Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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THE .




---- -


1NS MAYPORT. FLORIDA


CHINFO Award Winner


Make A Difference At Mayport


By Sarah Barthelemy
MWR

Naval Station Mayport and
MWR will partner up with First
Coast News and True Blue
Navy Family Benefactors, Inc.
on "Make a Difference Day"
on Oct. 26 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
For more than two decades,
this national day of community
service connects people with
opportunities to serve, increas-


es the strength of communities
and promotes civic engage-
ment.
At Mayport, the volunteer
team will be working on the
Lake Wonderwood Renovation
Project.
Volunteers will clear brush
along the lake as part of the
project, which will include
a mile-long recreation path
around the lake, picnic pavilion


and playground renovations.
This project is being funded
through monies gifted by True
Blue Navy Benefactors, Inc., an
all-volunteer nonprofit 501(C)-
3 formed in January 2012. Their
mission is to enhance the qual-
ity of life for local Jacksonville
military and their families.
All members of the Mayport
community, ages 16 and up,
are invited to volunteer for this


event. First Coast News will be
on-site filming segments for
"Good Morning Jacksonville"
and their evening news broad-
cast.
To volunteer for Make a
Difference Day or for more
information, call (904) 270-5228
or email MWRMayport@navy.
mil.
Following the event, MWR
will be hosting a Festival


Celebration (formerly Fall Fest)
at the Lake Wonderwood Field
from 1-5 p.m.
This event will feature, games,
rides, bouncy houses, free food
provided by Sea Breeze Food
Service, arts and crafts vendors,
a haunted house, a pumpkin
patch for photo opportunities,
carnival food for purchase, and
more.


Smith Takes


Helm Of Phil Sea


-Photo by ET1 Marty Parsons
Capt. Steve Shinego, left, shakes hands with Capt. Wesley Smith
after he is relieved of command during a change of command cer-
emony on the ship on Oct. 4. Also pictured is guest speaker Rear
Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4th Fleet.


By SHSN
Matthew Muhl
USS Philippine Sea Public. ;
USS Philippine Sea (CG
58) held a change of com-
mand ceremony on its flight
deck before Officers, crew and
guests on Oct. 4. Capt. Steve
Shinego was relieved by Capt.
Wesley Smith as the guided
missile cruiser's newest com-
manding officer. Ceremony
was presided by Rear Adm.
Sinclair Harris, Commander,
Fourth Fleet.
"Whenever RADM Dave
Thomas, Commander, Naval
Surface Forces (Ret.), is asked
which ship is the finest in the
fleet," Harris addressed at the
ceremony, "He emphatically
says, 'USS Philippine Sea"
Florida-native Shinego
began his naval career aboard
the very same vessel 25 years
ago as a newly-appointed
Ensign as part of the pre-
commissioning crew, serv-
ing as Auxiliaries Officer, First
Lieutenant and Missile Officer.


He assumed command of
Philippine Sea in October 2011
midway through its six-month
deployment. He subsequently
led the cruiser into successful
completions in all facets of its
multi-lateral training cycles, or
what the captain often refers
to as "team wins"
"The goal of this ship was to
be a team, build a gameplan,
and get wins," Shinego said
before being relieved. '"And we
did that"
Smith, whose previous
tour was as CO of USS The
Sullivans (DDG-68), assumed
command of Philippine Sea,
affirming that it is "a great
opportunity to serve on a great
ship," and is looking forward
to the cruiser's continued suc-
cess.
Among the myriad of
achievements throughout the
past two years aboard USS
Philippine Sea include suc-
cessful inspections such as

See Phil Sea, Page 7


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
Outgoing Commodore Ace Van Wagoner thanks DESRON 40for their hard work during his tenure at
the command. Van Wagoner was relieved by Capt. Sam Hancock, third from left, at a change of com-
mand ceremony on Oct. 10. Also pictured is guest speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander,
USNAVSO/4th Fleet, left, and Chaplain (Cmdr) Steve Souder.



COMDESRON 40 Holds


Change of Command


From Staff
Capt. Sam Hancock relieved
Capt. Ace Van Wagoner as com-
modore of COMDESRON 40
during a change of command
on Oct. 10 at Ocean Breeze
Conference Center. Rear Adm.
Sinclair Harris, Commander,
USNAVSO/411th Fleet was guest
speaker at the event.
Hancock, originally from
Pensacola, Florida, is a gradu-
ate of Auburn University and
was commissioned in 1990 via
the NROTC program.
In his sea duty assign-
ments, Captain Hancock has
seen world-wide deploy-
ments to every U.S. Fleet
area of responsibility. These
assignments include Division
Officer tours on USS Harold E.
Holt (FF 1074), USS Worden
(CG 18), and as Plank owner


of USS Mitscher (DDG 57).
His Department Head tours
were on USS Boone (FFG
28) and Destroyer Squadron
24 (COMDESRON 24). He
served as Executive Officer
of USS Carney (DDG 64) and
Commanded USS John Paul
Jones (DDG 53).
His shore assignments
include Aegis Ballistic Missile
Defense (BMD) Action Officer
for the Director of Surface
Warfare OPNAV (N76), Surface
Warfare liaison for Task Force
Total Force developing the
Navy Human Capital Strategy,
Executive Assistant for the Navy
Chief of Legislative Affairs, and
most recently as Chief of Staff
for the Aegis BMD Program
Office in the Missile Defense
Agency.


Hancock earned a Master
of Science degree in Systems
Management from the Naval
Postgraduate School and a
Master of Science degree in
National Security Strategy from
the National War College.
Van Wagoner graduated from
the University of Utah with a
Bachelor of Science in Applied
Mathematics and received a
regular commission via NROTC
in March 1986. He was desig-
nated a Surface Warfare Officer
and attended Navy Nuclear
Power training in Orlando,
Florida.
Captain Van Wagoner's sea
duty assignments include USS
Texas (CGN 39); USS Merrill
(DD 976); USS California

See DESRON 40, Page 10


Medina New CO Of PC Shamal
From Staff f t i t S e
Lt. Gillian Medina became commanding offi-
cer of USS Shamal (PC 13) permanent crew .
during a pierside ceremony held Oct. 11 at
Naval Station Mayport. Medina relieved Lt. "
Cmdr. Frank Azzarello during the ceremony. V -
Medina began her career by enlisting in the
United States Navy in 1991 under the Delayed
Entry Program and graduated from Recruitg"
Training Command Orlando in 1992. She was
selected for the Seaman to Admiral Program
and received a Bachelor of Arts in Political
Science from the University of San Diego in
May 2003. -Photo by Paige Gnann
Her operational tours include Assistant Lt. Gillian Medina speaks after taking command of USS
Damage Control Assistant in USS Bonhomme Shamal from Lt. Cmdr. Frank Azzarello, third from left, dur-
Richard (LHD 6), Navigator in USS ing a change of command ceremony Sept. 11. Also pictured is
Chaplain (Cmdr) Steve Souder and guest speaker Squadron 14
See Shamal, Page 10 Commodore Ryan Tillotson.


Give Blood, Save Lives
Naval Station Mayport will host its quarterly
blood drive on Oct. 22 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at
Building 1 training room. Walk-ins welcome. To
schedule an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org
or call 1-800-Red Cross.


Evening In Pink
Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport will host a
Breast Cancer Awareness Symposium and Health
Fair 2013 on Oct. 25 from 4-6 p.m. There will be
refreshments, presentations, information booths,
games and door prizes.


NS Mayport Says Fair

Winds To Former CO
Submitted
Navy Fighter Pilot,
Captain Paul A. "Andy" J
Anderson flew his "final
check ride west" when
his soul and spirit depart-
ed the earthly pattern at
1343, Oct. 5, 2013. W ^y
Born in Park River,
North Dakota on Sept. 2,
1922 to Norwegian immi- .i
grants, Paul was one of
five siblings. Capt. Paul Anderson
His aspiration to be an
aviator started early in father acquired the wrec
life. In the 1930s, when of a crashed airplane
Paul was a boy, his grand- See Anderson, Page 7


Hispanic Heritage
Celebration

Page 4-5


Check us out Online!


mayportmi rror.com

mayportmirror corn


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e














2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013




What The U.S. Navy Taught Me


Editor's Note: Retired
Capt. Bill Kennedy was
asked to speak recently at
NS Mayport Command
Quarters in remembrance
of the 238th birthday of
the U.S. Navy. His speech
was inspiring and I asked
if I could republish it in
The Mirror. He very kind-
ly agreed to let me do so
only if I would also men-
tion several of the ideas he
incorporated in the speech
come from Vietnam POW
Lee Ellis' book, "Leading
With Honor." The follow-
ing is that speech in its
,'11/1 i'/ '1'
I became a part of the
Navy family in 1963 as a
college student between
semesters when my draft
notice arrived. I was a
city boy and did not want
to go into the Army. My
father sent me to NAS
Willow Grove just outside
the city of Philadelphia.
I was commissioned an
ensign in December 1965,
and earned my wings of
Gold in July 1967. I flew
off carriers for 20 years
and drove ships for 10
years. I retired on Sept.
30, 1994. I have been
the director of the Navy-
Marine Corps Relief
Society here in Mayport
going on 14 years.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
NS Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Bob White joins junior Sailors Master-
at-Arms Seaman Apprentice Nathan Rollins and Seaman Abena Acheampong and
NMCRS Director and retired Capt. Bill Kennedy cutting a cake celebrating the 238th
birthday of the U.S. Navy on Oct. 10 at the Base Chapel.


As the so-called "Old
Guy" here today, celebrat-
ing the Navy birthday has
very important meaning.
It brings to mind how
much I have learned over
the many, many years that
I served on active duty.
The Navy taught me how
to do the right things ...
accept responsibility, ful-
fill my duty, tell the truth
and remain faithful to my
word.
It is the most important


thing you do, but it is also
t he thing that brings you
long-term success.
To be a good Sailor,
the Navy expected me to
"know myself" who am
I in terms of purpose, pas-
sion and personality. A
sense of purpose, fueled
by passion is essential for
true success. Clarity of
purpose sharpens focus,
lifts confidence and pro-
motes fulfillment.
A Sailor must "guard


his or her character."
Character is the founda-
tion for trust and trust is
the most essential ingre-
dient for leadership influ-
ence. People don't follow
those they cannot trust.
Guard your character,
protect your honor and
stay on course.
The Navy taught me to
"stay positive." Believe
me when I say having a
positive attitude proved
to be a great assent, and


it is one of the best ways
to influence others. Keep
your chin up, because
when it goes down, you
do too and many others
will follow right behind.
I learned how to manage
my emotions as if they
were contagious, because
they are. We all, at one
time or another, have
observed situations where
negative emotions affect-
ed others. I knew early
on that negative attitudes
and emotions contribute
to an unproductive unit,
ship or squadron.
"Confront your doubts
and fears." In the military
service, you learn early
on that courage is an act
of will. You choose to do
what you know is right.
You gain confidence and
trust in yourself. You
develop values and will-
ingly engage demanding
issues with strength and
humility, despite fears.
I recently saw four
words depicting an ele-
mentary school's core
values when I was asked
to pick up my grand-
daughter from school
a few weeks ago. The
school's motto captured
what I thought being in
the Navy, or that matter
any of our services, is all


about.
Tradition; Character;
Excellence; Service
When I read those
words sitting in the child
pick up line I was not only
impressed, but it made
me think of the "Sailor's
Creed." I certainly could
not recall the exact words
since it had been many,
many years ago that I was
expected to memorize it.
But I did look it up.
The Sailor's Creed
I am a United States
Sailor.
I will support and
defend the Constitution
of the United States
of America and I will
obey the orders of those
appointed over me.
I represent the fight-
ing spirit of the Navy and
those who have gone
before me to defend free-
dom and democracy
around the world.
I proudly serve
my country's Navy
combat team with
Honor, Courage and
Commitment.
I am committed to
excellence and the fair
treatment of all.
Happy 238th birth-
day Shipmates.
Congratulations!


What To Do When Your Child Is Being Bullied


Judy Cromartie
School Liaison Officer



When children are
involved in bullying, it is
important for parents to
be willing to take action.
Children often do not
tell their parents that they
are being bullied because
they are embarrassed or
frightened.


Bullying is about power.
One psychologist is quot-
ed as saying, "It's all about
big on little, many on
few, smart on less smart,
older on younger." At
some point you may have
been the smaller one,
the younger one, or had
your interests and feel-
ings unfairly damaged by
someone more powerful
than you.
If you suspect your
child is being bullied or
your child brings it up,
consider these steps:
Talk with your child.
Focus on your child.


Express your concern
and make it clear that you
want to help.
Empathize with your
child. Say bullying is
wrong, that it is not their
fault, and that you are
glad they had the courage
to tell you about it.
Work together to find
solutions. Ask your child
what they think can be
done to help. Reassure
them that the situation
can be handled private-
ly. Document ongoing
bullying. Work with your
child to keep a record of
all bullying incidents. If it


involves cyber bullying,
keep a record of all mes-
sages or postings.
Help your child devel-
op strategies and skills
for handling bullying.
Provide suggestions for
ways to respond to bul-
lying, and help your
child gain confidence by
rehearsing their respons-
es. If you need help with
suggestions, check with
your child's school coun-
selor.
Be persistent. Bullying
may not be resolved over-
night.
Stay vigilant to other
possible problems that
your child may be hav-
ing. Some of the warn-
ing signs may be signs of
other serious problems.


Share your concerns with
a counselor at your child's
school.
Bullying IS NOT a nor-
mal rite of passage. It
can have serious conse-
quences. You can help
your child learn how to
prevent bullying. These
tips can help bully proof
your child:
Help your child under-
stand bullying. Explain
what bullying is. It is more
than physical; it can be
done in person or over the
phone or computer.
Keep open lines of
communication with
your child. Check in
with your child and lis-
ten to any concerns about
friends and other stu-
dents.


Encourage your child
to pursue their interests.
Doing what they love may
help your child be more
confident among their
peers and make friends
with other kids with simi-
lar interests.
Teach your child to
take a stand against
bullying. Give guid-
ance about how to stand
up to those who bully if
it is safe to do so. Again,
engage the help of the
school counselor to assist
in counseling your child.
Talk to your child
about seeking help from
a trusted adult when
feeling threatened by a
bully. Talk about whom

See School, Page 3


Take Time To Remember What Is Important


Chap Darin Dunham
CHSMWL Chaplain

The Honor Guard transi-
tions from port arms. A
command is bellowed
out thrice, three suc-
cessive volleys ring out,
loud, jarring. All jump in
their seat, and the widow
begins to cry.
Taps rings out across the
immaculately groomed
grass and headstones.
Carefully and with digni-
ty, two Sailors slowly lift
the Stars and Stripes off
the casket and begin to
methodically fold it. The
flag is presented on behalf
of a grateful nation, a slow
salute, a final prayer.
This is a scene that has
played out many times
in my career as a Navy
Chaplain and still hits me
powerfully every time.
It is not the most joyous
duty, laying to rest ship-
mates, yet it remains one
of the most meaningful
aspects of this career I
have chosen and that has
chosen me. It is an honor.
My deep fear is to fail in
lending dignity to that
moment.


I have buried at sea and
on land and as I watch
grieving loved ones bid
farewell, I am always
struck with the notion
that in their lives at that
moment, the moment of
internment, time seems
to stop.
In sadness, pain and loss,
families have expressed
how surreal they feel. A
moment ago they were
so busy, rushing here
and rushing there. Then
suddenly... the dreaded
phone call, the bad news,
the funeral, the burial.
Now they can't remem-
ber what was so terribly
important before. What
was it they were so busy
doing? What would they
give for five more min-
utes with their loved one?
What would they say?
Tick, stock, tick, tock...
We spend so much of our
life waiting. We wait in
lines. We wait at the store.
We wait at the bank.
In our life, we wait on
major events. We wait to
graduate from school.
We wait till we marry. We
wait till we have kids. We
wait to begin careers. We
wait to retire.
But we buy into an illu-
sion, don't we? We think
we will always have time.
Our seconds become
minutes; our min-


utes become hours; our
hours become days; our
days become weeks; our
weeks become months;
our months become
years. From seconds to
years, and one day life
suddenly pauses, perhaps
at a funeral. And we say,
"Where did the years go?"
Tick, tock, tick, tock...







Command Chaplain
Lt. Cmndr.
Jerome Cayangyang
Roman Catholic Mass
Sunday 9 a.m.
Monday-Thursday
11:30 a.m.
Holy Day of Obligation
(call chapel for schedule)
Confessions: before & after mass
or upon request
CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed:
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Baptisms
3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m.
Catholic Youth Group
2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m.
Protestant Worship
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Sunday school 9:15 a.m.
Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m.
Baptism: For information,
contact your chaplain
Women's Bible Study
Wednesday 9:30 a.m.
Protestant Youth Group
1st Friday Youth Quak Trip
6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel
5-8:30 p.m.
PWOC
2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m.
PMOC
3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast
9a.m.
MOPS
1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m.
For more information,
call 270-5212.


There is a certain precious
gift that is offered at buri-
als. There is a moment,
perhaps "the" moment,
where those who are
inclined to, can reflect on
their own life. For one
honest moment, some-
times a harsh moment,
one can reflect on wheth-
er or not the things they
are pursuing with all vigor
and might are worth it. I
mean really worth it in
light of the brevity of life.
What is really impor-


tant? For a brief moment
before we are thrust back
into the rat race and
the chaos of life.., time
stops, or seems to. And
in that moment is the gift
- a chance for a rudder
adjustment, a new course
alignment, a compass cal-
ibration. It is not uncom-
mon to see people leave
with new resolve, with
humility, with determi-
nation to utilize the time
they do have well. To for-
give, to love, to live bet-


ter than before. They hear
the cadence of their life
beating time. Tick, tock,
tick, tock...
What matters in this life?
A chaplain will always say
Faith first; then the rest
of life has a way of falling
into its proper place.
But family should next
and I want to address
my shipmates who have
unresolved issues with
family and friends.

See Chaplain, Page 3


Knowing
THE ROPES


CHAPLAIN'S
C (C) R N E R


A iil id A
Naval Station Mayport
Capt. W esley M cCall .......................................................................................... Com m ending O officer
C m dr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive O officer
CM DCM Robert L. W hite................................................................................ Com m and M aster Chief
Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff
M CC W illiam Tow nsend ....................................................................................... Public Affairs O officer
G SM 3 H illary H icks ............................................................................. Assistant Public Affairs O officer
P aige G n an n ............................................................................................................................... E d itor
The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayport's Navy community, including the Naval Station,
on and off base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies
are also available at the Naval Station's Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times Union,
1 RiversideAvenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202.
The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles
should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to:
The Mirror
P.O. Box 280032
Naval Station
Mayport, FL 32228 0032
Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012
Commercial FAX (904) 270 5329 DSN FAX: 270 5329
Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net
CO Actionline: 270 5589 or 1 800 270 6307
This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of
The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department
of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times Union, a private firm in no way
connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear
ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by
the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times Union, of the products or services advertised.
Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without
regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation,
or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the
responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to:

uifi i .I
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1 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Advertising Sales
(904) 359-4168 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4168 FAX (904) 366-6230
Johnny Lloyd Territory Sales Representative (904) 591-5464














THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3


SECNAV, CNO, MCPON Wish Fleet Happy 238th


BY U.S. NAVY
Secretary of the Navy
Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval
Operations Jonathan Greenert
and Master Chief Petty Officer
of the Navy Mike Stevens joined
forces in a video birthday mes-
sage to the fleet.
"This year on October 13th
the United States Navy marks
its 238th birthday," said Mabus.
"Since our beginning in 1775,
our Navy has defended America
with pride a tradition that
continues today. As Secretary
of the Navy I have the honor
and privilege of working with
the finest men and women
our country has to offer. This
was the case 238 years ago and
remains as true today as it was
at our Navy's inception. On
any given day our Sailors are
deployed around the world
providing a constant presence,
defending the American peo-


-Photo by MCC Peter D. Lawlor
From left, retired Navy SEAL Lt. Jason Redman, country music
singer Mark Wills, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan
Greenert, the two youngest Sailors in attendance and Master Chief
Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens cut a birthday cake together
at the U.S. Navy Birthday Ball in Washington, D.C. The ball was in
celebration ofNavy's 238th birthday Oct. 13, 2013.


pie and our nation's interests.
We are and will continue to be
America's away team, the fin-
est expeditionary fighting force
the world has ever known. So
today as we reflect on our heri-


tage, I want to thank all of you
for what you do in the service to
our Navy and for our country.
Happy birthday, Navy! Semper
Fortis!
For their portion of the mes-


sage, Greenert and Stevens met
at the Washington Navy Yard's
Navy Museum in front of a dis-
play commemorating the battle
of Lake Erie, which according
to Greenert, was "perhaps the
most dramatic and important
battle in the War of 1812. It was
at this battle that our Sailors
really showed their mettle, real-
ly showed their tenacity, and,
in fact, were the asymmetric
advantage for our forces. Today,
the all-volunteer force you -
are our asymmetric advantage.
So think about that as we cel-
ebrate our 238th birthday.'
"For 238 years our Navy has
overcome enormous challeng-
es and faced adversity," said
Stevens. "We've risen with those
challenges and built a reputa-
tion as the strongest naval force
the world has ever seen. We
work daily among a rich land-


scape of ships, bases and water-
ways. But it's not the environ-
ment that keeps our Navy mov-
ing forward, it's our people! This
is our heritage!"
"So let's remember the
importance, as we look ahead,
of our tenets of today: warf-
ighting is first, we operate for-
ward, and we will be ready,"
said Greenert. "We will use the
genius of our diverse force our
all-volunteer force and we
will be where it matters when
it matters, because that's what
you and I are about: our great
Navy of today!"
"Thank you for your service
shipmates! I'm proud to serve
with you!" concluded Stevens.
"And thanks to our Navy fami-
lies. None of us could do what
we do without your love and
support!"


Boo Bags And The Future Of Humanity


The Meat&Potatoes
OF LIFE


Lisa Smith Molinari
Military Spouse
Columnist


Perhaps it's the fault
of the Me Generation.
Perhaps responsibil-
ity lies with our culture of
excess. Perhaps Emeril is
to blame for teaching us
all to "BAM! Kick it up a
notch:"
Whatever the cause,
modern American society
has an insatiable desire
for more, More, MORE;
and nowhere is that more
evident than during holi-
days like Halloween.
Back in the '70s, when I
was a kid yes, you should
brace yourself for an "up
hill to school both ways"
rant our parents were
too busy sipping vodka
gimlets and tapping their
Tareyton 100s into pedes-
tal ashtrays while watch-


ing Laugh In from the
comfort of their gabardine
slacks. They didn't have
time to spend countless
hours and dollars to pro-
vide my brother and me,
much less the rest of the
kids in the neighborhood,
with a better-than-ever
Halloween.
But we weren't com-
plaining.
We were beyond excited
to carve one pumpkin for
the whole family, using
seriously sharp knives,
because cutesy little kid-
safe pumpkin carving kits
hadn't been invented yet.
We were ecstatic about
dressing up in our $4.99
Woolworth's highly flam-
mable nylon tie in the
back Casper the Friendly
Ghost costume with the
brittle plastic facemask
secured with the hair
tangling elastic band.
We were beside our-
selves with anticipation
about the fact that ABC
was airing "It's the Great
Pumpkin, Charlie Brown"
one night during prime


time on our console TV.
We were over the moon
about going door to door
with our pillow cases,
gladly accepting whatever
we were given, because it
was free popcorn balls,
apples, coins, and candy.
Sure, we secretly hoped
some neighbor would be
giving out humongous
candy bars, but for the
most part, we appreci-
ated getting anything at
all, and did not expect
our parents to up the ante
every year.
Then why is it that,
nowadays, kids' base-
line expectations for
Halloween include corn
mazes, pet parades,
school parties, hay rides,
pumpkin carving con-
tests requiring a gradu-
ate degree in fine arts,
yard decorating contests
requiring professional
special effects and 23
hired extras, week-long
horror movie marathons,
venti no-whip pump-
kin spice lattes, moun-
tains of brand-name


only candy in tamper-
proof packaging, intri-
cate costumes that cost
at least $49.95, little kid
non-scary haunted hous-
es, regular kid kinda-
scary haunted houses,
and big kid Horrifically
Haunting Mega Mansions
of Traumatizing Terror
(post-traumatic stress
therapy not included)?
And now, as if all that
wasn't enough, some-
one had the bright idea
to add something called
"Boo Bags" to the list of
annual Halloween must
haves. Just when you
think your wallet and
energy have been sucked
out like pumpkin guts, a
well-intentioned neigh-
bor goes and drops a
Halloween themed bag of
thoughtfully assembled
items on your doorstep
with a little note instruct-
ing you to do the same for
another neighbor.


Sure, votive candles
and candy corn are great
and all, but is all this
really necessary? Isn't
Halloween fun enough
already? And how much
of this stuff will be re-gift-
ed anyway?
Now that my point has
been made, I must con-
fess, after initially grum-
bling at my neighbor's
suggestion that we give
Boo Bags on our street
this year, I quite enjoyed
picking out little gifts and
goodies for another mili-
tary family here on base.
My kids were happy to go
on a night-time recon-
naissance mission to
secretly deliver the bag
to our neighbor's porch,
and I've been downright
cocky knowing that, upon
finding my masterpiece,
they must've commented,
"Whoever put this fabu-
lous Boo Bag together is a
creative genius!"


Despite feeling tricked
into the excesses of
Halloween, I must admit,
giving a neighbor a Boo
Bag can be quite a treat.
Get more wit and
observations from Lisa at
her blog, The Meat and
Potatoes of Life, www.
themeatandpotatoesofli-
fe.com


School


From Page 2


they should go to for help
and role-play what they
should say. Assure your
child that they should not
be afraid to tell an adult
when someone they know
is being bullied.
Know what is going on
in your child's school.
Visit the school website,
subscribe to the student
paper-if there is bullying
going on at the school,
contact the school to find
out what is being done.
If you recognize these
symptoms in your child,
trying talking to him
about what is happening
at school. If your child
will not share the prob-
lem with you, call your
child's school counselor
and ask if he/she will talk
to your child about your
concerns. Sometimes
children will open up to a
trusted adult before they
will share with a parent. It
is vital that you work with
the teacher or school offi-
cials to find a solution.
But just as important as
What to Do is What Not
to Do. Also share these
Not to Do tips with your
child:
Never tell your child to
ignore the bullying. What
the child may "hear"


Chaplain
There are no perfect fami-
lies in this world. There
are no perfect relation-
ships.
We are hurt and we hurt
back and divides emerge
and widen over time. We
are let down, we let down,


is that you are going to
ignore it. Be supportive
and gather information
about the bullying. Often,
trying to ignore bullying
allows it to become more
serious.
Do not blame your
child for being bullied.
Do not assume that your
child did something to
provoke the bullying.
Do not encourage your
child to harm the person
who is bullying them. It
could get your child hurt,
suspended, or expelled.
Do not contact the
parents of the students
who bullied your child. It
may make matters worse.
School officials should
contact the parents of the
children involved.
Do not demand or
expect a solution on the
spot. Indicate you would
like to follow up to deter-
mine the best course of
action. Also, be aware
that the law limits the
ability of school person-
nel from revealing dis-
ciplinary actions taken
against other students.
Just because they cannot
tell you if or how another
student was disciplined,
does not mean action was
not taken.


we are disappointed, we
disappoint.
Sometimes we don't even
know how our fractured
relationships got to the
state there in.
Here is a lesson from a
funeral. Don't wait any


The Duval County
School Board has adopted
an anti-bullying policy to
address bullying in the
district.
If your child tells you he
has been bullied, the inci-
dent should be reported
to the school principal
or another trusted adult.
This report can be done
anonymously on paper
at www.duvalschools.org
or by phone at (904) 390-
CALL.
An investigation will be
conducted by the school
principal or his/her des-
ignee. Consequences will
be in accordance with the
Student Code of Conduct.
If necessary, individuals
involved will be referred
for appropriate services.
Judy Cromartie is the
School Liaison Officer for
NS Mayport.
If you have questions
about this article or con-
cerns about an edu-
cational issue impact-
ing your child, she can
be reached via email at
Judith.cromartie @navy.
mil or by phone at (904)
270-6289 X1305 [office] or
(904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or
you can schedule a meet-
ing with her in her office
in Building One.

From Page 2
longer. You have done
enough waiting in your
life. Reach out, say sorry
and forgive. Do so with-
out "mental reservation or
purpose of evasion"
Life is short, live well.
Tick, tock, tick, tock...


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F i o np r s cc n ei r i a u t n a g d t vi .9 i tw v c I .e s u eno.














4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013


-- -......-
... I- 2--- --- -. "



.. --4_ -: .- --- "" -7 "" '' "


-~- -


-
_ -- -


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Adam Robertson and Rosie George of A Social Affair studio demonstrate a latin dance for attendees at the annual Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration held Oct. 10 at Beachside
Community Center. The celebration included dancing, a poem reading, and food.



Mayport Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month


-Photos by Paige Gnann


Above, Retired Chief
Yeoman Alvin Lozada
recites a poem about a
young man who speaks
English and Spanish
interchangeably. Right,
Lozada plays the drums for
attendees during the base
Hispanic Heritage Month
celebration on Oct. 10.


By MC2(SW/AW)
Adam Henderson
COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt Public.;,

Sailors from around Naval Station
Mayport attended a Hispanic Heritage
celebration on Oct. 11 at Beachside
Community Center.
The ceremony was held to celebrate
the rich heritage and cultural diver-
sity that Hispanic Americans have
contributed to the country and to the
Navy. Hispanic Heritage month runs
from Sep. 15 to Oct. 15.
The observation started in 1968
as Hispanic Heritage Week under
President Lyndon Johnson and was
expanded by President Ronald Reagan
in 1988 to cover a 30-day period start-
ing on September 15 and ending on
October 15.
"My overall take on Hispanic
Heritage month is great. Growing
up I didn't get to interact too much
with Hispanics, but since I joined the
Navy I have grown to love many fac-
ets of the culture," said Operations
Specialist 1st class Sheena Sheared.
The heritage week was enacted into
law on Aug. 17, 1988, with the approv-
al of Public Law 100-402.
"Hispanic Heritage month is a
great opportunity for everyone in the
Navy to acknowledge the many con-
tributions that Hispanics have made
throughout our Naval History," said
CMDCM David Tellez, U.S. 4th Fleet
Command Master Chief.
Hispanic Americans make up a sub-
stantial portion of Sailors in the Navy.
Today, there are more than 58,000
Hispanic active duty and Reserve
Sailors and officers, and nearly 15,000
Hispanics serve within the Navy Total
Force, along with four Hispanic flag
officers and 172 Hispanic master
chiefs
"I think diversity in the Navy brings
ideas, new plans, new strategies to
make the Navy better," Tellez added.


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez gives the closing remarks during the
Naval Station Mayport Hispanic Heritage Month celebration event on Oct. 10.


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
Commander U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris speaks to Sailor's and attend-
ees about the importance of Hispanic Heritage during the Naval Station Mayport cel-
ebration event on Oct. 10.






































-Photo by Paige Gnann
Paula and Mateo Aldas perform during the Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration at
Beachside Community Center


THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5























-Photo by Paige Gnann
Dance instructors pull audience members out to learn a few latin dance moves during
the celebration.


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson


Sailor's stationed aboard Naval Station Mayport learn a few latin moves during the base Hispanic Heritage Month celebration event on Oct. 10.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
Attendees enjoy learning step moves during a dance demonstration at the heritage cel-
ebration.


-Photo by Paige Gnann
The floor is crowded with beginner and experienced latin dancers during a dancing
demonstration at the celebration.


Cmdr. Brian Morrill from COMFOURTHFLT speaks about his Venezuelan upbringing during the Hispanic Heritage Month celebration.













6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013


4th Fleet Celebrates Navy's 238th Birthday


By MC2(SW/AW)
Adam Henderson
U.S. 4th Fleet Public. ;"
U.S. 4th Fleet held an all
hands call and cake cut-
ting ceremony Oct. 9 to
celebrate the Navy's 238th
birthday at the fleet's
headquarters at Naval
Station Mayport.
"As we celebrate our
Navy's 238th birthday,
our history and heritage
forms our identity, tell-
ing us who we are and
what we stand for," U.S.
Naval Forces Southern
Command/U.S. 4th Fleet
Command Master Chief
David Tellez said.
Tellez was the guest of
honor at today's celebra-
tion.
"Our core values of
honor, courage, commit-
ment have been passed
down from our founders,
who charged the Navy
with the solemn duty to
serve as the shield of our
republic," he said.
The Navy's cake cut-
ting practice calls for
the eldest and young-
est Sailors cut the cake
together with a Navy
sword or cutlass.
"Being a part of the
great Navy tradition, the
cake cutting ceremony for
the Navy's 238th birthday
made me feel very hon-
ored today during this


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris left, cuts the 4th Fleet Navy's
Birthday cake with Operations Specialist 2nd Class Ronald Fogel, Operations Specialist
Seaman 3,1il/I,,'i Thomas, and Command Master Chief David Tellez during a birthday
celebration for the Navy's 238th birthday on Oct. 9 at Naval Station Mayport.


momentous occasion,"
Operations Specialist
Seaman Matthew
Thomas, youngest Sailor


at U.S. 4th Fleet said.
Vice Chief of Naval
Operations, Adm. Mark
Ferguson., said, "It is


important to come
together to celebrate our
heritage perhaps even
more so during these dif-


ficult times."'
"This has been a year of
challenges for our Navy
as our nation has worked
through many challenges
at home and abroad. We
continue to mourn our
fallen shipmates at the
Washington Navy Yard
and think about all the
Sailors deployed forward.
Through it all, we remain
resilient and we press
on," Commander, U.S.
Naval Forces Southern
Command/U.S. 4th Fleet,
Rear Adm. Sinclair M.
Harris said.
The U.S. Navy traces its
roots to the Continental
Navy, which the
Continental Congress
established on 13 October
1775, by attaining, fitting,
manning, and dispatching
two armed ships in search
of enemy ammunition
ships.
"Just this year 4th Fleet
celebrated our 5th anni-
versary since the fleet
was reestablished July 12,
2008," Commander, U.S.
Naval Forces Southern
Command/U.S. 4th Fleet
Rear Adm. Sinclair M.
Harris said.
U.S. 4th Fleet was first
established in 1943 as one
of the original numbered
fleets during World War
II and was disestablished
after the war.


Foreign ministers of
countries of the Western
Hemisphere agreed to
establish a neutrality zone
in around the Atlantic and
Pacific coasts of North
and South America to
be enforced by the U. S.
Navy, specifically U.S. 4th
Fleet headquartered in
Recife, Brazil.
"Today, it is not only the
U.S. Navy...it is all of our
partner nation navies that
are keeping the Americas
free and prosperous, a
realization of our global
maritime partnership,"
Harris said.
U.S. 4th Fleet supports
a combined full-spec-
trum military operations
by providing principally
sea-based, forward pres-
ence to ensure freedom
of maneuver in the mari-
time domain, to foster
and sustain cooperative
relationships with inter-
national partners and to
fully exploit the sea as
maneuver space in order
to enhance regional secu-
rity and promote peace,
stability, and prosperity
in the Caribbean, Central
and South American
regions.


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
Chief Petty Officers at U.S. 4th Fleet lead the command in singing Anchors Away during
a birthday ceremony held on Oct. 9for the Navy's 238th birthday at the Fleet headquar-
ters at Naval Station Mayport.



Raising Awareness About

By MC2 (SW/AW) "
Adam Henderson
COMUSNAVSO/C4F Public. ;
U.S. 4th Fleet's Drug and
Alcohol Programs Advisor '.-!
(DAPA) hosted an educa- .j i
tional event Oct. 3 to educate- --."
Sailors about the Navy's 'Keep .r......
what you've earned' cam- j' .. ..
paign focused on encouraging .-'-._
responsible drinking by cel- .-

during Navy careers. -
As part of the program,
Sailors are reminded of their -.
accomplishments-and how a e n de'''''A
much they have to lose if they
make poor choices regarding
alcohol.
Education programs like
this are working. According to
the Naval Alcohol and Drug
Prevention Office, alcohol-relat- -
ed incidents have decreased
by 51 percent across the Navy
since last year.
"Although the number of
incidents are on the decrease,
alcohol and drug abuse remain
at the forefront of our concern.
Irresponsible drinking not only
threatens the health and careers
of our personnel, it threatens
the Navy's ability to be mission-
ready," said Rear Adm. Sinclair
M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 41
Fleet. U.S. 4th Fleet's Drug and Alcohol Programs Adviso
Alcohol and drug abuse Sailors about the Navy's 'Keep what you've earned'
awareness can begin with the duringNavy careers.
DAPA.
"Throughout the course of my a person that will end a career, while drinking,'
career, I have noticed a social but is the person that can help Only one-ti
stigma that Sailors seeking help save a career," Fennell said. year olds in th
from the DAPA representative Fennell oversaw the event at are even eligit
are thought to have an alcohol 4th Fleet headquarters, which vice, and even
or drug-related problem and was organized by Yeoman 1st ble of endurin
will be systematically sepa- Class Robert Lowder and Fire ofbeingaSailo
rated from the Navy," U.S. 4th Controlman Vt Class Harry Hall. From boot ca
Fleet's Command DAPA, Chief "It's a great time to give back ment exams, j
Culinary Specialist Dwight to the Sailors at 4th Fleet by pro- deployments
Fennell said. viding them information on excelled throi
"A DAPA representative is not how to make smarter decisions sacrifice and de


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez gives remarks during the ceremony
held to celebrate the Navy's 238th Birthday on Oct. 9.



Drug Alcohol Prevention


7 ~

K.
Lw
C' -
~iJ I ~.- -~
~-I !-I--~-
I -~


-Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson
or (DAPA) put out educational material and pizzas for a DAPA event Oct. 3 to educate
campaign focused on encouraging responsible drinking by celebrating achievements made


" Lowder said.
third of 17 to 24
ie United States
)le for Navy ser-
Sfewer are capa-
g the challenges
r.
amp to advance-
ob training and
, Sailors have
ugh hard work,
dedication.


"We encourage Sailors to
drink responsibly and if they
choose to drink, to know their
limits and don't lose control,"
Lowder said. "We want Sailors
to advance in rank and safe-
guard what they have worked so
hard to earn."'
COMUSNAVSO/C4F sup-
ports USSOUTHCOM joint and
combined full-spectrum mili-
tary operations by providing


principally sea-based, forward
presence to ensure freedom
of maneuver in the maritime
domain, to foster and sustain
cooperative relationships with
international partners and to
fully exploit the sea as maneu-
ver space in order to enhance
regional security and promote
peace, stability, and prosperity
in the Caribbean, Central and
South American regions.














THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7


ATG's Man of Iron Honors Wounded Warriors


By Lt.
Samuel Lopez, Jr.
ATG Mayport

As PFA season begins
what a better way to
start the season than by
sharing the story of ATG
Mayport's own Command
Fitness Leader, Chief
Operations Specialist
Scott "Duke" (SW/EXW)
Fulton from Corpus
Christi, Tx. His story is 7
years in the making and
ends with a triumphant
finish in the Ironman
70.3 Augusta Triathlon
while supporting a special
cause.
The 70.3 Ironman
begins with a 1.2 mile
swim through the
Savannah River. As the
athlete exits the cool
waters, they enter the
transition area to pre-
pare for a 56-mile bike
ride throughout Georgia
and into the country-
side of South Carolina.
The hilly terrain spreads
out the field and is a true
test of stamina. As they
make their way back to
the transition area, they
disembark their bike and
rush to prepare for their
final event a 13.1 mile
run throughout down-
town Augusta. Lined with


-Courtesy of ATG Mayport
Chief Operations Specialist (SW/EXW) Fulton completes the Ironman 70.3 Augusta
supporting The Scott Rigsby Foundation for Wounded Warriors.


spectators, the athlete
is cheered from start to
finish as they conclude
a long day with a strong
push to the finish line.
OSC Fulton represent-
ing the Navy with his
Chief's Pride shirt not


only participated, but was
competitive in all three
events: Swim 30min,
Bike 2hr:40, Run lhr:54,
Overall 5hr: 14min.
Just as special was the
cause he supported, "I
registered through The


IRONMAN Foundation
to raise funds and sup-
port returning war-
riors through The Scott
Rigsby Foundation, the
exclusive charity part-
ner of IRONMAN 70.3
Augusta. Funds raised


will help military fami-
lies and its partners in the
Georgia Warrior Alliance,
focusing on Health and
Wellness, Education and
Employment Assistance"
The Scott Rigsby
Foundation is a non-
profit 501-(c)3 organiza-
tion dedicated to inspire,
inform and enable indi-
viduals with loss of limb
or mobility, to live a
healthy, active lifestyle.
The foundation's prima-
ry goal is to promote the
health and wellness of
individuals with physical
challenges by improving
access to Prosthetic and
Orthotic resources, while
supporting programs
that advance prosthetic
technology and empow-
er individual lifestyle
change. For more infor-
mation, visit www.scot-
trigsbyfoundation.org.
"When I race and feel
the pain, I think about
those warriors who have
lost a limb, persevered
and are competing just as
I am. It is then that I real-
ize that these bodies that
carry us are pathetic com-
pared to what is inside us';
Fulton adds.
OSC Fulton has had a
positive impact to ATG


Anderson


flown by the famous
bush pilot and Antarctic
explorer, Carl Ben Eielson.
The plane was stored in
his grandfather's machine
shop where Paul would
come and sit in it to
dream of flight adventure.
Eielson, a Hatton, North
Dakota man, was legend-
ary for aviation exploits
and strong "inspirational
soup" for the young Paul.
As a consequence, a Naval
Aviation career became
the goal of his life. He got
his Naval commission and
received his Navy "Wings
of Gold" at NAS Corpus
Christie in July 1944.
In the years following,
Paul became not only a
great fighter pilot, but
also an accomplished
Naval Officer and coura-
geous leader during some
of the most turbulent and
challenging times in our
country and abroad. He
lived up to the challenge
of those times, gradu-
ating from Marquette
University, furthering
his education at George
Washington University,
obtaining a post gradu-
ate degree at the Naval
Post Graduate School
in Monterey, California
and persevering to earn
the distinguished rank of
"Captain" During this part
of his life, he experienced
many adventures as was
his young wish, living the
life he dreamed of as a
boy.
In the early times, dur-
ing 1945, at the end of
WWII, Paul flew the
F6F Hellcat on the USS
Yorktown, participat-
ing in air strikes during
the amphibious cam-
paigns at Iwo Jima and
Okinawa. He flew numer-
ous sorties over mainland
Japan. For aerial action,
bravery and valor in that

Phil Sea

TYCOM LOA, Sea Trials
and Basic Phase, culmi-
nating with the ship's
receiving of the Battle
Efficiency


venue, Paul received the
Distinguished Flying
Cross and four air medals.
Returning from the
arduous duty that war
time brought, Paul con-
tinued his demanding
pace. He was assigned
to several carrier based
squadrons flying in the
Atlantic Fleet. During this
time, Paul became one of
the earliest "jet qualified"
Naval pilots of his gen-
eration, training in the
"Shooting Star" or F-80.
After qualification, he
went on to VF-41, one of
the pioneer carrier based
jet squadrons in the U.S.
Navy.
Following the sea duty
tour, Paul got a very
unique assignment. He
reported to the Naval Air
Special Weapons Facility
in New Mexico where
he was part of a project
to test nuclear weap-
ons delivery platforms.
His group of pilots flew
dangerous missions in
A4D "Skyhawks" where
airplanes were in very
close proximity to above
ground nuclear blast-
ing tests. This important
research led to many of
the modern systems used
to save pilot lives today.
Paul's long career took
him to leadership roles in
many places, including:
Commanding Officer
of Attack Squadron
64 aboard the USS
Enterprise; "Air Boss"
aboard the USS
Enterprise; Action Officer
at the Joint Chiefs of
Staff in the Pentagon;
Operations and Plans
Officer for Commander
Fleet Air, Western Pacific.
He was assigned to
the staff of the CNO in
Washington, D.C. as the
Naval Technical Training
Officer in 1969.



Award for FY 2012, as
well as the honor of con-
ducting National Tasking
of last year's burial-at-sea
for iconic naval aviator


In between learning,
leading and managing,
Paul continued to log in
flight hours and carrier
landings. By the end of his
career, he accomplished
790 carrier landings and
more than 8,000 flight
hours.
As Commanding Officer
of USS Mars during the
Vietnam War, Paul again
demonstrated his com-
petence and leadership,
receiving the Bronze Star
while in a combat post.
Modestly, he always
insisted that the com-
bined character of his
crew members earned
him the medal.
His last duty station
before retirement was
Commanding Officer of
Naval Station Mayport,
Florida where he served
until 1974. This post-
ing was the most satisfy-
ing of his life. At the time,
26 ships and two aircraft
carriers made Mayport
"home Base". A stunning
responsibility, but again
safe in the hands and
heart of the accomplished
Captain. He reluctantly
retired after the Navy
allowed his command
to uncharacteristically
extend beyond the nor-
mal two year charge.
After retirement, he
made his home in Atlantic
Beach with his wife,
Rosina, "Rosi". Together
they built a very suc-
cessful business in pre-
mier outdoor furniture,
"The Sandpiper" of
Jacksonville.
Paul loved being a fight-
er pilot and served his
country with honor, cour-
age and commitment.
He was grateful to live
his life in service to oth-
ers, generous and kind to
those around him, never
giving up the tradition of

From Page 1

Neil Armstrong, univer-
sally known as the first
man to set foot on the
Moon.


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valor he learned so well
in his long sojourn in the
U.S.Navy.
For those who knew
him as a commander,
Paul's aptitude as an
outstanding and selfless
leader will be remem-
bered fondly. For those
who knew him as a friend,
his witty sense of humor
and basic decency will be
greatly missed. To all who
knew him, he was an offi-
cer and a gentleman.
Paul leaves behind his


loving wife Rosi, his chil-
dren: Pamela Takeshige
(husband Takao), Paul
(wife Sony), Phillip
(wife Michelle), Nella, 4
grandchildren, brother
Dave and a scattering of
numerous nieces, neph-
ews and their families.
He will be deeply
missed.
Church Service will
be held at the Naval
Station Mayport Chapel,
Friday, Oct. 25 at 10 a.m.
Internment with full


Mayport's overall fitness
level. Leading Command
PT every Wednesday he
keeps changing the rou-
tine and incorporates
CrossFit training in order
to elevate the heart rate
and give everyone in the
command no matter the
fitness level an excellent
workout. He had a signifi-
cant role in helping one
of ATG's own being rec-
ognized as NS Mayport's
Athlete in the Spot light
for September.
"Consistency in physi-
cal fitness and nutrition
is key, without it we are
destined to return to
unhealthy habits which
ultimately lead to disap-
pointment in our own
self-image. When I talk
to service members about
their health and fitness
goals, I say come up with
a realistic physical fitness
milestone that is condu-
cive to healthy living, like
running a 5K, or doing
a pull up, instead of try-
ing to lose x-amount of
pounds. In doing this, the
byproduct of achieving
your fitness goal is inevi-
tably weight loss and a
much more positive num-
ber than what we perceive
our weight should be."

From Page 1
military honors at the
Jacksonville National
Cemetery following the
church service at 2:30
p.m.
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made to the Bald Eagle
Squadron, P.O. Box 621,
Orange Park, Fla., 32067-
0621. Funds will be used
to send local area high
school students to the
National Flight Academy's
summer aviation program
in Pensacola.


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8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013



NMCRS Open To Help During Shutdown

From Navy-Marine Corps .- ....


The Navy-Marine Corps
Relief Society is providing assis-
tance to active duty and retired
Marines and Sailors who are
experiencing financial difficul-
ties associated with the govern-
ment shutdown.
Every day of the week, around
the globe, the Society provides
interest-free loans and grants
for basic living expenses, emer-
gency travel expenses, and
other family emergencies for


military members and their
families facing financial crisis
or need. As a non-government,
but Federally-sanctioned orga-
nization, our support to Navy
and Marine Corps families is
unaffected by the government
shutdown.
As a result of the govern-
ment shutdown, the Society is
working closely with the Navy
and Marine Corps Casualty
Assistance Offices to advance


necessary financial assis-
tance for next of kin to travel to
the bedside of seriously ill or
injured Marines and Sailors, or
those who have paid the ulti-
mate sacrifice for our country.
"No Marine Corps or Navy
family with legitimate financial
needs should suffer hardship as
a result of this temporary gov-
ernment closure," stated Maj.
Gen. Jensen, Executive Vice
President and Chief Operating


Officer of the Society. "Every
member of the NMCRS Team is
leaning forward to assist those
in need!"
For more information on the
Society's programs and servic-
es, please visit www.nmcrs.org
or contact your nearest NMCRS
office at www.nmcrs.org/loca-
tion.
Since 1904, the Navy-Marine
Corps Relief Society has pro-
vided financial assistance and


education to active duty and
retired members of the United
States Navy and Marine Corps,
their eligible family members
and survivors when in need.
Headquartered in Arlington,
Virginia, the Society is a non-
profit, charitable organization
that is staffed by nearly 3,700
volunteers, and a small cadre
of employees, in offices around
the world ashore and aboard
ships.


October FFSC Classes Available


From FFSC
The following class-
es and activities are
offered by the Fleet and
Family Support Center
(FFSC) and are free of
charge. Pre-registration
is required and childcare
is not available. For more
information about the
classes or to register call
270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC
is located in Building One
on Massey.
Oct. 17, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
Parents and children
together meet to share
parenting concerns,
ideas, and fun! The group
invites professionals to
address specific areas of
concern such as nutrition,
toilet training, etc. We
even take field trips sev-
eral times a year to local
parks, museums and play-
grounds. This group is
designed for moms new
to the area or moms who
want their child to inter-
act with other children
their child's age. All chil-
dren age four and below
are invited to attend.
Oct. 21, 8:30 a.m.-4
p.m., Ombudsman Basic
Training, FFSC Bldg. 1,
Room 607
Oct. 21-25, 7:30 a.m.-


4:30 p.m., Transition GPS
Separatee Workshop,
Bldg. 1, Room 1616
Oct. 22, 8:30 a.m.-4
p.m., Ombudsman Basic
Training, FFSC Bldg. 1,
Room 607
Oct. 22, 10 a.m.-noon,
What About The Kids?,
FFSC Building 1, Room
702
Children who witness
family violence are often
forgotten as the unintend-
ed victims. A wide range
of child adjustment prob-
lems has been found to
be associated with expo-
sure to domestic violence.
Parent's need to see,
understand the effects
of domestic violence on
children as encompass-
ing behavior, emotion,
development and social-
ization. Parents need to
understand that there is
an intergenerational cycle
of violence and they may
be creating a legacy for
their child of learned vio-
lent behavior. The pur-
pose of this program is
not to shame parents for
events that have already
happened, but to instill
hope that things can
change. The knowledge
that the violence, which
many parents incorrectly


believe is unseen by their
children, is negatively
impacting their children's
growth and development
and may provide an addi-
tional motivator for end-
ing the violence and seek-
ing intervention.
Oct. 23, 8:30 a.m.-4
p.m., Ombudsman Basic
Training, FFSC Bldg. 1,
Room 607
Oct. 23, 9 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., Military
Family Employment
Orientation, FFSC Bldg.
1, Room 719
Oct. 23, 1:30-3
p.m., Military Family
Employment Resume
Writing, FFSC Bldg. 1,
Room 719
Oct. 23, 9-11 a.m.,
Credit Management,
FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719
Oct. 24, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.,
FAP Key Personnel
Training, FFSC Bldg. 1,
Room 607
Oct. 24, 9 a.m.-noon,
Tottle Tyme Playgroup,
USO
Oct. 28-Nov. 1, 7:30
a.m.-4 p.m., Command
Financial Specialist
Training, FFSC Bldg. 1
Room 1616
Oct. 28, Anger
Management Workshop,
FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702


Oct. 29, 10 a.m.-noon,
Active Parenting Ages
5-12, FFSC Building 1,
Room 607
The program is
based on Dr. Michael
Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE
PARENTING NOW 6
classes. This program
is designed to assist you
and your family put into
practice the skills learned
in the class. Specific par-
enting skills that are dis-
cussed as well as some
of the challenges that
are faced by all families
include understanding
yourself and your child,
the four goals of misbe-
havior, building courage
and character in your
child, and encourag-
ing and listening to your
child. Each week a differ-
ent topic is thoroughly
covered via discussion,
video vignettes, and
handbook information.
Participation in all 6 ses-
sions is required.
Oct. 30, 9 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., Military
Family Employment
Orientation, FFSC Bldg.
1, Room 719
Oct. 30, 1:30-3
p.m., Military Family
Employment Resume
Writing, FFSC Bldg. 1


CFC Placed



On Hold

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

The Combined Federal Campaign has been
placed on hold while the federal government
shutdown continues, according to a Pentagon
memo.
Susan A. Yarwood, the human resources direc-
tor with Washington Headquarters Services,
announced that CFC activities in the continental
United States, apart from on-going employee
contributions, are indefinitely suspended.
The campaign is a one-stop shop for federal
employees to make donations to thousands of
charities through automatic payroll deductions.
Last year, federal workers contributed $258 mil-
lion via the CFC.
The 2013 CFC campaign started Sept. 5. When
the partial government shutdown hit on October
1, officials determined that the program would
have to be suspended.
"Upon legal review, these activities are not
excepted from furlough nor are they appropri-
ate activities under the Pay Our Military Act,"
Yarwood wrote in the memo dated Oct. 9. "Until
such time as we have a continuing resolution or
congressionally approved appropriation, please
postpone all CFC events, training, and fund-
raisers."
During the hiatus, military and civilian mem-
bers can still donate to the charities of their
choice via the MyPay option.
Officials say the campaign is prepared to
restart quickly once the shutdown is over.


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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9


Robert G. Bradley Performs Burial At Sea


By Lt.j.g. Matthew
Roberts
USSRobert G. 5'. PAO
Sailors stationed aboard
the guided missile frigate,
USS Robert G. Bradley
(FFG 49) performed a
burial at sea for 18 veter-
ans and 2 of their spouses
while underway on Oct. 7.
Following tradition, the
ship slowed, lowered the
colors to half-mast, and
a delegation of officers,
chief petty officers, and
Sailors lined-up in forma-
tion in dress uniform to
pay their respects. A fir-
ing detail was also assem-
bled for a 21-gun salute.
The military and reli-
gious aspects of the cer-
emony were conducted
with dignity and solem-
nity.
The burial at sea
ceremony was offici-
ated by Chaplain (Lt.)
Thomas Bingol with
Bradley's Commanding
Officer, Cmdr. Peter
Ehlers, Executive Officer
Cmdr. John Lepak and
Command Senior Chief
Willie Henson as mem-
bers of the official party.
"The Sailors were very


-Photo by ET1 Daniel Raley
The firing detailfires a salute during a burial at sea ceremony onboard USS Robert G.
Bradley (FFG 49).


professional and showed
great respect towards
those who were laid
to rest," said Chaplain
Bingol.
Following the ceremo-
ny, Chaplain Bingol will
mail packages to the pri-
mary next of kin, which
include a letter from the
commanding officer
detailing the date, time,


and exact location of the
burial. Also in the pack-
age will be three volleys
from the 21-gun salute.
Fire Controlman 2nd
Class Gregory Glover, one
of the Sailors in the rifle
detail, was proud to be
included in the ceremony.
"I'm proud to give our
prior service members the
dignity and respect they


earned,";' said Glover.
USS Robert G. Bradley,
homeported out of
Mayport, FL, is currently
scheduled to decom-
mission in March 2014.
The RGB was commis-
sioned August 11, 1984
in Portsmouth, New
Hampshire as the 41St
Oliver Hazard Perry Class
Guided Missile Frigate.


-Photo by ET1 Daniel Raley
Seaman Quartermaster Michael Pagan and Seaman
Personnel Specialist Roberto Cruz lay the deceased to rest.


Carney Crew Spends


Time With Families


By Lt.jg. Lily Hinz
USS Carney Public. ,,-
USS Carney Sailors and
their families participated
in its Family Day event on
Oct. 8.
Planned and executed
by Carney's First Class
Petty Officer Association,
the younger family mem-
bers of Carney Sailors
became "Junior Carney
Warriors" and were given
a signature book in hopes
of becoming an honorary
Enlisted Surface Warfare
Specialist.
This event was an


opportunity to demon-
strate to families and
friends some of Carney's
awesome and unique
capabilities, such as dam-
age control, VBSS opera-
tions and combat sys-
tems. Friends and fam-
ily also got a chance to sit
in the Captain's chair in
the pilot house. The ship
served pizza dinner, ice
cream for dessert.
"I am glad I got to
come see my Dad and all
the people he works for
and with every day," said
10-year-old Alex Dover,


son of Lt.j.g. Tim Dover.
Hospitalman 1st Class
(SW) Christopher Loy
played a big role in put-
ting the event together.
"The First Class worked
together to plan and
organize this event, and I
think it went really well,"
he said. "We are looking
forward to doing some-
thing like this again when
we return from deploy-
ment next spring."
USS Carney will depart
today (Oct. 17) on a
scheduled seven-month
deployment to 51 fleet.


-Photo courtesy of USS Carney
Lt.j.g. Tim Dover guides wife Amanda and their two sons on a tour of the ship during
Carney's Family Day on Oct. 8.




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10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013



Unemployment Benefits May Help



Some Furloughed DOD Civilians


By Cheryl Pellerin
American Forces Press Service

On the 10th day of the
partial government shut-
down, DOD civilians
excluded by law from
Defense Secretary Chuck
Hagel's Oct. 7 recall to
work of thousands of fel-
low employees still await
an end to the political
standoff that sent them
home and stopped their
paychecks Oct. 1.
Hagel said Oct. 5 that
the department tried to
"exempt as many DOD
civilian personnel as pos-
sible" from furloughs and
will continue to try to
bring all civilian employ-
ees back to work as soon
as possible.
"Ultimately," he added,
"the surest way to end
these damaging and irre-
sponsible furloughs and
to enable us to fulfill our
mission as a department
is for Congress to pass a
budget and restore funds
for the entire federal gov-
ernment."
According to a Defense
Civilian Personnel
Advisory Service ref-
erence guide called
"Pay and Leave dur-


ing the Fiscal Year 2014
Shutdown Furlough,"
employees furloughed
Oct. 1 and not recalled to
work will receive regular
pay and allowances for
hours worked through
Sept. 30. They'll also get
a partial paycheck for the
pay period including Oct.
1-5.
DOD civilians will
stay in nonpay, nonduty
status until recalled to
duty. If they are in non-
pay, nonduty status on
the days before and after
Columbus Day, they
won't receive pay at that
time for the holiday.
Congress must pass leg-
islation to restore pay and
allowances for all days
spent in furlough sta-
tus before any employee
goes back into pay sta-
tus. -tIf such legislation
is passed, employees will
be paid for the time they
spent conducting shut-
down activities on Oct.
1 but they won't get that
pay until a 2014 appropri-


ation is approved for the
department. At that time
they'll receive pay for the
Columbus Day holiday.
Furlough affects leave
accrual, according to
the reference guide. In a
separate furlough earlier
this year triggered by the
budget sequester, most
employees were ordered
to take six unpaid days, or
48 hours, off work. During
the current round of fur-
loughs brought on by the
government shutdown,
when employees reach a
total of 10 furlough days
this month, or 80 hours,
on or around Oct. 4,
they'll lose the sick leave
and annual leave they
would have earned during
the pay period.
Once an employee
reaches 80 hours of non-
pay time during a cal-
endar year, leave is no
longer accrued. A new
80-hour threshold begins
the following pay period.
For individuals or fami-
lies who are struggling


because they're not work-
ing and not getting paid,
some help may be avail-
able through state unem-
ployment compensation
agencies.
According to a
fact sheet on unem-
ployment insurance
for federal workers,
the Unemployment
Compensation for Federal
Employees, or UCFE,
program is adminis-
tered by state unemploy-
ment insurance agencies.
In general, eligibility is
determined by the state
where an employee is
assigned to duty.
Furloughed DOD civil-
ians may apply on or after
the first day they're fur-
loughed and put in non-
pay status. Furloughed
employees should be eli-
gible as long as they meet
all other state eligibility
factors, according to the
fact sheet.
To file claims, DOD
civilians can contact the
unemployment insurance
agency in the state where
they work. Such agencies
usually have websites,
online forms and tele-
phone numbers to call for


information or to submit
applications by phone.
Employees may be
asked to provide a form
SF-8 to verify an agency
mailing address or a form
SF-50 to verify wages.
If these documents are
unavailable, the state
may request proof of
wages such as earnings
and leave statements or
last year's W-2. The state
may also request an affi-
davit certifying that the
employee is not working
because of the furlough
and to verify wages.
Amounts paid vary
according to prior earn-
ings. Most states pay a
maximum of 26 weeks
of regular benefits. Once
the shutdown ends
and employees have
returned to work, regard-
less of whether they have
received paychecks, they
are no longer eligible for
benefits.
Some states require
applicants to serve a wait-
ing week, the fact sheet
says. This means that
after a claim is approved,
the first week for which
individuals are entitled
to benefits is an unpaid


week.
Most states issue pay-
ments to eligible individu-
als within 14-21 days after
the claim is approved.
On Oct. 5, the Federal
Employee Retroactive
Pay Fairness Act passed
the House by a vote of
407-0. The Senate hasn't
yet taken action on the
bill but if they do and
President Barack Obama
signs it into law, fur-
loughed federal employ-
ees will receive back pay
for the time they've been
out of work once the
shutdown ends. Any lost
leave would also will be
restored.
According to the fact
sheet, if Congress pass-
es legislation that retro-
actively provides for the
payment of salary, states
generally require repay-
ment of unemployment
benefits paid out. States
will advise affected claim-
ants if benefits are over-
paid, the fact sheet says,
and provide repayment
options.


Furlough Raises


Questions On


Civilian Leave, Pay


By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service
Only those Defense
Department civil-
ians recalled from fur-
lough under the Pay Our
Military Act may take
annual and sick leave, a
Pentagon spokesman said
Oct. 8.
"Employees who
remain on furlough are
in a nonpay, nonduty sta-
tus, so there is no leave
to take," Lt. Cmdr. Nate
Christensen explained.
So a civilian employee
who had leave planned
and is now furloughed
can still take that vaca-
tion. It will not count as
leave as long as the fur-
lough lasts.
Once the president
signs an appropria-
tion or Congress passes
a continuing resolution,
furloughed employees
will report back to work.
Further legislation is nec-
essary for employees to
receive retroactive pay
for days lost to the shut-
down. If that happens,
employees will be paid


for the furlough time, and
will not be charged for
any leave that had been
approved for days that
became furlough days.
On DoD civilian pay,
the situation is a bit differ-
ent. The next civilian pay
date is Oct. 11, and under
the Pay Our Military Act,
Defense Department
civilians will receive pay-
checks. Excepted employ-
ees those who contin-
ued to work will receive
the full 80 hours of pay.
Those furloughed will
receive 48 hours of pay
for the pay period cov-
ered by that payday, up
and to and including Sept.
30. Furloughed employ-
ees will receive pay for the
four hours they worked
Oct. 1 to implement the
orderly shutdown once
there a new appropriation
or continuing resolution
is in effect.
DoD civilian employees
called back to work Oct.
7 will receive their pay-
checks for the current pay
period Oct. 25.


Contract Award For


NAVSEA Repairs


From Defense Media Activity -
Navy

The Navy awarded
CH2M Hill Constructors,
Inc. a $6.4 million dollar
firm-fixed-price contract
for the repair and res-
toration of the Historic
Headquarters Facility of
the Naval Sea Systems
Command (NAVSEA),
Building 197, at the
Washington Navy Yard
Sept. 30.
Building 197 suffered
extensive and widespread
damage during the trag-
ic shooting and related
events that occurred Sept.
16.
The Naval Facilities
Engineering Command
awarded the contract to
CH2M Hill Constructors,
Inc., to make immedi-
ate safety repairs to the
facility, conduct detailed
damage assessments, and
develop alternative con-
cept designs.


The contract also con-
tains funding for con-
cept studies related to
final disposition of the
building. This contract
will allow the Navy to
restore the building to a
safe condition and pro-
vide options for the Chief
of Naval Operations and
Secretary of the Navy's
consideration in their
decision making process.
No decision has been
reached on the final dis-
position of NAVSEA HQ.
The NAVSEA
Headquarters building
is approximately 650,000
square feet and is a his-
toric federal facility with
administrative and sup-
port spaces for more than
3,000 employees.
CH2M Hill
Constructors, Inc. is
based out of Englewood,
Colo.


-Photo by MC1 Joshua J. Wahl
Newport News Shipbuilding floods Dry Dock 12 to float the first in class aircraft carrier, Pre-Commissioning
Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).



Shamal From Page 1


McCampbell (DDG 85),
and Combat Systems
Officer in USS Rentz (FFG
46).
She graduated The
George Washington
University with a Master
of Arts in Political
Management.
Assignments ashore
have included a tour as
flag aide at U.S. Fifth Fleet
and as editor of Surface
Warfare Magazine, Chief
of Naval Operations
(N86).
Her personal deco-
rations include the
Navy and Marine Corps
Commendation Medal
(three awards), Navy
and Marine Corps
Achievement Medal
(six awards), and vari-
ous campaign and unit


DESRON 40

(CGN 36); USS John
A. Moore (FFG 19) as
Executive Officer; and
Destroyer Squadron 22
as Chief of Staff. Van
Wagoner then com-
manded USS Mclnerney
(FFG 8) deploying to
the North Sea and
Mediterranean as plank
owner of Standing
NATO Response Force
Maritime Group 1; and
Reactor Officer in USS
Theodore Roosevelt


awards.
Azzarello was born
and raised in Buffalo,
New York. He enlisted
in the Navy in February
1993 and was com-
missioned through the
Enlisted Commissioning
Program. While in the
Enlisted Commissioning
Program, he attended Old
Dominion University and
graduated in 2002 with
a Bachelors of Science
Degree in Mechanical
Engineering Technology.
As an Enlisted Sailor,
Azzarello completed
Recruit Training and
Airman Apprenticeship
Training in April 1993 and
shortly after he reported
aboard the USS Enterprise
(CVN 65). In February
1995, he attended AS




(CVN 71) and USS I
Abraham Lincoln (CVN (
72). t
Captain Van p
Wagoner's shore duty t
assignments include
Naval Nuclear Power
School where he earned
an AQD to super-
vise Naval Nuclear
Propulsion Systems C
(graduating second in
his class), Commander a
Naval Surface Forces, t
U.S. Pacific Fleet as I


Al School in NATTC
Millington and subse-
quently reported to NAS
Norfolk AIMD. Following
shore duty Azzarello,
reported aboard USS
George Washington
(CVN 73) until his accep-
tance in to the Enlisted
Commissioning Program
in June 1999.
Following commission-
ing he reported aboard
USS Gunston Hall (LSD
44) where he served as the
Repair Officer, Machinery
Division Officer, Main
Propulsion Assistant and
then Navigator.
In February 2006,
Azzarello reported as an
Engineering Assessor at
Afloat Training Group,
Atlantic. As an Assessor,
he served as a member


From Page 1

Force Reactor Controls
Officer and member of
he Nuclear Propulsion
Mobile Training Team;
he Naval War College
here he earned a
Master's Degree in
National Security
and Strategic Studies;
and Special Assistant
or CVN Training
and Readiness for
he Director of Naval
Reactors (NAVSEA 08).


of the Diesel and Steam
Assessment teams and as
the MCM and PC Class
Engineering lead. While
at Afloat Training Group
Atlantic he received
his Masters of Science
Degree in Engineering
Management from Old
Dominion University.
In June 2010, he was
assigned as the Chief
Engineer aboard USS
McFaul (DDG 74). In May
2012, Azzarello assumed
command of PC Crew
KILO. Since assuming
command, Crew KILO has
embarked USS Hurricane
(PC 3), completed an
8-month deployment on
USS Firebolt (PC 10), and
became the permanent
crew of USS Shamal (PC
13).



Information, guiac, and I1_


Navy
N E W S


Getting Wet


Ir- A.

1 -














THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11



FY14 GMT Schedule Announced


By Cmdr. Kelly Branno
Naval Education and Training Comm
Public.;,
Topics for General Milil
Training (GMT) for Fiscal Y
(FY) 14 were announced
NAVADMIN 264/13, Oct. 9.
The announcement, usi
ly released Oct. 1, was dela
due to the ongoing effor
streamline or eliminate adn
istrative burdens on the fl
allowing more time to focus
mission readiness. In suppoi
this effort, known as Reduc
Administrative Distracti
(RAD), a revision of the G
instruction is nearing comp
tion.
"Through RAD and ot
feedback, the Fleet has b
pretty clear that they wan
to give this a good hard lo
said Vice Adm. Bill Mori
chief of naval personnel. '
need to find the right bala
of required training and w]
space for our commanders."
While each of the GMT s
jects are important, Mo
said his staff's review of


Southern Womens
Show
The Southern Women's
show will be at the Prime
Osborn Convention
Center on Oct. 17-20.
Come on out to enjoy
food, fashion, celebrity
guests, health informa-
tion, along with beauty
and lifestyle informa-
tion. For more informa-
tion please visit: www.
southernwomensshow.
com. Mayport and NAS
JAX USO Centers are sell-
ing tickets for $5 each/
cash only. Tickets will also
be available for purchase
through the ITT office at
Kings Bay.
FRA 290 Halloween
Carnival-Oct, 26
Come out to Fleet
Reserve 290 on Mayport
Road for the Halloween
Carnival. It is free and
open to military families.
There will be food and
games for the children, a
costume contest, bounce
house, and pictures. You
must preregister for this
event. You can register
by calling (904) 629-4444
and via email: fra290car-
nival@yahoo.com.
Military Spouse
Vendor Show
Looking for holiday gift
ideas? Are you a military
spouse with a small busi-


Out in Town


Oct. 18-20
The Florida Branch of
the Second Indianhead
Division Association will
have its annual reunion
in Titusville, Florida on,
2013 at the Best Western
Space Shuttle Inn. All vet-
erans of the 2nd Infantry
Divisions are invited. For
more information, call
the branch secretary-trea-
surer, Donald Calnan, at
(561) 742-5379 or send an
email to 2ida.mail@char-
ter.net.
Sunday, Oct. 20
The Beaches Museum
& History Park invites its
members and the gen-
eral public to attend the
opening of the Beaches
Museum Chapel from
5-6:30 p.m. The his-
toric chapel is located
at 505 Beach Boulevard,
Jacksonville Beach.
Admission is free and
refreshments will be
served. Parking is avail-
able along Pablo Avenue.
Friday, Oct. 25


The UF/IFAS Extension
Duval County Office will
be offering a class on
Food Preservation from
9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. The pro-
gram will focus mainly
on the proper techniques
in canning foods safely,
however freezing and dry-
ing will also be covered.
Come and learn the new-
est rules and techniques


instruction will ensure train-
ing requirements are validated,
inefficiencies are eliminated,
and improvements are made to
overall program effectiveness.
The intent of the GMT instruc-
tion revision is to provide clear
communication of require-
ments and to establish an annu-
al review process for each topic.
There are two categories of
GMT topics that must be com-
pleted in FY 14. Category One
topics must be conducted via
face-to-face, instructor-led
training sessions provided
at the command level. Senior
leadership, command training
teams, or collateral duty train-
ing officers/chief petty officers
will conduct Category One
GMT. The FY 14 Category One
GMT topics are: Alcohol Abuse
Prevention and Control; Equal
Opportunity and Grievance
Procedures; Hazing Policy and
Prevention; Personal Financial
Management; Sexual Assault
Prevention and Response
Awareness; Sexual Harassment
and Grievance Procedures;




uso
N e s


ness? If you answered
yes to either of these
questions, the Military
Spouse Vendor Show
at the Mayport USO on
Nov. 2 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
is for you. Please email
milwivesbusinessande-
vents@gmail.com for
more information or to
become a vendor. Vendor
slots fill fast, so sign up
today.
NOSA Holiday Bazaar-
Dec. 7
Join NOSA at the
Mayport USO for their
annual holiday bazaar.
There will be food, ven-
dors, and fun for all.
NOSA will provide free
holiday photos so come
dressed in your holiday
best. For vendor reg-
istration, please email
Jennifer.wilsnack@gmail.
com. See attached flyer
for more information.
Military Spouse
COMPASS Program
COMPASS is a spouse-
to-spouse mentoring
program that introduces
participants to all aspects
of the military lifestyle.
COMPASS offers mili-
tary spouses the oppor-


Stress Management; and
Suicide Awareness and
Prevention.
"These are the opportuni-
ties for leadership to engage
and have frank and deliberate
discussions about command-
delivered training, ensuring
Sailors understand their roles
and responsibilities;'" said Capt.
John Newcomer, Commanding
Officer at the Center for
Personal and Professional
Development (CPPD).
The remaining required GMT
topics are Category Two top-
ics that can be completed via
Navy e-Learning or through
face-to-face, command-deliv-
ered training at the discretion
of the unit commander. The
Category Two GMT topics for
FY 14 are: Anger Management;
Antiterrorism/Force Protection;
Combating Trafficking in
Persons; Counterintelligence
Awareness and Reporting;
Domestic Violence Prevention
and Reporting; Drug Abuse
Prevention and Control;
Fraternization Awareness


tunity to establish a peer
network, acquire knowl-
edge and develop skills
necessary to successfully
meet future challenges of
military life. Please come
join us! We'll be sure to
make you smile, help you
meet other spouses, pro-
vide you with YUMMY
Dinners, and even reim-
burse you for babysitting
fees** (please inquire with
a Compass Mentor for
more info). Registration
IS REQUIRED! Please visit
www.gocompass.org to
find a Session near you.
Jazzland Cafe Free
Admission
Active Duty, Retirees,
Reservists, and National
Guard members enjoy
live jazz music sessions
for free every Tuesday
night from 6-9 p.m. at the
Jazzland Caf6 located at
1324 University Blvd.
North. Jazzland has an
authentic mix of local and
internationally known
musicians, led by a Jazz
Trio of great, world class
performers. And for you
musicians out there,
you're invited to partici-
pate in the jam sessions.


COMMUNITY
(._\ II N I).\I


for keeping your family
safe while preserving your
favorite foods all year
long. All participants will
receive the newest food
preservation information
and will have the oppor-
tunity to make their own
homemade jelly. Cost is
$10 per person. Space is
limited, pre-registration
and pre-payment are
required by Wednesday,
Oct. 23. Please contact
Sandra or Melanie at 904-
255-7450 to register.
Saturday, Oct. 19
Come celebrate five
centuries of Spanish
influence in Florida with
an informative talk at 2
p.m. about the San Juan
del Puerto Mission on
Ft. George Island. Learn
about Fr. Pareja, who
translated the native
Timucuan language and
gained insight into their
unique culture. This pro-
gram will take place at
the Ribault Club on Fort
George Island Cultural
State Park. No reserva-
tions are necessary and
the program is free.
The Jacksonville
Genealogical Society
(JGS) will hold their
monthly meeting begin-
ning at 1:30 p.m. at the
Webb-Wesconnett Branch
Library, 6887 103rd Street,


Jacksonville, Florida.
Join a park ranger at 2
p.m. to learn about the
many common species
that inhabit the natural
communities of the unde-
veloped barrier islands of
northeast Florida. This
program will take place at
the Ribault Club on Fort
George Island Cultural
State Park. No reserva-
tions are necessary and
the program is free.
Christ United
Methodist Church, 400
Penman Road, Neptune
Beach. Come join us at
the Pumpkin Patch from
10 a.m.-2 p.m. for this
annual event for fam-
ily fun, food, games, and
those very special hand-
made gifts and home-
made goodies for the
holidays. For information,
please contact the Church
Office at 249-5370.
Saturday, Nov. 2
The University Of
Florida Cooperative
Extension Family and
Consumer Sciences
Program will present
a program on Cooking
Healthy for the Holidays
at the Duval County
Extension Office, 1010
North McDuff Avenue on
at 10 A.M. Come deco-
rate and bake using fresh
herbs of the season.


and Prevention; Information
Assurance; Operational Risk
Management; Operational
Security; Physical Readiness;
Privacy and Personally
Identifiable Information
Awareness; Records
Management; Sexual Health
and Responsibility; and
Tobacco Use Prevention and
Cessation.
In order to allow sufficient
time to complete the GMT
program review, formulate
program change proposals,
and implement the approved
changes, completion of
Category Two GMT topics is
waived for FY 14 except for the
following topics which must
be completed: Antiterrorism/
Force Protection; Combating
Trafficking in Persons;
Counterintelligence Awareness
and Reporting; Information
Assurance; Operational
Security; and Records
Management.
Standardized training mate-
rial for Category One and
Category Two training is avail-


For more information,
please email: info@jaz-
zlandcafe.com or call
Carole at (904) 240-1009.
etc).
Checker Yellow Cab
Of Jacksonville-Rate
Discounts
The Greater
Jacksonville Area USO is
proud to announce a new
partnership with Checker
Yellow Cab of Jacksonville
to support troops and
families.
Are You Ready For
Some Football?
Jaguar Ticket sales will
begin at noon. Price is
$15 per ticket (cash only).
All active duty mem-
bers, including Florida
National Guard, Reserve
personnel who are on
current active duty orders
and dependents are eligi-
ble to purchase/use these
tickets. Tickets are first
come, first served.
Supporting America's
Heroes
The American Red
Cross is expanding ser-
vices to provide assis-
tance and resources to
veterans of Operation
Enduring Freedom and
Operation Iraqi Freedom
to help support their tran-
sition into civilian life.
Emergency needs that
may warrant assistance


Sample a variety of tasty
dishes using herbs as
the centerpiece. Reserve
your spot and take home
recipes and ideas to
make your holiday one
to remember. All ages
are encouraged to par-


may include medical and
dental needs, rent assis-
tance, utility payments,
and food; access to refer-
ral services; or other
assistance depending on
need. Applicants for these
funds must demonstrate
financial hardship, and/
or lack of other available
resources due to par-
ticipation in OEF or OIF.
Eligible veterans include
those of all services, the
Reserve component and
National Guard.
For more informa-
tion, please contact a Red
Cross Military Services
caseworker at (904) 246-
1395
Recycling
Recycling has come to
the Greater Jacksonville
Area USO. If you have
any office paper, shred-
ded paper, old magazines,
and newspapers that you
would like to donate,
please bring it to either
the Mayport or NAS JAX
USO Center. This will be
a great fundraiser for the
USO so please help us fill
the bins. Help support the
troops with your unwant-
ed paper!
United Through
Reading program makes
it possible to share in the
enjoyment of reading to
the children in your life,


ticipate in this workshop!
Reservations and pre-
payment are necessary
by Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013.
You may pre-register at:
https://cookinghealthy-
forfall.eventbrite.com or
contact Sandra at 255-


e for download from the
sonal Development GMT
,e on the Navy Knowledge
line (NKO) webpage at www.
).navy.mil. Training com-
tion of Category One top-
must be recorded in Fleet
dining Management Planning
tem (FLTMPS) via learn-
event completion forms.
ditionally, a GMT calendar
FY 14 is also available on
NKO GMT page, including
ommended training deliv-
months to coincide with
wide training themes.
MT questions should be
Dressed to Lyman Watts,
AT program manager at
'-492-0763, DSN: 492 or
e-mail to the Center for
rsonal and Professional
velopment at gmt.distribu-
i@navy.mil.
additional information about
T training requirements for
14 is detailed in NAVADMIN
/13.


even while thousands of
miles apart. The Mayport
Center and NAS Center
can record you reading
a book to your children
and send it to them after
you have gone on deploy-
ment. It is a great way to
make them smile on their
special day even when
you can not be there with
them. Please contact your
local USO center for more
information.
There is a computer
resource center avail-
able to all service mem-
bers with email, Internet
and word processing. Fax,
copy and free notary ser-
vice is also available.
Watch TV or a movie
from the video library.
Service members can also
enjoy video games or use
the sports equipment.
There is a full kitchen,
showers, a quiet reading
room and a meeting room
available at the USO. The
USO is available for meet-
ings, support groups,
receptions, parties and
pre-deployment briefs.
A TV, VCR and overhead
projector are available for
use.
For more information
about activities or meet-
ing availabilities, call 246-
3481 or stop by the center
at 2560 Mayport Road.


7450 to schedule your res-
ervation.
Saturday, Nov. 9
Christ United
Methodist Churchis host-
ing its annual Veteran's
Day Dinner Dance at 6
p.m. Call 249-5370.













12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013



Get Cookin' With Fire Prevention


By MCI(SW)
Michael Wiss
Navy Public. Support Ele-
ment, Southeast
"Get Cookin' and pre-
vent Kitchen Fires" was
the message stressed by
the First Coast Navy Fire
& Emergency Service
Department and nonprof-
it National Fire Protection
Agency (NFPA) during
Fire Prevention Week
October 6-12.
Although Kitchen
fires were the theme, the
First Coast team along
with Sparky Pumper and
Engine Company held
many events to make peo-
ple and children on Naval
Station Mayport aware of
fire dangers and how to
prevent them from hap-
pening.
"We try and educate
the children about fire
prevention with the hope
they can make their
parents more aware of
the potential hazards,"
said First Coast Navy
and Fire Emergency
Inspector Angel Roman.
"Sometimes people
become complacent. We
are trying to heighten
awareness to teach about
the possible dangers with
kitchen fires. We make it
fun for the kids, but there
is always the message
about the dangers of fire
and how to prevent it."
The events included
a "Kickoff" visit from
Sparky Pumper and
the Engine Company
at the Off-base Child
Development Center, fire
drills at the Youth cen-
ter, family home provider
"Home Evacuation Drills,"
live fire extinguisher
training and a base-wide
unannounced fire drill.
According to First Coast
Navy and Fire Emergency
Inspector Anita Wilson,
people need to use this
training and common
sense to help prevent
kitchen fires, which are
the leading cause of home
fires.
"This event is to just get
the word out that people
can be a little safer to help
prevent kitchen fires'," she
said. "We try and make
the kids not afraid or hide
from us if there is a fire or


FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 6-12L2013 1
PREVENT KITCHEN FIRES
GO TO FPW.ORG AND GET COOKING WITH FIRE SAFETY

, _.A


medical emergency in the
home.'
The history of Fire
Prevention Week can be
traced back to the Great
Chicago Fire, which start-
ed on Oct. 8, 1871 and
continued through Oct.
9. In just 27 hours this
conflagration killed 300,
left 90,000 people home-
less, and destroyed 17,400
structures.
In 1911, on the 40th
anniversary of this tragic
event, the Fire Marshals
Association of North
America started the tra-
dition of using this anni-
versary to keep the pub-
lic informed about the
importance of fire preven-
tion.
Over the next nine
years this effort became
so effective that in 1920
President Woodrow
Wilson issued the first
National Fire Prevention
Day Proclamation set-
ting Fire Prevention Week
as the Sunday through
Saturday period in which
Oct. 8 falls each year
The latest statistics
from NFPA say U.S. Fire
Departments responded
to an estimated annual
average of 156,600 cook-
ing-related fires between
2007-2011. Two of every
five home fires begin in
the kitchen-more than
any other place in the
home. Cooking fires are
also the leading cause of
home fire-related inju-
ries. Among the fire safety
tips being emphasized
include:
-Stay in the kitchen
when you are frying, grill-
ing, or broiling food. If
you must leave the room
even for a short period of
time, turn off the stove.
*Keep cooking areas
clean and clear of com-
bustibles (e.g. potholders,
towels, rags, drapes and
food packaging).
-Keep children away
from cooking areas by
enforcing a "kid-free


zone" of three feet around
the stove.
-Always keep an oven
mitt and a lid nearby. If a
small grease fire starts in
a pan, smother the flames
by carefully sliding the lid
over the pan (make sure
you are wearing the oven
mitt). Turn off the burner.
Do not move the pan. To
keep the fire from restart-
ing, do not remove the
lid until it is completely
cool. Never pour water
on a grease fire. If the fire
does not go out, get out of
the home and call the fire
department.
Fire prevention and
injuries can be eliminat-
ed. People need to prac-
tice fire safety all the time,
not just during fire pre-
vention week.
"We started this to bring
into people's mind to
remember to check their
smoke detectors, prac-
tice fire drills and have
an escape plan in case of
a fire," Wilson said. "We
need to put fire preven-
tion front and center. We
provide the training and
with common sense you
can stay safe and avoid
potential dangers in the
kitchen'"


-Photos by MC2 Salton Cebe
Above, First Coast Navy and Fire Emergency Inspector Angel Roman talk to children
at the NS Mayport Child Development Center about fire safety during Fire Prevention
Week Oct. 7. Below, children take a closer look at the arm on one of thefire trucks.


Children learn about the importance of fire prevention from First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue. Children at the
Mayport Child Development Center participate in Fire Prevention Week.


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Above, Firefighter Davy Lam high fives a child during
the kick off of Fire Prevention Week at the Mayport Child
Development Center Below, children get a close look at
one of First Coast Navy Fire and Rescues fire trucks on
display.


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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13


Auto Skills Center
Oct. Special: 10% off open
stall fees and 4-wheel brake job,
turn rotors, tire rotation and
balance $225 (most vehicles).
270-5392
Tire Special: Buy four tires
and receive free rotation on
those tires for life (must show
receipt to receive rotation). 270-
5392
Beachside Bingo
Wednesday: Lunchtime
Bingo. Every Wednesday at
11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo.
Two $500 payouts every week.
Buy two, get one free. Still only
$13.00 per pack. 270-7204
Oct. 18: Bingomania. 6:30
pm at Beachside Bingo. Over
$17,000 in prizes, drawings,
prize wheel, dessert table &
more! call and sign up; no tick-
ets required. 5 pack Computers
$99.00 All Paper Packs $30.00;
No Coupons to be used on this
day. 270-7204
Castaway's Lounge
Every Weekday: Castaway's
After Work, At Ease: Stop into
Castaway's every Monday-
Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our
great nightly specials! Enjoy
Margarita Monday, Tuesday's
Pint Glass Night, Around-the-
World Wednesday, BOGO
Thursday and Five Dollar
Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles
on the 141 and last day of every
month! 270-7205


Com e o ta d l:f'y. r'---, i a <'; *,_r,_r;"-



USA WEEKEND.

Saturday:, L.FOctober 26
Saturday, October 26


Lake Wonderwood Community Volunteer Project
8 am-1 pm
Volunteers can p'e req'sver b, calling 19'041 270 5228 or bi email \all MnRMayponT@navy mil
Following the volunteer efforts join us for a day of family fun and entertainment

Festival Celebration
1-5 pm aat Lake Wonderwood Field

1 Bouncy Houses Free Fooe -
1L41 Ie!=J~aes -Haunted House Le
Music by the Navy Bando- AIs
'. '"L^ a rand Crafts Vendors' Take Pe:iu, s in Our Pur npiin Pain
I .. ,H, ,h Carnival Food for Purchase & More!
Sponsored in part by
BI NAVY '-- -, a.I
firsnCanmand FEDERAL Universityof Phoenix'
rC.e.i Union Military Division USAA
tMAw Im teWa .. l 0 "e Na,). e ty r c ,r t 1 e l en0Baiet of Oeteese 1as wflysn rose sceroys I"r- cifd- eoas d od s w


Every Thursday: Trivia on
Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaway's. Test
your general trivia knowledge!
the winning team of four takes
home awesome prizes! 270-
7205
NFL Sunday Ticket. Every
Sunday at Noon at Castaways.
Watch you favorite NFL team on


one of Castaways' 9 flat-screens.
Drink specials throughout the
day and opportunity to win
prizes every Sunday. 270-7205
Oct. 16: Game Night. 7:30
p.m. at Castaway's Lounge
Enjoy a nigh of your favorite
games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister
& more. 270-7205


Oct. 18: HFC 166-Velasquez
vs. Dos Santos. 10 p.m. at
Castaway's Lounge. 270-7205
Oct. 25: Liberty Halloween
Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside
Community Center. Be pre-
pared to be scared to death. DJ,
food, costume contest, prizes,
games and more. 270-7205
Community Events
Oct. 26: Make a Difference
Day. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. True Blue
Navy Family Benefactors has
partnered with First Coast
News to assist in Naval Station
Mayport's Lake Wonderwood
Project. We are inviting volun-
teers from the Naval Station
Mayport Community to assist in
this event focusing on helping
our base community. We will
follow this event with our annu-
al Fall Fest. 270-5228
Oct. 26: Fall Fest 2013. 1-5
p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free
activities include a haunted
house, games, rides, bounce
houses, take your own pic-
tures in the pumpkin patch and
more. Food and beverages will
be available. A variety of ven-
dors will be on-hand selling arts
and crafts, baked goodies, and
more. Purchase your seasonal
pumpkin from the pumpkin
patch. 270-5228
Foc'sle Lounge CPO Club
Every Tuesday: All Khaki
Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7
p.m. every Tuesday at Foc'sle


CPO Club with 40-cent wings,
drink specials and all-you-can-
drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia
begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis
welcome (Chief Petty Officers,
Officers and their guests). 270-
5431
Chicken Wednesdays. Every
Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at
Foc'sle Lounge. Enjoy a two-
piece fried chicken plate with
two sides for only $7.00. 270-
5431
ITT
Monster Jam Tickets Now
On Sale. Tickets are now on
sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22,
2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s
section is $22 and 100s is $42.
270-5145
Halloween Horror Nights
Now On Sale. Tickets are now
available for Halloween Horror
Nights at Universal Studios
Orlando select nights from Sept.
20- Oct. 31. Prices range from
$44.25-$74.25. 270-5145
Jacksonville Zoo Halloween
Spooktacular Tickets on Sale.
Dates available Oct. 18-20 and
Oct. 25-31. Tickets are $9.00,
ages 3 and up (under 3 are free)
270-5145


Intramural Sports
Please contact Rita
Hammerstad at for more
information
Oct. 18: Surf Contest.
10 a.m. at Sea Otter
Pavilion. Sign up by Oct.
9.
Oct. 21-24: Pre-Season
Basketball Tournament.
Sign up by Oct. 14.
Oct. 28: Men's
Basketball Season
Begins. Season ends Feb.
13.
Mayport Bowling
Center
Friday Nights: Xtreme
Bowling. 8-11 p.m.
every Friday at Mayport
Bowling Center. $10
include 2 hours of black


light bowling, shoe rent-
al, prizes and dazzling
laser light show. 270-5377
Saturday Nights: Xtreme
Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every
Saturday at Mayport
Bowling Center. $10
include 2 hours of black
light bowling, shoe rental,
prizes and dazzling laser
light show. 270-5377
Sunday Nights:
Bowling Family Fun
Night. 4-7 p.m. at


Mayport Bowling Center.
Cost is $10 per person and
includes your choice of a
14 lb hamburger or a hot-
dog with fries and a soda,
All-You-Can Bowl with
shoes, music videos, light
show and colored head-
pin bowling for prizes.
270-5377
Oct. 27: Halloween
Family Fun Night. 4-7
p.m. at Mayport Bowling
Center. Enjoy a night


of ghoulish fun which
includes Xtreme Bowling,
shoe rental, goodie bags,
costume contest (4 age
brackets) and more.
$10.00 for adults, $7.00
for children 12 and under.
Advanced tickets and res-
ervations required. Call
(904) 270-5377 for tickets.
Windy Harbor Golf
Club
Wednesday: Military
Appreciation Day every
Wednesday at Windy
Harbor Golf Club.18
Holes and a Cart Only
$15. Offer open to DOD,
active duty, retired, and
military dependents


NAVY CYP


1 \I

Child and Youth Programs


Oct. 18: Freedom


Friday- Spooktacular
Costume Dance Party.
7-11 p.m. at the Youth
Center. Cost is $8
advanced sign-up and $10
day of.
Oct. 19: Teen Trip- Ice
Skating at Jacksonville
Ice and Sports Complex.
Departs 6 p.m.; returns
no later than 11 p.m. Cost
$15.







k**


1t4d S sWr Sfcfhote

Fitness Schedule


NAVY S


Naval Station Mayport, Florida


Monday through Thursday 0500-2000 0 Friday 0500-1900 0 Saturday 0800-1800 0 Sunday/Holidays 0800-1400


1130
TRX
1300-1500
CFL NOFFS/TRX
By Appointment


1130
Yoga
1800
Kids Clinic


I i


0700
Sunrise Yoga
1800
TRX


NATATORIUM
hi i] I' I *i,, 'i}


The following activities
target single or unaccom-
panied Sailors. For more
information, call 270-
7788/89 or stop by the
Mayport Liberty Center
and pick up the month-
ly activity calendar with
a complete listing of all
upcoming Liberty events.
Oct. 18: Mall Trip:
Town Center. Van departs
Liberty Center at 5 p.m;
transportation only.
Oct. 20: Jacksonville
Jaguars vs. San Diego
Chargers. Van Departs
11 a.m. at Liberty Center.
Cost $15. Sign up by Oct.


Oct. 23:
Tournament.


Chess
6 p.m. at


Liberty Center.
Oct. 27: Jacksonville
Jaguars vs. San
Francisco 49ers. Van
Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty
Center. Cost $15; Sign up
by Oct. 21.
Oct. 29: Ping Pong
Tournament. 6 p.m. at
Liberty Center.
Oct. 30: Call of Duty
Black Ops Tournament.
6 p.m. at Liberty Center.


0930 0730
Aqua Rehab Command Aqua
0930
Aqua Toning


1130
Steel Anchor


1130
Rowing


1500
Steel Anchor


SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE 17 OCTOBER 2013


Sunday, Oct. 27 4-7 pm
n.i*,' a night of ghoulish fun which
Includes Xtreme bowling, goody bags,.
shoe rental and colored pin Wheel of,
i AA, Fortune prizes,


0700
TRX
1800
Zumba


0930
Aqua Toning
1430
Aqua Rehab


1630
Deep Aqua


0930
Aqua Fitness
1630
Deep Aqua


STRENGTH/CARDIO B
I I6 I I


1130 0700
Steel Anchor Rowing


INDOOR CYCLING ROOM
i mp= I 'I '


woo
N A V Y 2 ow, m mm b.















14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013


THI


NS MAYPORT. FLORIDA ai i




irror Classified


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


BY PHONE
Mon. Thurs.
Fri. 7:30 am.
TOLL FREE
BY FAX


366-6300
7:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
- 5:30 p.m.
800-258-4637
904-359-4180


IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida Times-Union from 7:30
a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines

Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction
and billing adjustments.
Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about
payments or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all
advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of
publication. Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal,
State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.
Standard abbreviations are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.

S The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


CLASSIFIED INDEX

Anoneet Intuto


Auctions


I Employment


Real Estate for Rent


Financial


I Merchandise


I Transportation


S[WISA.=D 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears
online at no additional charge.


liinfIo n 'I


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment

Georgia Real Estate

Motivated Seller
40 Acres Brantley Co.
near Hoboken. 85% high land
with scattered pines on county
graded road. 90 miles north of
Jax. $65,000 will divide in half.
Call 912-281-1544


Springfield

519 W. 19th St.
4BR/3BAMulti Family
2142sqft. great investment.
LEASE or SALE
$1000/DN, $425/mo
877-500-9517

Waterfront

***REDUCED***
Waterfront Property Trout River
2 lots, 2.1 acres, $145k for both
150 by 400 deep walk to water
2822 Broward Rd. As-is.
No Realtors. Call 904-545-5823


"W'Out of Area/TownlState

Hunting Land 89.7 Acres $299,000.
1-10 and Highway 441 Lakecity, FI
Includes travel trailer, cook
house, wash house, 6 stall metal
storage shed. Hallmark Real
Estate, Rob Edwards 386-965-0763

r St. Johns
Homes for Sale

New Homes

READY

NOW!





























GLEN ST.
Frm The


























JOHNS



COMMUNITY
CLOSE-OUT
40










IIt
o *aln.Seeyu -whw

r *lt rsve. 21

GLNST.

























JONS
COMMUNITY







jus of -9,bhn
St. ohnsGof0



Country Clu



GLEN ST.360


' St. Johns
Homes for Sale




Experience

Life at

MuraBella






















t. Johns Condominiums










for Sale


PONTE VEDRA BEACH
Gated Sawgrass CC Quail Pointe 2
10 mins. to ocean. Spacious
2br/2bath for sale by owner.
Furnished or unfurnished.
All appliances. Call 84S-216-9694,
email: edboutonoaol.com


The bst arain
(001 DHotownn.Al







mifrro
PONTE VDR B r


Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St. Johns Apartments Furnished
St. Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St. Johns Condominiums
St. Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St. Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St. Johns Houses Furnished
St. Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St. Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St. Johns Lots
St. Johns Roommates
St. Johns Rooms to Rent
St. Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St Johns Vacation Rental
St Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St Johns Wanted to Rent

' Apartments Furnished

Orange Pk furnished rooms $150wk,TV,
cable, utils, microwave, trig, pool 264-1211

"A'partments Unfurnished

ARLINGTON $650mo.
Large 2br/2ba, water & sewer
included, fully renovated,
tile floors throughout, central
heat & air. 904-252-3626
ARLINGTON $550mo.
Large lbr/lba, water & sewer
included, fully renovated,
tile floors throughout, central
heat & air. 904-252-3626
ARLINGTON $550mo.
Large 1 BRJ1 BA, water & sewer
included, fully renovated, no
application fee, new tile floor,
best location in Arlington 904-252-3626
ATLANTIC BEACH 2BR.'2BA
MAYPORT LAND-TOWNHOUSE
Renovated, new plumbing, roof,
siding. $800mo. + dep. WAC.
military discount, 12 month lease
Call 904-910-0082

HODGES BLVD. 2/2 loft, w/d incld.,
NO pets / smokers, $1025.+sec. dep.
req'd. avail. 11/5. call 904-237-1974

Murray Hill- Florida Christian Apts.
Affordable senior living must be 62+
Studios & 1 bedrooms incls. utils.
Handicap accessible units avail!
Income based rent.
Equal housing opportunity.
Call 904-381-4800; TTY 800-955-8771

BWESTSIDE 1BR$495.1
New Paint, New carpet, Quiet,
SENIORS & SINGLES OVER 40.
$475. U NEED GOOD RENT
RECORD. 904-777-3039


HOM F.*.INDERREA


JACKSONVILLE
MAYPORT LANDING
THE COURTYARDS
GOLFVIEW CONDOMINIUMS
THE LAKES
WATERFLEAF
DAYBREAK WOODS
CRESTWICK CROSSING


$895
$825
$875
$995
$1795
$1195
$1350


BONAPARTE CROSSING NORTH 4/2 +flex rm
ISLANDS ODUNNS CREEK 4/2 $1395
HICKORY HILL 3/2.5 +Loft $1450
ASHFORD WOOD 4/2 $1350
BENTWATER 4/2 $1400
BENTWATER 4/2 $1650


Aail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
$1295 Avail 10/20
Avail 11/20
Avail NOW
Avail NOW
Avail 10/15
Avail NOW


MAYMOEHOE AALAL
JUSTCALLUS A 241550


TApartments Unfurnished

WESTSIDE/MURRAY HILL
HIL
1 B R $425. 2BR $545.
Security Deposit $149.
904-329-1985


SHouses Unfurnished

ARLINGTON Brick 3br/lba garage,
porch, fenced, $750mo. + dep. No
smokers, credit check 904-743-2199
Baymeadows East Hampton SD
3 BR, 2.5 BA, 2 car garage, screen
porch, den w/FP, separate LR &
DR, new wood floors, Ig. kitchen
w/granite counter tops, W/D,
clubhouse w/ many amenities.
$1,695/mth. 904.333.2550

IMandarin 5015 Tan St. 3br/2ba
frplc, tile floors, 2 car garage, Irg
fenced back yard, wsh/dryer hkup
all appliances. Available NOW.
$1,250.mo+dep. w/option to buy.
pets nego. No realtors 386-447-1832

NORTH JAX
3BRA1.SBA $850mo + dep.
3br/1ba $600mo + dep.
all have CH&A, w/d hookup. HUD
ok, near bus route. 904-219-3902

ORTEGA FARMS -
1BR$500.
2BR $600. wash/dryer hookup
No pets/smokers.
Coiall 904-388-1335

SOUTHSIDE NICE 4BR/2BA
w/carport, den, fenced back yard, I
oversized master bedroom w/walk
in closet & iacuzzitub,wash/dryer
hookup, call for info. 904-466-9953

^ Mobile Home
Lot Rentals

RV Lots or Mobile Home Lots -
Ask about a free months rent!
$288 lot rent only.
$385 lot rent includes electricity.
4 miles west of 1-295. 904-781-5645

Rooms to Rent

ARLINGTON/W'side/N'side Furn.
ph, TV, w/d, $100-$130 wk 838-4587
Northside nr bus route turn. rm, ch&a w/d
$125wk emrnpl verif/bkgrd 672-5337, 219-3902
Orange Pk furnished rooms $150wk, TV
cable, utils, microwave, trig, pool 264-1211

' Storage/Mini-Lockers

Pan Am Mini Storage
2383 Mayport Rd, Atlantic Beach,
FL 32233, 241-2300,
Free Month &8 Free Lock!





Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent


W Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
Warehouse w/Offices 3.80 SF and under
Great for Ind/Svc/Dist. Grade Level. $4/sf
NNN & under; Near JIA, 95, 295 & 9A.
Units have access to Common Area
Ramps, 3 phase power Call Lisa 493-5555





Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold

'Business Opportunities

For Sale $60K Jolly's Reef Shock An
established family owned aquarium
business of 5.5 years.We have over
1000 documented new customers a
year. Freshwater fish, saltwater
fish, coral, accessories, food, tanks,
stands, and canopies. The store is
being sold "as is" with everything
needed to run the store except reg-
ister system. All vendors, suppli-
ers, and helpful information will be
provided to buyer, for an easy
transition. 904-772-1600.
Popular and Unique Downtown
Fernandina Beach Retail Shop $37K
includes inventory / Turn key /3 yr
business (904)556-5493





Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events

Schools

Healthcare Education for Emloymeent'
Call Concorde for training today!
1-888-442-7814 or concorde4me.com




650,620



HOURS

Besides protecting our country,
military personnel stationed in our
communities donated 650,620 hours
of volunteer service in Northeast
Florida and Southeast Georgia last
year. heir time was given to community
organizations, church groups, youth
activities, scouting and more.,


Thank You!


rj1er! Hews

a 1M5 UP 11,
ecNS MAYPRT, FLORIDA
THM 1rror


TEPeriscope


Support
your military
newpaper.

The but bargain
Sin town.
For Classified Advertising,
call 904-366-6300,
or 1-800-258-4637.
-Miroer






Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted



V General Employment




EXPERIENCED EXECUTIVE DRIVER
needed to drive company vehicle:
Position is On-Call, including evenings
& weekends. Periodic schedule w/ avg.
10+ hours/week at $20-$25/hour.
Job Requirements:
* Class one license w/ clean record
* Ability to operate vehicle in safe &
courteous manner.
* Driver confidentiality & integrity
a must.
* Good communication & interpersonal
skills w/ability to present professional
attitude & promote a positive
impression of company.
To apply, send your resume to:
15177885@FTUiobs.com
Text JAX15177885


Navy

Classified

Ads_____________


THE FLEET________________________________

MARKET Rank/Grade:____ Work Phone# Organization: ________Date Submitted:________
Name(please print): Signature:
A DVERTISING 1. Free advertising in the RFleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
R U L ES personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to the Mayport calling 1-800-258-4637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
t Naval Station. 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-366-6230, however, they must be completed
Please fill out this 2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to on an original form.
form in black or help qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads Select the number of weeks ad is to run: Q 1 wk 0 2 wks L 3 wks Q 4 wks
blue ink. such as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found Items, and garage
sales DIl be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ANIMAL To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Mirror.
OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED FREE CHILD CARE NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not torn) along the outside border. (2) No
DEADLINES PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE. REAL ESTATE ADS WILL BE LIMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT more than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free
______________ OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF ads per family, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the
STATION (PCS) OR 'OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN Classified Index.
1 T HII E ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD- OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
THE- 3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be
M I RROR written independent of other information contained on this form.
MIRnROR4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue. Category:_________________
_____________ 5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the RFleet Market, Bldg. 3.
SBox 280032, Mayport Naval Station, Mayport, FL 32228-0032, or to The Mirror, .. M NS MAYPORT. FLURIDA
.NOOn One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 Mr o
Friday 6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the I-
rr, u y above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any
or all ads. One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202


I


I I I I I I I I I I


I Real Estate for Sale Services I


IJl,,I.JCJmmrcia ea Etat PtsAnm als I

















'W Carpentry

DAVE'S Carpentry Int/Ext Doors,
Crown, Trim, Facia, Wd rot, Drywall
repairs, painting. Refs- 904-755-6898

IV Child Care

SAVONDALE Early Learning
SCenter-A place for your child
.,lto learn & grow. Call Cindy foar
enrollment 904-389-4363

SCleaning Service

You've Got It Maidi Cleaning Ser-
vices. Lic/ Bonded/Insured. Many
references. Call Lisa 904-564-2327



AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade

' Arts and Crafts

FOR SALE: COMPLETE GLASS
SHOP (Lampworking, fusing,
Stained Glass) New, $6500.00. Must
sell. Call Bob at 912-674-2282 or
rschlag@tds.net

V Estate Sales

B. LANGSTON'S PRESENTS
Huge Decorator Estate
Fine furn & acc, pottery, art, jewelry,
tools, sew/craft. 701 Violet PI, St.
Johns Thur/Fri/Sat 9-5. blangston.com
SOUTHSIDE ESTATE SALE -
Sat 10/19, 9am-4pm, 2303 Wood Hill
FI. in Hillwood Condominiums off
Baymeadows and Southside Blvd.
Furniture, jewelry, kitchen, linens,
some antiques & lots more! !

'Furniture I Household


QUEEN PILLOW
TOP MATTRESS
FOR s150
STILL IN PLASTIC
904-655-5444
BED ABATEMENT $99 NEW queen
Sets still in the plastic 904-924-5944
Bed- Beautiful New Bedroom Set
Must Sell $275-Call 484-6177 for info
4 BED, iron frame, full size,
white w/large brass post
globes, old but in exc. cond.
$150. 904-502-1748
KING PILLOW TOP SET
$250 Never used. Still in Plastic
Call 904-655-6551
Queen PILLOWTOP Absolute
Bargain, Mattress Set $125 644-0498


Tom Bush BMW


'" Furniture I Household

STwin size bed w/mattress and
hdbd, exc. cand, like new $75.
553-3887

1W Garage Sale

E. Arlington Kernan/McCormick Mt
Pleasant Creek Community Sale
Sat 8a-2p, Rain Date 10/26.

Garden I Lawn

4, 350 Long Tractor 41 horse $3K.
5 foot bush hog $350. 6 foot box
blade $350. 912-729-6230

S Misc. Merchandise

4 1/2 Carat Diamond Solitaire
SRing 14K yellow gold $800 .
Back Pack Jonsport carries
Small tent, slpg bag $75.
904-384-7809
20" GIRLS BIKE 7-teens $45.
SCeiling fan 52" $75, 4 lights, 5
t blades, white wicker boarder
Mirror 19"x11"$50. 904-384-7809
4 Wall Curio, rosewood $150.
Oriental pictures $15. 100 chil-
dren silk sleeve $25. Brass but-
S terflies, swan bell. 904-269-4312

Portable Buildings

14 PORTABLE MODULAR
BLDGS FOR SALE. Fiberglass
shingle roof or metal roof. Exter.
& inter, walls ore washable Hardi
Panel cement fiber material. 30'
adi. height Hondi cap accessible
alum. ramps & steps incl. From
60amp up to 200amp elect, svc.
Completely renav. in '06 to hurri-
cane code for So. Florida. Bard
central heat 8& air incl. Fully insu-
lated. Dimensions: 24X36X12,
863sq.ft. $15,000. Delivered & set
up. Financing avail. For special
pricing call 904-629-2779



Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted

S Pets and Supplies

CAVALIER KING CHARLES PUPS
8 weeks, 2M, 1 F. $600. 904-655-3656
CHIHUAHUA PUPS, 904-540-0716
Joyshomegrawnchihuahuas.cam
LAB PUPS AKC Champ lines, OFA,
$500.-$2000. hith guar. 904-753-1155
Olde English Bulldog Brindle Pups
$1500. registered 904-314-7048
PERSIAN KITrENS CFA SO SWEEr !
health cert., 904-724-9620
www.lnthepinkperslans.comrn


-lri~i~i~ii


Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease

BMW 2014


320i


BMW 2014
X1 sDrive28i


W RVs and Supplies

SVRI Travel Trailer taow eg. 2
TV's, front bath, new tires, qn
.bed, sips 6, Irg slide out, $10K.
H :904-642-0881/c:716-1968

"WMotorcycleslMini Bikes

S2009 H.D. Heritage Screaming
Eagle intake, exhaust system,
stage one tuning, lots of extras
L.$12,000. Frank 904-282-1272
HONDA VTX 1300R '07 Cruiser
emaculate, 4300 mli, windsheild
highway bars, saddle bag and pass
backrest $5500 904-334-1840

W Auto Parts

4 RADIO, AM/FM with door
speakers. Original from '07
iFord Ranger. Exc. cond $60.
904-502-1748

qr Antiques / Classics

S'86 DODGE CONQUEST-very
good cond., collector's classic,
Vl/turbo, all records, $2500.
904-589-4851/469-2468/214-3476

W Automobiles

CADILLAC CTS 2009
Call for details 904-233-5459

I CADILLAC LIMOUSINE 1999
Super clean, 25mpg hwy, $16K
Invested, $6000 OBO. 904-838-0263

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THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 15


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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3


The Birth of the Navy of the United States


0


On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet-
ing in Philadelphia, the Continental
Congress voted to fit out two sailing
vessels, armed with ten carriage guns,
as well as swivel guns, and manned by
crews of eighty, and to send them out
on a cruise of three months to inter-
cept transports carrying munitions and
stores to the British army in America.
This was the original legislation out of
which the Continental Navy grew and
as such constitutes the birth certificate
of the navy.
To understand the momentous sig-
nificance of the decision to send two
armed vessels to sea under the author-
ity of the Continental Congress, we
need to review the strategic situation in
which it was made and to consider the
political struggle that lay behind it.
Americans first took up arms in the
spring of 1775, not to sever their rela-
tionship with the king, but to defend
their rights within the British Empire.
By the autumn of 1775, the British
North American colonies from Maine
to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal
governments had been thrust out of
many colonial capitals and revolution-
ary governments put in their places.
The Continental Congress had assumed
some of the responsibilities of a cen-
tral government for the colonies, cre-
ated a Continental Army, issued paper
money for the support of the troops, and
formed a committee to negotiate with
foreign countries. Continental forces
captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake
Champlain and launched an invasion
of Canada.
In October 1775 the British held supe-
riority at sea, from which they threat-
ened to stop up the colonies' trade
and to wreak destruction on seaside
settlements. In response, a few of the
states had commissioned small fleets
of their own for defense of local waters.
Congress had not yet authorized pri-
vateering. Some in Congress worried
about pushing the armed struggle too
far, hoping that reconciliation with the
mother country was still possible.
Yet, a small coterie of men in
Congress had been advocating a
Continental Navy from the out-
set of armed hostilities. Foremost
among these men was John Adams,
of Massachusetts. For months, he and
a few others had been agitating in
Congress for the establishment of an
American fleet.
They argued that a fleet would defend
the seacoast towns, protect vital trade,


nps.gov
John Paul Jones, "Father of the United States Navy." Portrait by Charles Willson Peale.


retaliate against British raiders, and
make it possible to seek out among neu-
tral nations of the world the arms and
stores that would make resistance pos-
sible.
Still, the establishment of a navy
seemed too bold a move for some of the
timid men in Congress. Some southern-
ers agreed that a fleet would protect and
secure the trade of New England but
denied that it would do so in the south-
ern colonies.
Most of the delegates did not consid-
er the break with England as final and
feared that a navy implied sovereignty
and independence. Others thought a
navy a hasty and foolish challenge to
the mightiest fleet the world had seen.
The most the pro-navy men could do
was to get Congress to urge each colony
to fit out armed vessels for the protec-
tion of their coasts and harbors.
Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's


delegates laid before Congress a bold
resolution for the building and equip-
ping of an American fleet, as soon as
possible.
When the motion came to the floor
for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland,
attacked it, saying it was "the maddest
Idea in the World to think of building an
American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem-
bers found the proposal too vague. It
lacked specifics and no one could tell
how much it would cost.
If Congress was yet unwilling to
embrace the idea of establishing a navy
as a permanent measure, it could be
tempted by short-term opportunities.
Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress
received intelligence of two English
brigs, unarmed and without convoy,
laden with munitions, leaving England
bound for Quebec.
Congress immediately appointed
a committee to consider how to take


advantage of this opportunity. Its mem-
bers were all New Englanders and all
ardent supporters of a navy. They rec-
ommended first that the governments
of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and
Connecticut be asked to dispatch
armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept
the munitions ships; next they outlined
a plan for the equipping by Congress
of two armed vessels to cruise to the
eastward to intercept any ships bearing
supplies to the British army.
Congress let this plan lie on the table
until 13 October, when another for-
tuitous event occurred in favor of the
naval movement. A letter from General
Washington was read in Congress in
which he reported that he had taken
under his command, at Continental
expense, three schooners to cruise off
Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup-
ply ships. The commander in chief had
preempted members of Congress reluc-
tant to take the first step of fitting out
warships under Continental authority.
Since they already had armed vessels
cruising in their name, it was not such a
big step to approve two more. The com-
mittee's proposal, now appearing emi-
nently reasonable to the reluctant mem-
bers, was adopted.
The Continental Navy grew into
an important force. Within a few
days, Congress established a Naval
Committee charged with equipping a
fleet. This committee directed the pur-
chasing, outfitting, manning, and oper-
ations of the first ships of the new navy,
drafted subsequent naval legislation,
and prepared rules and regulations to
govern the Continental Navy's conduct
and internal administration.
Over the course of the War of
Independence, the Continental Navy
sent to sea more than fifty armed ves-
sels of various types. The navy's squad-
rons and cruisers seized enemy sup-
plies and carried correspondence and
diplomats to Europe, returning with
needed munitions. They took nearly 200
British vessels as prizes, some off the
British Isles themselves, contributing
to the demoralization of the enemy and
forcing the British to divert warships to
protect convoys and trade routes.
In addition, the navy provoked dip-
lomatic crises that helped bring France
into the war against Great Britain. The
Continental Navy began the proud tra-
dition carried on today by our United
States Navy, and whose birthday we cel-
ebrate each year in October.
Shistory.navy.mil


Establishment


of the Navy,


October 13, 1775

This resolution of the Continental Congress
marked the establishment of what is now the
United States Navy.

"Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten
carriage guns, and a proportionable number of
swivels, with eighty men, befitted, with all possible
despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the
commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for
intercepting such transports as may be laden with
warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies,
and for such other purposes as the Congress shall
direct.
That a Committee of three be appointed to pre-
pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same
before the Congress, and to contract with proper
persons to fit out the vessel.
Resolved, that another vessel befitted out for the
same purposes, and that the said committee report
their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti-
mate of the expence."

Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13
October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval
Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2,
(Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office,
1966): 442.


Establishment of the Department


of the Navy, April 30, 1798

This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval mat-
ters were under the cognizance of the War Department.

AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the depart-
ment of the navy.
SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the
Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall
be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement
of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war,
as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States.
SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary,
shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most
expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the
principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office.
SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and
empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take pos-
session of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this depart-
ment, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War.
SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary
of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks
in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regula-
tions, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a fur-
ther compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments.
SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive depart-
ment, to be denominated the department of war," as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions
of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the
Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.
Approved, April 30, 1798.


About This Section

Air, Surface and Submarine: "A salute to dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen

our Navy and all who have served" is a spe- Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper,

cial advertising section produced by the Military and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn
Publications department of The Florida Times- Hirschman. Material, information and photo-

Union. graphs used in this section was provided by Naval
The section was coordinated and edited by Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport,

Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy,

section was designed by Military Publications and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise


designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor-


0


credited.







4 Air. Surface and Submarine Thursday. October 17. 2013


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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5


The Birth of the United States Marine Corps


During the American Revolution, the Continenii I
Congress passes a resolution stating thmi
"two Battalions of Marines be raised" for sei-
vice as landing forces for the recently formed
Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by
future U.S. president John Adams and adopt-
ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental
Marines and is now observed as the birth date
of the United States Marine Corps.
Serving on land and at sea, the original
U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in
a number of important operations during
the Revolutionary War. The first Marine
landing on a hostile shore occurred when
a force of Marines under Captain Samuel
Nicholas captured New Province Island in
the Bahamas from the British in March 1776.
Nicholas was the first commissioned offi-
cer in the Continental Marines and is cel-
ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After
American independence was achieved in 1783,
the Continental Navy was demobilized and its
Marines disbanded.
In the next decade, however, increasing con-
flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the 11 ,





Samuel N



Resolution

of the

Continental

Congress

establishing

the Marine

Corps -

November 10,

1775

This resolution of the Continental Congress
marked the establishment of what is now the
United States Marine Corps.

"Resolved, That two Battalions of marines
be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two
Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other
officers as usual in other regiments; and that
they consist of an equal number of privates with
other battalions; that particular care be taken,
that no persons be appointed to office, or inlist-
ed into said Battalions, but such as are good
seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs
as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when
required: that they be insisted and commis-
sioned to serve for and during the present war
between Great Britain and the colonies, unless
dismissed by order of Congress: that they be dis-
tinguished by the names of the first and second
battalions of American Marines, and that they
be considered part of the number which the con-
tinental Army before Boston is ordered to consist
of."


Ji


i(n-, : ,ss to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May
J Two months later, on July 11, President John
.hnms signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine
1 rps as a permanent military force under the
jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S.
Marines saw action in the so-called Quasi-
mWar with France and then fought against the
Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first
years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines
have participated in all the wars of the United
States and in most cases were the first sol-
s f w diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed
more than 300 landings on foreign shores.
Today, there are more than 200,000 active-
Sduty and reserve Marines, divided into
three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune,
North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California;
and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one
o r more expeditionary units, ready to launch
major operations anywhere in the world on two
Pdeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are
SI -sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery,
i i air forces. The motto of the service is Semper
I I schts, meaning "Always Faithful" in Latin.
history.com





icholas, first Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, 1775- 1783.



Reestablishment of the Marine

Corps July 11, 1798

An Actfor the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress
assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of
marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, forty-
eight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including
the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be
formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distri-
bution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment.
Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay anid subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be
as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, andfour rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth,
aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieu-
tenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and
musicians, conformably to the act, intituled An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of
the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment
of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in
the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof
may before the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or
repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by
the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster,
sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the
corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music,
respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments,
which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry.
Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in
lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed
vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States
may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed
vessels of the United States, "'i"."-,ti. "Iv as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing
a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding.
Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid,
shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are 1 "'". ,,, Ibfor the military
establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be estab-
lished by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same
allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain
and fix the military establishment of the United States."
Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or
shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or
shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of ser-
vice, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract.
Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do
duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his
discretion, shall direct.
Approved, July 11, 1798.


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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013



History of Veterans Day


World War I known at the
time as "The Great War" offi-
cially ended when the Treaty
of Versailles was signed on
June 28, 1919, in the Palace of
Versailles outside the town of
Versailles, France. However,
fighting ceased seven months
earlier when an armistice, or
temporary cessation of hos-
tilities, between the Allied
nations and Germany went
into effect on the eleventh hour
of the eleventh day of the elev-
enth month. For that reason,
November 11, 1918, is generally
regarded as the end of "the war
to end all wars."
Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry
near a church at Stenay,
Meuse in France, wait for the
end of hostilities. This photo
was taken at 10:58 a.m., on
November 11, 1918, two min-
utes before the armistice end-
ing World War I went into effect
In November 1919, President
Wilson proclaimed November
11 as the first commemoration
of Armistice Day with the fol-
lowing words:
"To us in America, the reflec-
tions of Armistice Day will be
filled with solemn pride in the
heroism of those who died in
the country's service and with
gratitude for the victory, both
because of the thing from which
it has freed us and because of
the opportunity it has given
America to show her sympathy
with peace and justice in the
councils of the nations..."
The original concept for
the celebration was for a day
observed with parades and
public meetings and a brief
suspension of business begin-
ning at 11:00 a.m.
The United States Congress
officially recognized the end
of World War I when it passed a
concurrent resolution on June
4, 1926, with these words:
Whereas the llth of
November 1918, marked the ces-
sation of the most destructive,
sanguinary, and far reaching
war in human annals and the
resumption by the people of the
United States of peaceful rela-
tions with other nations, which
we hope may never again be
severed, and
Whereas it is fitting that the
recurring anniversary of this
date should be commemorated
with thanksgiving and prayer
and exercises designed to per-
petuate peace through good
will and mutual understanding
between nations; and
Whereas the legislatures of
twenty-seven of our States have
already declared November 11


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U.S. Navy Photo
Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast Supervisory Project Manager Stan Kinmonth drives his Jeep in the City of
Jacksonville's Veterans Day Parade on Nov.12, 2012. His passenger was Frank Heppner, a World War II D-Day and Battle of the
Bulge combat engineer veteran. Heppner was named Grand Marshal of the parade. Kinmonth restored the 1942 Ford GPW Jeep in
30 months, completing it in September, 2011.


to be a legal holiday: Therefore
be it Resolved by the Senate (the
House of Representatives con-
curring), that the President of
the United States is requested
to issue a proclamation call-
ing upon the officials to display
the flag of the United States on
all Government buildings on
November 11 and inviting the
people of the United States to
observe the day in schools and
churches, or other suitable plac-
es, with appropriate ceremonies
of friendly relations with all
other peoples.
An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S.
Code, Sec. 87a) approved May
13, 1938, made the 11th of
November in each year a legal
holiday-a day to be dedicated
to the cause of world peace and
to be thereafter celebrated and
known as "Armistice Day."
Armistice Day was primarily
a day set aside to honor veter-
ans of World War I, but in 1954,
after World War II had required
the greatest mobilization of
soldiers, sailors, Marines and
airmen in the Nation's histo-
ry; after American forces had
fought aggression in Korea, the
83rd Congress, at the urging
of the veterans service orga-
nizations, amended the Act of
1938 by striking out the word
"Armistice" and inserting in
its place the word "Veterans."


With the approval of this legis-
lation (Public Law 380) on June
1, 1954, November llth became
a day to honor American veter-
ans of all wars.
Later that same year, on
October 8th, President Dwight
D. Eisenhower issued the first
"Veterans Day Proclamation"
which stated:
"In order to insure proper
and widespread observance of
this anniversary, all veterans,
all veterans' organizations, and
the entire citizenry will wish to
join hands in the common pur-
pose. Toward this end, I am des-
ignating the Administrator of
Veterans' Affairs as Chairman
of a Veterans Day National
Committee, which shall
include such other persons as
the Chairman may select, and
which will coordinate at the
national level necessary plan-
ning for the observance. I am
also requesting the heads of
all departments and agen-
cies of the Executive branch of
the Government to assist the
National Committee in every
way possible."
President Eisenhower
signing HR7786, changing
Armistice Day to Veterans Day.
From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne
Richards, Arthur J. Connell,
John T. Nation, Edward Rees,
Richard L. Trombla, Howard


W. Watts
On that same day, President
Eisenhower sent a letter to the
Honorable Harvey V. Higley,
Administrator of Veterans'
Affairs (VA), designating him
as Chairman of the Veterans
Day National Committee.
In 1958, the White House
advised VA's General Counsel
that the 1954 designation of the
VA Administrator as Chairman
of the Veterans Day National
Committee applied to all sub-
sequent VA Administrators.
Since March 1989 when VA
was elevated to a cabinet level
department, the Secretary of
Veterans Affairs has served as
the committee's chairman.
The Uniform Holiday Bill
(Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat.
250)) was signed on June 28,
1968, and was intended to
ensure three-day weekends
for Federal employees by cel-
ebrating four national holidays
on Monday: Washington's
Birthday, Memorial Day,
Veterans Day, and Columbus
Day. It was thought that these
extended weekends would
encourage travel, recreation-
al and cultural activities and
stimulate greater industrial
and commercial production.
Many states did not agree with
this decision and continued to
celebrate the holidays on their


original dates.
The first Veterans Day under
the new law was observed with
much confusion on October
25, 1971. It was quite apparent
that the commemoration of
this day was a matter of historic
and patriotic significance to a
great number of our citizens,
and so on September 20th,
1975, President Gerald R. Ford
signed Public Law 94-97 (89
Stat. 479), which returned the
annual observance of Veterans
Day to its original date of
November 11, beginning in
1978. This action supported the
desires of the overwhelming
majority of state legislatures,
all major veterans service orga-
nizations and the American
people.
Veterans Day continues to
be observed on November 11,
regardless of what day of the
week on which it falls. The res-
toration of the observance of
Veterans Day to November 11
not only preserves the histori-
cal significance of the date, but
helps focus attention on the
important purpose of Veterans
Day: A celebration to honor
America's veterans for their
patriotism, love of country, and
willingness to serve and sacri-
fice for the common good.
SU.S. Department
of Veterans Affairs


U.S. Navy photo
Navy Band Southeast from NAS Jacksonville participates in the city's Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 12, 2012. The parade was the culmination the city's "Week of
Valor" tribute that honored veterans, military members and their families.












Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7


Bwo


Photo courtesy of Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, NE Florida Chapter 6
NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders gathers with Pearl Harbor survivors (from left) Henry Griffin, U.S. Army retired, 19th Infantry Battalion, Schoffield
Barracks; Chuck Ellis, U.S. Navy, USS Pennsylvania; Bill Tardiff, U.S. Navy, NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Duane Reyelts, U.S. Navy, USS Oklahoma during a Pearl Harbor
Survivors Association Plaque Dedication Ceremony at Jacksonville National Cemetery on Nov. 10, 2012. The plaque was placed in honor of those who served at Pearl
Harbor in 1944.


Veterans Day, 1954


BY THE PRESIDENT OF

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

3071

Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by
paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and

Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have
added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and

Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November
11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351), that the eleventh of
November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and

Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay
appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the
Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to
observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who
fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate
ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the
appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on
Veterans Day.

In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the
entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose.

Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National
Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national
level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive
branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the
Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER


Navy photo
SThe 2012 Submarine Veterans of World War Memorial Week featured a
S memorial service for lost boats and shipmates, Nov. 2 at the World War
II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion, NSB Kings Bay.


?y1016-








8 Air. Surface and Submarine Thursday. October 17. 2013


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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9


Photo by MC2 Daniel Gay
A Sailor aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Stephen W. Groves (FFG 29) throws a heaving line to moor the ship at the North Bank of the Riverwalk in downtown
Jacksonville on Oct. 10, 2008. Groves invited friends and family members along on a family day cruise as they traveled the St. Johns river to Jacksonville to participate
in Navy birthday celebrations.

Sailors Creed
I am a United States Sailor.
I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States
of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me.
I represent thefighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone
before me to defendfreedom and democracy around the world.
I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team
with Honor, Courage and Commitment.
I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all.


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10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013


Military Family Appreciation Month (November)






i ie .... h. ..'."











Photo by Kaylee Larocque -
A little rain didn't dampen the VP-10 homecoming celebration as
Lt. Cmdr. David Neall hugs his son, Mason, while his wife, Kara, ,I
and son, Tyler, wait patiently for their turns.

Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring '
November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama
said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that
we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami- .
lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family
members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide .
unending support.",
This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a month-
long celebration of the Military Family in which the Department 1-.-A
of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacri- 1 ,,.
fices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. -
Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families
President Proclaims November as Military Family Month
Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom
Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families
Why Appreciate Military Families?
Throughout the month of November, military families serving
around the world are honored through a variety of observances
and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu-
tions they make every day in support of the military and our
nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by '
Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and support- '" '
ed by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange .
Service, Defense CommissaryAgency, and others. i ...
Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts,,
are teaming up to recognize military families through special
events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and Photo by MC2 Salt Cebe
community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business Sonar Technician 1st class Tony Benz, assigned to USS Farragut (DDG 99), greets his children on
and sporting events; and special recognition during cthe pier after returning home from a nine-month deployment. Farragut deployed with the John
activities throughout the month of November. mC. Stennis Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime secu-
military.com rity operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring
Freedom.



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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11

Military Family Appreciation Month (November)


File photo
Rachel Nieves, right, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville lactation nurse, works
with Lt. Sarah Peck and her infant daughter to promote a healthy start in life.
Naval Hospital Jacksonville is the first and only hospital on Florida's First Coast -
military or private sector certified as 'Baby Friendly' by UNICEF and the World
Health Organization.


Navy photo


EM1 Joshua
Harper
speaks at
the Boys and
Girls Club.
Many service
members
at Naval
Submarine
Base Kings
Bay take part
in volunteer
programs
such as
Adopt-A-
Schoolor
Habitat For
Humanity.


Photo by Paige Cnann
Lt.j.g. Nils Mattson says his last goodbyes to girlfriend Carmen Figueroa before
USS Simpson deploys from Naval Station Mayport for its NATO deployment.


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/ SALE = -

^^^^^ LOW MILES, CLEAN ^ ^
SALE "
$129600
JLOW MILES, FULLY LOADED
NOW ON ^'SErS~
S SALE ,- A
$459500 -S ^


Wlqualify for all rebates, Jeep Compass, Patriot, Grand Cherokee, Wrangler have S1,000 returning lease cash, and S500 Military cash, Jeep Compass, Jeep Patriot have college graduate cash of $500,
M prices, tax, tag, title fees. Daily payments W.A.C. at 75 months 2.9%. See dealers for details. Must qualify for these rebates for these prices. Prices and payments are on these specific vehicles.
Thank you for your service to our country te I RAMi petsfhs iVEIA.
.... .-----------------------if-W AS. ... .,,


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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13


Jacksonville: A Navy City


1*


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41


U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rob Aylward


Official USMC photo by Pfc. John Paul Imbody
Poolees from Recruiting Station Jacksonville raise their right hands and repeat the
Oath of Enlistment at a swearing-in ceremony held at EverBank Field before the
Gator Bowl Classic on January 1, 2013. Repeating of the oath and pledging their
allegiance to their nation is a time honored tradition all service members perform
as part of the induction process into the United States Armed Services. The cer-
emony took place at the fifty yard-line of the stadium in front of 48,000 plus fans
in attendance.


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U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Monica R. Nelson
The 2011 Sailors of the Year assigned throughout Navy Region Southeast visit the
Duval County Veterans Memorial wall in downtown Jacksonville. Sailors toured
the Jaguars stadium, Jacksonville Landing, and the Budweiser Brewery during
their day downtown.


Cryptological technician third class Katie Walley,
assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS
Bataan (LHD 5), exchanges greetings with the
Jacksonville Jaguars mascot Jaxon DeVille. More
than 300 Sailors and Marines gathered in the
EverBank Field practice facility as part of the city
of Jacksonville's "Week of Valor". Sailors met with
players after the practice for autographs and
photos.


904.503.9222 Miller Law Associates JAX










14 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013



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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 15


NwaI Alr Stebs Jacafli~


A


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Reconnaissance Force (N t'R1W 'iRaP&'.*MI'I
devoted to training anl.P-t: .-O!mwnWPi
P-SA Poseidon ASW aircrew af. .e.' 7
prepare to operate In conflict a nreals'idfii.
the globe., .ii
In addition to supporting the t.aWltd N
from the P-3C to the P-8A, NAS JanixAI
facilitating the transition from HSS anti-
submarine to HSM multi-mission Seabiwk
helicopters. The MH-60R deploys from
frigates, destroyers, cruisers and aircraft
carriers with unmatched capability as an
airborne multi-mission (anti-submarine
and anti-surface) naval platform.
In the realm of unmanned aerial vehicles
(UAV) designed for maritime intelligence,
surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR),
NAS Jax hosts the Navy's operator
training center for the MQ-8 series
of upgraded autonomous Fire Scout
helicopters.
The base also supports the new MQ-4C
Triton a forward deployed, land-based,
autonomously operated UAV system that
provides a persistent maritime ISR using
a multi-sensor mission payload. Along
with the P-8A manned aircraft, the MQ-
4C Triton UAV is integral to the Navy's
MPRF family of systems.
For 73 years, NAS Jax has enjoyed a
mutually beneficial partnership with the
City of Jacksonville and surrounding
counties. In the future, it will be necessary
buildd upon existing partnerships to
S.sure that realistic training may continue
J,6rder for America's warfighters to meet
iI'"rft ivfe diverse operational needs.

XIll |i "apt Roy Undersander
4Smfl
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Marking

73 years of

aviation

excellence

for the fleet,

fighter and

family

The station's total economic
impact (goods and services) is
$2.1 billion.


Base employment is about
19,000 persons a with payroll ol
about $1.28 billion
Active Duty 8,396
Military Retirees (50-mile
radius) 49,112
Reserves 2,028
Military Students (Duval/
Clay County) 12,482
*APF Civilians 6,300
*Non APF Civilians 962
Contractors 1,231


The base supports more
than 110 tenant commands,
including Commander Navy
Region Southeast, Naval
Hospital Jacksonville, Fleet
Logistics Center Jacksonville,
Naval Facilities Engineering
Command Southeast, and Fleet
Readiness Center Southeast.


Other significant com-
mands include Commander
Patrol & Reconnaissance
Wing (CPRW) 11, Helicopter
Maritime Strike Force
Weapons School, the Fire
Scout unmanned aerial
vehicle training center and
VP-30, the Navy's largest Fleet
Replacement Squadron.


NAS Jacksonville is home
base for seven active duty
P-3C squadrons, three reserve
squadrons and four helicop-
ter squadrons. There are more
than 100 aircraft of many types
operating full time from NAS
Jacksonville, including: P-8A
Poseidon, P-3C Orion, SH-60F
Seahawk helicopter, MH-60R
Seahawk helicopter, C-40A
Clipper, and C-130T Hercules.


There are more than 460
buildings spread over 24,476
total acres that include OLF
Whitehouse (2,564 acres) and
the target ranges at Pinecastle
(5,698 acres), Rodman (3,258
acres) and Lake George (8,960
acres). NAS Jacksonville alone
is 3,896 acres.


A
















Naval Air Station Jacksonville


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U.S Navy photo by Personnel Specialist 1st Class Anthony Petry
A P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 is seen in flight over Jacksonville.



VP-5 certified 'Safe for Flight'


Navy's second P-8A .

Poseidon squadron

begins IDRC

By Lt. j.g. Brian O'Bannon
VP 5 Public Affairs O0fier: pM' v s'rr*-p


The VP-5 "Mad Foxes" received
their certification from Patrol and
Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as
"Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A
Poseidon.
This concludes nearly seven months
of incredibly hard work by every Mad
Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their tran-
sition process from the P-3C Orion to
the P-8A.
VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974.
The Mad Foxes history of excellence
in the P-3C includes locating pieces
of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger
explosion, remaining on top of a sink-
ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine,
support of Operations Desert Shield,
Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom,
Iraqi Freedom and the first employ-
ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile
from a maritime patrol aircraft during
Operation Odyssey Dawn.
This memorable P-3C history came
to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5
Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin
Osborne landed the squadron's final
Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a
successful 7th Fleet deployment.
"Safe for Flight was a Herculean
accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes,"
VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr.
Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron
personnel during the Aug. 1 command
quarters.
"The work that began the day when
Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C


U.S. Navy photo by Glenn Fawcett
Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel
(left) sits in the cockpit of a P-8A
Poseidon aircraft flight simulator dur-
ing a visit to the Patrol Squadron (VP)
30 training center at Naval Air Station
Jacksonville. Hagel flew the simulator
and landed in a simulated version of
the runway at Joint Base Andrews.


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Douglas C. Wojciechowski
Airman Apprentice Jessica Diaz, a plane captain assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP)
5, signals directions to the pilot during the delivery of VP-5's first P-8A Poseidon
aircraft. VP-5 has been undergoing transition to the new P-8A aircraft since
January and is scheduled to complete the transition and receive a Safe-For-Flight
Certification by the end of July.


Orion could not have been possible
without the total effort of each and
every Mad Fox."
VP-5's Safe for Flight inspection was
conducted by Commander Patrol and
Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and
began June 3 when the ordnance shop
was inspected through a conventional
weapons training proficiency inspec-
tion (CWTPI).
Mad Fox ordnance men and women
demonstrated proficiency to both safely
upload and download ordinance to the
P-8A over the course of the three-day
inspection.
Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew
completed five tactical flights in the
Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30
instructor aircrew.
These flights took VP-5 aircrew
members from the Florida Keys to New


Orleans to showcase their abilities
operating this new aircraft. The month
concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi-
cers, acoustic operators, and electronic
warfare operators receiving their suc-
cessful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30
instructors.
The very last stage of Safe for Flight
certification began on July 29 as CPRW-
11 kicked off a comprehensive inspec-
tion of every VP-5 maintenance pro-
gram, administrative instruction, safety
program, and NATOPS program to
name just a few.
Following these intensive four days
of drills and inspections, skipper
Pottenburgh proudly announced to
the assembled squadron that VP-5 was
recommended as "Safe for Flight" by
CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance
Group.


U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Eric A. Pastor
Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class
Paul R. Toner (right) and Aviation
Ordnanceman 2nd Class LaPorsha
M. Shelton, both assigned to Patrol
Squadron (VP) 16, prepare a MK-54
torpedo before loading it onto a P-8A
Poseidon aircraft.

Each and every Mad Fox is now
focused on beginning the inter-deploy-
ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their
two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side
numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to exe-
cute safely and efficiently in prepara-
tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy-
ment.
The squadron continues to embody
their motto: "No Fox Like a Mad Fox!"


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Deven B. King

'Proud Warriors'
AWR2 Christopher Underwood raises LS2 Cody
Weaver in a rescue basket to an SH-60B SeaHawk
helicopter assigned to the "Proud Warriors" of HSL-
42, Det. 7, during a visit, board, search and seizure
(VBSS) exercise aboard the guided-missile destroyer
USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109).


Photo by Bob Brown

MQ-4C Triton
The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system completed its first flight in May 2013 from
the company's facility in Palmdale, Calif. The 90-minute flight successfully demonstrated control systems that
allow Triton to operate autonomously. Triton is specially designed to fly surveillance missions up to 24 hours
at altitudes of more than 10 miles, allowing coverage out to 2,000 nautical miles. The system's advanced suite
of sensors can detect and automatically classify different types of ships and submarines.


16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013


L


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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17


Naval Air Sta


toa


Jacksonville


-W


-44.


Sporting its fresh VFC-12 camouflage paint scheme, this F/A-18A+Hornet with upgraded avionics
join up with three other Hornets to play adversaries against fighters from Carrier Air Wing 3.


Photos by Clark Pierce
is about to be released for take-off from NAS Jax. In the air, it will


Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses


By Clark Pierce
Editor


A six-plane detachment
of F/A-18A+ Hornets from
Fighter Squadron Composite
(VFC) 12, along with a five-
plane detachment operated by
Airborne Tactical Advantage
Company (ATAC), a two-plane
detachment from L-3, and a
two-plane detachment from
Phoenix Air are operating from
NAS Jacksonville to provide
"adversary threat training" for
the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72)
Strike Group that is currently
underway in the Atlantic for
its Composite Training Unit
Exercise (COMPTUEX).
Together, the aircraft from
VFC-12 and contractor adver-
sary aircraft, represent a real-
istic hostile opposing force to
sharpen the war fighting capa-
bilities of Navy expeditionary
forces preparing for deploy-
ment.
Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot
with VFC-12, explained that
the "Fighting Omars" are the
Naval Reserves' premier adver-
sary squadron for providing
threat tactics training to Navy
strike fighter squadrons,
"Based at NAS Oceana in
Virginia Beach, our main job
is to provide tactical 'dissimilar
air combat training' for Navy,
Marine Corps and other avia-


I-= I I
ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio taxis his F-21 Kfir fighter to the main
runway of NAS Jax, where he took off to challenge the aerial
defenses of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group operating


in the Atlantic.
tion units. For COMPTUEX,
we primarily oppose air strikes
from the carrier air wing as
they enter or leave the air space
of Pinecastle Range Complex,"
said Menna. "Our goal is to
enable strike fighter aircrew to
hone their warfighting skills
against a creditable adversary
prior to deploying in the face of
real threats."
In late 2012, VFC-12 began
their transition from the blue
camouflage F/A-18C Hornet
that they flew for seven years
- to the upgraded F/A-18A+
Hornet painted in the bold
SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter
camouflage. The unique
challenges inherent to the
squadron's mission make the
Fighting Omars one of the
Navy's most sought after avia-


tion duty assignments.
ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio
said, "According to daily task-
ing from Commander, Strike
Force Training Atlantic
(CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres-
ent a variety of threat profiles
- either against Carrier Air
Wing-3, surface ships in the
strike group, or both.
"We may also fly joint mis-
sions against the strike group
with Hornets from VFC-12
or Lear jets from L-3," said
DeStasio.
"L-3 has provided the Navy
with COMPTUEX adversary
support for a number of years,"
explained Jim Bailey. "Our Lear
jets deliver threat simulations
for ship attacks, as well as tow-
ing aerial targets for ships and
fighter aircraft.


(From left) Two specially outfitted L-3 Lear jets are parked on the
NAS Jax tarmac alongside another Lear jet and a Gulfstream G-1
turboprop operated by Phoenix Air. They are all part of the spe-
cialized aerial threat force put together by Commander, Strike
Force Training Atlantic.


ATAC pilot John Burch and aircraft mechanic Darrell White fin-
ish the walk-around inspection of their F-21 Kfir fighter, prior
to take-off from NAS Jax for a joint mission with VFC-12, the
Navy's premier adversary threat squadron.


Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution


By Marsha Childs
FRCSE Public Affairs Specialist


Local residents are spared
much of the ear-throbbing
noise produced when Fleet
Readiness Center Southeast
(FRCSE) conducts out-of-air-
frame testing to certify the reli-
ability and performance of gas
turbine engines repaired at the
facility.
Annexed at the far end of
NAS Jacksonville along the
St Johns River, the Richard
Kemen Engine Test Facility
is acoustically treated and
aerodynamically designed to
reduce the powerful sound
waves generated by jet engine
combustion during testing.
"The walls around the con-
crete test chamber are 18 inch-
es thick," said Mark Stogdon,
an electronics engineer work-
ing at the testing facility. "We
used to test engines outside
in the late '60s, but the sound
carried right across the river.
Testing inside is easier, and
acoustics are contained. It is
considerably safer."
Stogdon said about 140
engines are tested at FRCSE
each year, and Kemen is the
Navy's only depot engine test
facility still in use. He said in
the "heyday" back in the 1970s,
six facilities were to be built,
but only one other was con-
structed at the military depot
in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down
years later following the depot
closures in the mid-1990s
according to Stogdon.
In the engine preparation


Photos by Victor Pitts
Marilyn Barzell, a quality
assurance specialist, inspects
a TF34-100 turbofan engine
in the Robert Kemen Engine
Test Facility at Fleet Readiness
Center Southeast. Artisans
perform acceptance test-
ing on jet engines rebuilt and
repaired at the facility to
ensure they are producing the
rated power and are safe for
flight.
area, a monorail system allows
technicians to suspend each
jet engine until it is rolled into
a test chamber, an enormous
room measuring about 90-feet
long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet
high.
The monorail improves
workflow and ensures opti-
mum efficiency, safety and
ease of use for the technicians.
Seated in the control room
behind two inches of bullet-
proof glass, test cell opera-
tors put a variety of off-wing
engines through their entire
operating range to simulate
the engine's flight mission. The
largest being the F414-GE-400
turbofan engine with 22,000
pounds of static thrust. The
F/A-18 Super Hornet and the
EA-18G Growler tactical air-
craft are each powered by two
of these engines.


I -


Photo by Marsha Childs
The Robert Kemen Engine Test Facility, located at the end of the flight line next to the St. Johns
River at NAS Jacksonville, is the Navy's only engine test facility. The structure is acoustically
treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine
combustion during testing.


Curtis Kimbler, the Fleet
Readiness Center Southeast
(FRCSE) test cell supervisor,
inspects a TF34-GE-100 tur-
bofan engine from an USAF
A-10 Thunderbolt II. Jet
engine mechanics service and
repair a variety of gas turbine
engines at the FRCSE Crinkley
Engine Facility aboard NAS
Jacksonville.
The test cell is designed with
special air intake baffles for
optimal air flow and exhaust
to ensure engine performance
consistency and to suppress
noise to Occupational Safety
and Health Administration
acceptable levels. An exhaust
collector and transfer tube,


Aircraft Mechanic Lee Peyton inspects an F414-GE-400 turbo-
fan engine, the power plant for the F/A-18 Super Hornet Strike
Fighter aircraft, in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Kemen
Engine Test Facility.


exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple-
num and exhaust stack with
baffles aid in reducing heat and
vibration from engine exhaust
during testing.
"We are not noisy," said
Curtis Kimbler, the former
test engine supervisor who
now serves as the TF34 engine


supervisor. "It is one of the
most people-friendly test cells
around. We have testing capa-
bility for the J52, TF34, F414
and the F404 engine."
The Richard Kemen Engine
Test Facility was dedicated in
1978 and underwent a major
upgrade in 2011.


L


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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013


Naval Sta


Mayport


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Holiday lights shine from ships


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Marcus L. Stanley
at Naval Station Mayport as each ship moored at the naval base participated in the annual holiday light display competition.


NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

From NS Mavoort Public Affairs


Established since 1942, Naval Station
Mayport has grown to become the third
largest fleet concentration in the United
States. The unique operational compo-
sition of the naval installation includes
a harbor capable of accommodat-
ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway
capable of handling any aircraft in the
Department of Defense inventory.
NS Mayport is home to more than 83
tenant commands, including 16 naval
ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4


helicopter squadrons and Commander,
U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/
Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet.
The mission of Naval Station Mayport
is to enhance and sustain the opera-
tional readiness of its tenant commands
and provide unparalleled support to its
families. The vision of the command is
to be recognized as the leader of shore
installations in the Navy and a model
facility that employs a premier work-
force always seeking to provide the fin-
est service to the fleet, family and com-


munity.
Over the past year, the base has
worked towards its mission by under-
taking vast energy conservation mea-
sures, completing a state of the art fit-
ness center to enhance the physical
readiness of Sailors and implementing
housing improvements to enrich the
quality of life.
NS Mayport improvements have saved
the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while
still providing the fleet with premium
services. These improvements not only


positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors,
but those soon to arrive with USS New
York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and
USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport
is also currently adding three patrol
coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal
arrived in October, followed shortly by
USS Tornado and USS Zephyr.
The base has provided support for
532 Navy ship movements, including
16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast
guard ship movements and 110 foreign
and commercial visiting ships.


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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
NAVAL STATION
F P 0 BO< 4260112
JACKSON"ILLE FLORIDA 322.21& 112


11i Crt 12


Dear friend-,

As ,,nuranrinq ,'fficer of Naval Station Mayport, I would like to
thank the men and women who hav.'e honorably served cur country, as well
as tnose currently 3ering in tne military anrd the families that
support them.

i am privileged co witness first-hand the pride and
prctessionaisirr our Sailors rand civilian employees exhibit each cay at
Naval -tdaion Mayport. I am extremely proud cro wear rhe uniform and
serve alongside tiese talernted and dedicated profesonrals.

For 23 years, dSailors hiive answered the call of duty to protect
rjur country and our constitutional freedoms. For as many years,
Sailors have enjoyed the support of trkeir families and their local
corrinuni t 1es. i want to thank our local civic leadership and the
wor,der ful Jackscrnvi 1 e conuniuty wrho, each and every day. clearly
demoni3tlate their suppOLt of our Trilitary and their families. Irn doing
so, you nave made Jacksonville the mrust military friendly city in the
country 'iour support has been rctning iess rrinr, eye watering. I
also want tu thank our military family members for their unmatched
support and their many great sacrifices endured c rn behalf of tneir
seri':e niermber. Each and every day I amr contrinuall amazed at r.he
strength, the spirit, and the courage that our military families
display. From the bottom of my heart...thank you!

'IrianK you once again Jacksonville for your continued support cf
eachr branch of orjur Arme.d Fores.


Captain U.SV Navy
Conmmnding Officer
Haval Station Maypc.rt


. .. l I .'.- .-, ,_, _..|_| q -- it L. '(,9JU LI i
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Ti\J-'


Capt. Wesley McCall
Conmmnandin Officer
NS Ma port


I ..................... I


11


41













Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19


S


S


File photo
U.S. Coast Guard, working with aircraft from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), seizes more than drugs on a recent Airborne Use of Force
(AUF) mission during a counter narcotics deployment with Navy, Coast Guard, and partner organizations.



HSL-60 'Jaguars' use nighttime




force against drug runners


By Senior Chief Mass
Communication Specialist
William Loveladv


Darkness won't stop a bullet.
Drug runners in the Caribbean and
Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard
way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not
only hunt them at night, but now their
U.S. Coast Guard precision marks-
men can use force to stop drug boats
24-hours-a-day.
Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine
Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60),
a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval
Station Mayport, Fla., became the first
Naval unit authorized for nighttime
use of force against drug boats. As they
prepare for their next deployments,
they expect this powerful new tool will
increase their effectiveness in the coun-
ter-narcotics mission.
For several years, the Navy helicopters
in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon-
sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans around Central and
South America) have had Coast Guard
precision marksmen aboard who are
authorized to fire disabling shots at
drug boats.
"It's a law enforcement action so there
are many legal aspects we have to com-
ply with," said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon
of HSL-60. "That is why it is a Coast
Guard member who ultimately fires the


shots."
"When we find a suspected drug boat
that meets the criteria for interdiction,
authority over the helicopter is trans-
ferred to the regional Coast Guard com-
mander," Patmon continued. "We hail
the boat on the radio advising them
to stop for inspection. If they do not
respond to radio calls, we have a large
sign that we use to visually request their
cooperation. If the boat still doesn't
stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires
warning shots. Finally, the shooter will
fire disabling shots at the boat's engine."
The Coast Guard precision marksmen
are a small group of less than two dozen
law enforcement members who have
been selected for the precision marks-
manship school. They use the M-107
semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50
caliber round as the M-2 machine gun,
to disable the drug boats.
While the M-107 rifle is accurate at
more than 1,000 yards on land, these
shots are taken at much closer range.
Delivering more than 10,000 foot
pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle
and cartridge combination can read-
ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or
metal drug boats.
"We try to get well inside 200 yards,"
said one of the Coast Guard shooters.
"We don't want to cause any harm to
personnel aboard the boats."


The shooters do not fire at anyone
aboard the boat, only at the engine.
"After the suspected drug boat has
stopped, of its own accord or because
of disabling fire, our ship will launch a
RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a
Coast Guard law enforcement team to
conduct VBSS (visit board search and
seizure)," said Patmon. "Once aboard
the suspect vessel, the law enforcement
team will seize the drugs and take the
smugglers into custody."
This new program has paid off for
HSL-60, with several night time busts.
"Last year on deployment, we cap-
tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed
for the United States," said Cmdr. Oscar
Toledo, HSL-60's executive officer.
It was no simple task, becoming the
first Navy unit to have authority for
night time use of force.
"We started in 2010, to get ready for
the 2012 deployment," said Toledo. "We
had to configure our aircraft and put
our crews through extensive training
before we got Coast Guard approval for
this program.
"One of our first challenges was the
night vision," Toledo continued. "We
needed a heads up display (HUD) inside
the goggles. Flying with night vision at
80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping
along at less than 30 knots is extremely
difficult. Night vision limits peripheral


vision and depth perception. Because
the HUD displays altitude, attitude, air-
speed, and other critical flight param-
eters, allows our pilots to look where
they were flying instead of turning their
heads constantly to look at the instru-
ment panel."
This increased safety and provided a
steadier platform for the Coast Guard
marksmen to shoot from, but it takes
practice.
"We did a lot of training for these mis-
sions," said Toledo. "One of our biggest
challenges as a Reserve squadron is
coordinating our training days with the
civilian work schedules of our Reserve
aircrew members.
"It's pretty exciting for a Reserve
squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to
lead the way with this new program. We
had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet
can incorporate as more units begin fly-
ing these missions.
Toledo concluded, "All of our guys
made the sacrifices of their personal
time to fly extra days and to be here
when necessary. Our maintainers
stepped up and kept our aircraft run-
ning under the increased load and did
what was necessary to incorporate the
new technology into the aircraft in order
to meet our mission. I'd say $1 billion
in dope off the street is mission accom-
plished."


Photo by ET3 Michelle Maltese
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert presents a coin to Crytpologic
Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Tranbarger during an All Hands Call and reen-
listment ceremony at Naval Station Mayport on May 3. Greenert and MCPON
Mike Stevens spoke to hundreds of Sailors about the future of the Navy and
today's Sailors during the All Hands held inside the HSL-48 hangar.


U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Luis Fiallos
Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Nathaniel Loesch, assigned to the guided-missile
cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), reports on station before a replenishment-at-sea
alongside the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Walter S.
Diehl (T-AO 193). Hue City is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility
promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and
support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.


Nava^II~l Li "IBB*^^^^^BB^^H^ma^^^P^~^^Hy ^B^^irtIF ^













20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013


Naval Stationii Mayport


A'


- ... f -^i ^ ,- -
.. .-AO
- 4A


Members of Naval Station
Mayport's Second Class
Petty Officers Association
(SCPOA) salute during
morning colors in the
newly refurbished Mayport
Memorial Garden. The
SCPOA spent a Saturday
cleaning, remulching,
pressure washing and
weeding the area and has
committed to perform the
upkeep every month.


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Deven B. King
Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Brandon Highwood, a member
of the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team from the
guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99), boards
the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG
109) during a VBSS exercise. Jason Dunham and Farragut
are deployed with the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group
to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting
maritime security operations, theater security coopera-
tion efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring
Freedom.


Photo by Paige Cnann


4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation


By MC1 Sean Allen
U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command


Budget cuts have reduced Depart-
ment of Navy spending across the
board. Ship deployments have been
cancelled and aircraft flying hours have
been reduced.
This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has
turned to innovative ways to continue
the fleet's important mission.
4th Fleet's current missions include
security cooperation activities, con-
tingency operations, and the domi-
nant mission of maritime security
operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes
this through Counter Transnational
Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission.
The illegal transportation of illicit
cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions
as the greatest means these organiza-
tions make money and influence and
destabilize the region.
4th Fleet and partner nations in the
region monitor detect and intercept
narcotics being smuggled via the water-
ways between the Americas. Defending
the homeland by preventing narcotics
from entering American schools and
neighborhoods is an important mission
that 4th Fleet must now accomplish
with fewer ships, aircraft, and other
assets.
"In the current fiscal environ-
ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova-
tive, cost effective solutions that can
address the capability gaps caused by
budget cuts." Rear Adm. Sinclair M.
Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces


Southern Command/Commander U.S.
4th Fleet said.
To continue sustained operations 4th
Fleet has employed a combination of
resources from the past with new tech-
nologies to continue the mission.
In March of this year 4th Fleet host-
ed a capabilities demonstration of the
Naval Air Warfare Center's MZ-3A
Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized
blimps during WWII in the South
Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare.
Harris discussed the benefits blimps
can bring to the C-TOC mission.
"Transnational criminal organiza-
tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics,
low observable and high speed vessels,
masked communication signatures and
sophisticated coordination to smug-
gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year.
One way to enhance detection efforts
against illicit trafficking within our area
of operations is to utilize long-endur-
ance platforms with the ability to use a
multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air
(LTA) technologies, like this blimp have
the potential to meet these operational
needs," Harris said.
In May Harris traveled to Key West for
a very successful demonstration of the
TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon)
and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle
(UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel
Swift.
The tethered Aerostat provides an
aerodynamically stable, reliable and
cost effective, unmanned aerial plat-
form for surveillance, monitoring and
detection. The standard system config-


uration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above
a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly
and safely.
The Puma UAV delivers flexibil-
ity, endurance and a payload capability
unmatched in its vehicle class. With a
wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight,
hand-launched UAV provides aerial
observation at line-of-sight ranges up
to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov-
ered in very restricted areas using verti-
cal descent Auto Land and is currently
undergoing sea landing trials.
On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey
airplane from Naval Oceanographic
Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet
headquarters for a capabilities demon-
stration prior to a scheduled deploy-
ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central
America, another vehicle from the past
4th Fleet wants to use for future opera-
tions.
The DC-3 collects oceanographic
and hydrographic data from the world's
oceans and coastlines, using a variety
of platforms including, ships, aircraft,
satellite sensors and buoys. The equip-
ment on board this DC-3 allows it not
only to survey coastal areas, but also
detect surface and underwater contacts
essential for the C-TOC mission.
"It is important for 4th Fleet to find
creative ways to continue the C-TOC
mission with fewer assets. In 2012,
318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole-
sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti-
mated street value of $25.5 billion
were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of
Responsibility (AOR)," Harris said.


Developing, testing and deploying
low cost innovative ideas and technol-
ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi-
ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue
operations now and in the near future.
"The Counter Transnational
Organized Crime mission is of vital
importance to our nation, as well as
our partners in the region. The effect
of crime and corruption that this ille-
gal activity has brought threatens the
stability of emerging countries like
Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing
the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem,
but a problem for all of the Americas",
Harris said.
4th Fleet AOR's close proximity to
the U.S. makes the Fleet's mission that
more important. Illegal materials enter-
ing the U.S. are a direct threat to the
homeland. The violence that drug traf-
ficking creates has impacted our part-
ner nations in the hemisphere.
It is important that 4th Fleet contin-
ues to explore innovative ways to do
more with less. Budget concerns are
a problem that is not going away any-
time soon, and neither is the attempt
to smuggle narcotics into the United
States.
U.S. Naval Forces Southern
Command and U.S. 4th Fleet
(COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari-
time forces in cooperative maritime
security operations in order to maintain
access, enhance interoperability, and
build enduring partnerships that foster
regional security in the U.S. Southern
Command Area of Responsibility.


Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient


form

By Ensign William Drummond
ATC Mayport PAO

With minimal investment and s
Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayp
nuity, a much more effective trainir
brought to the Fleet.
What started as a vision for a bei
for surface Navigation teams, spa
Petty Officers from Afloat Training G
implement the new team trainer cour
Net (MSN).
Identifying the need to have an i
gation team training tool, Chief
Cunningham and Chief Quarterm
ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of C
Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new
MSN is an effective way to train ti
navigation teams. The program is a
inclusive simulator for navigation tr
officers and enlisted to train togeth
problem.
MSN is able to provide refresher t
without ever leaving the basin.
CSCS provided classrooms to house
NAVAIR provided the computers use
tion.
"This is a way to integrate the e
team on the bridge, in combat, worn
dynamic problem, real time, pulling i


of navigation tear

port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the
ship is in the yard period," Holder said.
Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators,
ome impressive the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to
)ort Sailor inge- the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills nec-
nig tool has been essaryto ensure the safe navigation of the ship.
Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG
tter training aid Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000.
rked two Chief Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use
rroup Mayport to existing software and hardware to create the course.
se Mariner Skills They interfaced the existing equipment and inno-
vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator.
integrated navi- The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage
Quartermaster Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards,
master Holder of headsets, and reformat existing computers to com-
ESCS and Edmar plete networked watch stations.
v course. "This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the
ie surface ships' amount of underway times necessary to effectively
cost effective, all train the bridge team in navigation and ship han-
aining. It allows dling," Cunningham said.
er on a dynamic The training is not only cost effective, but it is also
receiving ample praise from those who experience the
training to ships MSN course first hand. USS Taylor's Navigation team
got to use the system first hand during a recent train-
e the new course, ing class atATG.
d for the simula- "The training we are now receiving through
MSN is far superior to the previous method," said
entire navigation Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. "As
king on the same opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD
into or out of any [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs


n training

to train together, allowing for much more realistic
training."
MSN has the ability for the training to match the
experience level of those at the controls. An entire new
bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit
from the course, Cunningham.
Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS
capable ships. VMS is the Navy's version of GPS. The
MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N,
enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to
fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway.
"The MSN course simulates relative motion, which
means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly
changing," added Operations Specialist 2nd Class
Harris of USS Taylor. "That definitely shows us where
we lacked and where we didn't lack."
The ship's Navigation team also commented on how
shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the
MSN simulation was exponentially better than read-
ing it off of a paper and applying it just to charts.
Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in
the trainer with the option to add any port to the sys-
tem with a request 90 days prior to the training date.
Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy
Achievement Medals by the command for their
actions.
This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the
VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to
schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344
ext. 3044.













Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21


S


Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year


East Coast Ohio-class

submarine home port ....... .tl,.....
1,." r i ''",-,,, Wi- r ,< '"- < -." .t, '-". '. _-- S'.., ". <' '\ "'*' "* "' ? .. .' *;- a' .~s^ S; s.s. "ti y. S.- "'

continues to thrive .... -".......

MW9
From Naval Submarine Base Kings .
Bay Public Affairs


What began as an inactive Army
Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now
home to the most powerful vessels ever
created for the U.S. Navy and the world.
Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is
the largest employer in Camden County
with more than 8,000 service members
and civilian employees and an estimat-
ed annual payroll of $500 million. The
goods and service the Kings Bay mili-
tary bring into Camden County is esti-
mated at $697 million.
Kings Bay is the home port to six
Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines
and two Ohio-Class guided missile sub-
marines.
The Navy's move to Kings Bay began
when treaty negotiations between the
United States and Spain called for the
withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16
from its operational base in Rota, Spain
by 1979.
Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials
looked at more than 60 sites along the
East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as
the future refit site for the squadron. In
addition to the land already owned by
the Army, the Navy acquired other sur-
rounding properties for a total of 16,900
acres to create the new support base.
It also transformed a sleepy com-
munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of
about 50,000.
"It changed Camden County forev-
er," said David Rainer during a 2005
interview. "It was a defining period for
everyone."
Rainer, a Camden County
Commissioner, was the superintendent
of Camden County schools in 1978.
During a visit to the base in 2005, for-
mer president Jimmy Carter jokingly
said it was hard not to have an influence
in Kings Bay's selection during his ten-
ure as president. However, the former
governor and submariner noted, "Kings
Bay was selected on its own merits."
Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility


Periscope file photo
An early aerial view of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay's administrative building, Fluckey Hall, and the massive Trident
Training Facility (left rear).


employee and mayor of Kingsland, said
the base was among the most important
events to occur in Camden County his-
tory.
"I don't know if [Carter] did anything
in office that was more significant to
Camden County," Smith said in 2005.
"He was in office at the time of the
base's inception. It helped bring a lot
of change, not only to Camden County,
but surrounding counties."
The first group of Sailors arrived in
January 1978 and began the transfer
process from the Army to the Navy that
was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert
Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and
civilian employees, raised the national
ensign and changed the sign to read
Naval Submarine Support Base Kings
Bay near what was to become Stimson
Gate. With the transition complete, the
commanding officer of the support base
and his crew set out to transform the
terminal into an operational naval base.
Initial construction began to prepare
for the arrival of the squadron and the


submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS-
33). According to base archives and
newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil-
lion cubic yards of material from the St.
Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland
Sound and Kings Bay in preparation
for the incoming fleet. Congress also
approved funding for many projects
such as the development of 250 fam-
ily housing units, the first base admin-
istration building (now public works),
security building, and a new fire sta-
tion.
"When I first arrived at Kings Bay
to take command in 1979, it was only
a few trailers and a pine forest," said
retired Capt. Richard Currier, who
was the second commanding officer
of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to
greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake
upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that
year. "Making do was our biggest chal-
lenge as was incorporating change. I
had a workforce of 350 personnel when
I started. When I left, there was close to


1,000 people working on the base."
Following an extensive one-year
environmental impact study in October
1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east
coast site for the new Ohio-class sub-
marines. The Navy then called for the
construction of three new commands.
Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit
Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility
Atlantic were built to support the mas-
sive new boats.
Trident Training Facility is the largest
building in Camden County, with more
than 500,000 square feet of classrooms
and office space. Trident Refit Facility's
dry dock is the largest covered dry dock
in the Western hemisphere.
The announcement spurred the larg-
est peacetime construction project
ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3
billion, 11-year construction project
also fueled a population explosion in
Camden County that still persists today.
Other milestones achieved dur-

See 35 YEARS, Page 22


r~VN~% .N i t~~N -
~cz


Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr.
Commanding Officer
NSB Kings Bai


-S.FTCD.L7_-L II l" it"7
ISYL1iufftlihi^ ]BceisIjKtLimi~iL~iu' Isaml
*s-) Us'
,-,--lhi.,a---,-,-. B-g1 IICi-.^ B a-r7.-


We at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay are happy to take part in
Air, Surface, Submnarine -A Salute to Our Navyi and All Those \'ho
Have Served. \\ ili our brothers and sisters at Na al Air Station
Jacksonville and Na al Station Mail)ort, iie are proud of the role we
play in the forward-deployed in missions that make our Nav y the true
global force for good that it is. %e salute as %%ell those at NAS Jax and
NS Mayport for the critical roles they so admirably perform.
As a member of the Tri-Base coininmunit, NSB Kings Bai is a crucial
part of the $7.8 billion economic inmp)acl thai the three installations
make to the Southeast Georgia aind Northeast Florida region. As the
exclusive base oni the East Coast for Ohio-Class ballistic missile and
guided missile submarines, %e place our utmost ,talue on the sen ice
members, civilian workforce and contractors, w hose dedicationl, hard
work and sacrifice are key to our success in fulfilling our mission.
The commands anid personnel % ho constitute Kings Bay function as
one team, enhancing our readiness and transforming challenges into
achievement. \\e make a difference through inlegrin, mutual respect
and professional conduct. The poler of our organization is in the
genius of our people. The quialit of our submarine crews and tenant
commands is second to none.
Today and throughout the historic of the base, thie hoiioi courage
and commitment of our people hai e enabled our country to preser% e
the freedoms Me all enjoy. In addition. |)articil)alionI b% the members
of Team Kings Bay and our families in coinmmuniit outreach )rogralms
has been and continues to be outstanding. The hundreds of volunteer
hours at area schools, building homes, sen ing meals, stocking food
pantries and cleaning piarks are admirable and great appreciated bh
the good people orf Camlden ('ount.
We never forget those w ho liha e set the course before us. As %we
approach Veterans Da% on No%. II. we build upon the solid keel laid
by so many in the past. and we truly stand on the shoulders ofrgianmls.
As we prepare ourselh es for the challenges of tomorrow, m ,faminili
and I send all here at Kings Bay and those at nearby NAS Jax and NS
Mayport, plus the surrounding communities of veterans and citizens.
a Bravo Zulu on a job well done and our best wishes for continued
success.


('apt. Harvey L. Guffey
('ommaiiiiuiiiiiig Officer
ArtUvl Subimrine' Ilace Kinqg liBr. (Ga.

Su)pp)orling the Fleet. Fighter; and Family


Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay












22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013


Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay


S


Navy photo by MC1 Kimberly Clifford
The ballistic-missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) is escorted by tug boats to her berth at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


Navy photo
USS Florida (SSGN 728) Gold crew members took part in Navy Week at Tampa.
Current Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba, then-Gold crew
chief of the boat, played Battleship with a patient at the St. Joseph's Children's
Hospital, Tampa.


Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber
Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding offi-
cer, addresses all Sailors stationed at the submarine base at last year's 9/11
Remembrance at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


it


-fit


Photo courtesy of NSB Kings Bay Fire Department
Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay's Trident Refit Facility's dry
dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemi-
sphere. Here firefighters carry a victim from 80 feet below
grade, adjacent to the massive trident submarine, to the top of
a dry dock using the stairway at bottom right.


35 YEARS __

From Page 21 11,01


ing the first years were the publication of the first
Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual
Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay
Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked
at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in
April 1980.
"When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for
Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years," said
Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later
worked for the base administration.
"The admin building was still being built, Trident
Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10
was non-existent."
Since then he said, construction of new buildings
changed the face of the base.
"The biggest impression I received from my initial


-'I-..


Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber
The Ohio-class guided missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729) transits the St. Marys River en
route home to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design
of the base, because everything was within walking
distance," Alexander said.
The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS


Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15,
1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150
Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to
10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000.
Kings Bay continues to evolve.
Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast
and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729)
were converted to guided missile submarines and
shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732)
arrived from the West Coast.
In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force
Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing
140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to
the base.
Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and
new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as
additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine
Corps Security Force Battalion.
The Times-Union contributed to this story.













Thursday, October 17, 2013 23


Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay


S


Navy photos by MC1 James Kimber
Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, assigned to the Gold crew of the ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) pins the submarine officer warfare device on his wife, Lt.
j.g. Marquette Leveque, assigned to the Gold crew of the ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

First qualified

female sub officers .-.,

receive Dolphins

From Commander,
Submarine Forces /
Public Affairs 4, iS 4 l 21 Z.N t ..


Three Sailors assigned to
USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and
USS Maine (SSBN 741) became
the first female unrestricted
line officers to qualify in sub-
marines, Dec. 5.
Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque,
a native of Fort Collins, Colo.,
assigned to the Gold Crew of
Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber
Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer
Noonan of Maine's Blue
Crew received their subma-
rine "Dolphins" during sepa-
rate ceremonies at Naval
Submarine Base Kings Bay
and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor,
Wash.
In order to receive their
Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan
and Noonan were required to
qualify as Officer of the Deck
and Engineering Officer of the
Watch, perform damage con-
trol functions, and demon-
strate satisfactory qualities of
leadership.
In Kings Bay, Leveque, along
with fellow Gold Crew officer
Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par-
ticipated in a ceremony pre-
sided by Cmdr. Christopher
Nash, commanding officer of
Wyoming's Gold Crew.
"Today was a very special
occasion" Nash said.
"It was special because two
talented young officers earned
the right to lead the next gen-
eration of submarine sailors
in the most capable Navy the
world has ever known. It was
also special because these
young leaders fully represent
the future of our nation's tech-
nical talent."
Nash pinned McFadden at
the ceremony.
Leveque was pinned by
her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke
Leveque, a qualified submari-
ner onboard the ballistic mis-
sile submarine USS Maryland
(SSBN 738).
"I am honored to be joining
the long tradition of the sub-
marine force by earning my
Dolphins and excited for the
journey to come," Leveque
said.
"I could not have accom-
plished this without the help of
the wardroom and crew of the
USS Wyoming."


Lt j.g. Marquette Leveque, assigned to the Gold crew of the bal-
listic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), signs her
command's copy of Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey's "Thunder Below!"
after receiving her submarine officer warfare device at Naval
Submarine Base Kings Bay. Leveque is one of three Sailors to
become the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in
submarines.


Cmdr. Chris Nash, commanding officer of the Gold crew of the
ballistic missile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), reads a
paragraph from Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey's "Thunder Below!"
after presenting Lt j.g. Marquette Leveque and Lt. j.g Kyle
McFadden, both assigned to Wyoming, with their submarine
officer warfare devices at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


Cowan, a native of Colorado
Springs, Colo., and Noonan,
who hails from Boston, joined
two other Blue Crew officers -
Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g.
John Schaeffer in receiving
their Dolphins.
Cowan was pinned by her
husband, Naval Flight Officer
Lt. Adam Cowan.
Noonan chose a former
Maine shipmate and mentor,
Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her
Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to
have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current
shipmate from the Blue Crew,
conduct his pinning.
The Commanding officer
of Maine's Blue Crew, Cmdr.
William Johnson, pinned


Barclay.
"I am honored to participate
in today's ceremony honoring
these four fine officers who
have proven themselves over
the past year," Johnson said.
"They are trulyworthyto join
in the great legacy of submari-
ners that have gone before us
as 'qualified in submarines.'"
Leveque, Cowan and
Noonan are three of 24 women
- 17 line officers and seven
supply officers assigned to
Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio
(SSGN 726) and USS Georgia
(SSGN 729).
Wyoming and Georgia are
homeported in Kings Bay,
while Maine and Ohio are


The signatures of Lt. j.g. Kyle McFadden and Lt j.g. Marquette
Leveque, both assigned to the Gold crew of the ballistic missile
submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), are with the signatures of
the submarine officers qualified before them aboard the Ohio-
class ballistic missile submarine after receiving their warfare
devices at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque (left) and Lt. j.g. Kyle McFadden, both
assigned to the Gold crew of the ballistic missile submarine USS
Wyoming (SSBN 742), receive their submarine officer warfare
devices at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Leveque is one of
three Sailors to become the first female unrestricted line officers
to qualify in submarines.


homeported in Bangor.
Leveque, Cowan and
Noonan have each complet-
ed strategic deterrent patrols
aboard their respective subma-
rines.
"Qualifying is a huge accom-
plishment for any submariner,
and it feels no different for me,"
Noonan said.
"I am thrilled to finally be a
member of this elite commu-
nity. I'm particularly grateful to
my crew, officers and enlisted,
for supporting me and hold-
ing me to the same standards
as those who have gone before
me. I look forward to being able
to fully contribute to the crew
now that I'm a qualified sub-
marine officer."
Cowan said qualification in
submarines is more of a per-
sonal achievement
"It requires understanding
of the many facets of subma-
rine life and has you perform
so many skills that when I take
a step back and look at every-
thing that I have done and


what this qualification means
I will do, it is pretty amazing,"
she said.
"I see it as that point where I
have demonstrated the knowl-
edge and the instinct to per-
form safely and smartly in all
areas of the ship and its mis-
sions. Ultimately, it is a monu-
mental mark of the confidence
my command and crew has in
me. And earning that respect
and acceptance is a feeling
that I will hold with me for my
entire life."
Prior to reporting to their
boats beginning in November
2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan
and the other women assigned
to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming
and Georgia graduated from
the Submarine Officer Basic
Course in Groton, Conn.
In addition, the submarine
line officers under instruc-
tion graduated from the Naval
Nuclear Power School at
Charleston, S.C., and under-
went naval nuclear prototype
training.


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PAGE 1

Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Naval Station Mayport will host its quarterly blood drive on Oct. 22 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at Building 1 training room. Walk-ins welcome. To schedule an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-Red Cross. Naval Branch Health Clinic Mayport will host a Breast Cancer Awareness Symposium and Health Fair 2013 on Oct. 25 from 4-6 p.m. There will be refreshments, presentations, information booths, games and door prizes.Naval Station Mayport and MWR will partner up with First Coast News and True Blue Navy Family Benefactors, Inc. on Make a Difference Day on Oct. 26 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. For more than two decades, this national day of community service connects people with opportunities to serve, increas es the strength of communities and promotes civic engage ment. At Mayport, the volunteer team will be working on the Lake Wonderwood Renovation Project. Volunteers will clear brush along the lake as part of the project, which will include a mile-long recreation path around the lake, picnic pavilion and playground renovations. This project is being funded through monies gifted by True Blue Navy Benefactors, Inc., an all-volunteer nonprofit 501(C)3 formed in January 2012. Their mission is to enhance the quality of life for local Jacksonville military and their families. All members of the Mayport community, ages 16 and up, are invited to volunteer for this event. First Coast News will be on-site filming segments for Good Morning Jacksonville and their evening news broad cast. To volunteer for Make a Difference Day or for more information, call (904) 270-5228 or email MWRMayport@navy. mil. Following the event, MWR will be hosting a Festival Celebration (formerly Fall Fest) at the Lake Wonderwood Field from 1-5 p.m. This event will feature, games, rides, bouncy houses, free food provided by Sea Breeze Food Service, arts and crafts vendors, a haunted house, a pumpkin patch for photo opportunities, carnival food for purchase, and more.Make A Difference At Mayport COMDESRON 40 Holds Change of Command-Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonOutgoing Commodore Ace Van Wagoner thanks DESRON 40 for their hard work during his tenure at the command. Van Wagoner was relieved by Capt. Sam Hancock, third from left, at a change of com mand ceremony on Oct. 10. Also pictured is guest speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4th Fleet, left, and Chaplain (Cmdr) Steve Souder. Capt. Sam Hancock relieved Capt. Ace Van Wagoner as commodore of COMDESRON 40 during a change of command on Oct. 10 at Ocean Breeze Conference Center. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4th Fleet was guest speaker at the event. Hancock, originally from Pensacola, Florida, is a gradu ate of Auburn University and was commissioned in 1990 via the NROTC program. In his sea duty assign ments, Captain Hancock has seen world-wide deploy ments to every U.S. Fleet area of responsibility. These assignments include Division Officer tours on USS Harold E. Holt (FF 1074), USS Worden (CG 18), and as Plank owner of USS Mitscher (DDG 57). His Department Head tours were on USS Boone (FFG 28) and Destroyer Squadron 24 (COMDESRON 24). He served as Executive Officer of USS Carney (DDG 64) and Commanded USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53). His shore assignments include Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Action Officer for the Director of Surface Warfare OPNAV (N76), Surface Warfare liaison for Task Force Total Force developing the Navy Human Capital Strategy, Executive Assistant for the Navy Chief of Legislative Affairs, and most recently as Chief of Staff for the Aegis BMD Program Office in the Missile Defense Agency. Hancock earned a Master of Science degree in Systems Management from the Naval Postgraduate School and a Master of Science degree in National Security Strategy from the National War College. Van Wagoner graduated from the University of Utah with a Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics and received a regular commission via NROTC in March 1986. He was desig nated a Surface Warfare Officer and attended Navy Nuclear Power training in Orlando, Florida. Captain Van Wagoners sea duty assignments include USS Texas (CGN 39); USS Merrill (DD 976); USS California -Photo by ET1 Marty ParsonsCapt. Steve Shinego, left, shakes hands with Capt. Wesley Smith after he is relieved of command during a change of command ceremony on the ship on Oct. 4. Also pictured is guest speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, USNAVSO/4th Fleet.Medina New CO Of PC ShamalSmith Takes Helm Of Phil Sea USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) held a change of com mand ceremony on its flight deck before Officers, crew and guests on Oct. 4. Capt. Steve Shinego was relieved by Capt. Wesley Smith as the guided missile cruisers newest com manding officer. Ceremony was presided by Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, Commander, Fourth Fleet. Whenever RADM Dave Thomas, Commander, Naval Surface Forces (Ret.), is asked which ship is the finest in the fleet, Harris addressed at the ceremony, He emphatically says, USS Philippine Sea. Florida-native Shinego began his naval career aboard the very same vessel 25 years ago as a newly-appointed Ensign as part of the precommissioning crew, serv ing as Auxiliaries Officer, First Lieutenant and Missile Officer. He assumed command of Philippine Sea in October 2011 midway through its six-month deployment. He subsequently led the cruiser into successful completions in all facets of its multi-lateral training cycles, or what the captain often refers to as team wins. The goal of this ship was to be a team, build a gameplan, and get wins, Shinego said before being relieved. And we did that. Smith, whose previous tour was as CO of USS The Sullivans (DDG-68), assumed command of Philippine Sea, affirming that it is a great opportunity to serve on a great ship, and is looking forward to the cruisers continued success. Among the myriad of achievements throughout the past two years aboard USS Philippine Sea include suc cessful inspections such as NS Mayport Says Fair Winds To Former CONavy Fighter Pilot, Captain Paul A. Andy Anderson flew his final check ride west when his soul and spirit departed the earthly pattern at 1343, Oct. 5, 2013. Born in Park River, North Dakota on Sept. 2, 1922 to Norwegian immi grants, Paul was one of five siblings. His aspiration to be an aviator started early in life. In the 1930s, when Paul was a boy, his grandfather acquired the wreck of a crashed airplane Capt. Paul AndersonSee Phil Sea, Page 7 See Anderson, Page 7 See DESRON 40, Page 10 Lt. Gillian Medina became commanding officer of USS Shamal (PC 13) permanent crew during a pierside ceremony held Oct. 11 at Naval Station Mayport. Medina relieved Lt. Cmdr. Frank Azzarello during the ceremony. Medina began her career by enlisting in the United States Navy in 1991 under the Delayed Entry Program and graduated from Recruit Training Command Orlando in 1992. She was selected for the Seaman to Admiral Program and received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of San Diego in May 2003. Her operational tours include Assistant Damage Control Assistant in USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), Navigator in USS See Shamal, Page 10 -Photo by Paige GnannLt. Gillian Medina speaks after taking command of USS Shamal from Lt. Cmdr. Frank Azzarello, third from left, dur ing a change of command ceremony Sept. 11. Also pictured is Chaplain (Cmdr) Steve Souder and guest speaker Squadron 14 Commodore Ryan Tillotson.

PAGE 2

2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror When children are involved in bullying, it is important for parents to be willing to take action. Children often do not tell their parents that they are being bullied because they are embarrassed or frightened. Bullying is about power. One psychologist is quot ed as saying, Its all about big on little, many on few, smart on less smart, older on younger. At some point you may have been the smaller one, the younger one, or had your interests and feel ings unfairly damaged by someone more powerful than you. If you suspect your child is being bullied or your child brings it up, consider these steps: Talk with your child. Focus on your child. Express your concern and make it clear that you want to help. Empathize with your child. Say bullying is wrong, that it is not their fault, and that you are glad they had the courage to tell you about it. Work together to find solutions. Ask your child what they think can be done to help. Reassure them that the situation can be handled private ly. Document ongoing bullying. Work with your child to keep a record of all bullying incidents. If it involves cyber bullying, keep a record of all mes sages or postings. Help your child devel op strategies and skills for handling bullying. Provide suggestions for ways to respond to bul lying, and help your child gain confidence by rehearsing their respons es. If you need help with suggestions, check with your childs school counselor. Be persistent. Bullying may not be resolved overnight. Stay vigilant to other possible problems that your child may be hav ing. Some of the warn ing signs may be signs of other serious problems. Share your concerns with a counselor at your childs school. Bullying IS NOT a nor mal rite of passage. It can have serious conse quences. You can help your child learn how to prevent bullying. These tips can help bully proof your child: Help your child understand bullying. Explain what bullying is. It is more than physical; it can be done in person or over the phone or computer. Keep open lines of communication with your child. Check in with your child and lis ten to any concerns about friends and other stu dents. Encourage your child to pursue their interests. Doing what they love may help your child be more confident among their peers and make friends with other kids with similar interests. Teach your child to take a stand against bullying. Give guid ance about how to stand up to those who bully if it is safe to do so. Again, engage the help of the school counselor to assist in counseling your child. Talk to your child about seeking help from a trusted adult when feeling threatened by a bully. Talk about whom What To Do When Your Child Is Being BulliedJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer The Honor Guard transitions from port arms. A command is bellowed out thrice, three suc cessive volleys ring out, loud, jarring. All jump in their seat, and the widow begins to cry. Taps rings out across the immaculately groomed grass and headstones. Carefully and with dignity, two Sailors slowly lift the Stars and Stripes off the casket and begin to methodically fold it. The flag is presented on behalf of a grateful nation, a slow salute, a final prayer. This is a scene that has played out many times in my career as a Navy Chaplain and still hits me powerfully every time. It is not the most joyous duty, laying to rest shipmates, yet it remains one of the most meaningful aspects of this career I have chosen and that has chosen me. It is an honor. My deep fear is to fail in lending dignity to that moment. I have buried at sea and on land and as I watch grieving loved ones bid farewell, I am always struck with the notion that in their lives at that moment, the moment of internment, time seems to stop. In sadness, pain and loss, families have expressed how surreal they feel. A moment ago they were so busy, rushing here and rushing there. Then suddenly the dreaded phone call, the bad news, the funeral, the burial. Now they cant remem ber what was so terribly important before. What was it they were so busy doing? What would they give for five more min utes with their loved one? What would they say? Tick, tock, tick, tock We spend so much of our life waiting. We wait in lines. We wait at the store. We wait at the bank. In our life, we wait on major events. We wait to graduate from school. We wait till we marry. We wait till we have kids. We wait to begin careers. We wait to retire. But we buy into an illu sion, dont we? We think we will always have time. Our seconds become minutes; our min -Take Time To Remember What Is ImportantChap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain What The U.S. Navy Taught MeEditors Note: Retired Capt. Bill Kennedy was asked to speak recently at NS Mayport Command Quarters in remembrance of the 238th birthday of the U.S. Navy. His speech was inspiring and I asked if I could republish it in The Mirror. He very kindly agreed to let me do so only if I would also men tion several of the ideas he incorporated in the speech come from Vietnam POW Lee Ellis book, Leading With Honor. The follow ing is that speech in its entirety. I became a part of the Navy family in 1963 as a college student between semesters when my draft notice arrived. I was a city boy and did not want to go into the Army. My father sent me to NAS Willow Grove just outside the city of Philadelphia. I was commissioned an ensign in December 1965, and earned my wings of Gold in July 1967. I flew off carriers for 20 years and drove ships for 10 years. I retired on Sept. 30, 1994. I have been the director of the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society here in Mayport going on 14 years. As the so-called Old Guy here today, celebrating the Navy birthday has very important meaning. It brings to mind how much I have learned over the many, many years that I served on active duty. The Navy taught me how to do the right things accept responsibility, ful fill my duty, tell the truth and remain faithful to my word. It is the most important thing you do, but it is also t he thing that brings you long-term success. To be a good Sailor, the Navy expected me to know myself who am I in terms of purpose, passion and personality. A sense of purpose, fueled by passion is essential for true success. Clarity of purpose sharpens focus, lifts confidence and pro motes fulfillment. A Sailor must guard his or her character. Character is the founda tion for trust and trust is the most essential ingre dient for leadership influence. People dont follow those they cannot trust. Guard your character, protect your honor and stay on course. The Navy taught me to stay positive. Believe me when I say having a positive attitude proved to be a great assent, and it is one of the best ways to influence others. Keep your chin up, because when it goes down, you do too and many others will follow right behind. I learned how to manage my emotions as if they were contagious, because they are. We all, at one time or another, have observed situations where negative emotions affect ed others. I knew early on that negative attitudes and emotions contribute to an unproductive unit, ship or squadron. Confront your doubts and fears. In the military service, you learn early on that courage is an act of will. You choose to do what you know is right. You gain confidence and trust in yourself. You develop values and will ingly engage demanding issues with strength and humility, despite fears. I recently saw four words depicting an ele mentary schools core values when I was asked to pick up my grand daughter from school a few weeks ago. The schools motto captured what I thought being in the Navy, or that matter any of our services, is all about. Tradition; Character; Excellence; Service When I read those words sitting in the child pick up line I was not only impressed, but it made me think of the Sailors Creed. I certainly could not recall the exact words since it had been many, many years ago that I was expected to memorize it. But I did look it up. The Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fight ing spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my countrys Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. Happy 238th birth day Shipmates. Congratulations! -Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Command Master Chief, CMDCM Bob White joins junior Sailors Masterat-Arms Seaman Apprentice Nathan Rollins and Seaman Abena Acheampong and NMCRS Director and retired Capt. Bill Kennedy cutting a cake celebrating the 238th birthday of the U.S. Navy on Oct. 10 at the Base Chapel.See School, Page 3utes become hours; our hours become days; our days become weeks; our weeks become months; our months become years. From seconds to years, and one day life suddenly pauses, perhaps at a funeral. And we say, Where did the years go? Tick, tock, tick, tock There is a certain precious gift that is offered at burials. There is a moment, perhaps the moment, where those who are inclined to, can reflect on their own life. For one honest moment, some times a harsh moment, one can reflect on whether or not the things they are pursuing with all vigor and might are worth it. I mean really worth it in light of the brevity of life. What is really impor tant? For a brief moment before we are thrust back into the rat race and the chaos of life time stops, or seems to. And in that moment is the gift a chance for a rudder adjustment, a new course alignment, a compass calibration. It is not uncommon to see people leave with new resolve, with humility, with determi nation to utilize the time they do have well. To forgive, to love, to live bet ter than before. They hear the cadence of their life beating time. Tick, tock, tick, tock What matters in this life? A chaplain will always say Faith first; then the rest of life has a way of falling into its proper place. But family should next and I want to address my shipmates who have unresolved issues with family and friends. See Chaplain, Page 3

PAGE 3

Perhaps its the fault of the Me Generation. Perhaps responsibility lies with our culture of excess. Perhaps Emeril is to blame for teaching us all to BAM! Kick it up a notch. Whatever the cause, modern American society has an insatiable desire for more, More, MORE; and nowhere is that more evident than during holi days like Halloween. Back in the s, when I was a kid yes, you should brace yourself for an up hill to school both ways rant our parents were too busy sipping vodka gimlets and tapping their Tareyton 100s into pedestal ashtrays while watch ing Laugh In from the comfort of their gabardine slacks. They didnt have time to spend countless hours and dollars to pro vide my brother and me, much less the rest of the kids in the neighborhood, with a better-than-ever Halloween. But we werent com plaining. We were beyond excited to carve one pumpkin for the whole family, using seriously sharp knives, because cutesy little kidsafe pumpkin carving kits hadnt been invented yet. We were ecstatic about dressing up in our $4.99 Woolworths highly flam mable nylon tie in the back Casper the Friendly Ghost costume with the brittle plastic facemask secured with the hair tangling elastic band. We were beside our selves with anticipation about the fact that ABC was airing Its the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown one night during prime time on our console TV. We were over the moon about going door to door with our pillow cases, gladly accepting whatever we were given, because it was free popcorn balls, apples, coins, and candy. Sure, we secretly hoped some neighbor would be giving out humongous candy bars, but for the most part, we appreci ated getting anything at all, and did not expect our parents to up the ante every year. Then why is it that, nowadays, kids base line expectations for Halloween include corn mazes, pet parades, school parties, hay rides, pumpkin carving con tests requiring a gradu ate degree in fine arts, yard decorating contests requiring professional special effects and 23 hired extras, week-long horror movie marathons, venti no-whip pump kin spice lattes, moun tains of brand-name only candy in tamperproof packaging, intri cate costumes that cost at least $49.95, little kid non-scary haunted hous es, regular kid kindascary haunted houses, and big kid Horrifically Haunting Mega Mansions of Traumatizing Terror (post-traumatic stress therapy not included)? And now, as if all that wasnt enough, some one had the bright idea to add something called Boo Bags to the list of annual Halloween must haves. Just when you think your wallet and energy have been sucked out like pumpkin guts, a well-intentioned neigh bor goes and drops a Halloween themed bag of thoughtfully assembled items on your doorstep with a little note instructing you to do the same for another neighbor. Sure, votive candles and candy corn are great and all, but is all this really necessary? Isnt Halloween fun enough already? And how much of this stuff will be re-gifted anyway? Now that my point has been made, I must con fess, after initially grum bling at my neighbors suggestion that we give Boo Bags on our street this year, I quite enjoyed picking out little gifts and goodies for another mili tary family here on base. My kids were happy to go on a night-time recon naissance mission to secretly deliver the bag to our neighbors porch, and Ive been downright cocky knowing that, upon finding my masterpiece, they mustve commented, Whoever put this fabu lous Boo Bag together is a creative genius! Despite feeling tricked into the excesses of Halloween, I must admit, giving a neighbor a Boo Bag can be quite a treat. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comBoo Bags And The Future Of HumanityLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist they should go to for help and role-play what they should say. Assure your child that they should not be afraid to tell an adult when someone they know is being bullied. Know what is going on in your childs school. Visit the school website, subscribe to the student paper-if there is bullying going on at the school, contact the school to find out what is being done. If you recognize these symptoms in your child, trying talking to him about what is happening at school. If your child will not share the prob lem with you, call your childs school counselor and ask if he/she will talk to your child about your concerns. Sometimes children will open up to a trusted adult before they will share with a parent. It is vital that you work with the teacher or school officials to find a solution. But just as important as What to Do is What Not to Do. Also share these Not to Do tips with your child: Never tell your child to ignore the bullying. What the child may hear is that you are going to ignore it. Be supportive and gather information about the bullying. Often, trying to ignore bullying allows it to become more serious. Do not blame your child for being bullied Do not assume that your child did something to provoke the bullying. Do not encourage your child to harm the person who is bullying them. It could get your child hurt, suspended, or expelled. Do not contact the parents of the students who bullied your child. It may make matters worse. School officials should contact the parents of the children involved. Do not demand or expect a solution on the spot. Indicate you would like to follow up to determine the best course of action. Also, be aware that the law limits the ability of school person nel from revealing dis ciplinary actions taken against other students. Just because they cannot tell you if or how another student was disciplined, does not mean action was not taken. The Duval County School Board has adopted an anti-bullying policy to address bullying in the district. If your child tells you he has been bullied, the incident should be reported to the school principal or another trusted adult. This report can be done anonymously on paper at www.duvalschools.org or by phone at (904) 390CALL. An investigation will be conducted by the school principal or his/her des ignee. Consequences will be in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. If necessary, individuals involved will be referred for appropriate services. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this article or con cerns about an edu cational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. There are no perfect families in this world. There are no perfect relation ships. We are hurt and we hurt back and divides emerge and widen over time. We are let down, we let down, we are disappointed, we disappoint. Sometimes we dont even know how our fractured relationships got to the state there in. Here is a lesson from a funeral. Dont wait any longer. You have done enough waiting in your life. Reach out, say sorry and forgive. Do so without mental reservation or purpose of evasion. Life is short, live well. Tick, tock, tick, tock From Page 2ChaplainFrom Page 2SchoolSECNAV, CNO, MCPON Wish Fleet Happy 238thSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens joined forces in a video birthday mes sage to the fleet. This year on October 13th the United States Navy marks its 238th birthday, said Mabus. Since our beginning in 1775, our Navy has defended America with pride a tradition that continues today. As Secretary of the Navy I have the honor and privilege of working with the finest men and women our country has to offer. This was the case 238 years ago and remains as true today as it was at our Navys inception. On any given day our Sailors are deployed around the world providing a constant presence, defending the American peo ple and our nations interests. We are and will continue to be Americas away team, the fin est expeditionary fighting force the world has ever known. So today as we reflect on our heritage, I want to thank all of you for what you do in the service to our Navy and for our country. Happy birthday, Navy! Semper Fortis! For their portion of the mes sage, Greenert and Stevens met at the Washington Navy Yards Navy Museum in front of a dis play commemorating the battle of Lake Erie, which according to Greenert, was perhaps the most dramatic and important battle in the War of 1812. It was at this battle that our Sailors really showed their mettle, really showed their tenacity, and, in fact, were the asymmetric advantage for our forces. Today, the all-volunteer force you are our asymmetric advantage. So think about that as we cel ebrate our 238th birthday. For 238 years our Navy has overcome enormous challeng es and faced adversity, said Stevens. Weve risen with those challenges and built a reputa tion as the strongest naval force the world has ever seen. We work daily among a rich land scape of ships, bases and waterways. But its not the environ ment that keeps our Navy moving forward, its our people! This is our heritage! So lets remember the importance, as we look ahead, of our tenets of today: warf ighting is first, we operate for ward, and we will be ready, said Greenert. We will use the genius of our diverse force our all-volunteer force and we will be where it matters when it matters, because thats what you and I are about: our great Navy of today! Thank you for your service shipmates! Im proud to serve with you! concluded Stevens. And thanks to our Navy fami lies. None of us could do what we do without your love and support! -Photo by MCC Peter D. LawlorFrom left, retired Navy SEAL Lt. Jason Redman, country music singer Mark Wills, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the two youngest Sailors in attendance and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens cut a birthday cake together at the U.S. Navy Birthday Ball in Washington, D.C. The ball was in celebration of Navy's 238th birthday Oct. 13, 2013. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 -Photo by Paige GnannAdam Robertson and Rosie George of A Social Affair studio demonstrate a latin dance for attendees at the annual Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration held Oct. 10 at Beachside Community Center. The celebration included dancing, a poem reading, and food.Mayport Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month Sailors from around Naval Station Mayport attended a Hispanic Heritage celebration on Oct. 11 at Beachside Community Center. The ceremony was held to celebrate the rich heritage and cultural diver sity that Hispanic Americans have contributed to the country and to the Navy. Hispanic Heritage month runs from Sep. 15 to Oct. 15. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. My overall take on Hispanic Heritage month is great. Growing up I didnt get to interact too much with Hispanics, but since I joined the Navy I have grown to love many fac ets of the culture, said Operations Specialist 1st class Sheena Sheared. The heritage week was enacted into law on Aug. 17, 1988, with the approval of Public Law 100-402. Hispanic Heritage month is a great opportunity for everyone in the Navy to acknowledge the many con tributions that Hispanics have made throughout our Naval History, said CMDCM David Tellez, U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief. Hispanic Americans make up a substantial portion of Sailors in the Navy. Today, there are more than 58,000 Hispanic active duty and Reserve Sailors and officers, and nearly 15,000 Hispanics serve within the Navy Total Force, along with four Hispanic flag officers and 172 Hispanic master chiefs I think diversity in the Navy brings ideas, new plans, new strategies to make the Navy better, Tellez added. Above, Retired Chief Yeoman Alvin Lozada recites a poem about a young man who speaks English and Spanish interchangeably. Right, Lozada plays the drums for attendees during the base Hispanic Heritage Month celebration on Oct. 10. -Photos by Paige Gnann Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Commander U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris speaks to Sailors and attendees about the importance of Hispanic Heritage during the Naval Station Mayport cel ebration event on Oct. 10. Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez gives the closing remarks during the Naval Station Mayport Hispanic Heritage Month celebration event on Oct. 10.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5 Cmdr. Brian Morrill from COMFOURTHFLT speaks about his Venezuelan upbringing during the Hispanic Heritage Month celebration.-Photo by Paige GnannAttendees enjoy learning step moves during a dance demonstration at the heritage celebration.Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Sailors stationed aboard Naval Station Mayport learn a few latin moves during the base Hispanic Heritage Month celebration event on Oct. 10.-Photo by Paige GnannPaula and Mateo Aldas perform during the Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration at Beachside Community Center.-Photo by Paige GnannDance instructors pull audience members out to learn a few latin dance moves during the celebration.-Photo by Paige GnannThe floor is crowded with beginner and experienced latin dancers during a dancing demonstration at the celebration.

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6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 4th Fleet Celebrates Navys 238th Birthday U.S. 4th Fleet held an all hands call and cake cut ting ceremony Oct. 9 to celebrate the Navys 238th birthday at the fleets headquarters at Naval Station Mayport. As we celebrate our Navys 238th birthday, our history and heritage forms our identity, tell ing us who we are and what we stand for, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez said. Tellez was the guest of honor at todays celebra tion. Our core values of honor, courage, commit ment have been passed down from our founders, who charged the Navy with the solemn duty to serve as the shield of our republic, he said. The Navys cake cut ting practice calls for the eldest and young est Sailors cut the cake together with a Navy sword or cutlass. Being a part of the great Navy tradition, the cake cutting ceremony for the Navys 238th birthday made me feel very hon ored today during this momentous occasion, Operations Specialist Seaman Matthew Thomas, youngest Sailor at U.S. 4th Fleet said. Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mark Ferguson., said, It is important to come together to celebrate our heritage perhaps even more so during these dif ficult times. This has been a year of challenges for our Navy as our nation has worked through many challenges at home and abroad. We continue to mourn our fallen shipmates at the Washington Navy Yard and think about all the Sailors deployed forward. Through it all, we remain resilient and we press on, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. The U.S. Navy traces its roots to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775, by attaining, fitting, manning, and dispatching two armed ships in search of enemy ammunition ships. Just this year 4th Fleet celebrated our 5th anni versary since the fleet was reestablished July 12, 2008, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. U.S. 4th Fleet was first established in 1943 as one of the original numbered fleets during World War II and was disestablished after the war. Foreign ministers of countries of the Western Hemisphere agreed to establish a neutrality zone in around the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North and South America to be enforced by the U. S. Navy, specifically U.S. 4th Fleet headquartered in Recife, Brazil. Today, it is not only the U.S. Navy...it is all of our partner nation navies that are keeping the Americas free and prosperous, a realization of our global maritime partnership, Harris said. U.S. 4th Fleet supports a combined full-spec trum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward pres ence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the mari time domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with inter national partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris left, cuts the 4th Fleet Navys Birthday cake with Operations Specialist 2nd Class Ronald Fogel, Operations Specialist Seaman Matthew Thomas, and Command Master Chief David Tellez during a birthday celebration for the Navys 238th birthday on Oct. 9 at Naval Station Mayport. Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson Chief Petty Officers at U.S. 4th Fleet lead the command in singing Anchors Away during a birthday ceremony held on Oct. 9 for the Navys 238th birthday at the Fleet headquarters at Naval Station Mayport.Photo by MC2 Adam Henderson U.S. 4th Fleet Command Master Chief David Tellez gives remarks during the ceremony held to celebrate the Navys 238th Birthday on Oct. 9.Raising Awareness About Drug Alcohol Prevention U.S. 4th Fleets Drug and Alcohol Programs Advisor (DAPA) hosted an educa tional event Oct. 3 to educate Sailors about the Navys Keep what youve earned cam paign focused on encouraging responsible drinking by cel ebrating achievements made during Navy careers. As part of the program, Sailors are reminded of their accomplishmentsand how much they have to lose if they make poor choices regarding alcohol. Education programs like this are working. According to the Naval Alcohol and Drug Prevention Office, alcohol-related incidents have decreased by 51 percent across the Navy since last year. Although the number of incidents are on the decrease, alcohol and drug abuse remain at the forefront of our concern. Irresponsible drinking not only threatens the health and careers of our personnel, it threatens the Navys ability to be missionready, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. 4th Fleet. Alcohol and drug abuse awareness can begin with the DAPA. Throughout the course of my career, I have noticed a social stigma that Sailors seeking help from the DAPA representative are thought to have an alcohol or drug-related problem and will be systematically sepa rated from the Navy, U.S. 4th Fleets Command DAPA, Chief Culinary Specialist Dwight Fennell said. A DAPA representative is not a person that will end a career, but is the person that can help save a career, Fennell said. Fennell oversaw the event at 4th Fleet headquarters, which was organized by Yeoman 1st Class Robert Lowder and Fire Controlman 1st Class Harry Hall. Its a great time to give back to the Sailors at 4th Fleet by providing them information on how to make smarter decisions while drinking, Lowder said. Only one-third of 17 to 24 year olds in the United States are even eligible for Navy ser vice, and even fewer are capa ble of enduring the challenges of being a Sailor. From boot camp to advance ment exams, job training and deployments, Sailors have excelled through hard work, sacrifice and dedication. We encourage Sailors to drink responsibly and if they choose to drink, to know their limits and dont lose control, Lowder said. We want Sailors to advance in rank and safe guard what they have worked so hard to earn. COMUSNAVSO/C4F sup ports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum mili tary operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonU.S. 4th Fleets Drug and Alcohol Programs Advisor (DAPA) put out educational material and pizzas for a DAPA event Oct. 3 to educate Sailors about the Navys Keep what youve earned campaign focused on encouraging responsible drinking by celebrating achievements made during Navy careers.

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flown by the famous bush pilot and Antarctic explorer, Carl Ben Eielson. The plane was stored in his grandfathers machine shop where Paul would come and sit in it to dream of flight adventure. Eielson, a Hatton, North Dakota man, was legendary for aviation exploits and strong inspirational soup for the young Paul. As a consequence, a Naval Aviation career became the goal of his life. He got his Naval commission and received his Navy Wings of Gold at NAS Corpus Christie in July 1944. In the years following, Paul became not only a great fighter pilot, but also an accomplished Naval Officer and coura geous leader during some of the most turbulent and challenging times in our country and abroad. He lived up to the challenge of those times, gradu ating from Marquette University, furthering his education at George Washington University, obtaining a post gradu ate degree at the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey, California and persevering to earn the distinguished rank of Captain. During this part of his life, he experienced many adventures as was his young wish, living the life he dreamed of as a boy. In the early times, dur ing 1945, at the end of WWII, Paul flew the F6F Hellcat on the USS Yorktown, participat ing in air strikes during the amphibious campaigns at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He flew numer ous sorties over mainland Japan. For aerial action, bravery and valor in that venue, Paul received the Distinguished Flying Cross and four air medals. Returning from the arduous duty that war time brought, Paul continued his demanding pace. He was assigned to several carrier based squadrons flying in the Atlantic Fleet. During this time, Paul became one of the earliest jet qualified Naval pilots of his gen eration, training in the Shooting Star or F-80. After qualification, he went on to VF-41, one of the pioneer carrier based jet squadrons in the U.S. Navy. Following the sea duty tour, Paul got a very unique assignment. He reported to the Naval Air Special Weapons Facility in New Mexico where he was part of a project to test nuclear weap ons delivery platforms. His group of pilots flew dangerous missions in A4D Skyhawks where airplanes were in very close proximity to above ground nuclear blast ing tests. This important research led to many of the modern systems used to save pilot lives today. Pauls long career took him to leadership roles in many places, including: Commanding Officer of Attack Squadron 64 aboard the USS Enterprise; Air Boss aboard the USS Enterprise; Action Officer at the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Pentagon; Operations and Plans Officer for Commander Fleet Air, Western Pacific. He was assigned to the staff of the CNO in Washington, D.C. as the Naval Technical Training Officer in 1969. In between learning, leading and managing, Paul continued to log in flight hours and carrier landings. By the end of his career, he accomplished 790 carrier landings and more than 8,000 flight hours. As Commanding Officer of USS Mars during the Vietnam War, Paul again demonstrated his com petence and leadership, receiving the Bronze Star while in a combat post. Modestly, he always insisted that the com bined character of his crew members earned him the medal. His last duty station before retirement was Commanding Officer of Naval Station Mayport, Florida where he served until 1974. This post ing was the most satisfy ing of his life. At the time, 26 ships and two aircraft carriers made Mayport home Base. A stunning responsibility, but again safe in the hands and heart of the accomplished Captain. He reluctantly retired after the Navy allowed his command to uncharacteristically extend beyond the nor mal two year charge. After retirement, he made his home in Atlantic Beach with his wife, Rosina, Rosi. Together they built a very suc cessful business in pre mier outdoor furniture, The Sandpiper of Jacksonville. Paul loved being a fighter pilot and served his country with honor, courage and commitment. He was grateful to live his life in service to oth ers, generous and kind to those around him, never giving up the tradition of valor he learned so well in his long sojourn in the U.S.Navy. For those who knew him as a commander, Pauls aptitude as an outstanding and selfless leader will be remem bered fondly. For those who knew him as a friend, his witty sense of humor and basic decency will be greatly missed. To all who knew him, he was an officer and a gentleman. Paul leaves behind his loving wife Rosi, his chil dren: Pamela Takeshige (husband Takao), Paul (wife Sony), Phillip (wife Michelle), Nella, 4 grandchildren, brother Dave and a scattering of numerous nieces, neph ews and their families. He will be deeply missed. Church Service will be held at the Naval Station Mayport Chapel, Friday, Oct. 25 at 10 a.m. Internment with full military honors at the Jacksonville National Cemetery following the church service at 2:30 p.m. Donations may be made to the Bald Eagle Squadron, P.O. Box 621, Orange Park, Fla., 320670621. Funds will be used to send local area high school students to the National Flight Academys summer aviation program in Pensacola. TYCOM LOA, Sea Trials and Basic Phase, culmi nating with the ships receiving of the Battle Efficiency Award for FY 2012, as well as the honor of con ducting National Tasking of last years burial-at-sea for iconic naval aviator Neil Armstrong, univer sally known as the first man to set foot on the Moon.From Page 1Phil SeaFrom Page 1AndersonATGs Man of Iron Honors Wounded Warriors As PFA season begins what a better way to start the season than by sharing the story of ATG Mayports own Command Fitness Leader, Chief Operations Specialist Scott Duke (SW/EXW) Fulton from Corpus Christi, Tx. His story is 7 years in the making and ends with a triumphant finish in the Ironman 70.3 Augusta Triathlon while supporting a special cause. The 70.3 Ironman begins with a 1.2 mile swim through the Savannah River. As the athlete exits the cool waters, they enter the transition area to pre pare for a 56-mile bike ride throughout Georgia and into the countryside of South Carolina. The hilly terrain spreads out the field and is a true test of stamina. As they make their way back to the transition area, they disembark their bike and rush to prepare for their final event a 13.1 mile run throughout down town Augusta. Lined with spectators, the athlete is cheered from start to finish as they conclude a long day with a strong push to the finish line. OSC Fulton represent ing the Navy with his Chiefs Pride shirt not only participated, but was competitive in all three events: Swim 30min, Bike 2hr:40, Run 1hr:54, Overall 5hr:14min. Just as special was the cause he supported, I registered through The IRONMAN Foundation to raise funds and sup port returning war riors through The Scott Rigsby Foundation, the exclusive charity part ner of IRONMAN 70.3 Augusta. Funds raised will help military fami lies and its partners in the Georgia Warrior Alliance, focusing on Health and Wellness, Education and Employment Assistance The Scott Rigsby Foundation is a nonprofit 501-(c)3 organiza tion dedicated to inspire, inform and enable indi viduals with loss of limb or mobility, to live a healthy, active lifestyle. The foundations prima ry goal is to promote the health and wellness of individuals with physical challenges by improving access to Prosthetic and Orthotic resources, while supporting programs that advance prosthetic technology and empow er individual lifestyle change. For more infor mation, visit www.scot trigsbyfoundation.org. When I race and feel the pain, I think about those warriors who have lost a limb, persevered and are competing just as I am. It is then that I realize that these bodies that carry us are pathetic compared to what is inside us, Fulton adds. OSC Fulton has had a positive impact to ATG Mayports overall fitness level. Leading Command PT every Wednesday he keeps changing the rou tine and incorporates CrossFit training in order to elevate the heart rate and give everyone in the comm and no matter the fitness level an excellent workout. He had a significant role in helping one of ATGs own being rec ognized as NS Mayports Athlete in the Spot light for September. Consistency in physi cal fitness and nutrition is key, without it we are destined to return to unhealthy habits which ultimately lead to disap pointment in our own self-image. When I talk to service members about their health and fitness goals, I say come up with a realistic physical fitness milestone that is condu cive to healthy living, like running a 5K, or doing a pull up, instead of try ing to lose x-amount of pounds. In doing this, the byproduct of achieving your fitness goal is inevi tably weight loss and a much more positive number than what we perceive our weight should be.-Courtesy of ATG MayportChief Operations Specialist (SW/EXW) Fulton completes the Ironman 70.3 Augusta supporting The Scott Rigsby Foundation for Wounded Warriors. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7

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NMCRS Open To Help During ShutdownThe Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is providing assistance to active duty and retired Marines and Sailors who are experiencing financial difficul ties associated with the government shutdown. Every day of the week, around the globe, the Society provides interest-free loans and grants for basic living expenses, emergency travel expenses, and other family emergencies for military members and their families facing financial crisis or need. As a non-government, but Federally-sanctioned orga nization, our support to Navy and Marine Corps families is unaffected by the government shutdown. As a result of the govern ment shutdown, the Society is working closely with the Navy and Marine Corps Casualty Assistance Offices to advance necessary financial assis tance for next of kin to travel to the bedside of seriously ill or injured Marines and Sailors, or those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our country. No Marine Corps or Navy family with legitimate financial needs should suffer hardship as a result of this temporary gov ernment closure, stated Maj. Gen. Jensen, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Society. Every member of the NMCRS Team is leaning forward to assist those in need! For more information on the Societys programs and servic es, please visit www.nmcrs.org or contact your nearest NMCRS office at www.nmcrs.org/loca tion. Since 1904, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has pro vided financial assistance and education to active duty and retired members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members and survivors when in need. Headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, the Society is a nonprofit, charitable organization that is staffed by nearly 3,700 volunteers, and a small cadre of employees, in offices around the world ashore and aboard ships. CFC Placed On HoldThe Combined Federal Campaign has been placed on hold while the federal government shutdown continues, according to a Pentagon memo. Susan A. Yarwood, the human resources director with Washington Headquarters Services, announced that CFC activities in the continental United States, apart from on-going employee contributions, are indefinitely suspended. The campaign is a one-stop shop for federal employees to make donations to thousands of charities through automatic payroll deductions. Last year, federal workers contributed $258 mil lion via the CFC. The 2013 CFC campaign started Sept. 5. When the partial government shutdown hit on October 1, officials determined that the program would have to be suspended. Upon legal review, these activities are not excepted from furlough nor are they appropri ate activities under the Pay Our Military Act, Yarwood wrote in the memo dated Oct. 9. Until such time as we have a continuing resolution or congressionally approved appropriation, please postpone all CFC events, training, and fundraisers. During the hiatus, military and civilian mem bers can still donate to the charities of their choice via the MyPay option. Officials say the campaign is prepared to restart quickly once the shutdown is over.October FFSC Classes AvailableThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Oct. 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Oct. 21, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 607 Oct. 21-25, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Oct. 22, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 607 Oct. 22, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. Oct. 23, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ombudsman Basic Training, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 607 Oct. 23, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 23, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 23, 9-11 a.m., Credit Management FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 24, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., FAP Key Personnel Training, FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 607 Oct. 24, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Oct. 28-Nov. 1, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Command Financial Specialist Training FFSC Bldg. 1 Room 1616 Oct. 28, Anger Management Workshop FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Oct. 29, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, and encourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Participation in all 6 sessions is required. Oct. 30, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 30, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Bldg. 1 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Robert G. Bradley Performs Burial At Sea Sailors stationed aboard the guided missile frigate, USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) performed a burial at sea for 18 veter ans and 2 of their spouses while underway on Oct. 7. Following tradition, the ship slowed, lowered the colors to half-mast, and a delegation of officers, chief petty officers, and Sailors lined-up in formation in dress uniform to pay their respects. A fir ing detail was also assembled for a 21-gun salute. The military and religious aspects of the cer emony were conducted with dignity and solemnity. The burial at sea ceremony was offici ated by Chaplain (Lt.) Thomas Bingol with Bradleys Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Peter Ehlers, Executive Officer Cmdr. John Lepak and Command Senior Chief Willie Henson as mem bers of the official party. The Sailors were very professional and showed great respect towards those who were laid to rest, said Chaplain Bingol. Following the ceremo ny, Chaplain Bingol will mail packages to the pri mary next of kin, which include a letter from the commanding officer detailing the date, time, and exact location of the burial. Also in the pack age will be three volleys from the 21-gun salute. Fire Controlman 2nd Class Gregory Glover, one of the Sailors in the rifle detail, was proud to be included in the ceremony. Im proud to give our prior service members the dignity and respect they earned, said Glover. USS Robert G. Bradley, homeported out of Mayport, FL, is currently scheduled to decom mission in March 2014. The RGB was commis sioned August 11, 1984 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire as the 41st Oliver Hazard Perry Class Guided Missile Frigate. -Photo by ET1 Daniel RaleyThe firing detail fires a salute during a burial at sea ceremony onboard USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). -Photo by ET1 Daniel RaleySeaman Quartermaster Michael Pagan and Seaman Personnel Specialist Roberto Cruz lay the deceased to rest. Carney Crew Spends Time With FamiliesUSS Carney Sailors and their families participated in its Family Day event on Oct. 8. Planned and executed by Carneys First Class Petty Officer Association, the younger family mem bers of Carney Sailors became Junior Carney Warriors and were given a signature book in hopes of becoming an honorary Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist. This event was an opportunity to demon strate to families and friends some of Carneys awesome and unique capabilities, such as damage control, VBSS opera tions and combat sys tems. Friends and fam ily also got a chance to sit in the Captains chair in the pilot house. The ship served pizza dinner, ice cream for dessert. I am glad I got to come see my Dad and all the people he works for and with every day, said 10-year-old Alex Dover, son of Lt.j.g. Tim Dover. Hospitalman 1st Class (SW) Christopher Loy played a big role in put ting the event together. The First Class worked together to plan and organize this event, and I think it went really well, he said. We are looking forward to doing some thing like this again when we return from deploy ment next spring. USS Carney will depart today (Oct. 17) on a scheduled seven-month deployment to 5th fleet. -Photo courtesy of USS CarneyLt.j.g. Tim Dover guides wife Amanda and their two sons on a tour of the ship during Carneys Family Day on Oct. 8. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 Unemployment Benefits May Help Some Furloughed DOD CiviliansOn the 10th day of the partial government shut down, DOD civilians excluded by law from Defense Secretary Chuck Hagels Oct. 7 recall to work of thousands of fel low employees still await an end to the political standoff that sent them home and stopped their paychecks Oct. 1. Hagel said Oct. 5 that the department tried to exempt as many DOD civilian personnel as pos sible from furloughs and will continue to try to bring all civilian employees back to work as soon as possible. Ultimately, he added, the surest way to end these damaging and irre sponsible furloughs and to enable us to fulfill our mission as a department is for Congress to pass a budget and restore funds for the entire federal gov ernment. According to a Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service ref erence guide called Pay and Leave dur ing the Fiscal Year 2014 Shutdown Furlough, employees furloughed Oct. 1 and not recalled to work will receive regular pay and allowances for hours worked through Sept. 30. Theyll also get a partial paycheck for the pay period including Oct. 1-5. DOD civilians will stay in nonpay, nonduty status until recalled to duty. If they are in non pay, nonduty status on the days before and after Columbus Day, they wont receive pay at that time for the holiday. Congress must pass legislation to restore pay and allowances for all days spent in furlough sta tus before any employee goes back into pay sta tus. If such legislation is passed, employees will be paid for the time they spent conducting shut down activities on Oct. 1 but they wont get that pay until a 2014 appropriation is approved for the department. At that time theyll receive pay for the Columbus Day holiday. Furlough affects leave accrual, according to the reference guide. In a separate furlough earlier this year triggered by the budget sequester, most employees were ordered to take six unpaid days, or 48 hours, off work. During the current round of fur loughs brought on by the government shutdown, when employees reach a total of 10 furlough days this month, or 80 hours, on or around Oct. 4, theyll lose the sick leave and annual leave they would have earned during the pay period. Once an employee reaches 80 hours of non pay time during a cal endar year, leave is no longer accrued. A new 80-hour threshold begins the following pay period. For individuals or families who are struggling because theyre not working and not getting paid, some help may be avail able through state unem ployment compensation agencies. According to a fact sheet on unem ployment insurance for federal workers, the Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees, or UCFE, program is adminis tered by state unemploy ment insurance agencies. In general, eligibility is determined by the state where an employee is assigned to duty. Furloughed DOD civil ians may apply on or after the first day theyre fur loughed and put in non pay status. Furloughed employees should be eli gible as long as they meet all other state eligibility factors, according to the fact sheet. To file claims, DOD civilians can contact the unemployment insurance agency in the state where they work. Such agencies usually have websites, online forms and tele phone numbers to call for information or to submit applications by phone. Employees may be asked to provide a form SF-8 to verify an agency mailing address or a form SF-50 to verify wages. If these documents are unavailable, the state may request proof of wages such as earnings and leave statements or last years W-2. The state may also request an affi davit certifying that the employee is not working because of the furlough and to verify wages. Amounts paid vary according to prior earn ings. Most states pay a maximum of 26 weeks of regular benefits. Once the shutdown ends and employees have returned to work, regard less of whether they have received paychecks, they are no longer eligible for benefits. Some states require applicants to serve a waiting week, the fact sheet says. This means that after a claim is approved, the first week for which individuals are entitled to benefits is an unpaid week. Most states issue pay ments to eligible individuals within 14-21 days after the claim is approved. On Oct. 5, the Federal Employee Retroactive Pay Fairness Act passed the House by a vote of 407-0. The Senate hasnt yet taken action on the bill but if they do and President Barack Obama signs it into law, fur loughed federal employ ees will receive back pay for the time theyve been out of work once the shutdown ends. Any lost leave would also will be restored. According to the fact sheet, if Congress pass es legislation that retro actively provides for the payment of salary, states generally require repay ment of unemployment benefits paid out. States will advise affected claimants if benefits are over paid, the fact sheet says, and provide repayment options. -Photo by MC1 Joshua J. WahlNewport News Shipbuilding floods Dry Dock 12 to float the first in class aircraft carrier, Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).Furlough Raises Questions On Civilian Leave, PayOnly those Defense Department civil ians recalled from fur lough under the Pay Our Military Act may take annual and sick leave, a Pentagon spokesman said Oct. 8. Employees who remain on furlough are in a nonpay, nonduty status, so there is no leave to take, Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen explained. So a civilian employee who had leave planned and is now furloughed can still take that vaca tion. It will not count as leave as long as the fur lough lasts. Once the president signs an appropria tion or Congress passes a continuing resolution, furloughed employees will report back to work. Further legislation is nec essary for employees to receive retroactive pay for days lost to the shut down. If that happens, employees will be paid for the furlough time, and will not be charged for any leave that had been approved for days that became furlough days. On DoD civilian pay, the situation is a bit different. The next civilian pay date is Oct. 11, and under the Pay Our Military Act, Defense Department civilians will receive pay checks. Excepted employees those who contin ued to work will receive the full 80 hours of pay. Those furloughed will receive 48 hours of pay for the pay period cov ered by that payday, up and to and including Sept. 30. Furloughed employ ees will receive pay for the four hours they worked Oct. 1 to implement the orderly shutdown once there a new appropriation or continuing resolution is in effect. DoD civilian employees called back to work Oct. 7 will receive their paychecks for the current pay period Oct. 25.Contract Award For NAVSEA Repairs The Navy awarded CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. a $6.4 million dollar firm-fixed-price contract for the repair and res toration of the Historic Headquarters Facility of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), Building 197, at the Washington Navy Yard Sept. 30. Building 197 suffered extensive and widespread damage during the trag ic shooting and related events that occurred Sept. 16. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command awarded the contract to CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc., to make immedi ate safety repairs to the facility, conduct detailed damage assessments, and develop alternative con cept designs. The contract also con tains funding for con cept studies related to final disposition of the building. This contract will allow the Navy to restore the building to a safe condition and pro vide options for the Chief of Naval Operations and Secretary of the Navys consideration in their decision making process. No decision has been reached on the final dis position of NAVSEA HQ. The NAVSEA Headquarters building is approximately 650,000 square feet and is a historic federal facility with administrative and sup port spaces for more than 3,000 employees. CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. is based out of Englewood, Colo. McCampbell (DDG 85), and Combat Systems Officer in USS Rentz (FFG 46). She graduated The George Washington University with a Master of Arts in Political Management. Assignments ashore have included a tour as flag aide at U.S. Fifth Fleet and as editor of Surface Warfare Magazine Chief of Naval Operations (N86). Her personal deco rations include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (six awards), and vari ous campaign and unit awards. Azzarello was born and raised in Buffalo, New York. He enlisted in the Navy in February 1993 and was com missioned through the Enlisted Commissioning Program. While in the Enlisted Commissioning Program, he attended Old Dominion University and graduated in 2002 with a Bachelors of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. As an Enlisted Sailor, Azzarello completed Recruit Training and Airman Apprenticeship Training in April 1993 and shortly after he reported aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN 65). In February 1995, he attended AS A1 School in NATTC Millington and subse quently reported to NAS Norfolk AIMD. Following shore duty Azzarello, reported aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73) until his accep tance in to the Enlisted Commissioning Program in June 1999. Following commission ing he reported aboard USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44) where he served as the Repair Officer, Machinery Division Officer, Main Propulsion Assistant and then Navigator. In February 2006, Azzarello reported as an Engineering Assessor at Afloat Training Group, Atlantic. As an Assessor, he served as a member of the Diesel and Steam Assessment teams and as the MCM and PC Class Engineering lead. While at Afloat Training Group Atlantic he received his Masters of Science Degree in Engineering Management from Old Dominion University. In June 2010, he was assigned as the Chief Engineer aboard USS McFaul (DDG 74). In May 2012, Azzarello assumed command of PC Crew KILO. Since assuming command, Crew KILO has embarked USS Hurricane (PC 3), completed an 8-month deployment on USS Firebolt (PC 10), and became the permanent crew of USS Shamal (PC 13).From Page 1Shamal(CGN 36); USS John A. Moore (FFG 19) as Executive Officer; and Destroyer Squadron 22 as Chief of Staff. Van Wagoner then com manded USS McInerney (FFG 8) deploying to the North Sea and Mediterranean as plank owner of Standing NATO Response Force Maritime Group 1; and Reactor Officer in USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Captain Van Wagoners shore duty assignments include Naval Nuclear Power School where he earned an AQD to super vise Naval Nuclear Propulsion Systems (graduating second in his class), Commander Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet as Force Reactor Controls Officer and member of the Nuclear Propulsion Mobile Training Team; the Naval War College where he earned a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies; and Special Assistant for CVN Training and Readiness for the Director of Naval Reactors (NAVSEA 08).From Page 1DESRON 40

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11 FY14 GMT Schedule Announced Topics for General Military Training (GMT) for Fiscal Year (FY) 14 were announced in NAVADMIN 264/13, Oct. 9. The announcement, usual ly released Oct. 1, was delayed due to the ongoing effort to streamline or eliminate admin istrative burdens on the fleet, allowing more time to focus on mission readiness. In support of this effort, known as Reducing Administrative Distractions (RAD), a revision of the GMT instruction is nearing comple tion. Through RAD and other feedback, the Fleet has been pretty clear that they want us to give this a good hard look, said Vice Adm. Bill Moran, chief of naval personnel. We need to find the right balance of required training and white space for our commanders. While each of the GMT sub jects are important, Moran said his staffs review of the instruction will ensure train ing requirements are validated, inefficiencies are eliminated, and improvements are made to overall program effectiveness. The intent of the GMT instruction revision is to provide clear communication of require ments and to establish an annual review process for each topic. There are two categories of GMT topics that must be com pleted in FY 14. Category One topics must be conducted via face-to-face, instructor-led training sessions provided at the command level. Senior leadership, command training teams, or collateral duty train ing officers/chief petty officers will conduct Category One GMT. The FY 14 Category One GMT topics are: Alcohol Abuse Prevention and Control; Equal Opportunity and Grievance Procedures; Hazing Policy and Prevention; Personal Financial Management; Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Awareness; Sexual Harassment and Grievance Procedures; Stress Management; and Suicide Awareness and Prevention. These are the opportuni ties for leadership to engage and have frank and deliberate discussions about commanddelivered training, ensuring Sailors understand their roles and responsibilities, said Capt. John Newcomer, Commanding Officer at the Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD). The remaining required GMT topics are Category Two top ics that can be completed via Navy e-Learning or through face-to-face, command-deliv ered training at the discretion of the unit commander. The Category Two GMT topics for FY 14 are: Anger Management; Antiterrorism/Force Protection; Combating Trafficking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Domestic Violence Prevention and Reporting; Drug Abuse Prevention and Control; Fraternization Awareness and Prevention; Information Assurance; Operational Risk Management; Operational Security; Physical Readiness; Privacy and Personally Identifiable Information Awareness; Records Management; Sexual Health and Responsibility; and Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation. In order to allow sufficient time to complete the GMT program review, formulate program change proposals, and implement the approved changes, completion of Category Two GMT topics is waived for FY 14 except for the following topics which must be completed: Antiterrorism/ Force Protection; Combating Trafficking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Information Assurance; Operational Security; and Records Management. Standardized training mate rial for Category One and Category Two training is avail able for download from the Personal Development GMT page on the Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) webpage at www. nko.navy.mil. Training com pletion of Category One top ics must be recorded in Fleet Training Management Planning System (FLTMPS) via learn ing event completion forms. Additionally, a GMT calendar for FY 14 is also available on the NKO GMT page, including recommended training deliv ery months to coincide with Navywide training themes. GMT questions should be addressed to Lyman Watts, GMT program manager at 757-492-0763, DSN: 492 or via e-mail to the Center for Personal and Professional Development at gmt.distribu tion@navy.mil. Additional information about GMT training requirements for FY 14 is detailed in NAVADMIN 264/13. Southern Womens Show The Southern Womens show will be at the Prime Osborn Convention Center on Oct. 17-20. Come on out to enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health informa tion, along with beauty and lifestyle informa tion. For more informa tion please visit: www. southernwomensshow. com. Mayport and NAS JAX USO Centers are selling tickets for $5 each/ cash only. Tickets will also be available for purchase through the ITT office at Kings Bay. FRA 290 Halloween Carnival-Oct, 26 Come out to Fleet Reserve 290 on Mayport Road for the Halloween Carnival. It is free and open to military families. There will be food and games for the children, a costume contest, bounce house, and pictures. You must preregister for this event. You can register by calling (904) 629-4444 and via email: fra290car nival@yahoo.com. Military Spouse Vendor Show Looking for holiday gift ideas? Are you a military spouse with a small busi ness? If you answered yes to either of these questions, the Military Spouse Vendor Show at the Mayport USO on Nov. 2 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. is for you. Please email milwivesbusinessande vents@gmail.com for more information or to become a vendor. Vendor slots fill fast, so sign up today. NOSA Holiday BazaarDec. 7 Join NOSA at the Mayport USO for their annual holiday bazaar. There will be food, ven dors, and fun for all. NOSA will provide free holiday photos so come dressed in your holiday best. For vendor reg istration, please email Jennifer.wilsnack@gmail. com. See attached flyer for more information. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Jazzland Caf Free Admission Active Duty, Retirees, Reservists, and National Guard members enjoy live jazz music sessions for free every Tuesday night from 6-9 p.m. at the Jazzland Caf located at 1324 University Blvd. North. Jazzland has an authentic mix of local and internationally known musicians, led by a Jazz Trio of great, world class performers. And for you musicians out there, youre invited to partici pate in the jam sessions. For more information, please email: info@jaz zlandcafe.com or call Carole at (904) 240-1009. etc). Checker Yellow Cab Of Jacksonville-Rate Discounts The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is proud to announce a new partnership with Checker Yellow Cab of Jacksonville to support troops and families. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more informa tion, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwanted paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to t he children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. Oct. 18-20 The Florida Branch of the Second Indianhead Division Association will have its annual reunion in Titusville, Florida on, 2013 at the Best Western Space Shuttle Inn. All veterans of the 2nd Infantry Divisions are invited. For more information, call the branch secretary-treasurer, Donald Calnan, at (561) 742-5379 or send an email to 2ida.mail@char ter.net. Sunday, Oct. 20 The Beaches Museum & History Park invites its members and the gen eral public to attend the opening of the Beaches Museum Chapel from 5-6:30 p.m. The his toric chapel is located at 505 Beach Boulevard, Jacksonville Beach. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. Parking is avail able along Pablo Avenue. Friday, Oct. 25 The UF/IFAS Extension Duval County Office will be offering a class on Food Preservation from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. The pro gram will focus mainly on the proper techniques in canning foods safely, however freezing and drying will also be covered. Come and learn the newest rules and techniques for keeping your family safe while preserving your favorite foods all year long. All participants will receive the newest food preservation information and will have the oppor tunity to make their own homemade jelly. Cost is $10 per person. Space is limited, pre-registration and pre-payment are required by Wednesday, Oct. 23. Please contact Sandra or Melanie at 904255-7450 to register. Saturday, Oct. 19 Come celebrate five centuries of Spanish influence in Florida with an informative talk at 2 p.m. about the San Juan del Puerto Mission on Ft. George Island. Learn about Fr. Pareja, who translated the native Timucuan language and gained insight into their unique culture. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. The Jacksonville Genealogical Society (JGS) will hold their monthly meeting begin ning at 1:30 p.m. at the Webb-Wesconnett Branch Library, 6887 103rd Street, Jacksonville, Florida. Join a park ranger at 2 p.m. to learn about the many common species that inhabit the natural communities of the undeveloped barrier islands of northeast Florida. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Christ United Methodist Church, 400 Penman Road, Neptune Beach. Come join us at the Pumpkin Patch from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for this annual event for fam ily fun, food, games, and those very special handmade gifts and homemade goodies for the holidays. For information, please contact the Church Office at 249-5370. Saturday, Nov. 2 The University Of Florida Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Program will present a program on Cooking Healthy for the Holidays at the Duval County Extension Office, 1010 North McDuff Avenue on at 10 A.M. Come deco rate and bake using fresh herbs of the season. Sample a variety of tasty dishes using herbs as the centerpiece. Reserve your spot and take home recipes and ideas to make your holiday one to remember. All ages are encouraged to par ticipate in this workshop! Reservations and prepayment are necessary by Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. You may pre-register at: https://cookinghealthy forfall.eventbrite.com or contact Sandra at 2557450 to schedule your reservation. Saturday, Nov. 9 Christ United Methodist Churchis hosting its annual Veterans Day Dinner Dance at 6 p.m. Call 249-5370.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Get Cookin With Fire Prevention Get Cookin and pre vent Kitchen Fires was the message stressed by the First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Service Department and nonprofit National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week October 6-12. Although Kitchen fires were the theme, the First Coast team along with Sparky Pumper and Engine Company held many events to make people and children on Naval Station Mayport aware of fire dangers and how to prevent them from happening. We try and educate the children about fire prevention with the hope they can make their parents more aware of the potential hazards, said First Coast Navy and Fire Emergency Inspector Angel Roman. Sometimes people become complacent. We are trying to heighten awareness to teach about the possible dangers with kitchen fires. We make it fun for the kids, but there is always the message about the dangers of fire and how to prevent it. The events included a Kickoff visit from Sparky Pumper and the Engine Company at the Off-base Child Development Center, fire drills at the Youth cen ter, family home provider Home Evacuation Drills, live fire extinguisher training and a base-wide unannounced fire drill. According to First Coast Navy and Fire Emergency Inspector Anita Wilson, people need to use this training and common sense to help prevent kitchen fires, which are the leading cause of home fires. This event is to just get the word out that people can be a little safer to help prevent kitchen fires, she said. We try and make the kids not afraid or hide from us if there is a fire or medical emergency in the home. The history of Fire Prevention Week can be traced back to the Great Chicago Fire, which started on Oct. 8, 1871 and continued through Oct. 9. In just 27 hours this conflagration killed 300, left 90,000 people home less, and destroyed 17,400 structures. In 1911, on the 40th anniversary of this tragic event, the Fire Marshals Association of North America started the tra dition of using this anni versary to keep the pub lic informed about the importance of fire prevention. Over the next nine years this effort became so effective that in 1920 President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day Proclamation set ting Fire Prevention Week as the Sunday through Saturday period in which Oct. 8 falls each year The latest statistics from NFPA say U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cook ing-related fires between 2007-2011. Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen-more than any other place in the home. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire-related inju ries. Among the fire safety tips being emphasized include: when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you must leave the room even for a short period of time, turn off the stove. clean and clear of com bustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging). from cooking areas by enforcing a kid-free zone of three feet around the stove. mitt and a lid nearby. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan (make sure you are wearing the oven mitt). Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. To keep the fire from restarting, do not remove the lid until it is completely cool. Never pour water on a grease fire. If the fire does not go out, get out of the home and call the fire department. Fire prevention and injuries can be eliminat ed. People need to practice fire safety all the time, not just during fire pre vention week. We started this to bring into peoples mind to remember to check their smoke detectors, prac tice fire drills and have an escape plan in case of a fire, Wilson said. We need to put fire preven tion front and center. We provide the training and with common sense you can stay safe and avoid potential dangers in the kitchen. -Photos by MC2 Salton CebeAbove, First Coast Navy and Fire Emergency Inspector Angel Roman talk to children at the NS Mayport Child Development Center about fire safety during Fire Prevention Week Oct. 7. Below, children take a closer look at the arm on one of the fire trucks. Above, Firefighter Davy Lam high fives a child during the kick off of Fire Prevention Week at the Mayport Child Development Center. Below, children get a close look at one of First Coast Navy Fire and Rescues fire trucks on display. Children learn about the importance of fire prevention from First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue. Children at the Mayport Child Development Center participate in Fire Prevention Week. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13 Auto Skills Center Oct. Special: 10% off open stall fees and 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance $225 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Oct. 18: Bingomania. 6:30 pm at Beachside Bingo. Over $17,000 in prizes, drawings, prize wheel, dessert table & more! call and sign up; no tickets required. 5 pack Computers $99.00 All Paper Packs $30.00; No Coupons to be used on this day. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and opportunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Oct. 16: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Oct. 18: UFC 166-Velasquez vs. Dos Santos. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Oct. 25: Liberty Halloween Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Be pre pared to be scared to death. DJ, food, costume contest, prizes, games and more. 270-7205 Community Events Oct. 26: Make a Difference Day 8 a.m.-1 p.m. True Blue Navy Family Benefactors has partnered with First Coast News to assist in Naval Station Mayports Lake Wonderwood Project. We are inviting volun teers from the Naval Station Mayport Community to assist in this event focusing on helping our base community. We will follow this event with our annual Fall Fest. 270-5228 Oct. 26: Fall Fest 2013. 1-5 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pic tures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available. A variety of ven dors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked goodies, and more. Purchase your seasonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Jacksonville Zoo Halloween Spooktacular Tickets on Sale. Dates available Oct. 18-20 and Oct. 25-31. Tickets are $9.00, ages 3 and up (under 3 are free) 270-5145 Oct. 18: Freedom FridaySpooktacular Costume Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of. Oct. 19: Teen TripIce Skating at Jacksonville Ice and Sports Complex Departs 6 p.m.; returns no later than 11 p.m. Cost $15. The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Oct. 18: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Oct. 20: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Diego Chargers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 23: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 27: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Francisco 49ers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Oct. 21. Oct. 29: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 30: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Intramural Sports Please contact Rita Hammerstad at for more information Oct. 18: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by Oct. 9. Oct. 21-24: Pre-Season Basketball Tournament Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 28: Mens Basketball Season Begins Season ends Feb. 13. Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rent al, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Oct. 27: Halloween Family Fun Night 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy a night of ghoulish fun which includes Xtreme Bowling, shoe rental, goodie bags, costume contest (4 age brackets) and more. $10.00 for adults, $7.00 for children 12 and under. Advanced tickets and reservations required. Call (904) 270-5377 for tickets. Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and military dependents

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AIR, SURF A CE A ND SUBM A RINE A SA LUTE TO OUR NA VY AN D ALL WHO HA VE SERVED FEA TURING NA VY BIRTHD AYMA RINE S BIRTHD AY VETER ANS DAY AND MILIT A RY FA MILY APPRECI A TION MONTH PUBLI S HED BY

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2 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3 On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to inter cept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certificate of the navy. To understand the momentous sig nificance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their rela tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolution ary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a cen tral government for the colonies, cre ated a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held superiority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies' trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized pri vateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the out set of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance pos sible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would do so in the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protec tion of their coasts and harbors. Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equip ping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was "the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress received intelligence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They rec ommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until 13 October, when another for tuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup ply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The committee's proposal, now appearing emi nently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the pur chasing, outfitting, manning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navy's conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed ves sels of various types. The navy's squadrons and cruisers seized enemy sup plies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked dip lomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we celebrate each year in October.~ history.navy.mil Establishment of the Navy, October 13, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Navy. "Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for intercepting such transports as may be laden with warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies, and for such other purposes as the Congress shall direct. That a Committee of three be appointed to pre pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same before the Congress, and to contract with proper persons to fit out the vessel. Resolved, that another vessel be fitted out for the same purposes, and that the said committee report their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti mate of the expence."Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13 October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966): 442. Establishment of the Department of the Navy, April 30, 1798This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval matters were under the cognizance of the War Department. AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the department of the navy. SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war, as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary, shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take possession of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this department, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War. SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regulations, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a further compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments. SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive department, to be denominated the department of war,'' as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.Approved, April 30, 1798. Air, Surface and Submarine: A salute to our Navy and all who have served is a spe cial advertising section produced by the Military Publications department of The Florida TimesUnion. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper, and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn Hirschman. Material, information and photo graphs used in this section was provided by Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise credited.

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Resolution of the Continental Congress establishing the Marine Corps November 10, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Marine Corps. "Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commis sioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be distinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of." Reestablishment of the Marine Corps July 11, 1798An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, fortyeight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distribution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay and subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, and four rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth, aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieutenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and musicians, conformably to the act, intituled "An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself, to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof, may be for the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster, sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music, respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments, which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed vessels of the United States, respectively, as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid, shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be established by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States." Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of service, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his discretion, shall direct. Approved, July 11, 1798.During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that two Battalions of Marines be raised for ser vice as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopt ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned offi cer in the Continental Marines and is cel ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded. In the next decade, however, increasing con flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called QuasiWar with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first sol diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores. Today, there are more than 200,000 activeduty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning Always Faithful in Latin.~ history.com Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5

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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 World War I known at the time as The Great War officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hos tilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of the war to end all wars. Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two min utes before the armistice end ing World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the fol lowing words: "To us in America, the reflec tions of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the countrys service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations" The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business begin ning at 11:00 a.m. The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words: Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful rela tions with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to per petuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives con curring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation call ing upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holidaya day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veter ans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nations histo ry; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service orga nizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common pur pose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary plan ning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agen cies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible." President Eisenhower signing HR7786, changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne Richards, Arthur J. Connell, John T. Nation, Edward Rees, Richard L. Trombla, Howard W. Watts On that same day, President Eisenhower sent a letter to the Honorable Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs (VA), designating him as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee. In 1958, the White House advised VA's General Counsel that the 1954 designation of the VA Administrator as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee applied to all sub sequent VA Administrators. Since March 1989 when VA was elevated to a cabinet level department, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has served as the committee's chairman. The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by cel ebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreation al and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service organizations and the American people. Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the histori cal significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacri fice for the common good.~ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7 Veterans Day, 1954 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION 3071Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351) that the eleventh of November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day. In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. A heartfelt thank you to all advertisers who have taken part in this special Salute to our Navy and all who have served! Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide unending support." This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a monthlong celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacrifices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families President Proclaims November as Military Family Month Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families Why Appreciate Military Families? Throughout the month of November, military families serving around the world are honored through a variety of observances and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu tions they make every day in support of the military and our nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and supported by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange Service, Defense Commissary Agency, and others. Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts are teaming up to recognize military families through special events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business and sporting events; and special recognitions during community activities throughout the month of November.~ military.com 10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRCThe VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their transition process from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a successful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weapons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficiency to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their successful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspection of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to execute safely and efficiently in prepara tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy ment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Proud Warriors MQ-4C Triton

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 A six-plane detachment of F/A-18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a fiveplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, the aircraft from VFC-12 and contractor adver sary aircraft, represent a real istic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capabilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deploy ment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC-12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adversary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other avia tion units. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their warfighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A-18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after avia tion duty assignments. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily task ing from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres ent a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint mis sions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as towing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-air frame testing to certify the reliability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the con crete test chamber are 18 inches thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was con structed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid-1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the control room behind two inches of bullet proof glass, test cell opera tors put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical air craft are each powered by two of these engines. The test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine performance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple num and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly test cells around. We have testing capability for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution

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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Station Mayport Established since 1942, Naval Station Mayport has grown to become the third largest fleet concentration in the United States. The unique operational compo sition of the naval installation includes a harbor capable of accommodat ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway capable of handling any aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory. NS Mayport is home to more than 83 tenant commands, including 16 naval ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4 helicopter squadrons and Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. The mission of Naval Station Mayport is to enhance and sustain the opera tional readiness of its tenant commands and provide unparalleled support to its families. The vision of the command is to be recognized as the leader of shore installations in the Navy and a model facility that employs a premier work force always seeking to provide the fin est service to the fleet, family and community. Over the past year, the base has worked towards its mission by under taking vast energy conservation mea sures, completing a state of the art fit ness center to enhance the physical readiness of Sailors and implementing housing improvements to enrich the quality of life. NS Mayport improvements have saved the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while still providing the fleet with premium services. These improvements not only positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors, but those soon to arrive with USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport is also currently adding three patrol coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal arrived in October, followed shortly by USS Tornado and USS Zephyr. The base has provided support for 532 Navy ship movements, including 16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast guard ship movements and 110 foreign and commercial visiting ships. NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19 Darkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-a-day. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they prepare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the counter-narcotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marksmen aboard who are authorized to fire disabling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to comply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a suspected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, authority over the helicopter is trans ferred to the regional Coast Guard commander, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard precision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforcement members who have been selected for the precision marks manship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can read ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we cap tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to configure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive training before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth perception. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, airspeed, and other critical flight param eters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instru ment panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these missions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coordinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin flying these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when necessary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accomplished. HSL-60 Jaguars use nighttime force against drug runners

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20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 With minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor inge nuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for surface Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated navi gation team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships navigation teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive simulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simulation. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hardware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equipment and inno vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, headsets, and reformat existing computers to com plete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of underway times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in navigation and ship han dling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experience the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent training class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course simulates relative motion, which means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly changing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the MSN simulation was exponentially better than reading it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the system with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient form of navigation team training Budget cuts have reduced Department of Navy spending across the board. Ship deployments have been cancelled and aircraft flying hours have been reduced. This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has turned to innovative ways to continue the fleets important mission. 4th Fleets current missions include security cooperation activities, con tingency operations, and the domi nant mission of maritime security operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes this through Counter Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission. The illegal transportation of illicit cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions as the greatest means these organiza tions make money and influence and destabilize the region. 4th Fleet and partner nations in the region monitor detect and intercept narcotics being smuggled via the waterways between the Americas. Defending the homeland by preventing narcotics from entering American schools and neighborhoods is an important mission that 4th Fleet must now accomplish with fewer ships, aircraft, and other assets. In the current fiscal environ ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova tive, cost effective solutions that can address the capability gaps caused by budget cuts. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet said. To continue sustained operations 4th Fleet has employed a combination of resources from the past with new technologies to continue the mission. In March of this year 4th Fleet host ed a capabilities demonstration of the Naval Air Warfare Centers MZ-3A Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized blimps during WWII in the South Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. Harris discussed the benefits blimps can bring to the C-TOC mission. Transnational criminal organiza tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics, low observable and high speed vessels, masked communication signatures and sophisticated coordination to smug gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year. One way to enhance detection efforts against illicit trafficking within our area of operations is to utilize long-endur ance platforms with the ability to use a multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) technologies, like this blimp have the potential to meet these operational needs, Harris said. In May Harris traveled to Key West for a very successful demonstration of the TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon) and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel Swift. The tethered Aerostat provides an aerodynamically stable, reliable and cost effective, unmanned aerial plat form for surveillance, monitoring and detection. The standard system configuration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly and safely. The Puma UAV delivers flexibil ity, endurance and a payload capability unmatched in its vehicle class. With a wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight, hand-launched UAV provides aerial observation at line-of-sight ranges up to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov ered in very restricted areas using vertical descent Auto Land and is currently undergoing sea landing trials. On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters for a capabilities demonstration prior to a scheduled deploy ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America, another vehicle from the past 4th Fleet wants to use for future operations. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a variety of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The equipment on board this DC-3 allows it not only to survey coastal areas, but also detect surface and underwater contacts essential for the C-TOC mission. It is important for 4th Fleet to find creative ways to continue the C-TOC mission with fewer assets. In 2012, 318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti mated street value of $25.5 billion were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Harris said. Developing, testing and deploying low cost innovative ideas and technol ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue operations now and in the near future. The Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission is of vital importance to our nation, as well as our partners in the region. The effect of crime and corruption that this ille gal activity has brought threatens the stability of emerging countries like Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem, but a problem for all of the Americas, Harris said. 4th Fleet AORs close proximity to the U.S. makes the Fleets mission that more important. Illegal materials entering the U.S. are a direct threat to the homeland. The violence that drug traf ficking creates has impacted our part ner nations in the hemisphere. It is important that 4th Fleet contin ues to explore innovative ways to do more with less. Budget concerns are a problem that is not going away any time soon, and neither is the attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari time forces in cooperative maritime security operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. 4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21 East Coast Ohio-class submarine home port continues to thrive What began as an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now home to the most powerful vessels ever created for the U.S. Navy and the world. Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is the largest employer in Camden County with more than 8,000 service members and civilian employees and an estimated annual payroll of $500 million. The goods and service the Kings Bay mili tary bring into Camden County is esti mated at $697 million. Kings Bay is the home port to six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and two Ohio-Class guided missile submarines. The Navys move to Kings Bay began when treaty negotiations between the United States and Spain called for the withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16 from its operational base in Rota, Spain by 1979. Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials looked at more than 60 sites along the East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as the future refit site for the squadron. In addition to the land already owned by the Army, the Navy acquired other surrounding properties for a total of 16,900 acres to create the new support base. It also transformed a sleepy com munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of about 50,000. It changed Camden County forev er, said David Rainer during a 2005 interview. It was a defining period for everyone. Rainer, a Camden County Commissioner, was the superintendent of Camden County schools in 1978. During a visit to the base in 2005, former president Jimmy Carter jokingly said it was hard not to have an influence in Kings Bays selection during his tenure as president. However, the former governor and submariner noted, Kings Bay was selected on its own merits. Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility employee and mayor of Kingsland, said the base was among the most important events to occur in Camden County history. I dont know if [Carter] did anything in office that was more significant to Camden County, Smith said in 2005. He was in office at the time of the bases inception. It helped bring a lot of change, not only to Camden County, but surrounding counties. The first group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and civilian employees, raised the national ensign and changed the sign to read Naval Submarine Support Base Kings Bay near what was to become Stimson Gate. With the transition complete, the commanding officer of the support base and his crew set out to transform the terminal into an operational naval base. Initial construction began to prepare for the arrival of the squadron and the submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS33). According to base archives and newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil lion cubic yards of material from the St. Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland Sound and Kings Bay in preparation for the incoming fleet. Congress also approved funding for many projects such as the development of 250 fam ily housing units, the first base administration building (now public works), security building, and a new fire sta tion. When I first arrived at Kings Bay to take command in 1979, it was only a few trailers and a pine forest, said retired Capt. Richard Currier, who was the second commanding officer of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that year. Making do was our biggest challenge as was incorporating change. I had a workforce of 350 personnel when I started. When I left, there was close to 1,000 people working on the base. Following an extensive one-year environmental impact study in October 1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east coast site for the new Ohio-class sub marines. The Navy then called for the construction of three new commands. Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic were built to support the massive new boats. Trident Training Facility is the largest building in Camden County, with more than 500,000 square feet of classrooms and office space. Trident Refit Facilitys dry dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemisphere. The announcement spurred the larg est peacetime construction project ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3 billion, 11-year construction project also fueled a population explosion in Camden County that still persists today. Other milestones achieved dur A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year

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22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 ing the first years were the publication of the first Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in April 1980. When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years, said Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later worked for the base administration. The admin building was still being built, Trident Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10 was non-existent. Since then he said, construction of new buildings changed the face of the base. The biggest impression I received from my initial arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design of the base, because everything was within walking distance, Alexander said. The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15, 1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150 Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to 10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000. Kings Bay continues to evolve. Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729) were converted to guided missile submarines and shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732) arrived from the West Coast. In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing 140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to the base. Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. The Times-Union contributed to this story. 35 YEARS

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 23 First qualified female sub officers receive Dolphins Three Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in sub marines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during sepa rate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Officer of the Deck and Engineering Officer of the Watch, perform damage con trol functions, and demon strate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew officer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par ticipated in a ceremony pre sided by Cmdr. Christopher Nash, commanding officer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young officers earned the right to lead the next gen eration of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations technical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualified submari ner onboard the ballistic mis sile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the sub marine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew officers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeffer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Officer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. The Commanding officer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four fine officers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. They are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submari ners that have gone before us as qualified in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line officers and seven supply officers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each complet ed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective submarines. Qualifying is a huge accomplishment for any submariner, and it feels no different for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to finally be a member of this elite commu nity. Im particularly grateful to my crew, officers and enlisted, for supporting me and hold ing me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualified sub marine officer. Cowan said qualification in submarines is more of a per sonal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of subma rine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at every thing that I have done and what this qualification means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowledge and the instinct to per form safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its mis sions. Ultimately, it is a monu mental mark of the confidence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line officers under instruc tion graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and under went naval nuclear prototype training. Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

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24 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013