Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00333


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Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet hosted the 12th annual U.S. Military Group Navy Section Chief Synchronization Conference Jan. 27-30. Navy section chiefs are U.S. Navy represen tatives who worked with the Military Group at U.S. embassies world wide to coordinate a variety of maritime pro grams within their host country. This confer ence involved Navy sec tion chiefs from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility, which encompasses the Caribbean, Central and South America. The work of our Navy section chiefs and their supporting staffs is vital to the suc cess of our Cooperative Maritime Strategy and SOUTHCOM engage ment goals. They are vital to the success of Fourth Fleet across our lines of operation from Maritime Security Operations to Security Cooperation Activities. This confer ence allows both the Navy section chiefs and our Fourth Fleet staffs to Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Security Scans May Mean Delays At GateNaval Station Mayport is adding an additional Security measure to its gates and it may be an ini tial delay to getting on the base. The Navy Access Control Management System (NACMS) Handheld Scanners have been re-issued to Naval Station Mayport for use at the stations Entry Control Points (ECPs), such as the main gate at Mayport Road and Gate 5, off of SRA1A. The scanners have the added capability to scan, read and authenticate DoD Common Access Cards (CAC), DoD Retired Military IDs, and DoD Dependents IDs, along with RAPIDGate creden tials. Initial scanning of an ID Card or RAPIDGate cre dential may take 15-20 seconds to complete, however, once an ID Card or RAPIDGate credential is scanned, all scans after wards should only take around 5 seconds to com plete. To reduce traffic backups and delays, personnel are asked to plan an extra 15-20 minutes in their morning commute dur ing the next 3 to 4 weeks while the scanners work to effectively scan each and every credential and ID card. -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Clayton Conley, the incoming Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, salutes Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic after relieving Capt. Dan Boyles, middle, at a change of command ceremony on Jan. 31 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.Capt. Clayton Clay Conley relieved Capt. Daniel Boyles as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, on Jan. 31 during a change of command ceremo ny at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. Boyles, a native of Mount Prospect, Ill., was commissioned through the University of Illinois NROTC program in 1986, where he earned a Bachelors of Science Degree in Mathematics. He was designated a Naval Aviator in June 1988. Boyles flew the SH-2F Seasprite during his initial sea assignment in HSL-35 and made two deployments to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean in USS Sides (FFG 14) and USS Reasoner (FF 1063). Captain Boyles then transferred to HSL-41 in February 1992, where he transitioned to SH-60B Seahawk and served as an Instructor Pilot. In September 1994, Boyles reported to USS Juneau (LPD 10), locat ed at Naval Station San Diego, where he served as Air Boss and deployed to the Central Pacific and Persian Gulf. During this tour Captain Boyles earned his Officer of the Deck (Underway) and Surface Warfare Officer Qualifications. In June 1999, Boyles returned to San Diego, California, and report ed to HSL-47 where he served as Safety Officer, Operations Officer and completed a Caribbean Counter Narcotics deployment as Officerin-Charge of Detachment Six in USS Doyle (FFG 39). In September 2004, he returned to HSL-47 as Executive Officer and on December 8, 2006 he took command of the Saberhawks. During this tour the Saberhawks won the coveted Secretary of Defense Maintenance Award, the Lockheed Martin Superior HSL Maintenance Award and the Capt. Arnold J. Isbell award for tactical excellence. In addition, the Saberhawks partici pated in Tsunami and Conley Relieves Boyles As CHSMWL Commodore Get Alerts In Emergency Situations A small purple globe icon located at the bottom of your computer screen is responsible for warning personnel at Naval Station Mayport of impending danger during an emer gency. Commander, Navy Installations Command in 2008 deployed The Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system to allow local commanders to pass critical informa tion to affected person nel, military, civilians and their families. According to Mayport Installation Emergency Management Officer Steven Millican, early notification is cru cial to protect personnel and their families. Anytime you can have an early notification message to protect yourself and your family is criti cal, he said. We have been working to educate personnel about the sys tem and maintain that education on how impor tant this is for them. The WAAN system is a four-prong approach. Computer Desktop Notification System (CDNS), Automated Telephone Notification System (ATNS), Giant Voice (GV) and Interior Voice (IV). The primary system at Mayport is the AtHoc notification sys tem. Every shore based military and civilian with Common access Card (CAC), assigned to Mayport address NMCI computer and valid in the Global Address Locator (GAL) has an AtHoc account automatically generated. The AtHoc system is the program that generates CDNS alerts. You can receive alerts via work/personal email, work/personal telephone and text. Sailors assigned to afloat units receive alerts via registration with the ship email and distribution lists by radio. When an alert is generated from the installation, the ship receives the alert and for wards the message via internal email and tele phone text. A different system is used when the ship or unit is deployed, he added. When the ship is away from port, the ship does not receive AtHoc alerts; thus the Sailors are not notified and can not notify their fami lies. Millican said that the ombudsman contact data has been included into the AtHoc server so they can receive the alert issued by the installation. According to Millican, it is essential that all person nel whether on ship or shore maintain updated information in your con tact information account to make the system run properly. The ombudsman serve a critical role to make this system work for deployed personnel, he said. All personnel need to make sure and have their family information updated [with their command ombudsman] so they can be contacted in case of an emergency. Instructions for add ing and updating contact information to the WAAN using the AtHoc self ser vice client are:See Alerts, Page 6 -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs speaks at the beginning of 12th annual U.S. Military Group Navy Section Chief Synchronization Conference Jan. 27-30 held at Naval station Mayport.COMUSNAVSO/US4F Hosts 2014 Latin America Navy Section Chief ConferenceSee CHSMWL, Page 12 See NAVSEC, Page 6

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Pet owners believe that dogs make us better people. Turns out they can also make us better readers! The Reading Education Assistance Dogs, or R.E.A.D. liter acy program, which has service dogs come into schools to help kids with reading, is an unconven tional but effective way to help children improve their reading skills. The R.E.A.D. Intermountain Therapy Animals Program was launched in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1999. Students selected for the READ program dont usually like to read in front of other children. Most are stuck and cant move forward in their reading. There is an anxiety factor that the reading dog helps to break. The dog in the photo relaxes on a felt blan ket in a room off of the media center at Finegan Elementary School. She listens to a student sound out a short chapter book. The dog is Lindy a highly-trained Golden Retriever therapy dog. The student is Thomas Le the son of Lane Cook, a member of the Coast Guard attached to the USCG Hilton. Lindys handler, Joan Streightiff, introduced R.E.A.D. to Finegan Elementary School last year. She visited once a week. This year Finegan has expanded the pro gram to two days a week. Six 2nd graders and six 4th graders meet with Lindy for eight weeks. Out of the 18 children who have been involved in the R.E.A.D. program, 14 are military depen dents. The school hopes to facilitate two more groups by the end of this school year. R.E.A.D. (pronounced read) gives elementaryaged students the oppor tunity to practice their literary and communica tion skills by reading to a captive canine audi ence. The program also motivates young students to pursue reading and encourages confidence when reading aloud. On their first visit with Lindy, each stu dent receives a stuffed Golden Retriever to read to at home. While no offi cial research has been done on reading to a stuffed animal pet, class room teachers whose stu dents have been selected for the program have evidence of students gain ing confidence in read ing aloud and effectively using reading strategies. Each week the students look forward to their vis its with their four-legged friends. During reading time, the dog relaxes on a blanket near its handler, while the student reads aloud from an age-level, appropriate book. All of the R.E.A.D. students leave each session with a sticker. In addition to the stick er, the students in the R.E.A.D. program leave with improved reading skills, learned in a unique R.E.A.D.ing Is For The DogsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Be Prepared For Lifes Unexpected ChallengesThis past week we wit nessed some really crazy weather for the south eastern United States and while we were spared here in Jacksonville from the worst of it, Pensacola and other places north of us like Atlanta struggled to deal with the onslaught of an unusually severe winter storm that includ ed 3 to 6 inches of snow and shut down major sec tions of the interstate. I have some friends in the Atlanta area and the reports were not good. Many people were stuck in their cars on the inter state for 24 hours or more as the entire city came to a virtual halt when 7 million people hit the road all at once in the middle of the storm. It seems almost everyone was caught off guard. Apparently the weath er folks had predicted Atlanta would have much milder winter weather so folks were not prepared when the storm hit and the consequences were severe. I asked myself how in the world could this pos sibly have happened? It seemed fairly obvi ous to me that a major storm was coming and we should prepare for the worst, even here in Jacksonville. I am still a bit puzzled as to how so many people could be caught off guard. Of course, it could happen to any of us I suppose. Interestingly enough, the Bible is not silent on the subject of being pre pared. Of course, in the Middle East they are much more inclined to be hit by severe drought or wildfires then a massive blizzard. God raised up Joseph in the book of Genesis to save countless thou sands from a severe seven-year drought. He revealed to him through interpreting Pharaohs vision that there would be seven years of extraor dinary blessing followed by seven years of intense drought and through his leadership they prepared accordingly. Of course, we not only suffer through unexpect ed storms in life but we also have all sorts of unex pected challenges to our marriages, to our families, and to our faith in God. In Psalm 1, King David writes that the one who meditates on the law of God will be like a tree planted by streams of water, whose leaf does not wither and who bears fruit in season. He says the Lord watch es over the way of the righteous but the way of the wicked will perish. In other words, one way God helps us to be prepared for the challenges of life is by giving us his word to reflect upon so that when tragedy strikes we will have firm ground to stand upon. For in the end, the Lord is the one who can help us weather the storms of life. Jesus also makes some extraordinary claims in this regard in the Matthew 7:24-27. Are you prepared for those unexpected chal lenges in life? Dust off the good book from the shelf and see what God can do in your life. A great place to start might be Matthew 7.Chaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry Center Chairmans Corner: Trust Transcends Gender In the days follow ing September 11, 2001, women and men took to the seas, to the skies and to the sands in defense of our country. Its worth noting that women served in combat zones in Afghanistan and Iraq because they were need ed. They shared a com mon commitment to their nation with their male counterparts in squad rons, ships and squads. Today, and every other day, women and men, sons and daughters, mothers and fathers faith fully serve our nation at home and abroad. We cel ebrate their contributions. They make the United States military the domi nant military force on the planet. Victor Hugo once wrote, There is one thing stron ger than all the armies in the world and that is an idea whose time has come. One year ago this month, we repealed the combat exclusion on women in the military. We formally recognized reality that women serve courageously in combat zones whenever or wherever their nation calls. By this act, we codi fied our commitment to offer everyone in uni form equal professional opportunities to serve the nation. We continue to work to make this a real ity throughout the force. Were reviewing stan dards, not to artificially lower them but to ensure we have them right. Were educating leaders. As our sacred responsibility, we are committed to improv ing the readiness of the force while also increas ing opportunities for our women in uniform. These two goals are complementary, not contradic tory. When in contact with the enemy, the individual soldier, sailor, airman or Marine doesnt consider whether their comrade in arms is a man or woman. They care about wheth er they can do their job. There is a simple expla nation for this: trust tran scends gender. The service of our women and men in uni form is worthy of recognition today and every day.-Photos submitted Benjamin Thomas, son of Joseph Thomas assigned to USS New York, sits with Joan Streightiff and Lindy who make up the Pawsitive Pets team at Finegan Elementary. Thomas Le reads to Lindy, a therapy dog working at Finegan Elementary School to help children learn to improve reading skills.and fun environment; the discovery that reading is FUN; the realization that school attendance is important (so as to not miss a day with Lindy); improved self-confi dence and self-esteem; a sense of pride in their accomplishments; and a willingness to get involved in other activi ties is developed. Pawsitive Pets is part of registered Pet Partner therapy teams. It cur rently has 19 teams in Duval with four in train ing. Joan and Lindy serve Finegan Elementary two days a week. Each child, selected for the program, spends 20 minutes each week, one-on-one with Lindy, for eight weeks. Reading to dogs helps calm young children and relieves the pressure of embarrassment when they make reading mis takes. A University of California study found that young children who read with a therapy dog improved their reading skills by 12 percent over the course of a 10-week program in comparison to children in the same pro gram who didnt read to dogs. To become a R.E.A.D. companion, pets are required to first train and then pass an evaluation in order to be registered with an animal-assisted therapy organization, like Pet Partner therapy teams. Then, both pets and handlers must suc cessfully pass specific trainings, workshops, and evaluations with R.E.A.D. to ensure they know the required rules and regu lations, as well as how to handle unfamiliar situa tions and environments. Its more than being good with people, the dog has to have solid obedience skills, and it has to really be aware of whats going on. Interested in becoming a R.E.A.D. tem volunteer of Pawsitive Pets, go to www.pawsitivepets.org or call (904) 992-4533. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions or concerns about an educational issue, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell].

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Chapel Teen Club Beyond Gets JammingClub Beyond is a new program at Naval Station Mayport. It is sponsored by the Chapel and is an authorized part of the Command Religious Program. Kevin Burgess is leading the program and he and his wife, Kelley, have 20 years of experience work ing with adolescent youth. As an approved resource for the Chapel commu nity, Burgess said they are excited to be serv ing military families. In addition to special events, Bible studies and weekly activities at the Chapel, middle school and high school students will have the opportunity to par ticipate in service proj ects both on base and in the community as well as camping trips and fun activities, such as going kayaking or to Adventure Landing. With the support of Chapel staff along with approved adult volun teers like Navy person nel, spouses and parents, the Club Beyond pro gram will provide mili tary kids with safe and fun activities, mentoring relationships and a pres sure free environment in which to explore their faith. Recently, Kevin and Kelley had the chance to take a group of kids to WinterJam, one of the first Club Beyond special events. What a night! Burgess said. Bands, speakers and artists comprise the WinterJam Concert Tour, which trav els to over 50 cities in 3 months. Kids screamed for American Idols Colton Dixon; rocked out with Thousand Foot Crutch; were turned up with rap & hip hop artist Lecrae; and challenged by a meaningful message to the teen-aged audience from the guest speaker Nick Hall. Only one of our kids had been to this event before, but the others had never been to an event with this many topname artists, he continued. During the closing act, the Newsboys entire drum set and drummer were lifted off the stage, turned vertical and spun around like a carnival ride. My wife and I had seen this type of special effect at previous concerts we have attended over the years, but these kids had never seen anything like it! Their faces said it all. They were in shock, in awe they LOVED IT! It is pretty early in our time here at Mayport to know what God might have in store for the Club Beyond program a NS Mayport, but I hope it may be something like what the old testa ment prophet Habakkuk wrote, For I am going to do something in your days that you would not believe, even if you were told. (Habakkuk Ch 1 vs 5), and so far this has been the case, Burgess said. My wife and I have the privilege of working with an amazing team at the NS Mayport Chapel and have already gotten to know a dozen or so middle and high school students, along with their families. After our very first meeting, one of the students went home and told her parents, I think this is really going to work! At our first Club (the name of the regu lar weekly meeting) our new adult volunteer said, I loved my youth group back home, but we never did anything like this! Also, I recently received a letter from a friend (a former Navy spouse) who was stationed in Jacksonville in the 1980s, he said. She shared that she often felt alone during that time, and felt threatened by the normal comparisons and jealousies concern ing rank and position that occur in the militar ; and she felt that her marriage was in competition with her husbands career. She said that her faith did not seem to be appreci ated or respected by those around her and that this experience impacted her children. She encour aged me that she felt military kids and families need something like Club Beyond and that they need an opportunity to, hear about Gods grace and all-encompassing love for them. That they are not alone. We have been wel comed and supported so far by the Navy personnel and officers at Mayport, school officials and cha pel families, Burgess added. We look forward to meeting new kids and offering Navy families fun activities, consistency of programs across mul tiple installations (Club Beyond is also at NAS Jacksonville), adult men tors who can care for kids in healthy ways, a com munity of positive peers, and opportunities to serve and gain leadership expe rience all in the context of a safe environment in which to explore ques tions of faith no matter what their background. We have an exciting year of trips, activities, clubs, Bible studies and service projects planned. My hope and prayer is that kids and their families will feel appreciated, encour aged, supported and will say, we have seen remarkable things(the Gospel of Luke Ch 9 vs 26) after participating in Club Beyond here at NS Mayport. -Photos submitted by Club Beyond ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS ducks.org 800-45DUCKS Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. 13 MILLION ACRESAND COUNTING Pictured, teens from the Naval Station Mayport Club Beyond enjoy a night of inspir ing music at the WinterJam Concert Tour during the clubs first outing. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 USS Halyburton Prepares For Martillo The oldest Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate USS Halyburton stopped at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a scheduled refueling stop Jan. 18 and to begin its mission in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Halyburton departed Naval Station Mayport just a few days before with a full crew, an embarked air detachment from the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HSM) 46 and an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) to support Operation Martillo and join the fight again Counter Illicit Trafficking (CIT) opera tions in the region. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a multinational mis sion tasked with conduct ing those CIT operations. Belize, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States are participating in Martillo with additional contributions from Chile. We are very thrilled to work hand-andhand with the Sailors aboard Halyburton, said Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Fidel Castillo, a U.S. Coast Guard LEDET boarding officer aboard Halyburton. Our mission aboard USS Halyburton is vital. We are here to provide law enforce ment support, in order to enable the navys mari time security mission to counter drug tasking. Castillo went on to say enthusiastically that since this is Halyburtons last deployment, the LEDET is extraordinarily keen about getting a drug bust so that Halyburton ends her service life on a high note while supporting Operation Martillo and her nation as she has done for more than 30 years. The Coast Guardsmen have conducted con trolled drills with Halyburtons Visit, Board, Search and Seizure team (VBSS) to build cohesion and ensure compliance with the applicable rules of engagement and use of force. They have also worked with the aircrews of HSM 46 on aerial use of force. It was great to get to work with the Halyburton See Halyburton, Page 5 -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettQuartermaster 1st class Bruce Addison from Naples, Fla. plots the course of guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) during the ships deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Personnel Specialist Seaman Ruben Cruz from Orlando, Fla. makes a photocopy for a personnel record aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Above, Yeoman 2nd class Mark Mitchell (back) reviews the requirements for, uses of and proper format of an enlisted evaluation with Yeoman Seaman Justin Mileski (front) aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Left, Ship Serviceman 3rd class Keny Liningham cuts Boatswains Mate 2nd class Joshua Grays hair in the barbershop aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Jeffrey Oceguera from Miami, Fla. assigned to the U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) aboard the guidedmissile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) works out in the ships gym. USCG LEDET is currently embarked aboard Halyburton assisting the crew during the ships deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Culinary Specialist Seaman Apprentice Montel Moore from San Diego, Calif. seasons fajita meat in preparation for chow aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 5 VBSS team and Law enforcement detachment all together in our operat ing area, said Lt j.g. Brian Stong, a pilot assigned to the Grandmasters of HSM 46 detachment 4. Its something we have been training for individually, for a while, but its great to bring it all together and see all the pieces work. We enjoy working togeth er and perfecting our craft. Halyburton is the sec ond oldest commis sioned frigate in the U.S. Navy behind the esteemed sailing frigate USS Constitution. While Halyburton is scheduled for decommissioning after this deployment, she is ready for action. As we set out on USS Halyburtons final deploy ment, it is an honor to be the command mas ter chief that will write the final chapter of her career, said Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander. Over the last 30 years, she has served us well; taken our Sailors into harms way, protect ed our seas, trained our Sailors and returned them safely home to their loved ones. Our crew is trained and ready to fight from the engineers that main tain a 30-year-old propul sion plant, to our combat systems team that flaw lessly provides commu nications, navigation and coordination to our VBSS team, boat crew, crew serve weapons and bridge watch teams, which have all trained together and are 100 percent ready to carry out and complete the mission. Friedlander stated the crew will continue to maintain and care for their beloved ship, and send her ashore with full honors. His final state ment was a shout out to his Sailors, Thank you Shipmates, its a true honor to be serving with you. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet provide a sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions in support of U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spec trum military operations.From Page 4Halyburton Lt. j.g. Jeff Bland from Basking Ridge, N.J. changes the wire harness in the soda machine aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Seaman Apprentice Jose Soto and fellow Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) moor the ship pier side to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of respon sibility. Seaman Apprentice Brandon Archibald heaves line off of the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG40) to line-handlers on Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibil ity. Boatswains Mate Seaman Pedro Duran (back) and Seaman Brian Cuevas (front) set the anchor brake wheel aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) in preparation for a refueling stop at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) prepare to moor lines at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Boatswains Mates aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) scrub the ships anchor chain during cleaning stations. Halyburton is currently deploying to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Seaman Travis Jackson and Seaman Apprentice Brandon Gutierrez stand watch as aft lookouts onboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton during the transit south on deployment to the 4th Fleet area of responsibility.

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From Page 1Alerts From Page 1NAVSEC-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport breaks ground for the second phase of the Charlie Wharf improvement project Jan. 29. This project will provide a new bulkhead approximately 15 feet seaward of the existing Wharf Charlie C-2 at Naval Station Mayport. The project will enable more efficient servicing of ships and will extend the service life on the currently degraded wharf bulkhead. Pictured from left is NAVFAC Construction Manager Chanda Comegys, Chris Jones with CMS, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall and Mayport Public Works Officer, Cmdr. Phillip Lavallee. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Davidson talks to the crew of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) during an all-hands call. -Photo by MC1 Christopher B. StoltzVice Adm. Phil Davidson, commander of U.S. 6th Fleet, addresses the crew of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) during an all-hands call in Naples, Italy on Jan. 29. During the visit, Davidson also toured the ship and met with the ship's senior leadership. USS Simpson, Armed Forces of Malta Exchange Tactics Members of the Armed Forces of Malta joined with Sailors from guid ed-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to share tactics and tech niques in a number of maritime mission areas, Jan. 24. Members from dif ferent sections of the Armed Forces of Malta made good use of this exchange, which featured damage control training evolutions, expedition ary medical care and boarding team. Those that participated felt that the exchange allowed for greater growth in those skill sets. Members of the Maltese Special Detachment Enhanced Boarding Team showcased their skills in maritime interdiction operations as they board ed Simpson. The board ing exercise highlighted the use of both forces tac tics and equipment. I think that there is always some knowledge gained in partnering with other forces, said Senior Chief Allen Bylls, assigned to Simpsons Visit, Board, Search and Seizure team. The damage control scenarios featured pro cesses for detection of fire and other hazards while at sea. Simpsons Damage Control Assistant Lt.j.g. Marco Arroyo walked Maltese Sailors through the ships repair lockers to familiarize them with the tools used to counter fire, flooding and toxic gas. The training culmi nated in a crash and sal vage drill, which simulat ed the crew responding to a downed aircraft on the flight deck. I was very impressed with the how well the Maltese Sailors per formed, said Arroyo. Maltese medics were also given training in expeditionary medicine testing their capabilities to rapidly treat combat wounds in conflict sce narios or incidents out at sea. It was very interest ing to have a chance to compare critical life sav ing techniques, while indentifying the differ ences between Western and European medical practices, said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mathew Robichaux. The port visit to Malta on Simpsons deployment in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations, serves as an important event in pro moting and strengthen ing maritime partnerships with European nations.USS Elrod, HSL-60 Det 2 Arrive In Morocco Guided-missile frig ate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked NS Mayport-based HSL-60 Detachment Two arrived in Morocco for a sched uled port visit, Feb. 2. During the visit, Elrod is scheduled to host a number of exchanges with Moroccan Royal Armed Forces, including ship tours and a reception for local and U.S. State Department officials. Im looking forward to speaking with some of my Moroccan peers, said Cmdr. Brad Stallings, commanding officer of Elrod. Well have oppor tunities to discuss mari time and theater security as well as gain personal friendships that could go a long way during future operations. The visit will also pro vide Elrod Sailors an opportunity to experience Moroccan culture first hand. Its not often that people get to say theyve had a chance to explore Morocco, said Seaman Kyle Stuart, an Elrod crew member. Theres so much culture and history here. I cant wait to see as much of it as I can for myself. Elrod and HSL-60 are currently on a scheduled deployment. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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Above, Aviation Boatswains Mate Fuel Airman Kirk Ramos, right, fires a .50 caliber machine gun while Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Justin Blennis stands as safety aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during a weapons qualification course. Right, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Justin Stone of Kingsport, Tenn. fires an M2HB .50-caliber machine gun aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during live fire exercises. -Photos by MC2 Cyrus Roson The amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) prepares to exit the Mayport Naval Base Basin to go underway. Applications Out For BBC Scholarships Balfour Beatty Communities Foundations is once again offering post-secondary academic scholarships to both high school seniors and undergraduate stu dents who reside in Balfour Beatty Communities mili tary family housing. The application process is now open for scholarships that will be awarded for the 20142015 academic year. We are so thankful to be able to support the con tinuing education of our young residents through the Foundation scholarship program, said Chris Williams, president of the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation. I encourage all of our residents who are planning on or currently attending a post-secondary school to apply for a Foundation Scholarship in recog nition of their hard work and achievements. On average, Foundation scholarships are awarded in amounts up to $2,500, however larger amounts may be awarded based on the number and caliber of submis sions. Applicants must be the child of an active-duty service member and reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military housing. Additional eligibility requirements and application details and submittal requirements can be found on the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation website (www.bbcommunitiesfoundation. org). Please note, all applications must be postmarked by April 15, 2014. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a nonprofit organization, which was founded in 2007, is com mitted to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families. One of the Foundations primary goals is to support continuing education and the development of future community leaders through an annual academic schol arship program and other initiatives.Forrestal Off To Scrapyard The decommissioned air craft carrier Forrestal (AVT 59) was scheduled to begin its final voyage, Feb. 4, weather permitting, when it departs Philadelphia on its way to a ship disman tling and recycling facility in Brownsville, Texas. The ship will be towed down the Delaware River, along the eastern seaboard, and across the Gulf of Mexico to arrive at the All Star Metals facility. The best opportunity for viewing the departure will be from publicly accessible areas along the Delaware River. The Navy awarded a ship dismantling contract to All Star Metals of Brownsville on Oct. 22, 2013, and All Star Metals subcontracted with Foss Marine Towing to tow the ship to its final des tination. The first of the super carriers, Forrestal was launched Dec. 11, 1954, by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., and commissioned Sept. 29, 1955. Forrestal was home ported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., from 1977 until 1991, when it transi tioned to Philadelphia for decommissioning. Forrestal was decom missioned Sept. 11, 1993, after more than 38 years of service. On June 16, 1999, the Navy announced the ship would be available for donation to an eligible organization for use as a museum or memorial. However, no viable appli cations were received and the vessel was removed from donation hold in December 2003 and redes ignated for disposal. In October, the Navy competitively awarded a contract to All Star Metals for the towing, dismantling and recycling of conventionally powered aircraft carriers. Under the terms of the contract, the company will be paid $0.01 for disman tling and recycling ex-USS Forrestal, which is the low est price the Navy could possibly have paid the con tractor for the work. The Navy continues to own the ship during the dismantling process until the ship has been fully dismantled. The contrac tor takes ownership of the scrap metal as it is pro duced and sells the scrap to offset its costs of operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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FAuto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double pay outs on all hard cards, free desserts, extra $1000 Sweetheart Game, plus, when you bring your sig nificant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Feb. 7: Castaways Olympics Opening Ceremony. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Come show your support to your favorite ath letes and country. While youre there, watch the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Winter Games and sign up for the events YOU want to play during our very own Castaways Olympics. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 8: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5. Sign up deadline Feb. 6 Feb. 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Feb. 11: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 10. Feb. 15: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Sign up by Feb. 14, trans portation only. Feb. 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by Feb. 14. Feb. 17: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Feb. 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all others; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 24. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. Feb. 14: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians chil dren ages 7-14 (soc cer) and 4-12 (baseball). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Registration deadline is Mar. 17. For more infor mation, please call (904) 270-5018 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy. mil. Feb. 21: Turn It Up @ the Teen Center. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Music, movies, food, drinks, a fire pit and more Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Intramural Sports Feb. 7: Womens Volleyball Begins. Season Ends Apr. 4. 270-5451 Feb. 10-13: Pre-Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 4. 270-5451 Feb. 11: Superbowl 5K Run/3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Soccer Begins. Season Ends April 17. 270-5451 Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes New Fitness Schedule Drop In Childcare Option At CDC, YACNeed a couple of hours to go grocery shop ping? Or youre regular childcare sitter called in sick and you have to get to work? Naval Station Mayports Child Development and Youth Activities Centers can help with their hourly care program. The program is avail able at all three cen ters, said CDC manager Colleen Sheridan. However, she warned, guardians must have their children registered with the centers before they can use the service. Sheridan said registra tion is as easy as filling out a registration card and a child profile with his or her likes and dislikes, providing the center with shot records for the child. It takes about 24 hours to update the system with the information. She also said she rec ommends guardians reg istering their children even if they dont think theyll use the service. You just never know when there may be an emergency, she said. Available to active duty and their dependents, DoD civilians and con tractors, it is also open if space is available to retir ees. Cost is $4 per hour and guardians can make reservations up to 30 days in advance. Sheridan warned that guardians can not use the service to supplement working part time. There is a care limit of 25 hours per week at the CDC and 10 hours per week at YAC. Hourly care spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, call 2477740. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Commissaries offer sweet savings in February Whether its nutritious foods for better health, candy treats for that Valentines Day sweetheart or all foods in between, commissary patrons will be able to find what they want with plenty of promotional savings in February. Between Valentines Day and February being Heart Health Month, there are lots of options for our patrons to save money at their commissary, said Randy Chandler, the Defense Commissary Agencys director of sales. Throughout February, DeCAs indus try partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are col laborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. For more, go to http://www.commissaries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_03_14.cfm Exclusive Savings offers link to commissary spe cials Commissary customers who want to check out more opportunities to find exclusive specials, promo tions and sales are just one website link away. The Defense Commissary Agency recently added more top name-brand websites to its Exclusive Savings link on the DeCA homepage, http://www.commissaries. com. When shoppers visit the commissarys homepage and look underneath the large rotating banner, they will find smaller, square banners, one of them being Exclusive Savings. Simply click on that banner and the landing page appears, showing all of DeCAs indus try partners who are participating in this exclusive sav ings Web program. The individual websites are exclu sively for commissary shoppers, offering downloadable coupons, recipes, promotional giveaways and contests. Applications for 2014 Scholarships for Military Children now available Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program became available Dec. 3 at com missaries worldwide or on the Internet at http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28. Packages must be hand-delivered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. For more infor mation, students or sponsors should call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at mili taryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com. -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Jackie Rodriguez applies make up to Skala Pikes as part of the Mayport Navy Exchange Spa Day on Jan. 31. Below, Barbara Leeds gives a complimentary facial as part of the the event. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Feds Outline Military Deposits Process The U.S. Office of Personnel Management conducted a webcast today to explain the pro cess of applying military service time toward civil service retirement. In order for the [mili tary] service to be cred itable, you have to make a deposit, said OPMs Karen McManus The deposit has to be made on service that was per formed after 1956. Before 1956, they can just get credit for it. McManussaid key to the process is the DD-214 form, a military service record document, which is used to determine sta tus and eligibility. Youve got to go to that DD-214 and figure out beginning dates and ending dates, she said. Youre giving them total years, months and days. The other thing that youre using the DD-214 for is to determine the periods of military ser vice. There can be more than one DD-214, McManus said, and more than one period of service as long as there is a break of at least one day. If they have a break of one day, they have more than one military period, and theyll pay a deposit for each of their periods of military service, she noted. While examining the DD-214, McManus said the issue of whether mili tary service is creditable is a necessary step in the process. The first thing before you even start talking about a deposit is you have to start talking about the creditability of the military service, she said. So what happens here is you have an employee and theyre either under the [Civilian Service Retirement System] or the [Federal Employees Retirement System], McManus said. And they have prior military service or they have military ser vice that interrupts their federal career. In either case, they would like to make a deposit so that that ser vice can also be credit able in their CSRS or FERS annuity, she added. McManus emphasized the employees agency will play a large role in assisting with the military deposit process. Theyre going to get a copy of their service record and bring it to their agency, she said, and this is where the agency is going to start. McManus added, Theyre going to look at that military ser vice record, and theyre going to try to figure out, based on looking at that DD-214, heres where were starting is that service creditable? What the agency is looking for, McManus said, is if the service is active and if its honor able, as well as the begin ning and ending dates of service. If the employee has an honorable discharge thats a good place to start, she said. Thats looking good -theyre probably going to get credit for this service. But if the discharge on that DD-214 has any of these other things writ ten there dishonorable discharge, clemency dis charge, neutral uncharac terized discharge, officer dismissal -it starts rais ing questions and theyre probably not going to be creditable, McManus said. McManus ensured the audience was clear that this portion of the process is legally mandated. I think its important to note this is not a policy decision on the part of the retirement service; this is the law, she stated. The law says that in order to get credit for service, it has to be honorable. The person in those situations has to go back to the military and ask for a different discharge, McManus said. They have to get that honorable discharge on the DD-214 in order for us to give them credit for that ser vice. The other important aspect of the DD-214, she said, is determining how the service is character ized on the DD-214 since there are two types == Title 10, federal service, and Title 32, working for the state. So when you pick up a DD-214 and it says Title 10, youre probably going to get credit for that ser vice, McManus said. Youre going to check all these boxes, but thats really a good indicator. When its Title 32, now you have to stop and take a look at the service, she said. Title 32 service is only creditable if its per formed under [Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act] and it interrupts someones federal career. If it doesnt do that, its not creditable. McManus also explained how much a military deposit would cost an employee based on what system they are operating in. We have to get their total earnings from the military, she said. If theyre under CSRS, the deposit amount is seven percent, and if theyre FERS, their deposit amount is three percent. So thats what were bas ing the deposit on. McManus also noted Congress adjusts these rates from time to time, as they did from 1999 to 2001, and as a result, those individuals will be charged a higher amount. It is also really impor tant, she said, knowing who is eligible to make a deposit. The person has to be under deductions, McManus said. They have to be under CSRS or FERS, or CSRS offset. Can a retiree make a military deposit? she continued. No, because theyre not under deduc tions right? Military deposits must be paid to the agency. Its structured way in the law; its been that way since 1956. Its still that way today. McManus also stressed that as an employee, everyone must work through their personnel offices to pay their military deposits. You cannot go through OPM, she said. We do not accept deposit pay ments; we do not calcu late the payments. Thats why your first step is to always go to your agency, and your agency will be doing everything. This includes survivors of a deceased employee, said McManus, noting they will still have to make the military deposit in the same manner that the employee would. The survivor can go ahead and make a mili tary deposit as long as their entitled to a survivor annuity, she said. McManus also explained who should make a military deposit based on their age and date they were hired. If you are under CSRS and you were hired before [Oct. 1, 1982], then you can [elect to] not make your military deposit if you retire before the age of 62 and use that service in the computation of your CSRS annuity, she said. However, if at the age of 62, youre eligible for social security, we will remove the military deposit from your CSRS calculation, McManus said, and you will not have an opportunity at that point to pay your military deposit, because youre an annuitant now. So this is a decision that has to be made before the person separates, she said, noting if an employ ee was hired after Oct. 1, 1982, even under FERS, they dont have an option. You either pay it and get credit, or dont pay it and dont get credit, she said. DOD Seeks To Modernize Mail Delivery Of Election Materials To Military A multiagency effort is underway to modern ize the mail delivery sys tem to improve delivery of election materials to military and overseas vot ers, the director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program said Jan. 29. Matt Boehmer testi fied before the Senate Rules and Administration Committee on how the Defense Department is improving ballot accessi bility. The Military Postal Service Agency is serv ing as the lead agency in an effort with the Department of State and the United States Postal Service to lead an effort to modernize military mail delivery, he said. Boehmer said the depart ment recognized the time required to redirect mail once it has arrived over seas hinders the ability to cast an absentee ballot. The system will redi rect election material to military and diplomatic addresses similar to how the civilian change-ofaddress system works, he said, noting it should be available in October. Boehmer noted Congress and the judicial system repeatedly have affirmed that vot ing is a citizens most fundamental right. The Federal Voting Assistance Program is committed to two voting assistance tenets: promoting the awareness of the right to vote, and eliminating bar rier for those who choose to exercise that right, he said. Last year, FVAP and the Defense Department exemplified this com mitment by advancing three major initiatives, Boehmer said: creating a robust information por tal, implementing greater voter assistance capabili ties and starting work on increasing mail delivery efficiency. FVAP recently opti mized its website, the director said, by re-orga nizing content to enhance the user experience and implementing a section of the portal to track per formance metrics for vot ing assistance officers. Updated online training will be released in the early spring, he added. To improve voting assistance capabilities, Boehmer said, FVAP cre ated a suite of materials in 2013 to provide absentee voters with specific infor mation. Boehmer also discussed a bill before Congress to amend the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act to improve ballot accessibil ity, among other purpos es, and said the Defense Department supports the bills initiatives. However, wed like to work with the committee to clarify some of the technical require ments to make sure that we are success in meeting the intent of the bill, he added. FVAP is already work ing to address some of the initiatives listed in the bill, Boehmer said. We cur rently link voters to state systems where theyre available, he noted. Officials are working with an internal Defense Department system to prompt service members updating their address to complete a new fed eral post card applica tion upon every address update. Officials also are capable and willing to create annual training by the 2016 general election for our active duty mili tary members, he said. It would lead them to the FVAP website to complete a new federal post card application or to decline assistance. Boehmer said language in the bill that requires DOD to send an electron ic transmission of a com pleted FPCA to the appro priate state and election officials is a concern. The way the bill is written, he explained, it appears to focus entirely on an elec tronic process that would prove costly and could be incompatible with elec tion rules in the 55 U.S. states and territories. Removing this requirement would remedy the departments con cern with this section, Boehmer said, and rec ognize the role of states to field their own systems and offer electronic voter registration. Boehmer expressed his gratitude to the commit tee for its desire to help in improving the voting process. Hurricane Katrina relief efforts while completing two USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group deployments. His shore assignments included tours to the Director Assessments Division (N81) on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Resources, Requirements, and Assessment) and to NORAD and US Northern Command Interagency Liaison Office in Washington D.C. Boyles reported to Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in February 2011 as Deputy Commodore. He became the Wings 16th Commodore in August 2012. Boyles holds a Masters Degree in Operations Research from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and a Masters Degree in National Security Strategy from the National War College, Fort McNair, Washington D.C. Conley is a native of Lexington, Okla., and graduate of Oklahoma State University. He received his commis sion in September 1988 through the Aviation Officer Candidate School Program and was desig nated a Naval Aviator in October 1989. Upon completion of SH-2F fleet replacement pilot training with the HSL-31 Arch Angels, he reported to the HSL33 Sea Snakes, NAS North Island, CA, where he served from August 1990 until January 1994. He deployed with USS Copeland (FFG 25) in the Western Pacific and USS Reid (FFG 30) in the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf. He also deployed as Detachment Officer in Charge aboard USS Lewis B. Puller (FFG 23) in the Eastern Pacific. He served as the squadron ASW Officer, Quality Assurance Officer, and NATOPS Officer, completing his first operational tour with more than 1,000 flight hours in the SH-2F. Following a short assign ment at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Light Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Conley transitioned to fly the SH-60B. He subsequent ly served as an SH-60B instructor pilot with the HSL-41 Seahawks from April 1995 until October 1997 serving as Schedules Officer, Pilot Training Officer, and CNAP SH-60B NATOPS Evaluator. Conley reported for duty aboard USS Essex (LHD 2) in November 1997 where he served as the Flight Deck Officer and Assistant Air Officer. In April 2000, he joined the HSL 45 Wolfpack where he served as the squadrons Operations Officer and Detachment Three Officer in Charge aboard USS Oldendorf (DD 972), con ducting counter-narcotic operations in the Eastern Pacific. Conley was then assigned to the Joint C4ISR Battle Center at U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) in Norfolk, Virginia, where he was responsible for assess ments of advanced C4ISR technologies. He also graduated from the Joint Forces Staff College while assigned to USJFCOM. In April 2005, Conley reported as the Executive Officer of the HSL-49 Scorpions and assumed duties as Commanding Officer from June 2006 to August 2007. Following his command tour, he served as Air Operations Officer for Commander, Task Force 70 / Carrier Strike Group FIVE in Yokosuka, Japan. Conley completed a second command tour from April 2010 until May 2012 with the HSM40 Airwolves, the Navys East Coast MH-60R and single site SH-60B Fleet Replacement Squadron. He assumed the duties as Deputy Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in August 2012.From Page 1CHSMWL Did you know? No family ever pays St. Jude for anything. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Call 800-822-6344 or visit stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.

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Academy Future SWOs Choose First ShipsThe future surface war fare officers (SWO) of the Naval Academys Class of 2014 chose their first ships during a ceremony Jan. 30 in Mahan Hall. Ship selection is one of the most significant events for the future SWOs of the senior class. Of the 243 Midshipmen assigned to surface war fare, 184 will fill conven tional surface billets, 32 will enter the nuclear surface community, and 27 are option SWOs. These mids will serve as conventional SWOs until they achieve their warfare qualifications. They then have the option to go into specialized fields such as meteorology and ocean ography, information dominance and engineer ing duty. The Midshipmen chose from 252 avail able billets, including 110 at Atlantic ports, 135 at Pacific ports and six in Bahrain. Pacific ports included Bremerton, Wash.; San Diego; Sasebo or Yokosuka, Japan; and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Atlantic ports include Norfolk, Va., and Mayport, Fla. Senior leaders from around the fleet attend the ceremony, joining ship commanding offi cers, executive officers and junior officers in welcoming the Navys future ensigns into the surface warfare community. Its a very important night to the midshipmen, said Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces. They spend their whole academic career getting ready to do this, and the night when they pick their ship where theyre going to spend the next two to three years is a big deal. We should make the night as special as we can. Ship selection is espe cially exciting for these Midshipmen because, unlike other service com munities that require extensive in-school train ing before their officers reach the Fleet, surface warfare officers report to their ships directly after graduation. In very short order, they will be standing before a division at quar ters and they will be asked to lead those people, pos sibly into dangerous situations, said Copeman. They have to very quickly make sure they under stand all the lessons that were taught here at the Naval Academy. Midshipman 1st Class Brynn Umbach, who selected guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) out of San Diego, said she was attracted to that platform because of the small crew size, variety of missions, and newer technology on board. This past summer I trained on board USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) as she sailed from South Korea to Hong Kong, said Umbach, of The Woodlands, Texas. I had an absolutely incredible experience which led me to select a destroyer. Choosing a homeport was harder. In addition to the warm climate and being near her extend ed family in California, Umbach felt that a West Coast port offered more action. The Navys strategic focus appears to be con centrating more in the Pacific, she said. Midshipman 1st Class Michael Madrid, of Vancouver, Wash., chose guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) homeported in Yokosuka, Japan, for the same rea son. I want to be forward deployed and get a lot of experience up front, and I think theres going to be a lot of action out in the Pacific, said Madrid. If you look at the news any day, theres definitely a lot going on in that region. The U.S. has shifted its attention to the AsiaPacific region in recent months to rebalance the power that was largely focused in the Middle East for more than a decade and ensure that the U.S. can respond to operational requirements in that area. Midshipmen choose their ships according to their order of merit, which takes into account their academic performance, physical fitness and pro fessionalism throughout their four years at the Naval Academy.USS Donald Cook Departs Norfolk For New Permanent Duty Station In Rota, Spain USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) departed her homeport of Norfolk, Va. Jan. 31 on her way to Rota, Spain, as the first of four Arleigh Burke-class guid ed-missile destroyers to be stationed there. The U.S. has a his torically strong partner ship with Spain, and the strength of that relation ship is exemplified today as the first of four U.S. Navy destroyers departs for Rota, Spain, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. Permanently for ward deploying four ships in Rota will enable us to be in the right place, not just at the right time, but all the time. In 2012, Mabus announced the BMDcapable destroyers Donald Cook, USS Ross (DDG 71), and USS Porter (DDG 78) from Norfolk, Va., and USS Carney (DDG 64) from Mayport, Fla. will be stationed in Rota. Donald Cook will arrive in mid-February. The Naval Station Rota community is excit ed about the arrival of the Sailors and families of USS Donald Cook. Everyone is working together to ensure they have a smooth transi tion as well as make them feel at home in Rota, said Capt. Greg Pekari, NAVSTA Rota command ing officer. Were look ing forward to having them enjoy the wonderful Spanish culture as well as the fantastic relationships weve enjoyed with our Spanish hosts for more than 60 years. These multi-mission ships will perform a myr iad of tasks, including NATO missile defense, the full spectrum of maritime security operations, bilateral and multi-lateral training exercises, and NATO operations and deployments. Ross will join Donald Cook in Rota later this year, and Carney and Porter will arrive in 2015. The Donald Cook team is excited and honored to be the first destroyer stationed in Rota, Spain, said Cmdr. Scott A. Jones, com manding officer, Donald Cook. We greatly appre ciate all the hard work from Naval Station Rota, Destroyer Squadron 60, Commander Naval Surface Force Atlantic, and Spain; they have all worked tremendously hard to ensure the ship, Sailors, and our families are well supported as we transition into the Rota community. -Photo by MCSN Shelby TuckerSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) handle line in preparation for departure. Donald Cook is underway enroute to Rota, Spain, as the first of four Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers to be sta tioned in Rota, Spain. EOQ Luncheon Feb. 11Please come out and support the nominees at the Naval Station Mayport Employee of the Quarter (1st quarter) and Supervisor of the Year 2013 luncheon/presen tation at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 11:30 a.m. Pay $8 at the door. RVSP to Sandra Barrett by Feb. 7 to ensure you have a seat Nominees are as fol lows: Employee of the Quarter 1st Quarter Stevan Ames, Fire/ Emergency Services Robert Garis, Air Ops Rebecca Klink, MWR Jacob Neith, PWD/ NAVFAC Charles Smith, Security Supervisor of the Year 2013 Edward Namyslowski, Fire & Emergency Services Thomas Douget, Air Ops John Aimone, MWR Emerita Lewis, NEX Bob Meury, SJA A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13

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14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 No Dough Dinner Mayport USO will host a No Dough Dinner on Feb. 10 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve spa ghetti, garlic bread, salad, and dessert. There will also be a No Dough Dinner on Feb. 24 from 5-7 p.m. Meatloaf is on the menu for that day. Fleet Readiness Group USS Halyburton FRG will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Feb. 7. USS Farragut FRG will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on Feb. 11. USS New York FRG will meet from 5-9 p.m. on Feb. 27. FRA #91 Daddy Daughter Dance Join FRA #91 at the Daddy Daughter dance on Feb. 15 from 6-8 p.m. Enjoy dinner, dancing, and daddy/daughter time. Tickets are $10 for each daddy/daughter pair and $5 for each additional daughter. Proceeds bene fit the Greater Jacksonville USO. Please contact FRA #91 for more information or to purchase tickets at 904-264-2833. Harlem Globetrotters Enjoy a military dis count on tickets to see the Harlem Globetrotters on Friday, Feb. 28 at 7:00PM at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annual Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxusochilicookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. Feb. 7-8 SPRING RUMMAGE SALE The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your spe cial treasure! For more information, please con tact the church office at 904-249-5370. Saturday, Feb. 8 Davidson Realty, Inc., has announced the Davidson Cares 5K and Fun Run through World Golf Village. Registration is open now at www. DavidsonCares.com or www.UltimateRacingInc. com. Runners, walkers, strollers and dogs are all welcome! There will be fun kids activities like giant hamster balls, laser tag, a bouncy house, face painting, temporary tat toos, a mile long kids fun run and more. The event sponsor, Mile Marker Brewing, will have deli cious brews on tap, and the S.O.S. Diner food truck will be on site. The race starts at 11 a.m. Growing and Eating Seasonally: 9 a.m.1 p.m. at the Duval County Extension Office. Grow Warm-Season Vegetables, Compost, and Food Sampling using seasonal product. Cost $10, checks should be made payable to DCOHAC, send to 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254. Pre-registration and prepayment required. Call Jeannie at 255-7450 to pre-register. Red knots migrate from the southern tip of South America to the arc tic every year. Join a park ranger at 2 pm to learn about these and other shorebirds that rely on the beaches of Little Talbot Island. The program will take place at the multiuse trail pavilion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. Tuesday, Feb. 11 The Jacksonville Public Library is partnering with local organizations to host a free Community Resource and Career Fair featuring 17 compa nies looking for potential employees and 10 agen cies with resources avail able to help job seekers. In addition, free work shops covering Dressing for Success and Interviewing Techniques that Work will be offered. The workshops will be held from 9 a.m.-Noon at the Main Library, Conference Center, 303 Laura St. N. Friday, Feb. 14 The Ladies Auxillary FRA #290 will hold a steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. A glass of wine and a box of choco lates will be served with the mea. Donation is $12. Open to the public. Take out orders welcome. 2496855 Saturday, Feb. 15 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 10 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and photog raphy supplies, RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARWorkshops, Classes Offered To Sailors, FamiliesThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 6, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 8, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Training Bldg. 1, Room 702 Feb. 10-14, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 10, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 19, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Bldg. 1, Room 1124 Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together.

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Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet hosted the 12th annual U.S. Military Group Navy Section Chief Synchronization Conference Jan. 27-30. Navy section chiefs are U.S. Navy represen tatives who worked with the Military Group at U.S. embassies world wide to coordinate a variety of maritime pro grams within their host country. This confer ence involved Navy sec tion chiefs from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility, which encompasses the Caribbean, Central and South America. The work of our Navy section chiefs and their supporting staffs is vital to the suc cess of our Cooperative Maritime Strategy and SOUTHCOM engage ment goals. They are vital to the success of Fourth Fleet across our lines of operation from Maritime Security Operations to Security Cooperation Activities. This confer ence allows both the Navy section chiefs and our Fourth Fleet staffs to Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Security Scans May Mean Delays At GateNaval Station Mayport is adding an additional Security measure to its gates and it may be an initial delay to getting on the base. The Navy Access Control Management System (NACMS) Handheld Scanners have been re-issued to Naval Station Mayport for use at the stations Entry Control Points (ECPs), such as the main gate at Mayport Road and Gate 5, off of SRA1A. The scanners have the added capability to scan, read and authenticate DoD Common Access Cards (CAC), DoD Retired Military IDs, and DoD Dependents IDs, along with RAPIDGate creden tials. Initial scanning of an ID Card or RAPIDGate cre dential may take 15-20 seconds to complete, however, once an ID Card or RAPIDGate credential is scanned, all scans afterwards should only take around 5 seconds to complete. To reduce traffic backups and delays, personnel are asked to plan an extra 15-20 minutes in their morning commute dur ing the next 3 to 4 weeks while the scanners work to effectively scan each and every credential and ID card. -Photo by Paige GnannCapt. Clayton Conley, the incoming Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, salutes Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic after relieving Capt. Dan Boyles, middle, at a change of command ceremony on Jan. 31 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center.Capt. Clayton Clay Conley relieved Capt. Daniel Boyles as Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, on Jan. 31 during a change of command ceremo ny at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Guest speaker for the event was Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. Boyles, a native of Mount Prospect, Ill., was commissioned through the University of Illinois NROTC program in 1986, where he earned a Bachelors of Science Degree in Mathematics. He was designated a Naval Aviator in June 1988. Boyles flew the SH-2F Seasprite during his initial sea assignment in HSL-35 and made two deployments to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean in USS Sides (FFG 14) and USS Reasoner (FF 1063). Captain Boyles then transferred to HSL-41 in February 1992, where he transitioned to SH-60B Seahawk and served as an Instructor Pilot. In September 1994, Boyles reported to USS Juneau (LPD 10), locat ed at Naval Station San Diego, where he served as Air Boss and deployed to the Central Pacific and Persian Gulf. During this tour Captain Boyles earned his Officer of the Deck (Underway) and Surface Warfare Officer Qualifications. In June 1999, Boyles returned to San Diego, California, and report ed to HSL-47 where he served as Safety Officer, Operations Officer and completed a Caribbean Counter Narcotics deployment as Officerin-Charge of Detachment Six in USS Doyle (FFG 39). In September 2004, he returned to HSL-47 as Executive Officer and on December 8, 2006 he took command of the Saberhawks. During this tour the Saberhawks won the coveted Secretary of Defense Maintenance Award, the Lockheed Martin Superior HSL Maintenance Award and the Capt. Arnold J. Isbell award for tactical excellence. In addition, the Saberhawks partici pated in Tsunami and Conley Relieves Boyles As CHSMWL Commodore Get Alerts In Emergency Situations A small purple globe icon located at the bottom of your computer screen is responsible for warning personnel at Naval Station Mayport of impending danger during an emer gency. Commander, Navy Installations Command in 2008 deployed The Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system to allow local commanders to pass critical informa tion to affected person nel, military, civilians and their families. According to Mayport Installation Emergency Management Officer Steven Millican, early notification is cru cial to protect personnel and their families. Anytime you can have an early notification message to protect yourself and your family is criti cal, he said. We have been working to educate personnel about the sys tem and maintain that education on how impor tant this is for them. The WAAN system is a four-prong approach. Computer Desktop Notification System (CDNS), Automated Telephone Notification System (ATNS), Giant Voice (GV) and Interior Voice (IV). The primary system at Mayport is the AtHoc notification sys tem. Every shore based military and civilian with Common access Card (CAC), assigned to Mayport address NMCI computer and valid in the Global Address Locator (GAL) has an AtHoc account automatically generated. The AtHoc system is the program that generates CDNS alerts. You can receive alerts via work/personal email, work/personal telephone and text. Sailors assigned to afloat units receive alerts via registration with the ship email and distribution lists by radio. When an alert is generated from the installation, the ship receives the alert and for wards the message via internal email and tele phone text. A different system is used when the ship or unit is deployed, he added. When the ship is away from port, the ship does not receive AtHoc alerts; thus the Sailors are not notified and can not notify their fami lies. Millican said that the ombudsman contact data has been included into the AtHoc server so they can receive the alert issued by the installation. According to Millican, it is essential that all person nel whether on ship or shore maintain updated information in your con tact information account to make the system run properly. The ombudsman serve a critical role to make this system work for deployed personnel, he said. All personnel need to make sure and have their family information updated [with their command ombudsman] so they can be contacted in case of an emergency. Instructions for add ing and updating contact information to the WAAN using the AtHoc self ser vice client are:See Alerts, Page 6 -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs speaks at the beginning of 12th annual U.S. Military Group Navy Section Chief Synchronization Conference Jan. 27-30 held at Naval station Mayport.COMUSNAVSO/US4F Hosts 2014 Latin America Navy Section Chief ConferenceSee CHSMWL, Page 12 See NAVSEC, Page 6

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Pet owners believe that dogs make us better people. Turns out they can also make us better readers! The Reading Education Assistance Dogs, or R.E.A.D. literacy program, which has service dogs come into schools to help kids with reading, is an unconven tional but effective way to help children improve their reading skills. The R.E.A.D. Intermountain Therapy Animals Program was launched in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1999. Students selected for the READ program dont usually like to read in front of other children. Most are stuck and cant move forward in their reading. There is an anxiety factor that the reading dog helps to break. The dog in the photo relaxes on a felt blan ket in a room off of the media center at Finegan Elementary School. She listens to a student sound out a short chapter book. The dog is Lindy a highly-trained Golden Retriever therapy dog. The student is Thomas Le the son of Lane Cook, a member of the Coast Guard attached to the USCG Hilton. Lindys handler, Joan Streightiff, introduced R.E.A.D. to Finegan Elementary School last year. She visited once a week. This year Finegan has expanded the pro gram to two days a week. Six 2nd graders and six 4th graders meet with Lindy for eight weeks. Out of the 18 children who have been involved in the R.E.A.D. program, 14 are military depen dents. The school hopes to facilitate two more groups by the end of this school year. R.E.A.D. (pronounced read) gives elementaryaged students the oppor tunity to practice their literary and communica tion skills by reading to a captive canine audi ence. The program also motivates young students to pursue reading and encourages confidence when reading aloud. On their first visit with Lindy, each stu dent receives a stuffed Golden Retriever to read to at home. While no official research has been done on reading to a stuffed animal pet, class room teachers whose students have been selected for the program have evidence of students gain ing confidence in read ing aloud and effectively using reading strategies. Each week the students look forward to their vis its with their four-legged friends. During reading time, the dog relaxes on a blanket near its handler, while the student reads aloud from an age-level, appropriate book. All of the R.E.A.D. students leave each session with a sticker. In addition to the sticker, the students in the R.E.A.D. program leave with improved reading skills, learned in a unique R.E.A.D.ing Is For The DogsJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer Be Prepared For Lifes Unexpected ChallengesThis past week we wit nessed some really crazy weather for the south eastern United States and while we were spared here in Jacksonville from the worst of it, Pensacola and other places north of us like Atlanta struggled to deal with the onslaught of an unusually severe winter storm that includ ed 3 to 6 inches of snow and shut down major sections of the interstate. I have some friends in the Atlanta area and the reports were not good. Many people were stuck in their cars on the interstate for 24 hours or more as the entire city came to a virtual halt when 7 million people hit the road all at once in the middle of the storm. It seems almost everyone was caught off guard. Apparently the weath er folks had predicted Atlanta would have much milder winter weather so folks were not prepared when the storm hit and the consequences were severe. I asked myself how in the world could this pos sibly have happened? It seemed fairly obvi ous to me that a major storm was coming and we should prepare for the worst, even here in Jacksonville. I am still a bit puzzled as to how so many people could be caught off guard. Of course, it could happen to any of us I suppose. Interestingly enough, the Bible is not silent on the subject of being pre pared. Of course, in the Middle East they are much more inclined to be hit by severe drought or wildfires then a massive blizzard. God raised up Joseph in the book of Genesis to save countless thou sands from a severe seven-year drought. He revealed to him through interpreting Pharaohs vision that there would be seven years of extraor dinary blessing followed by seven years of intense drought and through his leadership they prepared accordingly. Of course, we not only suffer through unexpect ed storms in life but we also have all sorts of unexpected challenges to our marriages, to our families, and to our faith in God. In Psalm 1, King David writes that the one who meditates on the law of God will be like a tree planted by streams of water, whose leaf does not wither and who bears fruit in season. He says the Lord watches over the way of the righteous but the way of the wicked will perish. In other words, one way God helps us to be prepared for the challenges of life is by giving us his word to reflect upon so that when tragedy strikes we will have firm ground to stand upon. For in the end, the Lord is the one who can help us weather the storms of life. Jesus also makes some extraordinary claims in this regard in the Matthew 7:24-27. Are you prepared for those unexpected chal lenges in life? Dust off the good book from the shelf and see what God can do in your life. A great place to start might be Matthew 7.Chaplain Buster Williams CNSL Ministry Center Chairmans Corner: Trust Transcends Gender In the days follow ing September 11, 2001, women and men took to the seas, to the skies and to the sands in defense of our country. Its worth noting that women served in combat zones in Afghanistan and Iraq because they were need ed. They shared a com mon commitment to their nation with their male counterparts in squad rons, ships and squads. Today, and every other day, women and men, sons and daughters, mothers and fathers faithfully serve our nation at home and abroad. We celebrate their contributions. They make the United States military the domi nant military force on the planet. Victor Hugo once wrote, There is one thing stronger than all the armies in the world and that is an idea whose time has come. One year ago this month, we repealed the combat exclusion on women in the military. We formally recognized reality that women serve courageously in combat zones whenever or wherever their nation calls. By this act, we codified our commitment to offer everyone in uni form equal professional opportunities to serve the nation. We continue to work to make this a real ity throughout the force. Were reviewing stan dards, not to artificially lower them but to ensure we have them right. Were educating leaders. As our sacred responsibility, we are committed to improving the readiness of the force while also increas ing opportunities for our women in uniform. These two goals are complementary, not contradic tory. When in contact with the enemy, the individual soldier, sailor, airman or Marine doesnt consider whether their comrade in arms is a man or woman. They care about wheth er they can do their job. There is a simple expla nation for this: trust tran scends gender. The service of our women and men in uni form is worthy of recognition today and every day.-Photos submitted Benjamin Thomas, son of Joseph Thomas assigned to USS New York, sits with Joan Streightiff and Lindy who make up the Pawsitive Pets team at Finegan Elementary. Thomas Le reads to Lindy, a therapy dog working at Finegan Elementary School to help children learn to improve reading skills.and fun environment; the discovery that reading is FUN; the realization that school attendance is important (so as to not miss a day with Lindy); improved self-confi dence and self-esteem; a sense of pride in their accomplishments; and a willingness to get involved in other activi ties is developed. Pawsitive Pets is part of registered Pet Partner therapy teams. It cur rently has 19 teams in Duval with four in train ing. Joan and Lindy serve Finegan Elementary two days a week. Each child, selected for the program, spends 20 minutes each week, one-on-one with Lindy, for eight weeks. Reading to dogs helps calm young children and relieves the pressure of embarrassment when they make reading mis takes. A University of California study found that young children who read with a therapy dog improved their reading skills by 12 percent over the course of a 10-week program in comparison to children in the same pro gram who didnt read to dogs. To become a R.E.A.D. companion, pets are required to first train and then pass an evaluation in order to be registered with an animal-assisted therapy organization, like Pet Partner therapy teams. Then, both pets and handlers must suc cessfully pass specific trainings, workshops, and evaluations with R.E.A.D. to ensure they know the required rules and regu lations, as well as how to handle unfamiliar situa tions and environments. Its more than being good with people, the dog has to have solid obedience skills, and it has to really be aware of whats going on. Interested in becoming a R.E.A.D. tem volunteer of Pawsitive Pets, go to www.pawsitivepets.org or call (904) 992-4533. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions or concerns about an educational issue, she can be reached via email at judith. cromartie@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell].

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Chapel Teen Club Beyond Gets JammingClub Beyond is a new program at Naval Station Mayport. It is sponsored by the Chapel and is an authorized part of the Command Religious Program. Kevin Burgess is leading the program and he and his wife, Kelley, have 20 years of experience work ing with adolescent youth. As an approved resource for the Chapel commu nity, Burgess said they are excited to be serv ing military families. In addition to special events, Bible studies and weekly activities at the Chapel, middle school and high school students will have the opportunity to par ticipate in service proj ects both on base and in the community as well as camping trips and fun activities, such as going kayaking or to Adventure Landing. With the support of Chapel staff along with approved adult volun teers like Navy person nel, spouses and parents, the Club Beyond pro gram will provide mili tary kids with safe and fun activities, mentoring relationships and a pres sure free environment in which to explore their faith. Recently, Kevin and Kelley had the chance to take a group of kids to WinterJam, one of the first Club Beyond special events. What a night! Burgess said. Bands, speakers and artists comprise the WinterJam Concert Tour, which trav els to over 50 cities in 3 months. Kids screamed for American Idols Colton Dixon; rocked out with Thousand Foot Crutch; were turned up with rap & hip hop artist Lecrae; and challenged by a meaningful message to the teen-aged audience from the guest speaker Nick Hall. Only one of our kids had been to this event before, but the others had never been to an event with this many topname artists, he continued. During the closing act, the Newsboys entire drum set and drummer were lifted off the stage, turned vertical and spun around like a carnival ride. My wife and I had seen this type of special effect at previous concerts we have attended over the years, but these kids had never seen anything like it! Their faces said it all. They were in shock, in awe they LOVED IT! It is pretty early in our time here at Mayport to know what God might have in store for the Club Beyond program a NS Mayport, but I hope it may be something like what the old testa ment prophet Habakkuk wrote, For I am going to do something in your days that you would not believe, even if you were told. (Habakkuk Ch 1 vs 5), and so far this has been the case, Burgess said. My wife and I have the privilege of working with an amazing team at the NS Mayport Chapel and have already gotten to know a dozen or so middle and high school students, along with their families. After our very first meeting, one of the students went home and told her parents, I think this is really going to work! At our first Club (the name of the regu lar weekly meeting) our new adult volunteer said, I loved my youth group back home, but we never did anything like this! Also, I recently received a letter from a friend (a former Navy spouse) who was stationed in Jacksonville in the 1980s, he said. She shared that she often felt alone during that time, and felt threatened by the normal comparisons and jealousies concern ing rank and position that occur in the militar ; and she felt that her marriage was in competition with her husbands career. She said that her faith did not seem to be appreci ated or respected by those around her and that this experience impacted her children. She encour aged me that she felt military kids and families need something like Club Beyond and that they need an opportunity to, hear about Gods grace and all-encompassing love for them. That they are not alone. We have been wel comed and supported so far by the Navy personnel and officers at Mayport, school officials and cha pel families, Burgess added. We look forward to meeting new kids and offering Navy families fun activities, consistency of programs across mul tiple installations (Club Beyond is also at NAS Jacksonville), adult men tors who can care for kids in healthy ways, a com munity of positive peers, and opportunities to serve and gain leadership experience all in the context of a safe environment in which to explore ques tions of faith no matter what their background. We have an exciting year of trips, activities, clubs, Bible studies and service projects planned. My hope and prayer is that kids and their families will feel appreciated, encour aged, supported and will say, we have seen remarkable things(the Gospel of Luke Ch 9 vs 26) after participating in Club Beyond here at NS Mayport. -Photos submitted by Club Beyond ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS ducks.org 800-45DUCKS Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. Help us conserve another 13 Million acres. 13 MILLION ACRESAND COUNTING Pictured, teens from the Naval Station Mayport Club Beyond enjoy a night of inspiring music at the WinterJam Concert Tour during the clubs first outing. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 USS Halyburton Prepares For Martillo The oldest Oliver Hazard Perry-class frig ate USS Halyburton stopped at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a scheduled refueling stop Jan. 18 and to begin its mission in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Halyburton departed Naval Station Mayport just a few days before with a full crew, an embarked air detachment from the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HSM) 46 and an embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) to support Operation Martillo and join the fight again Counter Illicit Trafficking (CIT) opera tions in the region. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) is a multinational mis sion tasked with conducting those CIT operations. Belize, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States are participating in Martillo with additional contributions from Chile. We are very thrilled to work hand-andhand with the Sailors aboard Halyburton, said Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Fidel Castillo, a U.S. Coast Guard LEDET boarding officer aboard Halyburton. Our mission aboard USS Halyburton is vital. We are here to provide law enforce ment support, in order to enable the navys mari time security mission to counter drug tasking. Castillo went on to say enthusiastically that since this is Halyburtons last deployment, the LEDET is extraordinarily keen about getting a drug bust so that Halyburton ends her service life on a high note while supporting Operation Martillo and her nation as she has done for more than 30 years. The Coast Guardsmen have conducted con trolled drills with Halyburtons Visit, Board, Search and Seizure team (VBSS) to build cohesion and ensure compliance with the applicable rules of engagement and use of force. They have also worked with the aircrews of HSM 46 on aerial use of force. It was great to get to work with the Halyburton See Halyburton, Page 5 -Photos by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettQuartermaster 1st class Bruce Addison from Naples, Fla. plots the course of guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) during the ships deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Personnel Specialist Seaman Ruben Cruz from Orlando, Fla. makes a photocopy for a personnel record aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Above, Yeoman 2nd class Mark Mitchell (back) reviews the requirements for, uses of and proper format of an enlisted evaluation with Yeoman Seaman Justin Mileski (front) aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Left, Ship Serviceman 3rd class Keny Liningham cuts Boatswains Mate 2nd class Joshua Grays hair in the barbershop aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Maritime Enforcement Specialist 2nd Class Jeffrey Oceguera from Miami, Fla. assigned to the U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) aboard the guidedmissile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) works out in the ships gym. USCG LEDET is currently embarked aboard Halyburton assisting the crew during the ships deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Culinary Specialist Seaman Apprentice Montel Moore from San Diego, Calif. seasons fajita meat in preparation for chow aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40).

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 5 VBSS team and Law enforcement detachment all together in our operating area, said Lt j.g. Brian Stong, a pilot assigned to the Grandmasters of HSM 46 detachment 4. Its something we have been training for individually, for a while, but its great to bring it all together and see all the pieces work. We enjoy working together and perfecting our craft. Halyburton is the sec ond oldest commis sioned frigate in the U.S. Navy behind the esteemed sailing frigate USS Constitution. While Halyburton is scheduled for decommissioning after this deployment, she is ready for action. As we set out on USS Halyburtons final deployment, it is an honor to be the command mas ter chief that will write the final chapter of her career, said Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander. Over the last 30 years, she has served us well; taken our Sailors into harms way, protect ed our seas, trained our Sailors and returned them safely home to their loved ones. Our crew is trained and ready to fight from the engineers that main tain a 30-year-old propulsion plant, to our combat systems team that flaw lessly provides commu nications, navigation and coordination to our VBSS team, boat crew, crew serve weapons and bridge watch teams, which have all trained together and are 100 percent ready to carry out and complete the mission. Friedlander stated the crew will continue to maintain and care for their beloved ship, and send her ashore with full honors. His final state ment was a shout out to his Sailors, Thank you Shipmates, its a true honor to be serving with you. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet provide a sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions in support of U.S. Southern Command joint and combined full-spec trum military operations.From Page 4Halyburton Lt. j.g. Jeff Bland from Basking Ridge, N.J. changes the wire harness in the soda machine aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40). Seaman Apprentice Jose Soto and fellow Sailors aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) moor the ship pier side to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Seaman Apprentice Brandon Archibald heaves line off of the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG40) to line-handlers on Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Boatswains Mate Seaman Pedro Duran (back) and Seaman Brian Cuevas (front) set the anchor brake wheel aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) in preparation for a refueling stop at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) prepare to moor lines at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a refueling stop scheduled in Halyburtons deployment to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Boatswains Mates aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton (FFG 40) scrub the ships anchor chain during cleaning stations. Halyburton is currently deploying to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. Seaman Travis Jackson and Seaman Apprentice Brandon Gutierrez stand watch as aft lookouts onboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton during the transit south on deployment to the 4th Fleet area of responsibility.

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From Page 1Alerts From Page 1NAVSEC-Photo by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport breaks ground for the second phase of the Charlie Wharf improvement project Jan. 29. This project will provide a new bulkhead approximately 15 feet seaward of the existing Wharf Charlie C-2 at Naval Station Mayport. The project will enable more efficient servicing of ships and will extend the service life on the currently degraded wharf bulkhead. Pictured from left is NAVFAC Construction Manager Chanda Comegys, Chris Jones with CMS, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall and Mayport Public Works Officer, Cmdr. Phillip Lavallee. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Davidson talks to the crew of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) during an all-hands call. -Photo by MC1 Christopher B. StoltzVice Adm. Phil Davidson, commander of U.S. 6th Fleet, addresses the crew of the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50) during an all-hands call in Naples, Italy on Jan. 29. During the visit, Davidson also toured the ship and met with the ship's senior leadership. USS Simpson, Armed Forces of Malta Exchange Tactics Members of the Armed Forces of Malta joined with Sailors from guid ed-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) to share tactics and tech niques in a number of maritime mission areas, Jan. 24. Members from dif ferent sections of the Armed Forces of Malta made good use of this exchange, which featured damage control training evolutions, expedition ary medical care and boarding team. Those that participated felt that the exchange allowed for greater growth in those skill sets. Members of the Maltese Special Detachment Enhanced Boarding Team showcased their skills in maritime interdiction operations as they board ed Simpson. The board ing exercise highlighted the use of both forces tactics and equipment. I think that there is always some knowledge gained in partnering with other forces, said Senior Chief Allen Bylls, assigned to Simpsons Visit, Board, Search and Seizure team. The damage control scenarios featured pro cesses for detection of fire and other hazards while at sea. Simpsons Damage Control Assistant Lt.j.g. Marco Arroyo walked Maltese Sailors through the ships repair lockers to familiarize them with the tools used to counter fire, flooding and toxic gas. The training culmi nated in a crash and sal vage drill, which simulat ed the crew responding to a downed aircraft on the flight deck. I was very impressed with the how well the Maltese Sailors per formed, said Arroyo. Maltese medics were also given training in expeditionary medicine testing their capabilities to rapidly treat combat wounds in conflict sce narios or incidents out at sea. It was very interest ing to have a chance to compare critical life sav ing techniques, while indentifying the differ ences between Western and European medical practices, said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mathew Robichaux. The port visit to Malta on Simpsons deployment in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations, serves as an important event in pro moting and strengthen ing maritime partnerships with European nations.USS Elrod, HSL-60 Det 2 Arrive In Morocco Guided-missile frig ate USS Elrod (FFG 55) with embarked NS Mayport-based HSL-60 Detachment Two arrived in Morocco for a sched uled port visit, Feb. 2. During the visit, Elrod is scheduled to host a number of exchanges with Moroccan Royal Armed Forces, including ship tours and a reception for local and U.S. State Department officials. Im looking forward to speaking with some of my Moroccan peers, said Cmdr. Brad Stallings, commanding officer of Elrod. Well have oppor tunities to discuss mari time and theater security as well as gain personal friendships that could go a long way during future operations. The visit will also pro vide Elrod Sailors an opportunity to experience Moroccan culture first hand. Its not often that people get to say theyve had a chance to explore Morocco, said Seaman Kyle Stuart, an Elrod crew member. Theres so much culture and history here. I cant wait to see as much of it as I can for myself. Elrod and HSL-60 are currently on a scheduled deployment. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Above, Aviation Boatswains Mate Fuel Airman Kirk Ramos, right, fires a .50 caliber machine gun while Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Justin Blennis stands as safety aboard amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during a weapons qualification course. Right, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Justin Stone of Kingsport, Tenn. fires an M2HB .50-caliber machine gun aboard the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) during live fire exercises. -Photos by MC2 Cyrus Roson The amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) prepares to exit the Mayport Naval Base Basin to go underway. Applications Out For BBC Scholarships Balfour Beatty Communities Foundations is once again offering post-secondary academic scholarships to both high school seniors and undergraduate stu dents who reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military family housing. The application process is now open for scholarships that will be awarded for the 20142015 academic year. We are so thankful to be able to support the con tinuing education of our young residents through the Foundation scholarship program, said Chris Williams, president of the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation. I encourage all of our residents who are planning on or currently attending a post-secondary school to apply for a Foundation Scholarship in recognition of their hard work and achievements. On average, Foundation scholarships are awarded in amounts up to $2,500, however larger amounts may be awarded based on the number and caliber of submis sions. Applicants must be the child of an active-duty service member and reside in Balfour Beatty Communities military housing. Additional eligibility requirements and application details and submittal requirements can be found on the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation website (www.bbcommunitiesfoundation. org). Please note, all applications must be postmarked by April 15, 2014. Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation, a nonprofit organization, which was founded in 2007, is committed to honoring military personnel active, disabled and fallen and their families. One of the Foundations primary goals is to support continuing education and the development of future community leaders through an annual academic scholarship program and other initiatives.Forrestal Off To Scrapyard The decommissioned aircraft carrier Forrestal (AVT 59) was scheduled to begin its final voyage, Feb. 4, weather permitting, when it departs Philadelphia on its way to a ship disman tling and recycling facility in Brownsville, Texas. The ship will be towed down the Delaware River, along the eastern seaboard, and across the Gulf of Mexico to arrive at the All Star Metals facility. The best opportunity for viewing the departure will be from publicly accessible areas along the Delaware River. The Navy awarded a ship dismantling contract to All Star Metals of Brownsville on Oct. 22, 2013, and All Star Metals subcontracted with Foss Marine Towing to tow the ship to its final destination. The first of the super carriers, Forrestal was launched Dec. 11, 1954, by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., and commissioned Sept. 29, 1955. Forrestal was home ported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., from 1977 until 1991, when it transi tioned to Philadelphia for decommissioning. Forrestal was decom missioned Sept. 11, 1993, after more than 38 years of service. On June 16, 1999, the Navy announced the ship would be available for donation to an eligible organization for use as a museum or memorial. However, no viable applications were received and the vessel was removed from donation hold in December 2003 and redes ignated for disposal. In October, the Navy competitively awarded a contract to All Star Metals for the towing, dismantling and recycling of conventionally powered aircraft carriers. Under the terms of the contract, the company will be paid $0.01 for disman tling and recycling ex-USS Forrestal, which is the low est price the Navy could possibly have paid the contractor for the work. The Navy continues to own the ship during the dismantling process until the ship has been fully dismantled. The contrac tor takes ownership of the scrap metal as it is pro duced and sells the scrap to offset its costs of operations. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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FAuto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double payouts on all hard cards, free desserts, extra $1000 Sweetheart Game, plus, when you bring your sig nificant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Feb. 7: Castaways Olympics Opening Ceremony. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Come show your support to your favorite ath letes and country. While youre there, watch the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Winter Games and sign up for the events YOU want to play during our very own Castaways Olympics. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 8: Cosmic Ice Skating. Van departs 1 p.m. Cost $5. Sign up deadline Feb. 6 Feb. 10: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Feb. 11: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 10. Feb. 15: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Sign up by Feb. 14, trans portation only. Feb. 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by Feb. 14. Feb. 17: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or just have some fun. Feb. 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all others; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Feb. 24. Feb. 28: Dinner & a Movie in San Marco. Van departs 5:30 p.m. Transportation Only. Feb. 14: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians chil dren ages 7-14 (soc cer) and 4-12 (baseball). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Registration deadline is Mar. 17. For more infor mation, please call (904) 270-5018 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy. mil. Feb. 21: Turn It Up @ the Teen Center. 7-10 p.m. at the Teen Center. Music, movies, food, drinks, a fire pit and more Feb. 28: Freedom FridayPajama Jam and Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Intramural Sports Feb. 7: Womens Volleyball Begins. Season Ends Apr. 4. 270-5451 Feb. 10-13: Pre-Season Soccer Tournament. Sign up by Feb. 4. 270-5451 Feb. 11: Superbowl 5K Run/3K Walk 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Soccer Begins. Season Ends April 17. 270-5451 Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes New Fitness Schedule Drop In Childcare Option At CDC, YACNeed a couple of hours to go grocery shop ping? Or youre regular childcare sitter called in sick and you have to get to work? Naval Station Mayports Child Development and Youth Activities Centers can help with their hourly care program. The program is avail able at all three cen ters, said CDC manager Colleen Sheridan. However, she warned, guardians must have their children registered with the centers before they can use the service. Sheridan said registra tion is as easy as filling out a registration card and a child profile with his or her likes and dislikes, providing the center with shot records for the child. It takes about 24 hours to update the system with the information. She also said she rec ommends guardians reg istering their children even if they dont think theyll use the service. You just never know when there may be an emergency, she said. Available to active duty and their dependents, DoD civilians and con tractors, it is also open if space is available to retirees. Cost is $4 per hour and guardians can make reservations up to 30 days in advance. Sheridan warned that guardians can not use the service to supplement working part time. There is a care limit of 25 hours per week at the CDC and 10 hours per week at YAC. Hourly care spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, call 2477740. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Commissaries offer sweet savings in February Whether its nutritious foods for better health, candy treats for that Valentines Day sweetheart or all foods in between, commissary patrons will be able to find what they want with plenty of promotional savings in February. Between Valentines Day and February being Heart Health Month, there are lots of options for our patrons to save money at their commissary, said Randy Chandler, the Defense Commissary Agencys director of sales. Throughout February, DeCAs indus try partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. For more, go to http://www.commissaries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_03_14.cfm Exclusive Savings offers link to commissary spe cials Commissary customers who want to check out more opportunities to find exclusive specials, promo tions and sales are just one website link away. The Defense Commissary Agency recently added more top name-brand websites to its Exclusive Savings link on the DeCA homepage, http://www.commissaries. com. When shoppers visit the commissarys homepage and look underneath the large rotating banner, they will find smaller, square banners, one of them being Exclusive Savings. Simply click on that banner and the landing page appears, showing all of DeCAs industry partners who are participating in this exclusive savings Web program. The individual websites are exclusively for commissary shoppers, offering downloadable coupons, recipes, promotional giveaways and contests. Applications for 2014 Scholarships for Military Children now available Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program became available Dec. 3 at com missaries worldwide or on the Internet at http://www. militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28. Packages must be hand-delivered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. For more infor mation, students or sponsors should call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at mili taryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com. -Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Jackie Rodriguez applies make up to Skala Pikes as part of the Mayport Navy Exchange Spa Day on Jan. 31. Below, Barbara Leeds gives a complimentary facial as part of the the event. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Feds Outline Military Deposits Process The U.S. Office of Personnel Management conducted a webcast today to explain the pro cess of applying military service time toward civil service retirement. In order for the [mili tary] service to be cred itable, you have to make a deposit, said OPMs Karen McManus The deposit has to be made on service that was per formed after 1956. Before 1956, they can just get credit for it. McManussaid key to the process is the DD-214 form, a military service record document, which is used to determine sta tus and eligibility. Youve got to go to that DD-214 and figure out beginning dates and ending dates, she said. Youre giving them total years, months and days. The other thing that youre using the DD-214 for is to determine the periods of military ser vice. There can be more than one DD-214, McManus said, and more than one period of service as long as there is a break of at least one day. If they have a break of one day, they have more than one military period, and theyll pay a deposit for each of their periods of military service, she noted. While examining the DD-214, McManus said the issue of whether military service is creditable is a necessary step in the process. The first thing before you even start talking about a deposit is you have to start talking about the creditability of the military service, she said. So what happens here is you have an employee and theyre either under the [Civilian Service Retirement System] or the [Federal Employees Retirement System], McManus said. And they have prior military service or they have military ser vice that interrupts their federal career. In either case, they would like to make a deposit so that that ser vice can also be credit able in their CSRS or FERS annuity, she added. McManus emphasized the employees agency will play a large role in assisting with the military deposit process. Theyre going to get a copy of their service record and bring it to their agency, she said, and this is where the agency is going to start. McManus added, Theyre going to look at that military ser vice record, and theyre going to try to figure out, based on looking at that DD-214, heres where were starting is that service creditable? What the agency is looking for, McManus said, is if the service is active and if its honor able, as well as the beginning and ending dates of service. If the employee has an honorable discharge thats a good place to start, she said. Thats looking good -theyre probably going to get credit for this service. But if the discharge on that DD-214 has any of these other things written there dishonorable discharge, clemency dis charge, neutral uncharacterized discharge, officer dismissal -it starts rais ing questions and theyre probably not going to be creditable, McManus said. McManus ensured the audience was clear that this portion of the process is legally mandated. I think its important to note this is not a policy decision on the part of the retirement service; this is the law, she stated. The law says that in order to get credit for service, it has to be honorable. The person in those situations has to go back to the military and ask for a different discharge, McManus said. They have to get that honorable discharge on the DD-214 in order for us to give them credit for that ser vice. The other important aspect of the DD-214, she said, is determining how the service is character ized on the DD-214 since there are two types == Title 10, federal service, and Title 32, working for the state. So when you pick up a DD-214 and it says Title 10, youre probably going to get credit for that ser vice, McManus said. Youre going to check all these boxes, but thats really a good indicator. When its Title 32, now you have to stop and take a look at the service, she said. Title 32 service is only creditable if its per formed under [Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act] and it interrupts someones federal career. If it doesnt do that, its not creditable. McManus also explained how much a military deposit would cost an employee based on what system they are operating in. We have to get their total earnings from the military, she said. If theyre under CSRS, the deposit amount is seven percent, and if theyre FERS, their deposit amount is three percent. So thats what were bas ing the deposit on. McManus also noted Congress adjusts these rates from time to time, as they did from 1999 to 2001, and as a result, those individuals will be charged a higher amount. It is also really impor tant, she said, knowing who is eligible to make a deposit. The person has to be under deductions, McManus said. They have to be under CSRS or FERS, or CSRS offset. Can a retiree make a military deposit? she continued. No, because theyre not under deduc tions right? Military deposits must be paid to the agency. Its structured way in the law; its been that way since 1956. Its still that way today. McManus also stressed that as an employee, everyone must work through their personnel offices to pay their military deposits. You cannot go through OPM, she said. We do not accept deposit pay ments; we do not calcu late the payments. Thats why your first step is to always go to your agency, and your agency will be doing everything. This includes survivors of a deceased employee, said McManus, noting they will still have to make the military deposit in the same manner that the employee would. The survivor can go ahead and make a mili tary deposit as long as their entitled to a survivor annuity, she said. McManus also explained who should make a military deposit based on their age and date they were hired. If you are under CSRS and you were hired before [Oct. 1, 1982], then you can [elect to] not make your military deposit if you retire before the age of 62 and use that service in the computation of your CSRS annuity, she said. However, if at the age of 62, youre eligible for social security, we will remove the military deposit from your CSRS calculation, McManus said, and you will not have an opportunity at that point to pay your military deposit, because youre an annuitant now. So this is a decision that has to be made before the person separates, she said, noting if an employee was hired after Oct. 1, 1982, even under FERS, they dont have an option. You either pay it and get credit, or dont pay it and dont get credit, she said. DOD Seeks To Modernize Mail Delivery Of Election Materials To Military A multiagency effort is underway to modern ize the mail delivery sys tem to improve delivery of election materials to military and overseas voters, the director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program said Jan. 29. Matt Boehmer testi fied before the Senate Rules and Administration Committee on how the Defense Department is improving ballot accessibility. The Military Postal Service Agency is serv ing as the lead agency in an effort with the Department of State and the United States Postal Service to lead an effort to modernize military mail delivery, he said. Boehmer said the department recognized the time required to redirect mail once it has arrived over seas hinders the ability to cast an absentee ballot. The system will redi rect election material to military and diplomatic addresses similar to how the civilian change-ofaddress system works, he said, noting it should be available in October. Boehmer noted Congress and the judicial system repeatedly have affirmed that vot ing is a citizens most fundamental right. The Federal Voting Assistance Program is committed to two voting assistance tenets: promoting the awareness of the right to vote, and eliminating barrier for those who choose to exercise that right, he said. Last year, FVAP and the Defense Department exemplified this com mitment by advancing three major initiatives, Boehmer said: creating a robust information por tal, implementing greater voter assistance capabili ties and starting work on increasing mail delivery efficiency. FVAP recently opti mized its website, the director said, by re-orga nizing content to enhance the user experience and implementing a section of the portal to track per formance metrics for vot ing assistance officers. Updated online training will be released in the early spring, he added. To improve voting assistance capabilities, Boehmer said, FVAP cre ated a suite of materials in 2013 to provide absentee voters with specific infor mation. Boehmer also discussed a bill before Congress to amend the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act to improve ballot accessibil ity, among other purpos es, and said the Defense Department supports the bills initiatives. However, wed like to work with the committee to clarify some of the technical require ments to make sure that we are success in meeting the intent of the bill, he added. FVAP is already work ing to address some of the initiatives listed in the bill, Boehmer said. We cur rently link voters to state systems where theyre available, he noted. Officials are working with an internal Defense Department system to prompt service members updating their address to complete a new fed eral post card applica tion upon every address update. Officials also are capable and willing to create annual training by the 2016 general election for our active duty mili tary members, he said. It would lead them to the FVAP website to complete a new federal post card application or to decline assistance. Boehmer said language in the bill that requires DOD to send an electronic transmission of a com pleted FPCA to the appropriate state and election officials is a concern. The way the bill is written, he explained, it appears to focus entirely on an elec tronic process that would prove costly and could be incompatible with elec tion rules in the 55 U.S. states and territories. Removing this requirement would remedy the departments con cern with this section, Boehmer said, and rec ognize the role of states to field their own systems and offer electronic voter registration. Boehmer expressed his gratitude to the commit tee for its desire to help in improving the voting process. Hurricane Katrina relief efforts while completing two USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group deployments. His shore assignments included tours to the Director Assessments Division (N81) on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Resources, Requirements, and Assessment) and to NORAD and US Northern Command Interagency Liaison Office in Washington D.C. Boyles reported to Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in February 2011 as Deputy Commodore. He became the Wings 16th Commodore in August 2012. Boyles holds a Masters Degree in Operations Research from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and a Masters Degree in National Security Strategy from the National War College, Fort McNair, Washington D.C. Conley is a native of Lexington, Okla., and graduate of Oklahoma State University. He received his commis sion in September 1988 through the Aviation Officer Candidate School Program and was desig nated a Naval Aviator in October 1989. Upon completion of SH-2F fleet replacement pilot training with the HSL-31 Arch Angels, he reported to the HSL33 Sea Snakes, NAS North Island, CA, where he served from August 1990 until January 1994. He deployed with USS Copeland (FFG 25) in the Western Pacific and USS Reid (FFG 30) in the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf. He also deployed as Detachment Officer in Charge aboard USS Lewis B. Puller (FFG 23) in the Eastern Pacific. He served as the squadron ASW Officer, Quality Assurance Officer, and NATOPS Officer, completing his first operational tour with more than 1,000 flight hours in the SH-2F. Following a short assignment at Helicopter AntiSubmarine Light Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Conley transitioned to fly the SH-60B. He subsequent ly served as an SH-60B instructor pilot with the HSL-41 Seahawks from April 1995 until October 1997 serving as Schedules Officer, Pilot Training Officer, and CNAP SH-60B NATOPS Evaluator. Conley reported for duty aboard USS Essex (LHD 2) in November 1997 where he served as the Flight Deck Officer and Assistant Air Officer. In April 2000, he joined the HSL 45 Wolfpack where he served as the squadrons Operations Officer and Detachment Three Officer in Charge aboard USS Oldendorf (DD 972), con ducting counter-narcotic operations in the Eastern Pacific. Conley was then assigned to the Joint C4ISR Battle Center at U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) in Norfolk, Virginia, where he was responsible for assess ments of advanced C4ISR technologies. He also graduated from the Joint Forces Staff College while assigned to USJFCOM. In April 2005, Conley reported as the Executive Officer of the HSL-49 Scorpions and assumed duties as Commanding Officer from June 2006 to August 2007. Following his command tour, he served as Air Operations Officer for Commander, Task Force 70 / Carrier Strike Group FIVE in Yokosuka, Japan. Conley completed a second command tour from April 2010 until May 2012 with the HSM40 Airwolves, the Navys East Coast MH-60R and single site SH-60B Fleet Replacement Squadron. He assumed the duties as Deputy Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in August 2012.From Page 1CHSMWL Did you know? No family ever pays St. Jude for anything. St. Jude freely shares the breakthroughs it makes, and every child saved at St. Jude means doctors and scientists worldwide can use that knowledge to save thousands more children. Call 800-822-6344 or visit stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service.

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Academy Future SWOs Choose First ShipsThe future surface war fare officers (SWO) of the Naval Academys Class of 2014 chose their first ships during a ceremony Jan. 30 in Mahan Hall. Ship selection is one of the most significant events for the future SWOs of the senior class. Of the 243 Midshipmen assigned to surface war fare, 184 will fill conven tional surface billets, 32 will enter the nuclear surface community, and 27 are option SWOs. These mids will serve as conventional SWOs until they achieve their warfare qualifications. They then have the option to go into specialized fields such as meteorology and ocean ography, information dominance and engineering duty. The Midshipmen chose from 252 avail able billets, including 110 at Atlantic ports, 135 at Pacific ports and six in Bahrain. Pacific ports included Bremerton, Wash.; San Diego; Sasebo or Yokosuka, Japan; and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Atlantic ports include Norfolk, Va., and Mayport, Fla. Senior leaders from around the fleet attend the ceremony, joining ship commanding offi cers, executive officers and junior officers in welcoming the Navys future ensigns into the surface warfare community. Its a very important night to the midshipmen, said Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces. They spend their whole academic career getting ready to do this, and the night when they pick their ship where theyre going to spend the next two to three years is a big deal. We should make the night as special as we can. Ship selection is espe cially exciting for these Midshipmen because, unlike other service com munities that require extensive in-school train ing before their officers reach the Fleet, surface warfare officers report to their ships directly after graduation. In very short order, they will be standing before a division at quar ters and they will be asked to lead those people, possibly into dangerous situations, said Copeman. They have to very quickly make sure they under stand all the lessons that were taught here at the Naval Academy. Midshipman 1st Class Brynn Umbach, who selected guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) out of San Diego, said she was attracted to that platform because of the small crew size, variety of missions, and newer technology on board. This past summer I trained on board USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) as she sailed from South Korea to Hong Kong, said Umbach, of The Woodlands, Texas. I had an absolutely incredible experience which led me to select a destroyer. Choosing a homeport was harder. In addition to the warm climate and being near her extend ed family in California, Umbach felt that a West Coast port offered more action. The Navys strategic focus appears to be con centrating more in the Pacific, she said. Midshipman 1st Class Michael Madrid, of Vancouver, Wash., chose guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) homeported in Yokosuka, Japan, for the same rea son. I want to be forward deployed and get a lot of experience up front, and I think theres going to be a lot of action out in the Pacific, said Madrid. If you look at the news any day, theres definitely a lot going on in that region. The U.S. has shifted its attention to the AsiaPacific region in recent months to rebalance the power that was largely focused in the Middle East for more than a decade and ensure that the U.S. can respond to operational requirements in that area. Midshipmen choose their ships according to their order of merit, which takes into account their academic performance, physical fitness and pro fessionalism throughout their four years at the Naval Academy.USS Donald Cook Departs Norfolk For New Permanent Duty Station In Rota, Spain USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) departed her homeport of Norfolk, Va. Jan. 31 on her way to Rota, Spain, as the first of four Arleigh Burke-class guid ed-missile destroyers to be stationed there. The U.S. has a his torically strong partner ship with Spain, and the strength of that relation ship is exemplified today as the first of four U.S. Navy destroyers departs for Rota, Spain, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. Permanently forward deploying four ships in Rota will enable us to be in the right place, not just at the right time, but all the time. In 2012, Mabus announced the BMDcapable destroyers Donald Cook, USS Ross (DDG 71), and USS Porter (DDG 78) from Norfolk, Va., and USS Carney (DDG 64) from Mayport, Fla. will be stationed in Rota. Donald Cook will arrive in mid-February. The Naval Station Rota community is excit ed about the arrival of the Sailors and families of USS Donald Cook. Everyone is working together to ensure they have a smooth transi tion as well as make them feel at home in Rota, said Capt. Greg Pekari, NAVSTA Rota command ing officer. Were look ing forward to having them enjoy the wonderful Spanish culture as well as the fantastic relationships weve enjoyed with our Spanish hosts for more than 60 years. These multi-mission ships will perform a myr iad of tasks, including NATO missile defense, the full spectrum of maritime security operations, bilateral and multi-lateral training exercises, and NATO operations and deployments. Ross will join Donald Cook in Rota later this year, and Carney and Porter will arrive in 2015. The Donald Cook team is excited and honored to be the first destroyer stationed in Rota, Spain, said Cmdr. Scott A. Jones, com manding officer, Donald Cook. We greatly appre ciate all the hard work from Naval Station Rota, Destroyer Squadron 60, Commander Naval Surface Force Atlantic, and Spain; they have all worked tremendously hard to ensure the ship, Sailors, and our families are well supported as we transition into the Rota community. -Photo by MCSN Shelby TuckerSailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) handle line in preparation for departure. Donald Cook is underway enroute to Rota, Spain, as the first of four Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers to be stationed in Rota, Spain. EOQ Luncheon Feb. 11Please come out and support the nominees at the Naval Station Mayport Employee of the Quarter (1st quarter) and Supervisor of the Year 2013 luncheon/presen tation at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 11:30 a.m. Pay $8 at the door. RVSP to Sandra Barrett by Feb. 7 to ensure you have a seat Nominees are as fol lows: Employee of the Quarter 1st Quarter Stevan Ames, Fire/ Emergency Services Robert Garis, Air Ops Rebecca Klink, MWR Jacob Neith, PWD/ NAVFAC Charles Smith, Security Supervisor of the Year 2013 Edward Namyslowski, Fire & Emergency Services Thomas Douget, Air Ops John Aimone, MWR Emerita Lewis, NEX Bob Meury, SJA A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13

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14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014 No Dough Dinner Mayport USO will host a No Dough Dinner on Feb. 10 from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate families. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve spa ghetti, garlic bread, salad, and dessert. There will also be a No Dough Dinner on Feb. 24 from 5-7 p.m. Meatloaf is on the menu for that day. Fleet Readiness Group USS Halyburton FRG will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Feb. 7. USS Farragut FRG will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on Feb. 11. USS New York FRG will meet from 5-9 p.m. on Feb. 27. FRA #91 Daddy Daughter Dance Join FRA #91 at the Daddy Daughter dance on Feb. 15 from 6-8 p.m. Enjoy dinner, dancing, and daddy/daughter time. Tickets are $10 for each daddy/daughter pair and $5 for each additional daughter. Proceeds benefit the Greater Jacksonville USO. Please contact FRA #91 for more information or to purchase tickets at 904-264-2833. Harlem Globetrotters Enjoy a military dis count on tickets to see the Harlem Globetrotters on Friday, Feb. 28 at 7:00PM at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Calling All Chili Cooks Join us for the 3rd annual Jax USO Chili Cook Off on March 15 from noon-5 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Association on Collins Road. Visit jaxusochilicookoff.com for more information on rules and sign ups. USO Memorial Golf Tournament The annual USO Golf Tournament will be held at NAS JAX Golf Club on Friday, March 21, 2014 with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Funds raised go directly to support the troops and their families. Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. Feb. 7-8 SPRING RUMMAGE SALE The United Methodist Women will be hosting their annual Spring Rummage Sale at Christ United Methodist Church Neptune Beach, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Looking for shoes, linens, clothing, purses, luggage, toys etc? Join us and find your special treasure! For more information, please con tact the church office at 904-249-5370. Saturday, Feb. 8 Davidson Realty, Inc., has announced the Davidson Cares 5K and Fun Run through World Golf Village. Registration is open now at www. DavidsonCares.com or www.UltimateRacingInc. com. Runners, walkers, strollers and dogs are all welcome! There will be fun kids activities like giant hamster balls, laser tag, a bouncy house, face painting, temporary tat toos, a mile long kids fun run and more. The event sponsor, Mile Marker Brewing, will have deli cious brews on tap, and the S.O.S. Diner food truck will be on site. The race starts at 11 a.m. Growing and Eating Seasonally: 9 a.m.1 p.m. at the Duval County Extension Office. Grow Warm-Season Vegetables, Compost, and Food Sampling using seasonal product. Cost $10, checks should be made payable to DCOHAC, send to 1010 N. McDuff Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32254. Pre-registration and prepayment required. Call Jeannie at 255-7450 to pre-register. Red knots migrate from the southern tip of South America to the arctic every year. Join a park ranger at 2 pm to learn about these and other shorebirds that rely on the beaches of Little Talbot Island. The program will take place at the multiuse trail pavilion located at the south beach area on Little Talbot Island. Tuesday, Feb. 11 The Jacksonville Public Library is partnering with local organizations to host a free Community Resource and Career Fair featuring 17 compa nies looking for potential employees and 10 agen cies with resources avail able to help job seekers. In addition, free work shops covering Dressing for Success and Interviewing Techniques that Work will be offered. The workshops will be held from 9 a.m.-Noon at the Main Library, Conference Center, 303 Laura St. N. Friday, Feb. 14 The Ladies Auxillary FRA #290 will hold a steak dinner from 5-8 p.m. at the branch home, 390 Mayport Road. A glass of wine and a box of choco lates will be served with the mea. Donation is $12. Open to the public. Take out orders welcome. 2496855 Saturday, Feb. 15 Ever dreamed of getting the perfect shot of a great blue heron in flight or a bumble bee nestled on a flower? Join a photogra pher at 10 a.m. and nature enthusiast for a leisurely stroll on the Fairway Loop Trail and learn tech niques to help capture the beauty of the maritime forest and salt marsh on film. Please bring your own camera and photog raphy supplies, RSVP to the Talbot Islands State Park Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDARWorkshops, Classes Offered To Sailors, FamiliesThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 6, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together. Feb. 6, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 8, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Family Readiness Group Leadership Training Bldg. 1, Room 702 Feb. 10-14, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Separatee Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 10, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 19, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Bldg. 1, Room 1124 Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Whether youve been dating for 6 months or married for 20 years, effective communica tion is critical to keeping your relationship happy, healthy and strong. Come learn new techniques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communica tion. Class is held every month from 3-hour class. Couples are encouraged but not required to attend class together.

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 6, 2014