevention Association Fire Analysis and ResearchCauses and circumstances of home candle res: On average, 42 home candle fires are reported every day. More than half of all candle res start when something that could burn, such as furniture, mattresses or bedding, curtains, is too close to the candle. In one-fth, or 20 percent, of candle res, the candles are unattended or abandoned. More than one-third, 36 percent, of home candle res begin in the bedroom. Falling asleep is a factor in 12 percent of home candle res and 36 percent of the associated deaths. One-half of home candle re deaths occur between midnight and 6 a.m. Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle res. e risk of fatal candle res appears higher when candles are used for light. Candle safety tips: Put candles in sturdy metal, glass or ceramic holders. Consider using battery-operated or electric ameless candles and fragrance warmers, which can look, smell and feel like real candles without the ame. If you do use candles, ensure they are placed where they cannot be easily knocked down. Avoid using candles in bedrooms and sleeping areas. Extinguish candles after use and before going to bed. Keep candles at least 12 inches from anything that can burn. Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets. Set a good example by using matches, lighters and re carefully. Children should never be allowed to play with matches, lighters or candles. Never use a candle where medical oxygen is being used. e two can combine to create a large, unexpected re. Always use a ashlight, not a candle, for emergency lighting. Never put candles on a Christmas tree. When using in home worship, dont place lit candles in windows where blinds and curtains can close over them, or pass handheld candles from one person to another. To lower the risk of re, candles should be used by only a few designated adults. And never leave burning candles unattended. Remember, candle res are preventable. Any question? Contact the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Departments Fire Prevention Oce at (912) 573-9998. Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Alaska Gold CoC Feb. 14Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth is scheduled to be relieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as com manding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) at 10 a.m., Feb.14 at the Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Chapel. Wirth has been in command since September 2011, serving dur ing four strategic deterrent patrols.Posner guest speaker at MOAAMaj. Calvin Posner, USA (Ret.), president of the Georgia Military Ocers of America Association, with be the guest speaker at the Feb. 18 dinner meeting and chapter new ocer instal lation ceremony of the Kings Bay Chapter. So cial hour begins at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road. Dinner is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KB MOAA. RSVP with Maj Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: Feb.14, starting at 10 a.m., a 5K Sweetheart Run at the base Fitness Center. Point of contact is MM1 Joseph Stockton at (912) 573-3905 or joseph.stockton@navy.mil March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Clue. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e evenings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and entertainment, is $35 per person. For parade participation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Now hear this! Practice care when using candles NSB Fire Department By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsFebruary is American Heart Month, an important month in the ght against heart disease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, causing narrowing and blood ow restriction. It remains the nations No. 1 killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans every year, approximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in serious illness, disability and decreased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is preventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles director for public health. Controllable risk factors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physical inactivity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other controllable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each year, to include the costs of healthcare services, medications and lost productivity. Making healthy choices such as good nutrition, weight management and exercise can signicantly decrease the probability of heart disease, Chamberlain said. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active children are also at risk for heart disease. Research has proven that children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. In addition to American Heart Month, National Wear Red Day, a day to raise awareness for the ght against heart disease in women, was recognized Feb. 7. National Wear Red Day began in 2003, when the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. As a result of their eorts, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 percent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center, located next to NAS Jacksonvilles Fitness Center, oers a variety of health-related classes, available to active duty, retirees and their families. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pressure management; Choose My Plate, to provide overviews on losing weight the healthy way; ShipShape, an eightweek weight loss program for active duty and civilians; Sail A Weigh, a six-week weight loss program for civilians only; health tness assessments; and, Tobacco Cessation, to assist smokers with quitting. For more information, call the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292/5293. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. e command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and ve branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. February is American Heart Month NH Jacksonville By MC3 Mayra A. KnightUSS Boxer (LHD 4) Public AffairsTaking college courses at sea can often be a challenge for service members because of the long hours and demanding schedule. Aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), a tutoring program has been established to help Sailors attending college courses succeed during deployment. e tutoring program is a volunteer program aboard Boxer set up to help our shipmates that are taking college courses, said Chief Navy Career Counselor Jane Epaloose, one of the tutors aboard. I jumped at the opportunity to create a tutoring program aboard Boxer because to me, there is no better way to use my time, said Lt. j.g. Chelsea Irish, program coordinator, who started the program to help Sailors and provide an opportunity for assistance. e program has no schedule restrictions and is set up so each Sailor can receive as much help as needed to ensure success. And tutors are available to oer help in a wide variety of subjects. We have 25 tutors available aboard Boxer, who have bachelors degrees or higher, for subjects such as math, science, history and social sciences, Epaloose said. Tutoring is available around the schedule of the tutor and the student, as long as both members have the time, said Epaloose. A student that worked with Epaloose enjoyed the extra help needed for her classes. I was really struggling with my English and with the stress of work it really helped to go to her and have the help, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Joni Bills said. Bills initiated the idea of a tutoring program by making a suggestion in the commanding ocers suggestion box. I was struggling, and I was going to people asking questions. I thought if only we had a program that streamlined people that want to help to the students it would help me and others in the same situation, Bills said. Bills feels appreciative of having her tutoring idea turn into a realization. It takes the stress o. When one is struggling, rather than panic about it you know where to turn to and what to do, and it feels good knowing that there may be other people in my situation who will have a place to turn to for the help, she said. At sea, students have limited resources and dont get the same opportunities that traditional college students get. I think a tutoring program is important because most of our degree programs in the Navy are online, and sometimes the student might need a little hands on instruction to help them understand the subject matter more clearly, Epaloose said. Irish says Sailors are motivated to get the help they need through tutors standing by to assist them in reaching their goals. In todays world a college education is essential. It opens the door to a multitude of opportunities. Knowing that my shipmates have a place to turn for help with their studies is rewarding for me, Irish said. Earning an associates degree earns a Sailor two points on the Navy Advancement Exam, and a bachelors degree earns a Sailor four. Every Sailor should take the maximum benets they can while serving their country. e only barrier to achieving your dreams is you, Epaloose said.Ships tutoring program helps at sea Education

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From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www.kingsbaynavylegue. org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power, and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/. From Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings BayNaval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay optometrist Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre recently was inducted into the American College of Healthcare Executives, the nations leading professional society for healthcare leaders, as a fellow Jan. 28. It is an honor to become a fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, Pierre said. Our priority here at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is to heal our nations heroes. Achieving this level of professional development is on par with the superior level of healthcare Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine, as a whole, provides for the nations warfighters and their families. ACHE is an international professional society of more than 40,000 healthcare executives who lead hospitals, healthcare systems and other healthcare organizations. ACHEs established network of more than 80 chapters provides access to networking, education and career development at the local level. Prior to being recognized as an ACHE fellow, candidates must fulll multi ple require ments, includ ing passing a compre hensive examination, meeting academic and experiential criteria, earning continuing education credits and demonstrating professional/ community involvement. Once inducted, a fellow is authorized to use the letters FACHE after their name. ey stay committed to ongoing professional development and undergo recertication every three years. Pierre, a 17-year Navy veteran, is the head of ancillary services at NBHC Kings Bay. She is a graduate of the University Of Houston College Of Optometry, and completed pediatric primary residency at Nova Southeastern University and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. PierreClinics Cmdr. Pierre inducted as fellowProgram Specialist Abraham Dukuly, a volunteer. For us, it is a small contribution, but it still means a lot to the sta here. Its absolutely a rewarding experience, considering the mission of the Ronald McDonald House. e house operates solely on donations from the local community and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military, Weiss said. We are so grateful to our military volunteers, Weiss said. ey are so dedicated to whatever it is they are asked to do, whether its gardening and raking leaves in the courtyard or cleaning indoors. Weiss said those eorts are appreciated not only by the houses sta, but by the families who stay there as well. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. e rst house opened in Philadelphia and was funded by donated McDonalds restaurant proceeds.RegionFrom Page 1 Navy League has student scholarshipSub Spouses oer community grant THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Top, Kings Bay veterinarian Lauren Seal and husband, Matt, hope their daughter will bring their team luck. Above, The chili cookoff competi tion started at home for MWRs Amber Widmer and Coast Guard husband, Richard. Left, Sailors Brandon McQueen, Anthony Romas and Edward Blackmon enjoy a lunch on MWR. Great Tailgate and The peoples choice Chili cookoffLeft, Morale, Welfare and Recreation treated these three MT C School students to a truck bed filled with huge cush ions. You can see their enthusi asm. Below, Sailors Robert Callahan and John Jasurda enjoy the game on MWRs inflatable big screen.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenThere were lots of folks gathered to enjoy the perfect tailgate weather for Super Bowl XLVIII at Kings Bay. MWR provided a variety activites for everyone to enjoy. Brad Patterson, right, hands a sample of his chili to Ed Rathgeber in hopes of earning Eds chili pepper necklace. The cook with the most necklaces was the cookoff winner. Navy family member Beth Morrison and her kids check in with MWRs Alexia Johnson and volunteer Sonya Wilson. The Great Tailgate and Peoples Choice Chili Cookoff was held Super Bowl Sunday. Sailors Henry Lindner and Jeff Dellenbaugh take a break from the chili cookoff competion to observe Colors. There was more than chili being passed around as Adyson takes careful aim on the tar get while under the watchful eye from her dad, Sub Group Tens YN1 Josh Hollinger.

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Navy photo by MC1 Rex Nelson The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 7 following routine operations. West Virginia is the third Navy ship to be named after the state. USS West Virginia arriving Left, The bridge is fully manned to navigate the submarine safely in the channel. Right, C-tractor tugs help the submarine moor to the pier. Below, Sailors man the deck topside, preparing to handle lines.Navy photos by MC2 Ashley Hedrick 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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weight to lose. Its a yoyo eect, when you go backand-forth between putting weight on and o you will typically put on more weight. What you consume is just as important as your tness regime and needs to be a part of the lifestyle change. After all, youre not going to get far if you eat a slice of pizza every time you leave the gym. To help make sense of your dietary choices Marybeth Pennington, registered dietician, and Joanne Rex, a registered nurse, are available for individual counseling. e Ship Shape program oers instruction in nutrition, weight management and supports those interested in breaking the smoking habit. Before you leave the Fitness Complex, you have to inquire about the Bod Pod. e Bod Pod is a device that measures your body composition of muscle, body fat and resting metabolic rate. It seems daunting to see in print how much body fat you have, but Rex said the Bod Pod, is simply a measurement of health. With printed results from the Bod Pod, you also can schedule a free appointment with a personal tness trainer who will design a tness program specically for you. For an additional cost, the Fitness Complex provides personal, one-onone workout sessions with personal trainers. Education is key, said Fitness Instructor Anjelica Ruiz. People come in with unrealistic expectations, so they quickly become discouraged to keep working out. We keep those who come in encouraged. You may not see the abs but now youre running two miles when before you couldnt. You start feeling better because your body is releasing endorphins, and your overall wellness is better. You dont have to do it alone. Grab a friend and attend one of the many group exercise classes, such as spinning, yoga and cardio kickboxing. You are sure to nd something you will enjoy. Fitness classes are free to active duty and retired military members and their families. For those civilians with access to the facility, classes are only $2.50 per class or $20 for 12 classes. A new addition to the host of available choices is the Mom and Tots Room, where mothers with young children can exercise while watching their children in a safe environment. Dont let those Valentine chocolates haunt your new lifestyle change. Make the step today to incorporate tness and a healthy diet to your dayto-day schedule. It wont be easy. You wont see results overnight, but the Fitness Complex sta is there to keep you on track. To make an appointment for Bod Pod, call (912) 573-4237. For other information or to make an sta appointment, call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. FitnessFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenWorking out helps Sailors wife Madalyn ONeill stay fit. e proclamations ofcially recognize the week and call on all service members throughout Kings Bay and the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household nancial situations. Personal nancial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Williamson said. Its very difcult for Sailors and families who are experiencing nancial diculties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage everyone to assess their nancial situation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have nancial advisors and resources available through the Fleet and Family Support Centers for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defense Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. e campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and family life coordinator. If a Sailor has a certain nancial goal, whether its setting up an emergency cash fund, getting out of debt or saving for retirement, Military Saves can help them develop those goals and take action. e program focuses on helping service members achieve their nancial goals by providing savings advice, nancial tools and resources, and motivation. Lucius said the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big nancial strains on military households and good nancial planning for both events is essential for success, Lucius said. FFSC personal nancial managers, who are accredited nancial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive nancial planning worksheet to illustrate their current nancial situation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good nancial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their nancial situation. e Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall nancial stability, Lucius said. e personal nancial readiness of our service members and their families directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining nancial discipline and stability within a military family, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop nancial skills. e Military Youth Saves program is specically designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. Service members or dependents that would like more information about resources and services oered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to nd out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more information is available at www.militarysaves.org/.SavesFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCapt. Harvey L. Guffey Jr., commanding officer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, right center, signed the Military Saves Week proclamation with members of the Fleet and Family Support Centers Command Financial Specialist Class, Feb. 10. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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From the Dolphin Scholarship FoundationIn 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following re-Presidents Day is Feb. 17. Lets face it, this is about George Washington, who was born Feb. 22, 1732, and Abraham Lincoln, born Feb. 12, 1809. You never see Garfield, Van Buren or Polk on ads for Presidents Day sales. Washington and Lincoln are the big dogs. They have the biggest monuments. And, they faced the most desperate, trying times in American his tory, although you could say FDR had a full plate with the Depression and WW II. Who was greater? Id say Lincoln, simply because a lot, though not all, of Washingtons biggest problems were solved by the time he took office. And then Abe had to deal with Mary. Not easy.George Washington vs. Abraham LincolnLance Cpl. Alec Cooksey Security Force Battalion Plano, Texas Lincoln. He wasnt afraid to stand up to an issue that gripped the nation. YN1 Jonathon Bong USS Rhode Island Blue Bakersfield, Calif. Probably Washington. He was great because he was first. But Lincoln did a lot of stuff. Stacey Nichols Retired Navy Atlanta Lincoln. He freed the slaves. Lance Cpl. Grant Carr Security Force Battalion Chino, Calif. Washington. He helped establish the country through his military leadership as the first Commander in Chief. Crystal Upton Family member Fernandina Beach, Fla. Im equal toward both, but Abraham Lincolns legacy is a little better. He saved the Union and freed the slaves. Spec. Trevor Heath Army National Guard Freemont, Neb. Abraham Lincoln. I feel his ideals were greater. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Kings Bay corpsman earns medalHM2 Alonzo Dunkentell, right, was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (with combat distinguished device) by Cmdr. Chad Roe Jan. 31 at the Kings Bay Naval Branch Health Clinic, for serving as corpsman with Scout Sniper Platoon, Weapons Co., 3rd Bn, 2nd Marines, Regimental Combat Team 8, 2nd Marine Division (Forward) from March, 2011 to Sept., 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During Dunkentells deployment, he participated in more than 12 sniper operations, providing field medical care for patients with injuries ranging from gunshot wounds to amputations. Dunkentell also treated a sucking chest wound on an insurgent patient July 27, 2011 after his sniper team repelled an enemy ambush. He continued to provide care to his patient, protecting him from enemy fire and arranging an aerial evacuation as his patients condition deteriorated. Dunkentells actions ensured the survival of the wounded man.Navy photo by MC2 Ashley Hedrick See Dolphin, Page 12Ocers wives oer scholarship help THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Valentines Scotch Doubles At Rack-N-Roll Lanes at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14, cost is $30 per couple and includes bowling, shoes, one large one-topping pizza, prizes and give-aways. Must be signed up no later than Feb. 13. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Presidents Day Special At Rack-N-Roll Lanes 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, Feb. 17, all games and shoe rentals are $1 each. Dress up like your favorite president and get 50 percent off your games. For more details, call (912) 5739492. Kings Bay is going to Tampa for a hockey game, the Tampa Bay Lightning against the Boston Bruins leaving here at 1:45 p.m., Saturday, March 8. Charter bus transportation will be provided. Cost is $45 per person, 18 years old and older, with a $40 special price for liberty single active duty. Pre-pay at ITT/OAC by Feb.14 COB. Bring money for food and souvenirs. For more information, call Navy Adventures Unleashed at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the coun ter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.face book.com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call Spring Driathlon comingPeriscope file photoSignups are ongoing for Youth Soccer and T-Ball and adult intramural soccer. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movies are Turbo Feb. 15 and 16, The Smurfs 2 (Monday) Feb. 17, and Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training requirement. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4p.m., Feb. 19. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Command Return and Reunion training setThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 19. Registration recommended, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 20. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Feb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial aware ness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 quirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship. org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 6713330 or e-mail scholars@dolphinscholarship.org. By Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsMarine Corps Air Station MiramarAs service members begin to settle into the new year, some look to the past in reverence and thanks for freedoms that werent available to them 72 years ago because of the color of their skin. Black History Month, which takes place in February every year, serves as a reminder to service members of the hardships of those who came before them like the Montford Point Marines. ese Marines became the rst African-Americans to enlist and train in the United States Marine Corps June 1942. ey trained and deployed to ght in World War II just as any other Marine. We came as a trial in the Marine Corps, said Joe Jackson, retired rst sergeant, one of the original Montford Point Marines who served from Feb. 12, 1943 to March 26, 1969. After the war was over, we were over. is trial period left something for these men to achieve. ey performed their duties exceedingly well, according to Jackson. He also explained that Gen. Alexander Vandegrift, commandant of the Marine Corps in 1945, denied the termination of segregated units and allowed for AfricanAmericans to become a fully-edged force in the Marine Corps, according to Jackson. We had to ght, we had to ght two ghts, Jackson said. You cant push a recruit like they pushed us. Our drill instructors said, youre going to be the best Marines in the Marine Corps. ey didnt know we were going to be in competition with Caucasians, they just wanted us to be the best, and that is what we became. ey did everything they could to make us quit, the training was the same as any other recruit, but they pushed us harder than any other recruit. ey pushed us longer and harder, and we were better for it. e transition from allblack units to complete integration took years, but the Marines successfully accomplished the task as can be seen by todays Marine Corps a fully racially integrated ghting force in readiness. Weve come a long way since the Montford Point Marines, said Capt. Zerbin Singleton, CH-46E Sea Knight pilot and ight line ocer in charge with Marine Medium Helicopter Training Squadron 164. ose Marines were the giants who enabled a lot of black Marines to continue on this rise through adversity. We owe everything to them. e Marine Corps continues to provide Marines with equal opportunity training on an annual basis. Marines from all over the country with dierent beliefs and backgrounds come together making the Marine Corps a cultural melting pot. It pays dividends to pay attention to the many dif ferent cultures coming into the Marine Corps, said Sgt. Maj. Donna Dunbar, Marine Light Attack Helicopter Training Squadron 303 ser geant major. ese dier ent cultures, dierent expe riences, bring very dierent things to the table and once you mix something like that together you get something truly magical. ats what the Marine Corps is all about, its what we do and will continue to do. Dunbar explained that it isnt about a Marines skin color, what religion or creed they hold faith to, or even their gender, what matters is the individual and what they bring to the bigger picture. ese individuals will also carry the torch into the future not only as Marines, but as members of the community too. What I truly love about the Marine Corps is how we are and what we build as a reection of ourselves in society, Dunbar said. What I nd important is that we take some time to realize and explain to not only our children, but the community as a whole exactly how important it is to celebrate these milestones. I will retire one day and pass the Corps on to younger Marines, but when I get out Im still a mother, wife and member of my community and I still have that responsibility to continue to pass on what I have learned. National ArchievesThree African-American Marine Corps recruits run the obstacle course at Camp Lejeune of Montford Point Camp, North Carolina, in 1943. Marine recalls beginningMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsJoe Jackson, first sergeant retired, was part of the Montford Point Marines, a segregated group of Marines during World War II. By PO3 Ali FlockerziFrom Coast Guard CompassNew York-based Coast Guard units are no strangers when it comes to assisting with large-scale events in the area but for the rst time in history, area crews put in a team eort alongside local New York and New Jersey authorities to safeguard a Super Bowl event. Having provided security for the United Nations General Assembly, Macys Fourth of July Firework display, Fleet Week and the NYC Marathon in previous years, the opportunity for the Coast Guards assets to assist with Super Bowl XLVIII was also a success. Were here to protect our citizens, said Lt. Cmdr. Luis E. Martinez, chief of Contingency Planning and Force Readiness at Sec tor New York, in Staten Is land, N.Y. With the Super Bowl comes the potential threat to our citizens. We, along with the other law enforcement agencies, got together as part of the se curity and transportation functions that would be needed to make this a suc cessful event. An event of this proportion required a years worth of time to prepare for. e Coast Guard had its hands in nine of 22 planning committees dedicated to the 2014 Super Bowl. Coast Guard assets in volved included Coast Guard cutters Sailsh, Pe nobscot Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Hawser and Line; Sector New York; Station New York; Station Kings Point; Maritime Security Response Team, Atlantic Strike Team; and a maritime safety and security team. ese Coast Guard assets worked alongside federal, state and local agencies in a joint eort to provide critical contributions toward the success of the Super Bowl. Due to events occurring on both sides of the water in New York as well as New Jersey, there were major impacts and heavy trac on city transportation systems such as bridges, tunnels and ferries. e mission of these Coast Guard assets was simple: provide security in the case of an event. ey contributed to waterside and shoreside protection, port security, security zone enforcement, increased waterside patrol presence in critical waterways and ensured the port was cleared of ice to allow easier transit. By having a presence on the water with our security assets, we are basically deterring any potential maritime threat factor, Martinez said. Working with our port partners, should something happen on the land side that would need a maritime evacuation or anything like that, we are set to do that as well. Martinez works within the Incident Command System, a structure for managing events ranging from an unexpected oil spill to an incident of national signicance. Because Sector New York is located in such a large and heavily active port, incident management skills are constantly utilized in order to respond appropriately to any situation. e Department of Homeland Security is that agency that was put in place to protect the citizens of the United States, Martinez said. In our role as the maritime law enforcement agency under the DHS, we are doing exactly that; we are protecting the citizens of the United States from any potential acts of terrorism.Coast Guard photo by PO3 Michael HimesA Coast Guard maritime safety and security team patrols the Hudson River. Guarding the Super Bowl DolphinFrom Page 9

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By Jim GaramoneHeadquarters Marine CorpsPresident Barack Obama and defense leaders spoke about the future of Afghanistan Feb. 4 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta; Navy Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman; Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, the commander of U.S. Central Command; Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, the commander of NATOs International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan; and Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, met with the president in the Oval Oce. is is the presidents opportunity to hear directly from his commanders, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren told reporters ahead of the meeting. is is an opportunity for the president to weigh inputs from the military, as well as other sources, for the president to make decisions as we move forward. In a related note, Warren commented on news reports that Afghan President Hamid Karzai has been meeting in secret with Taliban ocials. Weve long said the path to peace [in Afghanistan] is political and diplomatic, and not military, he said. Weve long said that Afghans speaking to Afghans are whats going to bring about peace and stability in Afghanistan. Warren did not conrm whether those meetings had taken place. Finally, the United States continues to urge the Afghan government not to release dangerous terrorists. e government has said it will release 37 prisoners from an Afghanrun detention facility in Bagram. In the past, Warren has called these men bad guys who have the blood of innocent Afghans on their hands. We believe they continue to be dangerous and should not be released prior to going through the Afghan judicial process, he said. By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press ServiceNever in his more than 50 years of intelligence experience has the nation been beset by more crises and threats from around the world than it now faces, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said Feb. 4 during a House hearing on worldwide threats. e long list of global threats includes terrorism, sectarian violence and radical extremism, Clapper said. And there are many other crises and threats around the globe, he added, to include the spillover of the Syria conict into neighboring Lebanon and Iraq, the destabilizing ood of refugees in Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon now about 2.5 million people, essentially one of the largest humanitarian disasters in a decade. Adding to the list of threats, Clapper said, are the implications of the drawdown in Afghanistan, the deteriorating internal security posture in Iraq, the growth of foreign cyber capabilities, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, aggressive nation-state intelligence eorts against the United States, an assertive Russia, a competitive China, a dangerous and unpredictable North Korea, a challenging Iran, the lingering ethnic divisions in the Balkans, and perpetual conict and extremism throughout Africa. I could go on with this litany, but suce to say that we live in a complex, dangerous world, he said. e intelligence community also is threatened by the fallout from leaks by former contract employee Edward Snowden, Clapper said. ough he didnt want to dwell on the debate about Snowdens motives, he added, he did want to address the damage caused by his disclosures. As a consequence, in my view, this nation is less safe and its people less secure, he said. What Snowden has stolen and exposed has gone way, way beyond his professed concerns with so-called domestic surveillance programs. As a result, weve lost critical foreign intelligence collections sources, including some shared with us by valued partners. e leaks have provided terrorists and other adversaries insight into U.S. intelligence sources, methods and tradecraft, Clapper said. And the insights that they are gaining are making our jobs much, much harder, he added. e stark consequences of this perfect storm are plainly evident, he said. e intelligence community is going to have less capacity to protect our nation and its allies than weve had. But if its necessary to operate with reduced capabilities to restore the faith and condence of the American people and their elected representatives, Clapper said, then we in the intelligence community will work as hard as we can to meet the expectations before us. e major lesson for the intelligence community from the revelations by Snowden and other leakers is that the community must lean in the direction of transparency wherever and whenever it can, he said. With greater transparency about these intelligence programs, the American people may be more likely to accept them, Clapper noted. President Barack Obama described the way forward for the intelligence community in a speech Jan. 14, and a new presidential directive, Clapper said. e major characteristic of this new direction is transparency, he said. Clapper and Attorney General Eric H. Holder were ordered to conduct further declassication, to develop special protections under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act governing collection of non-U.S. persons overseas, to modify how telephone metadata is collected under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, and to ensure more oversight of sensitive collection activities, he said. rough all of this, we must, and we will, sustain our professional tradecraft and integrity. We must continue to protect our sources and methods so that we can accomplish what weve always been chartered to do; to protect the lives of American citizens here and abroad to a myriad of threats, Clapper said. Clapper was joined at the hearing by Army Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn, Defense Intelligence Agency director, and Matthew G. Olsen, National Counterterrorism Center director.Intelligence director sees global threats everywhere ClapperMarine Corps photo by Cpl. Joshua YoungMarine Sgt. Eddie Glowacki provides security for a working party at an ANA base near Forward Operating Base Nolay, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Jan. 27. Military leaders, Obama talk on Afganistan Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Afghanistan counternarcotics eorts ongoing By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press Servicee United States has made an extraordinary investment in both blood and treasure to eradicate terrorist safe havens and narcotics production in Afghanistan, the Defense Departments principal director for counternarcotics and global threats told a House Foreign Affairs Committee panel yesterday. More than 2,000 Americans have died in Operation Enduring Freedom, and another nearly 20,000 have been wounded, Erin M. Logan said in prepared remarks for the subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa. In addition, the Defense Department has invested $2 billion for dedicated counternarcotics training and programs, out of the nearly $570 billion spent on the war since 2001. We believe that $2 billion has been well spent in developing specialized [counternarcotics] units and capabilities that have begun to achieve concrete results, Logan said. Despite this progress, the gains are not yet irreversible, she said. Likening the programs to a seedling, Logan said Afghanistans counternarcotics organizations will require care and nurturing before they are ready to stand on their own. Stepping back from our eorts now would jeopardize the further development of these units that have become reliable partners for U.S. and international law enforcement eorts, she said. Its impossible to envision a successful future for Afghanistan without sustaining an Afghan capability to ght violence and corruption created by the drug trade, she added. e production and distribution of narcotics contributes to the countrys insecurity, she said, leading to corruption, poor governance and stagnation of economic development. Addressing the drug trade and its eects is essential to the successful transition of security responsibility to the government of Afghanistan, Logan said. According to the United Nations Oce on Drugs and Crime, Afghanistans opium poppy cultivation was up 36 percent in 2013, she said. e link between insecurity and opium cultivation is well established in Afghanistan, she said. Most of the opium poppy cultivation is concentrated in southern and western provinces, where the narcotics trade continues to fuel criminal and insurgent networks. e trade in Afghanproduced opiates has become an increasingly global phenomenon, she continued, with drugs and illicit proceeds owing to the Persian Gulf and the Middle East, East Africa, Europe, Russia and North America, with a small percentage of the heroin consumed in the United States coming from Afghanistan. e DODs counternarcotics eorts in Afghanistan have two goals, Logan said: to counter and disrupt drug-related funding to the insurgency, and to strengthen the Afghan governments capacity to combat the drug trade during and after the security transition. e form those eorts take include building the capacity of the Counternarcotics Police of Afghanistan, improving border security, promoting information sharing and fostering regional and international cooperation, she said, including with other U.S. government agencies. e DODs post-2014 counternarcotics strategy prioritizes programs that disrupt, degrade, and dismantle illicit narcotics networks, Logan said. It has three aims: to contain and reduce the ow of drugs from Afghanistan, to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal organizations, and to reduce the ow of illicit proceeds that nance insurgent and terrorist activities globally, she said. To meet the goals outlined in the strategy, Logan said, the department must focus on three areas: continued support for vetted units, continued aviation capacity building, and continued leveraging of international and interagency capabilities. Afghanistans specialized counternarcotics units have shown that they are willing and able to do the job, she said. More and more specialized units are now able to plan, execute, and follow through on [counternarcotics] missions on their own, Logan said. For example, in December, the DOD-supported and [Drug Enforcement Agency]-mentored Sensitive Investigative Unit was able to use judicially authorized wire intercepts to build a case that led to the arrest of two criminals and the seizure of 660 grams of heroin, 500 boxes of ammunition, 40 remote control IEDs, and 75 rocketpropelled grenades. Logan said, the agency will expand Operation Riptide, which is located in Bahrain and leverages the capabilities of U.S. and international law enforcement and national intelligence agencies to facilitate interdictions, seizures, investigations and prosecutions. Naval interdictions from Combined Maritime Forces in Bahrain, notably by Canadas HMCS Toronto and by Australias HMAS Melbourne, have proven the international communitys ability to identify, track, board, and seize illicit cargo on the high seas, she said.Navy photo and take control of one of two wooden dhows found loaded with heroin and methamphetamines during a significant drug seizures in the 5th Fleet region. Photo by Marine Staff Sgt. Luis P. Valdespino Jr.A Marine Special Operations Companys Leatherneck examines a poppy plant handed to him by an Afghan National Army soldier, right, during a patrol through a Helmand Province village. Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Sweetheart LunchFriday, Feb. 14 Open to all Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personel, military civilan and dependents MenuSteak, lobster, baked potato, corn, carrotts and assorted desserts

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014



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THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Washington v. Lincoln for greatest president Page 9 West Virginia SSBN 736 returns to Kings Bay Page 6 Super fun Great Tailgate & Chili cookoff Pages 4, 5 Military Saves Week comingTools for eective nancial planning focus of programBy MC1 Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick William son, commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclama tion in support of Military Saves Week on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible nancial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. At Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 10, Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr. also signed a proclaimation in support. Knowing how to handle money is a sure way to improve the quality of life of our service members and family members, and to remove stresses that could interfere with their ability to execute the mission, Guey said. We are very fortunate on this base to have a strong Fleet and Family team which provides our troops the knowledge to make nancial decisions wisely. Kings Bay Fitness Center will help you take o weight ... and keep it oBy Laura Jefferson Special to The PeriscopeLike many Americans at the start of the New Year you made a resolution to nally lose that 15 pounds and start a healthy diet. But how is that going? As Valentines Day nears, heart-shaped boxes lled with candy ood the aisles of stores tempting to you to indulge and sab otage your resolution. Its not hard to lose sight of your goals as work, your childs soccer games, and your visiting in-laws ll your busy schedule. But with the support of the sta at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation Fitness Complex you can help turn your tness resolution to a lifestyle. Its gotta be part of your lifestyle said Stephanie Baribeau, tness director of the Fitness Complex. Once it is, its much easier to nd the time to go to the gym, or if youre at home to go for a walk, jog or ride a bike. Baribeau stresses the importance of maintaining a tness regimen year round. During spring everyone is thinking about summer time, bathing suit sea son and being on the beach, so we get another rush at the gym, she said. But if they stayed year round, they wouldnt have the extra Registered Dietician Mary Beth Penntington observes Ansley Childree, Health Fitness Specialist ACSM, have her body composition measurement be taken using the BOD POD System.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen NBHC Kings Bay open until 6 p.m. Mondays through ursdays, until 5 p.m. FridaysBy: Naval Hospital Jacksonville Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays primary care teams are now open later to better serve patients and oer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Black and Ma roon Teams) are now open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to ursday and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Patients with a primary care man ager at the branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port, a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by the PCM. e team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs, including preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the branch clinics Medical Home Port teams, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure e-mail, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.re layhealth.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. Patients assigned to the Medical Home Port Black or Maroon Teams, can call the appointment line at (912) 573-6450, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. After-hours nurse advice is avail able at (904) 542-4677 or (800) 5294677, on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient pop ulation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their fami lies more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/Na valHospitalJax.Branch clinic extends hoursNavy photo by Jacob SippelHM3 Roseline Oriabure, a general duty corpsman at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, conducts vital sign checks on a patient during a medical visit. Volunteers work at Ronald McDonald House in JaxBy Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsGiving back to the community is nothing new to Sailors. What volunteers often discover, however, is that they receive as much as they give. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast found this to be true when they volunteered their time for a service project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 5. During the project, participants helped replace light bulbs and clean light cov ers on three oors of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chronically ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer eorts like this are very im portant to us, said Fay Weiss, Ronald Mc Donald House Charities of Jacksonville outreach coordinator. Were a 30-bed room house with a small sta, so we rely heavily on the community and volunteer groups that come in to assist with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. Our vol unteers are essential to serving our mis sion. Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Greg Johnson, CNRSE volunteer coordinator, said the project was an opportunity for Sailors to build camaraderie while having a positive eect on the local community. I think its important for the Navy to maintain a strong presence in the com munity because we have the people and resources to have an impact, Johnson said. When you visit a place like this, it puts into perspective how much you take for granted. e families and children here are probably going through a tough er time than most of us could imagine and this house is here to make that time a little less stressful. Hopefully our eorts contribute to that goal. e house is located about a block away from Wolfson Childrens Hospital and Nemours Childrens Clinic, where many of the children receive treatment. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, no family is turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has served more than 32,000 families. In addition to providing lodging and reduced travel expenses for families, it also facilitates an emotionally-supportive environment where families can connect with others who may be going through similar situations, Weiss said. I think spending the day out here and help ing out with what we can is the very least we can do, said Religious Navy photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRP2 Abraham Dukuly replaces light bulbs during a Commander, Navy Region Southeast, volunteer effort at the Ronald McDonald House Jacksonville.Southeast Region Sailors provide helpCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Region, Page 3 See Saves, Page 7 See Fitness, Page 7 From resolution to lifestyle change Its gotta be part of your lifestyle. Stephanie Barbeau Fitness Director, Kings Bay Fitness Center

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net From National Fire Prevention Association Fire Analysis and ResearchCauses and circumstances of home candle res: On average, 42 home candle fires are reported every day. More than half of all candle res start when something that could burn, such as furniture, mattresses or bedding, curtains, is too close to the candle. In one-fth, or 20 percent, of candle res, the candles are unat tended or abandoned. More than one-third, 36 per cent, of home candle res begin in the bedroom. Falling asleep is a factor in 12 percent of home candle res and 36 percent of the associated deaths. One-half of home candle re deaths occur between midnight and 6 a.m. Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle res. e risk of fatal candle res appears higher when candles are used for light. Candle safety tips: Put candles in sturdy metal, glass or ceramic holders. Consider using battery-operated or electric ameless candles and fragrance warmers, which can look, smell and feel like real candles without the ame. If you do use candles, ensure they are placed where they cannot be easily knocked down. Avoid using candles in bed rooms and sleeping areas. Extinguish candles after use and before going to bed. Keep candles at least 12 inches from anything that can burn. Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets. Set a good example by using matches, lighters and re carefully. Children should never be allowed to play with matches, light ers or candles. Never use a candle where medi cal oxygen is being used. e two can combine to create a large, unexpected re. Always use a ashlight, not a candle, for emergency lighting. Never put candles on a Christmas tree. When using in home worship, dont place lit candles in windows where blinds and curtains can close over them, or pass handheld can dles from one person to another. To lower the risk of re, candles should be used by only a few desig nated adults. And never leave burning can dles unattended. Remember, candle res are preventable. Any question? Contact the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Departments Fire Prevention Oce at (912) 573-9998. Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. USS Alaska Gold CoC Feb. 14Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth is scheduled to be relieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as com manding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) at 10 a.m., Feb.14 at the Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Chapel. Wirth has been in command since September 2011, serving dur ing four strategic deterrent patrols.Posner guest speaker at MOAAMaj. Calvin Posner, USA (Ret.), president of the Georgia Military Ocers of America Association, with be the guest speaker at the Feb. 18 dinner meeting and chapter new ocer instal lation ceremony of the Kings Bay Chapter. So cial hour begins at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road. Dinner is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KB MOAA. RSVP with Maj Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: Feb.14, starting at 10 a.m., a 5K Sweetheart Run at the base Fitness Center. Point of contact is MM1 Joseph Stockton at (912) 573-3905 or joseph.stockton@navy.mil March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Clue. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e eve nings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and enter tainment, is $35 per person. For parade par ticipation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional informa tion, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Now hear this! Practice care when using candles NSB Fire Department By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsFebruary is American Heart Month, an important month in the ght against heart disease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, caus ing narrowing and blood ow re striction. It remains the nations No. 1 killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans ev ery year, approximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in serious illness, disability and de creased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is preventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital Jack sonvilles director for public health. Controllable risk factors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physical inactivity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other con trollable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each year, to include the costs of healthcare ser vices, medications and lost produc tivity. Making healthy choices such as good nutrition, weight management and exercise can signicantly decrease the probability of heart dis ease, Chamberlain said. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active children are also at risk for heart disease. Research has proven that chil dren need at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. In addition to American Heart Month, National Wear Red Day, a day to raise awareness for the ght against heart disease in women, was recognized Feb. 7. National Wear Red Day began in 2003, when the American Heart As sociation and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. As a result of their eorts, 21 per cent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 percent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center, located next to NAS Jacksonvilles Fitness Center, oers a variety of health-related classes, available to active duty, retirees and their fami lies. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pressure man agement; Choose My Plate, to pro vide overviews on losing weight the healthy way; ShipShape, an eightweek weight loss program for active duty and civilians; Sail A Weigh a six-week weight loss program for civilians only; health tness assess ments; and, Tobacco Cessation, to assist smokers with quitting. For more information, call the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292/5293. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. e command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and ve branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, Guards men and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. February is American Heart Month NH Jacksonville By MC3 Mayra A. KnightUSS Boxer (LHD 4) Public AffairsTaking college courses at sea can often be a challenge for service members because of the long hours and demanding schedule. Aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), a tutoring program has been established to help Sailors attending college cours es succeed during deployment. e tutoring program is a volun teer program aboard Boxer set up to help our shipmates that are taking college courses, said Chief Navy Career Counselor Jane Epaloose, one of the tutors aboard. I jumped at the opportunity to create a tutoring program aboard Boxer because to me, there is no better way to use my time, said Lt. j.g. Chelsea Irish, program coordinator, who started the program to help Sailors and provide an opportunity for assistance. e program has no schedule restrictions and is set up so each Sailor can receive as much help as needed to ensure success. And tutors are available to oer help in a wide va riety of subjects. We have 25 tutors available aboard Boxer, who have bachelors degrees or higher, for subjects such as math, science, history and social sciences, Epaloose said. Tutoring is available around the schedule of the tutor and the student, as long as both members have the time, said Epaloose. A student that worked with Epal oose enjoyed the extra help needed for her classes. I was really struggling with my English and with the stress of work it really helped to go to her and have the help, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Joni Bills said. Bills initiated the idea of a tutoring program by making a suggestion in the commanding ocers suggestion box. I was struggling, and I was go ing to people asking questions. I thought if only we had a program that streamlined people that want to help to the students it would help me and others in the same situa tion, Bills said. Bills feels appreciative of having her tutoring idea turn into a realization. It takes the stress o. When one is struggling, rather than panic about it you know where to turn to and what to do, and it feels good knowing that there may be other people in my sit uation who will have a place to turn to for the help, she said. At sea, students have limited re sources and dont get the same op portunities that traditional college students get. I think a tutoring program is im portant because most of our degree programs in the Navy are online, and sometimes the student might need a little hands on instruction to help them understand the subject matter more clearly, Epaloose said. Irish says Sailors are motivated to get the help they need through tutors standing by to assist them in reaching their goals. In todays world a college education is essential. It opens the door to a multitude of opportunities. Know ing that my shipmates have a place to turn for help with their studies is rewarding for me, Irish said. Earning an associates degree earns a Sailor two points on the Navy Advancement Exam, and a bach elors degree earns a Sailor four. Every Sailor should take the max imum benets they can while serv ing their country. e only barrier to achieving your dreams is you, Epaloose said.Ships tutoring program helps at sea Education

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From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Associa tion announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting appli cations for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Com munity Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant applica tion, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In ad dition to raising funds for the Community Grants pro gram, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholar ship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating se niors in the NJROTC pro gram and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www.kingsbaynavylegue. org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power, and obtain a recommen dation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the es say and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholar ship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholar ship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her par ents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the com mands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the coun cil Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/. From Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings BayNaval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay optom etrist Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre recently was in ducted into the American College of Healthcare Ex ecutives, the nations lead ing professional society for healthcare leaders, as a fellow Jan. 28. It is an honor to be come a fellow of the Amer ican College of Healthcare Executives, Pierre said. Our priority here at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is to heal our nations heroes. Achieving this level of professional development is on par with the superior level of healthcare Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine, as a whole, provides for the nations warf ighters and their families. ACHE is an internation al professional society of more than 40,000 health care executives who lead hospitals, healthcare sys tems and other healthcare organizations. ACHEs established network of more than 80 chapters provides access to networking, education and career development at the local level. Prior to being recog nized as an ACHE fellow, candidates must fulll multi ple require ments, includ ing passing a compre hensive examination, meeting academic and experiential criteria, earning continuing education credits and dem onstrating professional/ community involvement. Once inducted, a fellow is authorized to use the letters FACHE after their name. ey stay commit ted to ongoing profession al development and un dergo recertication every three years. Pierre, a 17-year Navy veteran, is the head of an cillary services at NBHC Kings Bay. She is a gradu ate of the University Of Houston College Of Op tometry, and completed pediatric primary residency at Nova Southeastern University and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities lo cated across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Sol diers, Marines, Airmen, Guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. PierreClinics Cmdr. Pierre inducted as fellowProgram Specialist Abraham Dukuly, a volunteer. For us, it is a small con tribution, but it still means a lot to the sta here. Its absolutely a rewarding ex perience, considering the mission of the Ronald Mc Donald House. e house operates solely on donations from the local community and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly spe cial relationship with the local military, Weiss said. We are so grateful to our military volunteers, Weiss said. ey are so dedicated to whatever it is they are asked to do, whether its gardening and raking leaves in the court yard or cleaning indoors. Weiss said those eorts are appreciated not only by the houses sta, but by the families who stay there as well. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. e rst house opened in Philadel phia and was funded by donated McDonalds res taurant proceeds.RegionFrom Page 1 Navy League has student scholarshipSub Spouses oer community grant THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Top, Kings Bay veterinarian Lauren Seal and husband, Matt, hope their daughter will bring their team luck. Above, The chili cookoff competi tion started at home for MWRs Amber Widmer and Coast Guard husband, Richard. Left, Sailors Brandon McQueen, Anthony Romas and Edward Blackmon enjoy a lunch on MWR. Great Tailgate and The peoples choice Chili cookoffLeft, Morale, Welfare and Recreation treated these three MT C School students to a truck bed filled with huge cush ions. You can see their enthusi asm. Below, Sailors Robert Callahan and John Jasurda enjoy the game on MWRs inflatable big screen.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenThere were lots of folks gathered to enjoy the perfect tailgate weather for Super Bowl XLVIII at Kings Bay. MWR provided a variety activites for everyone to enjoy. Brad Patterson, right, hands a sample of his chili to Ed Rathgeber in hopes of earning Eds chili pepper necklace. The cook with the most necklaces was the cookoff winner. Navy family member Beth Morrison and her kids check in with MWRs Alexia Johnson and volunteer Sonya Wilson. The Great Tailgate and Peoples Choice Chili Cookoff was held Super Bowl Sunday. Sailors Henry Lindner and Jeff Dellenbaugh take a break from the chili cookoff compet ion to observe Colors. There was more than chili being passed around as Adyson takes careful aim on the tar get while under the watchful eye from her dad, Sub Group Tens YN1 Josh Hollinger.

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Navy photo by MC1 Rex Nelson The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 7 fol lowing routine operations. West Virginia is the third Navy ship to be named after the state. USS West Virginia arriving Left, The bridge is fully manned to navigate the submarine safely in the channel. Right, C-tractor tugs help the submarine moor to the pier. Below, Sailors man the deck topside, preparing to handle lines.Navy photos by MC2 Ashley Hedrick 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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weight to lose. Its a yoyo eect, when you go backand-forth between put ting weight on and o you will typically put on more weight. What you consume is just as important as your tness regime and needs to be a part of the lifestyle change. After all, youre not going to get far if you eat a slice of pizza every time you leave the gym. To help make sense of your dietary choices Marybeth Pennington, registered dietician, and Joanne Rex, a registered nurse, are available for individual counseling. e Ship Shape program oers instruction in nutrition, weight management and supports those interested in breaking the smoking habit. Before you leave the Fit ness Complex, you have to inquire about the Bod Pod. e Bod Pod is a device that measures your body composition of muscle, body fat and resting metabolic rate. It seems daunt ing to see in print how much body fat you have, but Rex said the Bod Pod, is simply a measurement of health. With printed results from the Bod Pod, you also can schedule a free appointment with a per sonal tness trainer who will design a tness program specically for you. For an additional cost, the Fitness Complex provides personal, one-onone workout sessions with personal trainers. Education is key, said Fitness Instructor Anjelica Ruiz. People come in with unrealis tic expectations, so they quickly become discour aged to keep working out. We keep those who come in encouraged. You may not see the abs but now youre running two miles when before you couldnt. You start feeling better be cause your body is releas ing endorphins, and your overall wellness is better. You dont have to do it alone. Grab a friend and attend one of the many group exercise classes, such as spinning, yoga and cardio kickboxing. You are sure to nd something you will enjoy. Fitness classes are free to active duty and retired military members and their families. For those civilians with access to the facility, classes are only $2.50 per class or $20 for 12 classes. A new addition to the host of available choices is the Mom and Tots Room, where mothers with young children can exer cise while watching their children in a safe environment. Dont let those Valen tine chocolates haunt your new lifestyle change. Make the step today to incorporate tness and a healthy diet to your dayto-day schedule. It wont be easy. You wont see results overnight, but the Fitness Complex sta is there to keep you on track. To make an appoint ment for Bod Pod, call (912) 573-4237. For other information or to make an sta appointment, call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. FitnessFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenWorking out helps Sailors wife Madalyn ONeill stay fit. e proclamations of cially recognize the week and call on all ser vice members throughout Kings Bay and the South east Region to take action to improve their individual and household nancial situations. Personal nancial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Wil liamson said. Its very dif cult for Sailors and families who are experiencing nancial diculties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage ev eryone to assess their nancial situation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have nancial advi sors and resources avail able through the Fleet and Family Support Centers for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military fami lies to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic sav ings. It is a part of the Depart ment of Defense Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. e campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and family life co ordinator. If a Sailor has a certain nancial goal, whether its setting up an emergency cash fund, get ting out of debt or saving for retirement, Military Saves can help them de velop those goals and take action. e program focuses on helping service members achieve their nancial goals by providing savings advice, nancial tools and resources, and motivation. Lucius said the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big nancial strains on military households and good nancial planning for both events is essential for suc cess, Lucius said. FFSC personal nancial managers, who are accredited nancial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive nancial planning worksheet to il lustrate their current nancial situation and to help them plan for the fu ture. Whether a family is in good nancial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their nancial situation. e Military Saves cam paign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall nancial stability, Lucius said. e personal nancial readiness of our service members and their fami lies directly supports mis sion readiness, and engag ing our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining nancial discipline and stability within a military family, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop nancial skills. e Military Youth Saves program is specically de signed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. Service members or de pendents that would like more information about resources and services oered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to nd out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more in formation is available at www.militarysaves.org/.SavesFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCapt. Harvey L. Guffey Jr., commanding officer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, right center, signed the Military Saves Week proclamation with members of the Fleet and Family Support Centers Command Financial Specialist Class, Feb. 10. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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From the Dolphin Scholarship FoundationIn 1960, the Subma rine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholar ships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base un der the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following re-Presidents Day is Feb. 17. Lets face it, this is about George Washington, who was born Feb. 22, 1732, and Abraham Lincoln, born Feb. 12, 1809. You never see Garfield, Van Buren or Polk on ads for Presidents Day sales. Washington and Lincoln are the big dogs. They have the biggest monuments. And, they faced the most desperate, trying times in American his tory, although you could say FDR had a full plate with the Depression and WW II. Who was greater? Id say Lincoln, simply because a lot, though not all, of Washingtons biggest problems were solved by the time he took office. And then Abe had to deal with Mary. Not easy.George Washington vs. Abraham LincolnLance Cpl. Alec Cooksey Security Force Battalion Plano, Texas Lincoln. He wasnt afraid to stand up to an issue that gripped the nation. YN1 Jonathon Bong USS Rhode Island Blue Bakersfield, Calif. Probably Washington. He was great because he was first. But Lincoln did a lot of stuff. Stacey Nichols Retired Navy Atlanta Lincoln. He freed the slaves. Lance Cpl. Grant Carr Security Force Battalion Chino, Calif. Washington. He helped establish the country through his military leadership as the first Commander in Chief. Crystal Upton Family member Fernandina Beach, Fla. Im equal toward both, but Abraham Lincolns legacy is a little better. He saved the Union and freed the slaves. Spec. Trevor Heath Army National Guard Freemont, Neb. Abraham Lincoln. I feel his ideals were greater. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Kings Bay corpsman earns medalHM2 Alonzo Dunkentell, right, was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (with combat distinguished device) by Cmdr. Chad Roe Jan. 31 at the Kings Bay Naval Branch Health Clinic, for serving as corpsman with Scout Sniper Platoon, Weapons Co., 3rd Bn, 2nd Marines, Regimental Combat Team 8, 2nd Marine Division (Forward) from March, 2011 to Sept., 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During Dunkentells deploy ment, he participated in more than 12 sniper operations, providing field medical care for patients with injuries ranging from gunshot wounds to amputations. Dunkentell also treated a sucking chest wound on an insurgent patient July 27, 2011 after his sniper team repelled an enemy ambush. He continued to provide care to his patient, protecting him from enemy fire and arranging an aerial evacu ation as his patients condition deteriorated. Dunkentells actions ensured the survival of the wounded man.Navy photo by MC2 Ashley Hedrick See Dolphin, Page 12Ocers wives oer scholarship help THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon starts at 10 a.m., Sat urday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and in cludes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Valentines Scotch Doubles At Rack-N-Roll Lanes at 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14, cost is $30 per couple and includes bowling, shoes, one large one-topping pizza, prizes and give-aways. Must be signed up no later than Feb. 13. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Presidents Day Special At Rack-N-Roll Lanes 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, Feb. 17, all games and shoe rentals are $1 each. Dress up like your favorite president and get 50 percent off your games. For more details, call (912) 5739492. Kings Bay is going to Tampa for a hockey game, the Tampa Bay Lightning against the Boston Bruins leaving here at 1:45 p.m., Saturday, March 8. Charter bus transportation will be pro vided. Cost is $45 per person, 18 years old and older, with a $40 special price for liberty single active duty. Pre-pay at ITT/OAC by Feb.14 COB. Bring money for food and souvenirs. For more information, call Navy Adventures Unleashed at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the coun ter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.face book.com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call Spring Driathlon comingPeriscope file photoSignups are ongoing for Youth Soccer and T-Ball and adult intramural soccer. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. mov ies are Turbo Feb. 15 and 16, The Smurfs 2 (Monday) Feb. 17, and Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To reg ister, call 573-4512.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training require ment. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4p.m., Feb. 19. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19. For more information, call 573-4513. Command Return and Reunion training setThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 19. Registration recommended, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 20. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Feb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be regis tered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a min imum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial aware ness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and bene fits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 quirements: Sponsor must be qualified in subma rines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activi ties for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship. org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 6713330 or e-mail scholars@dolphinschol arship.org. By Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsMarine Corps Air Station MiramarAs service members begin to settle into the new year, some look to the past in reverence and thanks for freedoms that werent available to them 72 years ago because of the color of their skin. Black History Month, which takes place in Feb ruary every year, serves as a reminder to service members of the hardships of those who came before them like the Montford Point Marines. ese Marines became the rst African-Ameri cans to enlist and train in the United States Marine Corps June 1942. ey trained and deployed to ght in World War II just as any other Marine. We came as a trial in the Marine Corps, said Joe Jackson, retired rst sergeant, one of the origi nal Montford Point Marines who served from Feb. 12, 1943 to March 26, 1969. After the war was over, we were over. is trial period left something for these men to achieve. ey per formed their duties ex ceedingly well, according to Jackson. He also explained that Gen. Alexander Vandegrift, commandant of the Marine Corps in 1945, denied the termination of segregated units and allowed for AfricanAmericans to become a fully-edged force in the Marine Corps, according to Jackson. We had to ght, we had to ght two ghts, Jack son said. You cant push a recruit like they pushed us. Our drill instructors said, youre going to be the best Marines in the Marine Corps. ey didnt know we were going to be in competition with Cau casians, they just wanted us to be the best, and that is what we became. ey did everything they could to make us quit, the training was the same as any other recruit, but they pushed us harder than any other recruit. ey pushed us longer and harder, and we were better for it. e transition from allblack units to complete integration took years, but the Marines successfully accomplished the task as can be seen by todays Marine Corps a fully racially integrated ghting force in readiness. Weve come a long way since the Montford Point Marines, said Capt. Zerbin Singleton, CH-46E Sea Knight pilot and ight line ocer in charge with Marine Medium Helicop ter Training Squadron 164. ose Marines were the giants who enabled a lot of black Marines to continue on this rise through adver sity. We owe everything to them. e Marine Corps continues to provide Marines with equal opportunity training on an annual ba sis. Marines from all over the country with dierent beliefs and backgrounds come together making the Marine Corps a cultural melting pot. It pays dividends to pay attention to the many dif ferent cultures coming into the Marine Corps, said Sgt. Maj. Donna Dunbar, Marine Light Attack Helicopter Training Squadron 303 ser geant major. ese dier ent cultures, dierent expe riences, bring very dierent things to the table and once you mix something like that together you get something truly magical. ats what the Marine Corps is all about, its what we do and will continue to do. Dunbar explained that it isnt about a Marines skin color, what religion or creed they hold faith to, or even their gender, what matters is the individual and what they bring to the bigger picture. ese individuals will also carry the torch into the future not only as Marines, but as members of the community too. What I truly love about the Marine Corps is how we are and what we build as a reection of ourselves in society, Dunbar said. What I nd important is that we take some time to realize and explain to not only our children, but the community as a whole exactly how important it is to celebrate these mile stones. I will retire one day and pass the Corps on to younger Marines, but when I get out Im still a mother, wife and member of my community and I still have that responsibil ity to continue to pass on what I have learned. National ArchievesThree African-American Marine Corps recruits run the obstacle course at Camp Lejeune of Montford Point Camp, North Carolina, in 1943. Marine recalls beginningMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsJoe Jackson, first sergeant retired, was part of the Montford Point Marines, a segregated group of Marines during World War II. By PO3 Ali FlockerziFrom Coast Guard CompassNew York-based Coast Guard units are no strang ers when it comes to as sisting with large-scale events in the area but for the rst time in history, area crews put in a team eort alongside local New York and New Jersey au thorities to safeguard a Super Bowl event. Having provided secu rity for the United Nations General Assembly, Macys Fourth of July Firework display, Fleet Week and the NYC Marathon in pre vious years, the opportu nity for the Coast Guards assets to assist with Super Bowl XLVIII was also a success. Were here to protect our citizens, said Lt. Cmdr. Luis E. Martinez, chief of Contingency Planning and Force Readiness at Sec tor New York, in Staten Is land, N.Y. With the Super Bowl comes the potential threat to our citizens. We, along with the other law enforcement agencies, got together as part of the se curity and transportation functions that would be needed to make this a suc cessful event. An event of this pro portion required a years worth of time to prepare for. e Coast Guard had its hands in nine of 22 planning committees dedicated to the 2014 Su per Bowl. Coast Guard assets in volved included Coast Guard cutters Sailsh, Pe nobscot Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Hawser and Line; Sector New York; Station New York; Station Kings Point; Maritime Security Response Team, Atlantic Strike Team; and a maritime safety and security team. ese Coast Guard as sets worked alongside federal, state and local agencies in a joint eort to provide critical contributions toward the success of the Super Bowl. Due to events occurring on both sides of the water in New York as well as New Jersey, there were major impacts and heavy trac on city transportation sys tems such as bridges, tun nels and ferries. e mission of these Coast Guard assets was simple: provide security in the case of an event. ey contributed to wa terside and shoreside protection, port security, security zone enforcement, increased waterside patrol presence in critical water ways and ensured the port was cleared of ice to allow easier transit. By having a presence on the water with our se curity assets, we are ba sically deterring any po tential maritime threat factor, Martinez said. Working with our port partners, should some thing happen on the land side that would need a maritime evacuation or anything like that, we are set to do that as well. Martinez works within the Incident Command System, a structure for managing events ranging from an unexpected oil spill to an incident of national signicance. Because Sector New York is located in such a large and heavily active port, incident manage ment skills are constantly utilized in order to re spond appropriately to any situation. e Department of Homeland Security is that agency that was put in place to protect the citizens of the United States, Martinez said. In our role as the maritime law enforcement agency under the DHS, we are doing exactly that; we are protecting the citizens of the United States from any potential acts of terror ism.Coast Guard photo by PO3 Michael HimesA Coast Guard maritime safety and security team patrols the Hudson River. Guarding the Super Bowl DolphinFrom Page 9

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By Jim GaramoneHeadquarters Marine CorpsPresident Barack Obama and defense lead ers spoke about the future of Afghanistan Feb. 4 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta; Navy Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman; Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, the commander of U.S. Central Command; Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, the commander of NATOs International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan; and Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, met with the president in the Oval Oce. is is the presidents opportunity to hear di rectly from his commanders, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren told reporters ahead of the meeting. is is an op portunity for the president to weigh inputs from the military, as well as other sources, for the president to make decisions as we move forward. In a related note, War ren commented on news reports that Afghan Presi dent Hamid Karzai has been meeting in secret with Taliban ocials. Weve long said the path to peace [in Afghanistan] is political and dip lomatic, and not military, he said. Weve long said that Afghans speaking to Afghans are whats going to bring about peace and stability in Afghanistan. Warren did not conrm whether those meetings had taken place. Finally, the United States continues to urge the Afghan government not to release dangerous terrorists. e government has said it will release 37 prisoners from an Afghanrun detention facility in Bagram. In the past, Warren has called these men bad guys who have the blood of innocent Afghans on their hands. We believe they con tinue to be dangerous and should not be released prior to going through the Afghan judicial process, he said. By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press ServiceNever in his more than 50 years of intelligence experi ence has the nation been beset by more crises and threats from around the world than it now faces, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said Feb. 4 during a House hearing on worldwide threats. e long list of global threats includes terrorism, sectarian violence and radical extremism, Clapper said. And there are many other crises and threats around the globe, he added, to include the spillover of the Syria conict into neighboring Lebanon and Iraq, the destabilizing ood of refugees in Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon now about 2.5 mil lion people, essentially one of the largest humanitarian disas ters in a decade. Adding to the list of threats, Clapper said, are the implica tions of the drawdown in Af ghanistan, the deteriorating internal security posture in Iraq, the growth of foreign cyber ca pabilities, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, aggressive nation-state intelligence eorts against the United States, an assertive Russia, a competitive China, a dangerous and unpredictable North Korea, a challenging Iran, the lingering ethnic divisions in the Balkans, and perpetual conict and ex tremism throughout Africa. I could go on with this litany, but suce to say that we live in a complex, dangerous world, he said. e intelligence community also is threatened by the fallout from leaks by former contract employee Edward Snowden, Clapper said. ough he didnt want to dwell on the debate about Snowdens motives, he added, he did want to address the damage caused by his dis closures. As a consequence, in my view, this nation is less safe and its people less secure, he said. What Snowden has stolen and exposed has gone way, way be yond his professed concerns with so-called domestic sur veillance programs. As a result, weve lost critical foreign intelligence collections sources, including some shared with us by valued partners. e leaks have provided ter rorists and other adversaries insight into U.S. intelligence sources, methods and tra decraft, Clapper said. And the insights that they are gaining are making our jobs much, much harder, he added. e stark consequences of this perfect storm are plainly ev ident, he said. e intelligence community is going to have less capacity to protect our nation and its allies than weve had. But if its necessary to operate with reduced capabilities to re store the faith and condence of the American people and their elected representatives, Clapper said, then we in the intelligence community will work as hard as we can to meet the expectations before us. e major lesson for the intelligence community from the revelations by Snowden and other leakers is that the commu nity must lean in the direction of transparency wherever and whenever it can, he said. With greater transparency about these intelligence programs, the American people may be more likely to accept them, Clapper noted. President Barack Obama described the way forward for the intelligence community in a speech Jan. 14, and a new presi dential directive, Clapper said. e major characteristic of this new direction is transparency, he said. Clapper and Attorney General Eric H. Holder were ordered to conduct further declassication, to develop special protec tions under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act governing collection of non-U.S. persons overseas, to modify how telephone meta data is collected under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, and to ensure more oversight of sensitive collection activities, he said. rough all of this, we must, and we will, sustain our profes sional tradecraft and integrity. We must continue to protect our sources and methods so that we can accomplish what weve always been chartered to do; to protect the lives of American citizens here and abroad to a myriad of threats, Clapper said. Clapper was joined at the hearing by Army Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn, Defense Intelligence Agency director, and Matthew G. Olsen, National Counterterrorism Center direc tor.Intelligence director sees global threats everywhere ClapperMarine Corps photo by Cpl. Joshua YoungMarine Sgt. Eddie Glowacki provides security for a working party at an ANA base near Forward Operating Base Nolay, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Jan. 27. Military leaders, Obama talk on Afganistan Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Afghanistan counternarcotics eorts ongoing By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press Servicee United States has made an extraordinary investment in both blood and treasure to eradicate terrorist safe havens and narcotics production in Afghanistan, the Defense Departments principal director for counternar cotics and global threats told a House Foreign Af fairs Committee panel yesterday. More than 2,000 Americans have died in Opera tion Enduring Freedom, and another nearly 20,000 have been wounded, Erin M. Logan said in prepared remarks for the subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa. In addition, the Defense Department has invested $2 billion for dedicated counternarcotics training and programs, out of the nearly $570 billion spent on the war since 2001. We believe that $2 bil lion has been well spent in developing specialized [counternarcotics] units and capabilities that have begun to achieve concrete results, Logan said. Despite this progress, the gains are not yet irre versible, she said. Likening the programs to a seedling, Logan said Afghanistans counternar cotics organizations will require care and nurtur ing before they are ready to stand on their own. Stepping back from our eorts now would jeopardize the further development of these units that have become reliable partners for U.S. and inter national law enforcement eorts, she said. Its impossible to envi sion a successful future for Afghanistan without sustaining an Afghan ca pability to ght violence and corruption created by the drug trade, she added. e production and dis tribution of narcotics con tributes to the countrys insecurity, she said, lead ing to corruption, poor governance and stagnation of economic development. Addressing the drug trade and its eects is es sential to the successful transition of security re sponsibility to the govern ment of Afghanistan, Logan said. According to the United Nations Oce on Drugs and Crime, Afghanistans opium poppy cultivation was up 36 percent in 2013, she said. e link between insecurity and opium cultivation is well established in Afghanistan, she said. Most of the opium poppy cultivation is concentrat ed in southern and west ern provinces, where the narcotics trade continues to fuel criminal and insur gent networks. e trade in Afghanproduced opiates has become an increasingly global phenomenon, she continued, with drugs and illicit proceeds ow ing to the Persian Gulf and the Middle East, East Africa, Europe, Russia and North America, with a small percentage of the heroin consumed in the United States coming from Afghanistan. e DODs counternar cotics eorts in Afghani stan have two goals, Logan said: to counter and dis rupt drug-related funding to the insurgency, and to strengthen the Afghan governments capacity to combat the drug trade during and after the secu rity transition. e form those eorts take include building the capacity of the Counter narcotics Police of Af ghanistan, improving bor der security, promoting information sharing and fostering regional and in ternational cooperation, she said, including with other U.S. government agencies. e DODs post-2014 counternarcotics strat egy prioritizes programs that disrupt, degrade, and dismantle illicit narcotics networks, Logan said. It has three aims: to con tain and reduce the ow of drugs from Afghanistan, to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal or ganizations, and to reduce the ow of illicit proceeds that nance insurgent and terrorist activities globally, she said. To meet the goals out lined in the strategy, Logan said, the department must focus on three areas: continued support for vetted units, continued aviation capacity building, and continued leveraging of international and inter agency capabilities. Afghanistans specialized counternarcotics units have shown that they are willing and able to do the job, she said. More and more specialized units are now able to plan, execute, and follow through on [counternarcotics] missions on their own, Logan said. For example, in Decem ber, the DOD-supported and [Drug Enforcement Agency]-mentored Sensitive Investigative Unit was able to use judicially authorized wire intercepts to build a case that led to the arrest of two criminals and the seizure of 660 grams of heroin, 500 boxes of ammunition, 40 remote control IEDs, and 75 rocketpropelled grenades. Logan said, the agency will expand Operation Riptide, which is located in Bahrain and leverages the capabilities of U.S. and international law enforcement and national intelligence agencies to facilitate interdictions, seizures, investigations and prosecutions. Naval interdictions from Combined Maritime Forces in Bahrain, nota bly by Canadas HMCS Toronto and by Australias HMAS Melbourne, have proven the international communitys ability to identify, track, board, and seize illicit cargo on the high seas, she said.Navy photo and take control of one of two wooden dhows found loaded with heroin and methamphetamines during a sig nificant drug seizures in the 5th Fleet region. Photo by Marine Staff Sgt. Luis P. Valdespino Jr.A Marine Special Operations Companys Leatherneck examines a poppy plant handed to him by an Afghan National Army soldier, right, during a patrol through a Helmand Province village. Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Sweetheart LunchFriday, Feb. 14 Open to all Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personel, mil itary civilan and dependents MenuSteak, lobster, baked potato, corn, carrotts and assorted desserts

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 13, 2014