Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00317


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Welcome To Mayport, USS ShamalPatrol Coastal USS Shamal (PC 13) made the homeport shift from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek in Virginia Beach, Virginia to Naval Station Mayport on Saturday, bringing with her a crew of 30 to join the Florida installation. The crew and their families are extremely excited about moving to Mayport, said LCDR Frank Azzarello, com manding officer of USS Shamal. We already have some families who have moved to the area and they cannot say enough about it. Shamal is the first of three Patrol Coastal ships to join the Mayport basin, soon to be followed by USS Tornado (PC 14) and USS Zephyr (PC 8). I am excited to have the PCs join the Mayport waterfront, said Capt. Ryan Tillotson, Commodore of Squadron 14. USS Shamal is the first of several ships we will have join us over the next year. The arrival of new ships continues to show the Navy commit ment to the Jacksonville area and provides our Sailors new opportunities to serve on a variety of dif ferent platforms. Three years from now we will have Destroyers, Coastal Patrol, Amphibious, and Littoral Combatant ships. The waterfront will look different but the excel lent reputation Mayport has as a great duty sta tion with great ships will still be at the forefront of what we do. Destroyer Squadron 14 will change as well and we are excit ed about the opportuni ties and challenges for our staff. The ships will change but our primary mission to provide war ships ready for tasking to any Fleet will stay the same. It may sound corny but the future truly does look bright for Mayport and Squadron 14. The shift has been challenging, however the crew remains excit ed about moving to Mayport, Azzarello said. Our mission will to be support USNAVSO/Fourt Fleet tasking. Shamal was the 13th Cyclone-class Patrol Coastal built by Bollinger Shipyard of Lockport, La., for the U.S. Navy to support Naval Special Operations. The Patrol Coastals are based, in part, on the Vosper-Thornycroft Ramadan class and are named for weather phe nomena. Shamal is the Arabic name for a violent wind and sand storm that originates at the point where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers come together and travel south to the Arabian Gulf. Shamal was commis sioned as the USS Shamal (PC13) on Jan. 27, 1996, in Baton Rouge, La. Her first operational deploy ment was to the U.S. Southern Command for a 6-month deployment. -Photo by MCC William TownsendPatrol Coastal USS Shamal (PC 13) pulls into Naval Station Mayports basin on Saturday after shifting homeport from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek in Virginia Beach, Va. Shamal is the first of three Patrol Coastal ships to join the Mayport basin, soon to be followed by USS Tornado (PC 14) and USS Zephyr (PC 8). -Photo by Paige GnannCombined Federal Campaign (CFC) Regional Director John Smith talks to command CFC coordinators and key workers during a CFC training session on Sept. 19 about the 2013 fund drive. CFC is a yearly fund drive which gives vetted charitable organizations the ability to solicit donations from employees of the federal government of the United States. More than 2,000 national and local charities are a part of this years drive.Giving To Your Favorite Charity Just Got EasierGot 5 bucks in your pock et? What are you planning on spending it on? A soda and chips or maybe a cof fee? It doesnt take long for you to spend $5 nowadays and it definitely doesnt go far when you do. But in the hands of a non-profit orga nization, it could mean feeding a family, clothing children or buying medi cine supplies for the sick, said Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) Regional Director John Smith during a CFC training session held at Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 19. A dollar in the hands of non profits goes a lot farther than in your pocket, he told command CFC coordinators and key workers in atten dance at the training. And donators can give as little as $5 a month. Imagine what kind of good that could do. CFC gives service mem bers and federal civilians the opportunity to donate to any of more than 2,000 prescreened charities, includ ing several local charities that directly benefit Naval Station Mayport. MWR Youth Activities and Child Development Centers, Greater Jacksonville See USS Shamal, Page 6Navy Recommends Security Changes In Wake Of Navy Yard TragedyThe Navy has recommended three changes to security proce dures following the Washington Navy Yard shooting Sept. 16 in which a Navy contractor killed 12 people at the facility. Juan M. Garcia, the assistant sec retary of the Navy for manpower and reserve affairs, studied the ser vice record of the shooter Aaron Alexis to see how his conduct did or did not meet the threshold for the sustainment of his securi ty clearance and fitness for Naval duty. One recommendation, which must go to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel for approval, is that all Office of Personnel Management investigative reports include any available police documents related to the subject being backgrounded. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has already approved two other rec ommendations. The first will require command security man ager responsibilities be assigned to executive officers or other senior members of commands. Currently, junior officers hold those responsibilities. The second is to require seniorlevel accountability on all detach ment of individual evaluations/fit ness reports. A senior Navy official discussed the timeline of Alexis service and what the Navy knew about secu rity problems during a Pentagon background briefing. Alexis service went from 2007 to 2011. Looking individually at the events, as we knew them at the time, its very difficult to see a glar ing indicator that there is any kind of potential for the events that took place last week, the senior Navy official said. Many questions were raised about how Alexis, a former sailor and Navy contractor at the time of the shootings, received a secret security clearance. Three years prior to his enlistment, Alexis shot out the tires of a construction work ers vehicle in Seattle. No charges were filed. Upon entering the Navy Reserve in 2007, OPM initiated an investiga tion. The check turned up Alexis fingerprints in the FBI system and investigators became aware of the incident in Seattle. OPM sent inves tigators to speak to Alexis at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill. There was no mention of the inci dent involving firearms in the OPM report to the Navy. The OPM report to the Department of the Navy Central Adjudication Facility determined Alexis was eligible for a secret clearance with one caveat he had See Security, Page 11 See CFC, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Let me start off by welcoming aboard Lt. Cmdr. Frank Azzarello and the crew of USS Shamal (PC 13). The Cycloneclass Patrol Coastal ship is the first of three to join Mayports basin over the next few months. I know Mayport has seen a lot of change with the steady decommission ing of our frigates over the past couple of years, but now the winds have changed and were in period of growth. First Shamal, followed soon by her sis ter ships, Tornado and Zephyr; then the long awaited arrival of USS New York and the rest of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Readiness Group. This is an exciting time in Mayports history and I am excit ed to be a part of it. Now I want to address the big elephant of the base, our Gym. Construction on the Gym has been underway for the past couple of years and I know everyone is anxious for it to open. As you are probably aware, the open ing date has been pushed back a few times for one reason or another, but we are definitely nearing the end of con struction. According to our great folks at MWR, the Gym should finally be fully opera tional by mid-October. I know youre tired of waiting, but just hold on a little while longer. The end product is going to be magnificent. I want to say good luck to USS Simpson (FFG 56) and embarked HSM46 Detachment 8, who set out last week with four Fire Scout (MQ-8B) Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical (VTLT) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). The ship and crew will bring these maritime sur veillance and reconnaissance asset into the operational theater. I also want to say thank you to all our Naval Station Mayport families who switch off unnecessary lights, preserve water and turn up their thermostats to a reasonable level in an effort to do their part in conserving energy on the instal lation. For those of you in housing who have signed up for the Switch 4 Good pro gram, double BZs. Signing up for the energy conservation education program has allowed Balfour Beatty Communities to donate $500 to Finegan Elementary this school year. This money will go a long way toward providing awards for students who dem onstrate outstanding scholastic perfor mance. That makes energy conservation a win-win for all of us! Another shout out to CMC Bob White and his team for putting on an outstand ing POW/MIA ceremony this past Friday at Mayport Memorial Park. Capt. Glenn Kuffel, Deputy Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, was guest speaker at the event and reminded all in attendance of the Sailors and ships lost in battle over the past 230 years. It reminded me of how dedicated each branch of our military services, in particular the Navy, are in providing life changing services and support to our fellow service members, their fami lies and the public. Its evident through the success of programs like the annual Combined Federal Campaign fund drive conducted each year throughout all fed eral institutions. Soon volunteers from all commands will be reaching out to our Sailors and Government Service employees about giving to their favorite charities through CFC. I understand its sometimes difficult to give up part of your hard-earned paycheck, but the rewards reaped are worth it. There is not ONE of us who can say they havent been touched by a non-profit organization in some way whether it is through personal experi ence, a family member or friend. MWR Child Development Center and Youth Activities Center, American Red Cross, and the Greater Jacksonville USO are all local charities here on or near the base that benefit from CFC. Plus, there are more than 20,000 other local and national charities for you to choose. Im asking for you to consider choosing at least one. It can be as little as $5 a month out of your paycheck the cost of a Starbucks coffee with enormous returns for that charity. Its amazing how they can stretch $5 into so much more. So when a CFC coordinator or key worker comes to your space with a pledge form in their hands, spend a moment to listen to what they have to say. You never know when youll be on the receiving end. Id like to close this weeks article by expressing my heartfelt condolences to the families and shipmates who lost their loved ones and co-workers last week during the deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard. Rest assured, we are doing every thing in our power to keep the men and women who live and work here as safe as possible. It is everyones responsibil ity to stay vigilant and not dismiss signs that someone or a particular situation just doesnt seem right. Naval Station Mayport has several outlets ready to help, including the therapists at Fleet and Family Support Center. Please continue sending your sugges tions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer As the school year progresses, conflicts will emerge. These can go unresolved if the child involved in the conflict does not have the neces sary skills for cooperation, collaboration, or compro mise. While older children spend most of their day at school working with others to successfully complete a task, younger children do not always get the necessary practice. They may need additional practice at school by shar ing supplies or at home sharing responsibilities for completion of a chore. Cooperation is a neces sary skill required for conflict resolution. Children also need the skill of compromise. Without the ability to compromise, arguments or hurt feelings can result. But even very young chil dren can be taught strate gies which allow them to successfully make group decisions. For example if they must decide which fast food restaurant they would agree to, they look for common ground, dis cuss the final alternatives, and make a mutual deci sion. Involvement with sports, board games, crafts, or even volunteer ing will teach the skills of collaboration and cooperation with others. Appropriate social skills can also be learned dur ing these activities no matter what the age of the individual. As students engage more and more outside of school with friends, on committees, on a team, or in a dance class, this skill can resolve many conflicts. One particu larly important social skill which may need practice is agreeing to disagree, meaning that individu als can express and retain their own opinions on things without arguing, fighting, or otherwise becoming disagreeable Children can learn and remember strategies which may work for them in the next situational conflict by reflecting on which strategies have worked best for them in similar situations. By asking themselves ques tions such as, How did we both decide that? or How did I get the group or members of the team to decide on that course of actions? They can begin to build a library of conflict resolution strate gies. But can these skills work if the child is being bullied? Both bullies and chronic victims can be helped by those same skills of cooperation, col laboration, and compro mising, in addition to empathy and self-respect. In the next few weeks, I will write a new article on bullying explaining the new system Duval Schools has put into place. Empathy will allow the individual to feel compas sion and caring for oth ers. And recognizing that they have something to offer others helps one to feel good about ones self. This easily translates to feeling good about help ing others. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Children To Get Along With OthersJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer In his book Uncommon Decency, Fuller Theological Seminary President Richard Mouw discusses the impor tance of civility in our polarized society where there is often an usversus-them mental ity. He explains what he refers to as convicted civility we can have strong convictions and stay true to our beliefs while also treating others who are different from us with courtesy and respect. Civility and con viction are both impor tant. It may not be easy, but if we work at it, we can hold onto our strong beliefs and have a kind and gentle spirit as well. Becoming more civil does not mean weakening ones faith. Developing convicted civility can help us become more spiritu ally mature. We can cul tivate civility and actually strengthen our convic tions at the same time. When civility is sincere, it is not only an outward show of politeness, but also heartfelt compas sion for others. To really be civil is to genuinely care for others, to truly love your neighbor (see Leviticus 19:18). A religious leader once stated that living together in communi ties with respect and concern one for another is the hallmark of civi lization. Civility can be understood as the mea sure of our collective and individual character. A healthy community can maintain civility along with diversity, but this ultimately relies on the integrity of the people. One minister taught Chaplain Luke Wilson CNSL Ministry Center Keeping Your Civility In An Uncivil Worldthat virtues such as love, generosity, humility and responsibility form the foundation of our lives and are the outward manifestation of the inner man. Therefore, moral virtues have an influence on civic virtues. The moral basis of civil ity is the Golden Rule, taught by various religions and cultures: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you (see Matthew 7:12; Luke 6:31). This principle of reciproc ity reminds us all of our responsibility toward one another and of the impor tance of community in our lives. Speaking about civil ity on a personal level and about how to respond in difficult situations, another religious leader emphasized recently that some people mistakenly think responses such as silence, meekness, and forgiveness are passive or weak. But to love our enemies, bless them that curse us, do good to them that hate us, and pray for them which despitefully use us and persecute us (see Matthew 5:44) takes faith, strength, and, most of all, courage. The need for civility is especially relevant to reli gion and politics. As we interact with people who have different beliefs and perspectives, we realize that we live in a pluralistic society. It is also impor tant to recognize that different people share many values in common. In the midst of a diversity of voices and opinions, we must continue to have civil discussion. The decline of civiliza tion begins with the viola tion of simple principles of civility. Over time, cooperation, humility and empathy can gradually give way to contention, strife and hatred. I pray that all of us will strive to treat others with respect regardless of the situation, to love one another (see John 13:34), to be active in our com munities, and to work together cooperatively. I invite each of us to reflect on this thought expressed by Richard Mouw: Being civil is a way of becom ing more like what God intends us to be.

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Coast Guard Offloads $78 Mil In DrugsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Rentz (FFG-46) and its embarked Coast Guard law enforcement detach ment transferred $78 Million in confiscated cocaine Sept. 15 to the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Forward (WMEC 911) in the Western Caribbean Sea while assigned to the U.S. 4th Fleet. The 2,123 pounds of cocaine were seized in early August from a fish ing vessel north of the Galapagos Islands while the Rentz was conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime Operations (C-TOC) in the 4th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo, Spanish for hammer, is a partner-nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. The flow of illegal drugs has a destabiliz ing effect on our partner nations, and together, we are determined to prevent it, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the command er of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. The hard work of the Rentz and Forward crews is essential to this effort. U.S. military participa tion in Operation Martillo is led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a com ponent of U.S. Southern Command U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerPersonnel from the U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement detachment embarked aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Rentz (FFG 46) prepare an estimated $78 million of con fiscated cocaine for transfer to USCGC Forward (WMEC 911).-Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. SotoA crew member stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Forward places a bag of seized cocaine with the rest of the cache on Sept. 20 at NS Mayport. The drugs were seized approximately 260 nautical miles north of the Galapagos Islands. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 A Day For Kids At NS Mayport-Photos by Veronica MandezTwo-year-old Michael Estrada enjoys playing in the Go Fish pool at the Day for Kids event sponsored by MWR and Boys & Girls Clubs on Saturday at the Sea Otter Pavilion. Naval Station Mayport MWR Youth Activities, in conjunction with the Boys & Girls Clubs, hosted a Day for Kids on Sept. 21 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. The free event includ ed bouncy house, carnival games, face painting and food for the whole family. Day for Kids is a Boys and Girls Clubs event to remind families to celebrate and honor Americas children by spending meaningful time with them. Athena Cornell paints faces of one of the children enjoy ing a fun day at NS Mayport. Timia Goldenvoi hands out cupcakes at the Day for Kids event. Kids get hopping in the potato sack race, one of several activities planned at the Day for Kids event.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 5 Teen volunteer Devon Roddel gets wet in the dunking booth on Saturday at the Sea Otter Pavilion during the Day for Kids event. MWR Children and Youth Programs assistant Brian Wargo makes balloon animals for kids at the Day for Kids event. Left, Daisy Keil enjoys a cookie while getting a ride in a Radio Flyer during the Day For Kids event sponsored by Mayport MWR and Boys and Girls Clubs. Above, the Cregreen family puts together blocks, one of several activi ties planned at the Day for Kids event. Kids get together and pull with all their might during a tug-o-war event. Latrice Scott, Christine Ngaballa and Bethany McClendon do the macarena dance at the Day for Kids event at Sea Otter Pavilion. Kyle Creegen shows off his face paint at Day for Kids. Latrice Scott and Carla Ludwig hand out iceesto Jersey Long and Sarah McClendon. The McClendon family enjoys a day together at Day for Kids, a day devoted to honoring Americas kids through play.

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-Photo by Paige GnannAustralian Ambassador to the United States, the Honorable Kim Beazley, meets with Royal Australian Navy service members during a visit to Naval Station Mayport last week. Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 is training Royal Australian Navy (RAN) pilots and maintainers of 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. Forty-two Australian pilots and 40 Australian mainte nance personnel are being extensively trained in the operation and upkeep of the MH-60R. Remembering Those Who Fell On Sept. 11September 11th, a day that has defined a genera tion. Many still remem ber exactly where they were and what they were doing when this trag edy occurred. This year marks the 12th anniver sary of that day, and USS Halyburton honored the fallen with a remem brance ceremony. The ceremony was announced over the ships 1MC, to allow Sailors to continue work and remember. Speakers includ ed Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander, Chief Hull Technician Kyle Heck, Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class Patrick Walters, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Frank Charles, and Seaman Justin Gregory. Lt. Tom Bingol, the Chaplain attached to USS Halyburton, concluded the ceremony by lead ing the ship in prayer fol lowed by a moment of silence. The moment of silence, honoring those lost in the towers, the attack on the Pentagon, and those retaking Flight 93 before it could reach Washington D.C., was observed by all onboard. The Sailors of USS Halyburton will always remember, not just the terrorism that hap pened that day, but also the heroism. USS Halyburtons motto is Not for Self, but for Country; the passengers on flight 93, firefighters and police in New York City, and service mem bers in the Pentagon dis played a similar courage on that fateful day. In 1999, Shamal underwent two shipyard periods resulting in a hullstrengthening modification and the first Patrol Coastal stern ramp and Combat Craft Retrieval System (CCRS) modification. Shamals sec ond 6-month deployment was to the U.S. Central Command in the Arabian Gulf in 2000. From November 2001 until her transfer, Shamal was operation ally assigned to the Coast Guard to assist with maritime homeland security patrols. In her first year in commission as a Coast Guard cutter, Shamal made a significant impact. In January 2005, Shamal pursued and seized a 45-foot go-fast and recovered 19 bales of marijuana weighing 2,090 pounds. In February 2005, Shamal located a hidden compartment on a 165foot coastal freighter containing 35 bales of cocaine weighing 2,030 pounds. Shamal has also inter cepted 146 illegal aliens, conducted numerous search and rescue opera tions, and participated in the Coast Guards response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. On Sept. 30, 2011, Shamal was returned to U.S. Navy custody and re-commissioned USS Shamal. In June 2013 Shamal shifted away from the rotational crew concept and was permanently embarked by PC Crew Kilo. Specifications: Displacement, 370 Long Tons Length, 179 feet Beam, 25 feet Height, 60 feet Draft, 8 feet Propulsion, Four Paxman-Valenta Diesel Engines 14,000 combined horsepower Max Speed, 35 knots Small Boats, 24-foot RHIB Weapons, Two Mk 38 25mm can nons; Two Twin .50 cal machine guns; Two M240 machine guns; One Mk 19 Grenade launcher; Various Small ArmsFrom Page 1Shamal 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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USO and the Northeast Florida Chapter of the American Red Cross are just a few of the local charities vetted to participate in this years campaign. Last year, commands throughout the base raised more than $242,000 with the donations coming from just 16 percent of the eligible contrib utors. This years campaign is really focusing on upping the amount of donors and getting people to understand that even little is a lot. This years campaign theme is Make It Possible. Smith told the coordinators and key work ers that the best way to make this years campaign possible is by reaching out to each and every person in their command. To find out more or to look at the approved charities list, go to www.nefl-sega-cfc.org or con tact your CFC coordinator.CFC Adds Online Option For Donors At MyPayThe annual Combined Federal Campaign adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge option available through the Defense Finance and Accounting Services MyPay website, which most service members and civilians already use to view their leave and earnings statements. Anthony DeCristofaro is assistant director of the DoD Voluntary Campaign Management Office, which is within the Washington Headquarters Services human resources directorate. He told American Forces Press Service during a telephone interview that the online pledge option offers several advantages over paper pledge forms: Its available all the time, from any computer; Its more confidential and secure, as no paper forms pass from hand to hand; and Its less prone to error. He explained that donors directly enter their input online only once, while the informa tion on paper pledge forms is typed and retyped into the sys tem -offering more chances for mistakes to creep in and also consuming thousands of total work hours in processing. He said ease of use is poten tially much greater, since donors using the online pledge option can search local, nation al or international charities. Here in Washington, we have 4,500 charities, he noted. But nationwide, there are about 20,000 different charities in this campaign. DeCristofaro added that donors also are encouraged to use local CFC websites and other resources to research charities before giving DFAS their final instructions. I made my gift on Tuesday, ... [and] I was easily matched to my local campaign, he said. DeCristofaro said the process took him 10 minutes, and the next morning he had an email confirming his donation and start date. The system has been in active development for two years, he said. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service led the effort, with support from the Office of Management and Budget, which has a similar sys tem in its executive agencies. In its first year, the service is open to employees in 90 of the 160 local CFC areas. Officials said more areas may be added in the future, and ask donors to use paper pledge forms in areas where the MyPay option is not available this year. DeCristofaro said use of the system, like participation in CFC, is strictly voluntary. Many employees have asked for and will likely prefer electronic options, he said, although any one who wants to make a onetime gift or use a paper CFC pledge form still can do so. The new option is an exam ple of a collaborative effort that went into increasing our effi ciency, he added. The new option will be avail able to eligible donors includ ing departments of Veterans Affairs and EPA.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyAbove, Musician 3rd Class Shawn Reince assigned to Navy Band Southeast plays taps during a Prisoner of War/ Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Recognition Day ceremony held on Naval Station Mayport. Left, Capt. Glenn Kuffel, commander Destroyer Squadron Fourteen, gives a speech during a Prisoner of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Recognition Day ceremony held at Naval Station Mayport. National POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed on the third Friday in September and honors those who were prisoners of war and those who are still missing in action. From Page 1CFC THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 7

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-Photo by MCC William TownsendChaplain Karen Rector is presented the Military Chaplains Associations Distinguished Service Award for the Navy, along with a Navy/Marine Corps Commendation as well as a promotion to lieutenant commander during an awards ceremony on Sept. 3. Pictured is CNSL Ministry Center Cmdr. Steven Souders, Rector, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, and NS Mayport Chaplain Jay Cayangyang.FFSC Schedule SetThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific par enting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, and encourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Sept. 30, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Oct. 1-2, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Million Dollar Sailor FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Oct. 2, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 2, 2-4:30 p.m., Just For Dads Class, USO Oct. 2, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Oct. 3, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Oct. 7-11 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Oct. 9, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 9, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 9, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Oct. 9, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1, Room 719 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Volunteers Help Clean Mayport WaterwaysOn Sept. 21, military and civilian person nel from Naval Station Mayport joined with the Ocean Conservancy and hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world when they hit the beach and the Jetties for the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup. Volunteers spent two hours picking up trash and debris from these areas resulting in the col lection of many large bags of trash. The largest group to turn out for the event was from the Navy JROTC at Terry Parker High School. Every year, count less marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, and other animals are sick ened, injured, or killed because of dangerous items that are carried by rain water and wind into rivers and ultimately the ocean. -Photos by Paige GnannVolunteers from Terry Parker High School NJROTC pick up trash along Naval Station Mayports Jetties during the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup held Sept. 21. Military and civilian personnel from Naval Station Mayport joined with the Ocean Conservancy and hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world Brownies Jaiden Rucker, 7, and Ariana Lovelace, 8, pick up trash along the edge of the base jetties, at the mouth of the St. Johns River. Mom Rebecca Hofsheier holds a trash bag and makes sure the girls dont go out too far on the rocks. Scott Dombrowsky of Mayport Environmental thanks volunteers for coming out Saturday morning to participate in the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup to help clear out trash and debris from Mayports jetties and beach. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 9

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Simpson, HSM-46 Deploy To 6th Fleet AORThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) and embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8 deployed on Sept. 18 from its Mayport, Fla. home port on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). In preparation for their deployment the Simpson crew recently complet ed a basic/intermedi ate training period and a shipyard availability, where the ship was out fitted with four Fire Scout (MQ-8B) Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical (VTLT) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). Follin is excited about bringing the maritime surveillance and reconnaissance asset into the operational theater. As Simpson returns to the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility with the highest level of combat readiness and certified for Maritime Security Operations, we will per form our mission in one of the most dynamic and exciting surface warfare environments, he said. Our ship and this crew is well prepared to do our nations business. Simpson returned from her previous deployment, also to the Mediterranean Sea, in July 2012 and recently completed an Independent Deployer Certification Exercise (IDCERTEX). This is a three-week long wargame specifically tailored to prepare independent deployers for a wide range of war fighting capabili ties. Simpson is one the few remaining Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates. She is a multi-warfare platform and stands ready to take on any task in the 6th Fleet AOR. Commissioned on Sept. 13. 1985, Simpson was named after Rear Adm. Rodger W. Simpson, who commanded USS Mahan (DD-364) and Destroyer Division Fifteen during World War II. During his years of com bat duty in the Pacific, Simpson was awarded the Navy Cross, the Silver Star and the Legion of Merit for rescuing and evacu ating more than 7,500 Allied POWs and civilians interned in Japanese con centration camps as well as other significant tacti cal operations. For more information, contact pao@ffg56.navy. mil or CNSL PAO -Photos by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 2nd Class (SW/EXW) Gage Radtke takes a quiet moment to say goodbye to his fiance Hannah Thomas before deploying with USS Simpson (FFG 56) on Sept. 18. The guided-missile frigate, led by Cmdr. Chris Follin, left its NS Mayport homeport on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Families wave fairwell to the Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Simpson as it deploys with embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8. Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class (AW) Raul Hernandez of HSM-46 Detachment 8 holds his family close before deploying with guided-missile frigateUSS Simpson (FFG 56) on Sept. 18. USS Simpson, with embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8, left its NS Mayport homeport on Sept. 18 on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Martha White holds her 11-year-old daughter Jasmine after they say goodbye to Hull Technician 2nd Class Donald White who is deploying with USS Simpson on a NATO deployment to U.S. Sixth Fleet Area of Responsibility. Lt.j.g. Nils Mattson says his last goodbyes to girlfriend Carmen Figueroa before USS Simpson deploys from Naval Station Mayport for its NATO deployment. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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De Wert Families Stay United Through Reading More than wearing the uniform and fighting for our country, most Sailors share the dual role as parents. Parents leaving for deployment can put a strain on the children that are left at home. The United Through Reading program gives Sailors the opportunity to have a video recorded in which they read a book to a loved one or friends. This video is placed onto a DVD and mailed to the family or friend. Seeing and hearing the voice of the recorded Sailor is especially great for chil dren and young fam ily members to hear their Mom or Dad. The DVD recording may also help with ease separation issues, provide comfort, and bridge the distance deployment may cause. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Benjamin Rera has established the project for USS De Wert Sailors. He personally connected with this program as an expecting father himself. Emily Rera, his wife, will be giving birth to their first child shortly after deployment. A lot of Sailors today experience depression or separation anxiety due to lengthy deployments and lack of communication with loved ones back home. The United Through Reading program was of great interest to our Sailors as many of them are parents. Many Sailors have missed their childs first day of school and have used this program to become more involved from far away. Several Sailors have contacted their childs teachers and will be reading their childrens homework assignments to them. This helps the parents feel involved in their childs education while helping the child to see their mother, father, uncle, brother. There are many sacri fices that Sailors and their families make to ensure our freedom. It is of great appreciation for programs like United Through Reading to ease of trials of deployment. -Photo by Ensign Kierstin King Sonar Technician (Surface) Seaman Apprentice Juan Thigpen, Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Bradley Laroche, Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Benjamin Rera, and Seaman John Acebu read to their loved ones through United Through Reading.USS De Wert Pins New ChiefsThe USS De Wert Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Selectees lined up in ranks on the flight deck with the rest of the crew during their CPO pin ning ceremony on Sept. 13. This was the final CPO induction ceremony held on her decks before her decommission in the spring. De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Thomas, gave a power ful speech to the crew, explaining how the CPO Selectees had earned such a major achieve ment. He explained the new responsibility that came with wearing the Anchors of Chief Petty Officer. He also explained how many of the new Selectee Chiefs had over come numerous trials and tribulations to achieve this once in life time goal in U.S. Navy. As the pinning ceremo ny ended, Chief Tyrone Lumpkin led the Chiefs Mess in a cheer for the new selectees. Navy Chief! To which the USS De Wert Chief Mess replied, Navy Pride! in unison. Their voices echoed on the flight deck and throughout Gulf of Aden. This Phase II season was a successful, knowl edge refreshing experi ence, said Lumpkin. Our past, present, and FY14 Chiefs have paved the way for todays Navy. Making it the most pow erful Navy in the world This is my 4th pinning ceremony and every time this day comes I get excit ed and emotional at the same time because the feeling is real. I would like to also congratulate CMC Thomas Caudle, Chief Michael Flowers (Phase II Lead), Chief Nicholas Caciopoli and the rest of the Chief Mess on USS De Wert for a successful Phase II experience this year. The culmination of all the hard work and events that led to the pinning ceremony made for the proudest day of my Navy career, said newly pinned Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Fairbanks. Being pinned as a Chief Petty Officer has topped all the great experiences of my Navy career, Chief Yoeman (SW/PJ) Breshion Benn said. Im looking forward to continue taken care of Sailors and service to my country. Newly pinned Chiefs stand proudly with their fellow chiefs mess. USS De Wert is currently deployed with Coalition Task Force (CTF) 508 in support of Anti-Piracy operations within the Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin. -Photo by CTT1 Rioridannegative credit informa tion. During his Navy service, Alexis received a nonjudicial punishment for an unauthorized absence during service with VF-46 in Atlanta, Ga. His unau thorized absence coin cided with a brief stay in jail after being arrested for disorderly conduct out side a nightclub. There were other inci dents, but there were no further Article 15s. In one, Alexis discharged a firearm in his quarters. He stated he accidently dis charged the weapon while cleaning it. His commander initiat ed actions to administra tively separate Alexis from the service, but once the charges were dropped, that process stopped. On December 2, 2010, Alexis requested separa tion from the service in accordance with a reduc tion-in-force program. On Jan. 31, 2011, he received an honorable discharge with a reentry code of RE-1 the most favor able code.From Page 1Security Detailing Countdown Quick Reference Is Guide AvailableA detailing countdown reference guide is avail able for your Sailors; the guide lists what Sailors should be doing and expecting as they begin to enter the orders window. A step by step timeline from 18 months out from their PRD all the way until their PRD is out lined in the guide. The guide is available at http://www.pub lic.navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/toolbox/ Documents/Detailing%20Countdown%20 (20%20AUG%202013).pdf THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 11

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Intramural Sports Please contact Rita Hammerstad at rita.hammerstad@navy.mi l for more information Oct. 8: Knock Out Domestic Violence 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 8: Mens Basketball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. Oct. 18: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by Oct. 9. Oct. 21-24: Pre-Season Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 28: Mens Basketball Season Begins Season ends Feb. 13. Mayport Bowling Center Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowl ing for active duty when they bring a non-active duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 2705377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburg er or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Oct. 27: Halloween Family Fun Night 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy a night of ghoulish fun which includes Xtreme Bowling, shoe rental, goodie bags, costume contest (4 age brackets) and more. $10.00 for adults, $7.00 for children 12 and under. Advanced tick ets and reservations required. To purchase tickets, please call (904) 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) Surfside Fitness class sched ule Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located ocean front behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equip ment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your workout to the next level. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox Gymnasium class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Sept. 30, from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve chicken pot pie, broccoli, salad, and dessert. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes division, and medals to all finishers. Southern Womens Show The Southern Womens show will be at the Prime Osborn Convention Center on Oct. 17-20. Come on out to enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health informa tion, along with beauty and lifestyle informa tion. For more informa tion please visit: www. southernwomensshow. com. Mayport and NAS JAX USO Centers are sell ing tickets for $5 each/ cash only. Tickets will also be available for purchase through the ITT office at Kings Bay. Military Spouse Vendor Show Looking for holiday gift ideas? Are you a military spouse with a small busi ness? If you answered yes to either of these questions, the Military Spouse Vendor Show at the Mayport USO on Nov. 2 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. is for you. Please email milwivesbusinessande vents@gmail.com for more information or to become a vendor. Vendor slots fill fast, so sign up today. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Oct. Special: 10% off open stall fees and 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance $225 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and depen dents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be noti fied Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and opportunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 27: Reggae Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Oct. 2: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Oct. 16: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Oct. 18: UFC 166-Velasquez vs. Dos Santos. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Oct. 25: Liberty Halloween Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Be pre pared to be scared to death. DJ, food, costume contest, prizes, games and more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Jacksonville Zoo Halloween Spooktacular Tickets on Sale. Dates available Oct. 18-20 and Oct. 25-31. Tickets are $9.00, ages 3 and up (under 3 are free) 270-5145 Oct. 2: Halloween Horror Nights Day at ITT. 10:30 a.m.2 p.m. Come and speak to a Universal representative who can help you plan your visit. Prizes will be awarded every half hour, plus there is a grand prize of a Halloween Horror Nights Getaway including 2 tickets to the park and a 2-night getaway to Coco Key Resort. 270-5145 Oct. 4: Freedom FridayFreaky Creepy Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 18: Freedom FridaySpooktacular Costume Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of. Oct. 19: Teen TripIce Skating at Jacksonville Ice and Sports Complex Departs 6 p.m.; returns no later than 11 p.m. Cost $15. The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 28: Jacksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 2: Mess Lords Celebrity Chefs at Mayport Galley. 11-1 pm. A special lunchtime menu from celebrity chefs Sarah Simington, Hodad and Brian Duffy. This special lunchtime event is open to active duty personnel only. Lunch is free for those on a Galley meal plan; all other eligible Galley patrons pay $4.25. 270-5373. Oct. 2: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 4: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 6: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 11: Halloween Horror Nights at Universal. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $40.00. Sign up by Oct. 8. Oct. 14: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Oct. 16: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Oct. 7. Oct. 18: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Oct. 20: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Diego Chargers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 23: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 27: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Francisco 49ers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Oct. 21. Oct. 29: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 30: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Welcome To Mayport, USS ShamalPatrol Coastal USS Shamal (PC 13) made the homeport shift from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek in Virginia Beach, Virginia to Naval Station Mayport on Saturday, bringing with her a crew of 30 to join the Florida installation. The crew and their families are extremely excited about moving to Mayport, said LCDR Frank Azzarello, com manding officer of USS Shamal. We already have some families who have moved to the area and they cannot say enough about it. Shamal is the first of three Patrol Coastal ships to join the Mayport basin, soon to be followed by USS Tornado (PC 14) and USS Zephyr (PC 8). I am excited to have the PCs join the Mayport waterfront, said Capt. Ryan Tillotson, Commodore of Squadron 14. USS Shamal is the first of several ships we will have join us over the next year. The arrival of new ships continues to show the Navy commit ment to the Jacksonville area and provides our Sailors new opportunities to serve on a variety of different platforms. Three years from now we will have Destroyers, Coastal Patrol, Amphibious, and Littoral Combatant ships. The waterfront will look different but the excel lent reputation Mayport has as a great duty sta tion with great ships will still be at the forefront of what we do. Destroyer Squadron 14 will change as well and we are excit ed about the opportuni ties and challenges for our staff. The ships will change but our primary mission to provide war ships ready for tasking to any Fleet will stay the same. It may sound corny but the future truly does look bright for Mayport and Squadron 14. The shift has been challenging, however the crew remains excit ed about moving to Mayport, Azzarello said. Our mission will to be support USNAVSO/Fourt Fleet tasking. Shamal was the 13th Cyclone-class Patrol Coastal built by Bollinger Shipyard of Lockport, La., for the U.S. Navy to support Naval Special Operations. The Patrol Coastals are based, in part, on the Vosper-Thornycroft Ramadan class and are named for weather phe nomena. Shamal is the Arabic name for a violent wind and sand storm that originates at the point where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers come together and travel south to the Arabian Gulf. Shamal was commis sioned as the USS Shamal (PC13) on Jan. 27, 1996, in Baton Rouge, La. Her first operational deploy ment was to the U.S. Southern Command for a 6-month deployment. -Photo by MCC William TownsendPatrol Coastal USS Shamal (PC 13) pulls into Naval Station Mayports basin on Saturday after shifting homeport from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek in Virginia Beach, Va. Shamal is the first of three Patrol Coastal ships to join the Mayport basin, soon to be followed by USS Tornado (PC 14) and USS Zephyr (PC 8). -Photo by Paige GnannCombined Federal Campaign (CFC) Regional Director John Smith talks to command CFC coordinators and key workers during a CFC training session on Sept. 19 about the 2013 fund drive. CFC is a yearly fund drive which gives vetted charitable organizations the ability to solicit donations from employees of the federal government of the United States. More than 2,000 national and local charities are a part of this years drive.Giving To Your Favorite Charity Just Got EasierGot 5 bucks in your pocket? What are you planning on spending it on? A soda and chips or maybe a cof fee? It doesnt take long for you to spend $5 nowadays and it definitely doesnt go far when you do. But in the hands of a non-profit orga nization, it could mean feeding a family, clothing children or buying medi cine supplies for the sick, said Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) Regional Director John Smith during a CFC training session held at Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 19. A dollar in the hands of non profits goes a lot farther than in your pocket, he told command CFC coordinators and key workers in atten dance at the training. And donators can give as little as $5 a month. Imagine what kind of good that could do. CFC gives service mem bers and federal civilians the opportunity to donate to any of more than 2,000 prescreened charities, includ ing several local charities that directly benefit Naval Station Mayport. MWR Youth Activities and Child Development Centers, Greater Jacksonville See USS Shamal, Page 6Navy Recommends Security Changes In Wake Of Navy Yard TragedyThe Navy has recommended three changes to security proce dures following the Washington Navy Yard shooting Sept. 16 in which a Navy contractor killed 12 people at the facility. Juan M. Garcia, the assistant secretary of the Navy for manpower and reserve affairs, studied the service record of the shooter Aaron Alexis to see how his conduct did or did not meet the threshold for the sustainment of his securi ty clearance and fitness for Naval duty. One recommendation, which must go to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel for approval, is that all Office of Personnel Management investigative reports include any available police documents related to the subject being backgrounded. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has already approved two other rec ommendations. The first will require command security man ager responsibilities be assigned to executive officers or other senior members of commands. Currently, junior officers hold those responsibilities. The second is to require seniorlevel accountability on all detach ment of individual evaluations/fitness reports. A senior Navy official discussed the timeline of Alexis service and what the Navy knew about secu rity problems during a Pentagon background briefing. Alexis service went from 2007 to 2011. Looking individually at the events, as we knew them at the time, its very difficult to see a glaring indicator that there is any kind of potential for the events that took place last week, the senior Navy official said. Many questions were raised about how Alexis, a former sailor and Navy contractor at the time of the shootings, received a secret security clearance. Three years prior to his enlistment, Alexis shot out the tires of a construction workers vehicle in Seattle. No charges were filed. Upon entering the Navy Reserve in 2007, OPM initiated an investigation. The check turned up Alexis fingerprints in the FBI system and investigators became aware of the incident in Seattle. OPM sent investigators to speak to Alexis at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill. There was no mention of the incident involving firearms in the OPM report to the Navy. The OPM report to the Department of the Navy Central Adjudication Facility determined Alexis was eligible for a secret clearance with one caveat he had See Security, Page 11 See CFC, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Let me start off by welcoming aboard Lt. Cmdr. Frank Azzarello and the crew of USS Shamal (PC 13). The Cycloneclass Patrol Coastal ship is the first of three to join Mayports basin over the next few months. I know Mayport has seen a lot of change with the steady decommission ing of our frigates over the past couple of years, but now the winds have changed and were in period of growth. First Shamal, followed soon by her sister ships, Tornado and Zephyr; then the long awaited arrival of USS New York and the rest of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Readiness Group. This is an exciting time in Mayports history and I am excited to be a part of it. Now I want to address the big elephant of the base, our Gym. Construction on the Gym has been underway for the past couple of years and I know everyone is anxious for it to open. As you are probably aware, the opening date has been pushed back a few times for one reason or another, but we are definitely nearing the end of con struction. According to our great folks at MWR, the Gym should finally be fully opera tional by mid-October. I know youre tired of waiting, but just hold on a little while longer. The end product is going to be magnificent. I want to say good luck to USS Simpson (FFG 56) and embarked HSM46 Detachment 8, who set out last week with four Fire Scout (MQ-8B) Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical (VTLT) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). The ship and crew will bring these maritime surveillance and reconnaissance asset into the operational theater. I also want to say thank you to all our Naval Station Mayport families who switch off unnecessary lights, preserve water and turn up their thermostats to a reasonable level in an effort to do their part in conserving energy on the instal lation. For those of you in housing who have signed up for the Switch 4 Good pro gram, double BZs. Signing up for the energy conservation education program has allowed Balfour Beatty Communities to donate $500 to Finegan Elementary this school year. This money will go a long way toward providing awards for students who demonstrate outstanding scholastic perfor mance. That makes energy conservation a win-win for all of us! Another shout out to CMC Bob White and his team for putting on an outstanding POW/MIA ceremony this past Friday at Mayport Memorial Park. Capt. Glenn Kuffel, Deputy Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, was guest speaker at the event and reminded all in attendance of the Sailors and ships lost in battle over the past 230 years. It reminded me of how dedicated each branch of our military services, in particular the Navy, are in providing life changing services and support to our fellow service members, their fami lies and the public. Its evident through the success of programs like the annual Combined Federal Campaign fund drive conducted each year throughout all federal institutions. Soon volunteers from all commands will be reaching out to our Sailors and Government Service employees about giving to their favorite charities through CFC. I understand its sometimes difficult to give up part of your hard-earned paycheck, but the rewards reaped are worth it. There is not ONE of us who can say they havent been touched by a non-profit organization in some way whether it is through personal experi ence, a family member or friend. MWR Child Development Center and Youth Activities Center, American Red Cross, and the Greater Jacksonville USO are all local charities here on or near the base that benefit from CFC. Plus, there are more than 20,000 other local and national charities for you to choose. Im asking for you to consider choosing at least one. It can be as little as $5 a month out of your paycheck the cost of a Starbucks coffee with enormous returns for that charity. Its amazing how they can stretch $5 into so much more. So when a CFC coordinator or key worker comes to your space with a pledge form in their hands, spend a moment to listen to what they have to say. You never know when youll be on the receiving end. Id like to close this weeks article by expressing my heartfelt condolences to the families and shipmates who lost their loved ones and co-workers last week during the deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard. Rest assured, we are doing every thing in our power to keep the men and women who live and work here as safe as possible. It is everyones responsibil ity to stay vigilant and not dismiss signs that someone or a particular situation just doesnt seem right. Naval Station Mayport has several outlets ready to help, including the therapists at Fleet and Family Support Center. Please continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer As the school year progresses, conflicts will emerge. These can go unresolved if the child involved in the conflict does not have the neces sary skills for cooperation, collaboration, or compromise. While older children spend most of their day at school working with others to successfully complete a task, younger children do not always get the necessary practice. They may need additional practice at school by sharing supplies or at home sharing responsibilities for completion of a chore. Cooperation is a neces sary skill required for conflict resolution. Children also need the skill of compromise. Without the ability to compromise, arguments or hurt feelings can result. But even very young children can be taught strategies which allow them to successfully make group decisions. For example if they must decide which fast food restaurant they would agree to, they look for common ground, dis cuss the final alternatives, and make a mutual deci sion. Involvement with sports, board games, crafts, or even volunteer ing will teach the skills of collaboration and cooperation with others. Appropriate social skills can also be learned dur ing these activities no matter what the age of the individual. As students engage more and more outside of school with friends, on committees, on a team, or in a dance class, this skill can resolve many conflicts. One particu larly important social skill which may need practice is agreeing to disagree, meaning that individu als can express and retain their own opinions on things without arguing, fighting, or otherwise becoming disagreeable Children can learn and remember strategies which may work for them in the next situational conflict by reflecting on which strategies have worked best for them in similar situations. By asking themselves ques tions such as, How did we both decide that? or How did I get the group or members of the team to decide on that course of actions? They can begin to build a library of conflict resolution strate gies. But can these skills work if the child is being bullied? Both bullies and chronic victims can be helped by those same skills of cooperation, col laboration, and compro mising, in addition to empathy and self-respect. In the next few weeks, I will write a new article on bullying explaining the new system Duval Schools has put into place. Empathy will allow the individual to feel compassion and caring for oth ers. And recognizing that they have something to offer others helps one to feel good about ones self. This easily translates to feeling good about help ing others. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Teaching Children To Get Along With OthersJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer In his book Uncommon Decency, Fuller Theological Seminary President Richard Mouw discusses the impor tance of civility in our polarized society where there is often an usversus-them mental ity. He explains what he refers to as convicted civility we can have strong convictions and stay true to our beliefs while also treating others who are different from us with courtesy and respect. Civility and conviction are both impor tant. It may not be easy, but if we work at it, we can hold onto our strong beliefs and have a kind and gentle spirit as well. Becoming more civil does not mean weakening ones faith. Developing convicted civility can help us become more spiritu ally mature. We can cul tivate civility and actually strengthen our convic tions at the same time. When civility is sincere, it is not only an outward show of politeness, but also heartfelt compas sion for others. To really be civil is to genuinely care for others, to truly love your neighbor (see Leviticus 19:18). A religious leader once stated that living together in communi ties with respect and concern one for another is the hallmark of civi lization. Civility can be understood as the mea sure of our collective and individual character. A healthy community can maintain civility along with diversity, but this ultimately relies on the integrity of the people. One minister taught Chaplain Luke Wilson CNSL Ministry Center Keeping Your Civility In An Uncivil Worldthat virtues such as love, generosity, humility and responsibility form the foundation of our lives and are the outward manifestation of the inner man. Therefore, moral virtues have an influence on civic virtues. The moral basis of civility is the Golden Rule, taught by various religions and cultures: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you (see Matthew 7:12; Luke 6:31). This principle of reciprocity reminds us all of our responsibility toward one another and of the importance of community in our lives. Speaking about civil ity on a personal level and about how to respond in difficult situations, another religious leader emphasized recently that some people mistakenly think responses such as silence, meekness, and forgiveness are passive or weak. But to love our enemies, bless them that curse us, do good to them that hate us, and pray for them which despitefully use us and persecute us (see Matthew 5:44) takes faith, strength, and, most of all, courage. The need for civility is especially relevant to religion and politics. As we interact with people who have different beliefs and perspectives, we realize that we live in a pluralistic society. It is also impor tant to recognize that different people share many values in common. In the midst of a diversity of voices and opinions, we must continue to have civil discussion. The decline of civiliza tion begins with the violation of simple principles of civility. Over time, cooperation, humility and empathy can gradually give way to contention, strife and hatred. I pray that all of us will strive to treat others with respect regardless of the situation, to love one another (see John 13:34), to be active in our com munities, and to work together cooperatively. I invite each of us to reflect on this thought expressed by Richard Mouw: Being civil is a way of becom ing more like what God intends us to be.

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Coast Guard Offloads $78 Mil In DrugsThe Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Rentz (FFG-46) and its embarked Coast Guard law enforcement detach ment transferred $78 Million in confiscated cocaine Sept. 15 to the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Forward (WMEC 911) in the Western Caribbean Sea while assigned to the U.S. 4th Fleet. The 2,123 pounds of cocaine were seized in early August from a fish ing vessel north of the Galapagos Islands while the Rentz was conducting Counter Transnational Organized Crime Operations (C-TOC) in the 4th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo, Spanish for hammer, is a partner-nation effort targeting illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. The flow of illegal drugs has a destabiliz ing effect on our partner nations, and together, we are determined to prevent it, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the command er of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. The hard work of the Rentz and Forward crews is essential to this effort. U.S. military participa tion in Operation Martillo is led by Joint Interagency Task Force-South, a com ponent of U.S. Southern Command U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by Lt. Cmdr. Corey BarkerPersonnel from the U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement detachment embarked aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Rentz (FFG 46) prepare an estimated $78 million of confiscated cocaine for transfer to USCGC Forward (WMEC 911).-Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. SotoA crew member stationed aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Forward places a bag of seized cocaine with the rest of the cache on Sept. 20 at NS Mayport. The drugs were seized approximately 260 nautical miles north of the Galapagos Islands. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 A Day For Kids At NS Mayport-Photos by Veronica MandezTwo-year-old Michael Estrada enjoys playing in the Go Fish pool at the Day for Kids event sponsored by MWR and Boys & Girls Clubs on Saturday at the Sea Otter Pavilion. Naval Station Mayport MWR Youth Activities, in conjunction with the Boys & Girls Clubs, hosted a Day for Kids on Sept. 21 at the Sea Otter Pavilion. The free event includ ed bouncy house, carnival games, face painting and food for the whole family. Day for Kids is a Boys and Girls Clubs event to remind families to celebrate and honor Americas children by spending meaningful time with them. Athena Cornell paints faces of one of the children enjoying a fun day at NS Mayport. Timia Goldenvoi hands out cupcakes at the Day for Kids event. Kids get hopping in the potato sack race, one of several activities planned at the Day for Kids event.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 5 Teen volunteer Devon Roddel gets wet in the dunking booth on Saturday at the Sea Otter Pavilion during the Day for Kids event. MWR Children and Youth Programs assistant Brian Wargo makes balloon animals for kids at the Day for Kids event. Left, Daisy Keil enjoys a cookie while getting a ride in a Radio Flyer during the Day For Kids event sponsored by Mayport MWR and Boys and Girls Clubs. Above, the Cregreen family puts together blocks, one of several activities planned at the Day for Kids event. Kids get together and pull with all their might during a tug-o-war event. Latrice Scott, Christine Ngaballa and Bethany McClendon do the macarena dance at the Day for Kids event at Sea Otter Pavilion. Kyle Creegen shows off his face paint at Day for Kids. Latrice Scott and Carla Ludwig hand out iceesto Jersey Long and Sarah McClendon. The McClendon family enjoys a day together at Day for Kids, a day devoted to honoring Americas kids through play.

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-Photo by Paige GnannAustralian Ambassador to the United States, the Honorable Kim Beazley, meets with Royal Australian Navy service members during a visit to Naval Station Mayport last week. Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 40 is training Royal Australian Navy (RAN) pilots and maintainers of 725 Squadron in the operation and maintenance of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. Forty-two Australian pilots and 40 Australian maintenance personnel are being extensively trained in the operation and upkeep of the MH-60R. Remembering Those Who Fell On Sept. 11September 11th, a day that has defined a generation. Many still remem ber exactly where they were and what they were doing when this trag edy occurred. This year marks the 12th anniver sary of that day, and USS Halyburton honored the fallen with a remem brance ceremony. The ceremony was announced over the ships 1MC, to allow Sailors to continue work and remember. Speakers includ ed Command Master Chief Lee Friedlander, Chief Hull Technician Kyle Heck, Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class Patrick Walters, Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Frank Charles, and Seaman Justin Gregory. Lt. Tom Bingol, the Chaplain attached to USS Halyburton, concluded the ceremony by lead ing the ship in prayer fol lowed by a moment of silence. The moment of silence, honoring those lost in the towers, the attack on the Pentagon, and those retaking Flight 93 before it could reach Washington D.C., was observed by all onboard. The Sailors of USS Halyburton will always remember, not just the terrorism that hap pened that day, but also the heroism. USS Halyburtons motto is Not for Self, but for Country; the passengers on flight 93, firefighters and police in New York City, and service mem bers in the Pentagon dis played a similar courage on that fateful day. In 1999, Shamal underwent two shipyard periods resulting in a hullstrengthening modification and the first Patrol Coastal stern ramp and Combat Craft Retrieval System (CCRS) modification. Shamals second 6-month deployment was to the U.S. Central Command in the Arabian Gulf in 2000. From November 2001 until her transfer, Shamal was operation ally assigned to the Coast Guard to assist with maritime homeland security patrols. In her first year in commission as a Coast Guard cutter, Shamal made a significant impact. In January 2005, Shamal pursued and seized a 45-foot go-fast and recovered 19 bales of marijuana weighing 2,090 pounds. In February 2005, Shamal located a hidden compartment on a 165foot coastal freighter containing 35 bales of cocaine weighing 2,030 pounds. Shamal has also inter cepted 146 illegal aliens, conducted numerous search and rescue operations, and participated in the Coast Guards response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. On Sept. 30, 2011, Shamal was returned to U.S. Navy custody and re-commissioned USS Shamal. In June 2013 Shamal shifted away from the rotational crew concept and was permanently embarked by PC Crew Kilo. Specifications: Displacement, 370 Long Tons Length, 179 feet Beam, 25 feet Height, 60 feet Draft, 8 feet Propulsion, Four Paxman-Valenta Diesel Engines 14,000 combined horsepower Max Speed, 35 knots Small Boats, 24-foot RHIB Weapons, Two Mk 38 25mm cannons; Two Twin .50 cal machine guns; Two M240 machine guns; One Mk 19 Grenade launcher; Various Small ArmsFrom Page 1Shamal 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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USO and the Northeast Florida Chapter of the American Red Cross are just a few of the local charities vetted to participate in this years campaign. Last year, commands throughout the base raised more than $242,000 with the donations coming from just 16 percent of the eligible contrib utors. This years campaign is really focusing on upping the amount of donors and getting people to understand that even little is a lot. This years campaign theme is Make It Possible. Smith told the coordinators and key work ers that the best way to make this years campaign possible is by reaching out to each and every person in their command. To find out more or to look at the approved charities list, go to www.nefl-sega-cfc.org or con tact your CFC coordinator.CFC Adds Online Option For Donors At MyPayThe annual Combined Federal Campaign adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge option available through the Defense Finance and Accounting Services MyPay website, which most service members and civilians already use to view their leave and earnings statements. Anthony DeCristofaro is assistant director of the DoD Voluntary Campaign Management Office, which is within the Washington Headquarters Services human resources directorate. He told American Forces Press Service during a telephone interview that the online pledge option offers several advantages over paper pledge forms: Its available all the time, from any computer; Its more confidential and secure, as no paper forms pass from hand to hand; and Its less prone to error. He explained that donors directly enter their input online only once, while the informa tion on paper pledge forms is typed and retyped into the sys tem -offering more chances for mistakes to creep in and also consuming thousands of total work hours in processing. He said ease of use is poten tially much greater, since donors using the online pledge option can search local, national or international charities. Here in Washington, we have 4,500 charities, he noted. But nationwide, there are about 20,000 different charities in this campaign. DeCristofaro added that donors also are encouraged to use local CFC websites and other resources to research charities before giving DFAS their final instructions. I made my gift on Tuesday, ... [and] I was easily matched to my local campaign, he said. DeCristofaro said the process took him 10 minutes, and the next morning he had an email confirming his donation and start date. The system has been in active development for two years, he said. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service led the effort, with support from the Office of Management and Budget, which has a similar system in its executive agencies. In its first year, the service is open to employees in 90 of the 160 local CFC areas. Officials said more areas may be added in the future, and ask donors to use paper pledge forms in areas where the MyPay option is not available this year. DeCristofaro said use of the system, like participation in CFC, is strictly voluntary. Many employees have asked for and will likely prefer electronic options, he said, although any one who wants to make a onetime gift or use a paper CFC pledge form still can do so. The new option is an exam ple of a collaborative effort that went into increasing our effi ciency, he added. The new option will be available to eligible donors includ ing departments of Veterans Affairs and EPA.-Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyAbove, Musician 3rd Class Shawn Reince assigned to Navy Band Southeast plays taps during a Prisoner of War/ Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Recognition Day ceremony held on Naval Station Mayport. Left, Capt. Glenn Kuffel, commander Destroyer Squadron Fourteen, gives a speech during a Prisoner of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Recognition Day ceremony held at Naval Station Mayport. National POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed on the third Friday in September and honors those who were prisoners of war and those who are still missing in action. From Page 1CFC THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 7

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-Photo by MCC William TownsendChaplain Karen Rector is presented the Military Chaplains Associations Distinguished Service Award for the Navy, along with a Navy/Marine Corps Commendation as well as a promotion to lieutenant commander during an awards ceremony on Sept. 3. Pictured is CNSL Ministry Center Cmdr. Steven Souders, Rector, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, and NS Mayport Chaplain Jay Cayangyang.FFSC Schedule SetThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 The program is based on Dr. Michael Popkin, PH.D ACTIVE PARENTING NOW 6 classes. This program is designed to assist you and your family put into practice the skills learned in the class. Specific parenting skills that are dis cussed as well as some of the challenges that are faced by all families include understanding yourself and your child, the four goals of misbe havior, building courage and character in your child, and encourag ing and listening to your child. Each week a differ ent topic is thoroughly covered via discussion, video vignettes, and handbook information. Sept. 30, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Anger Management Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Oct. 1-2, 7:30 a.m.4 p.m., Million Dollar Sailor FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Oct. 2, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 2, 2-4:30 p.m., Just For Dads Class, USO Oct. 2, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Oct. 3, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 702 Oct. 7-11 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Oct. 9, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 9, 1:30-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing FFSC Bldg. 1, Room 719 Oct. 9, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Oct. 9, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Developing Your Spending Plan, Bldg. 1, Room 719 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Volunteers Help Clean Mayport WaterwaysOn Sept. 21, military and civilian person nel from Naval Station Mayport joined with the Ocean Conservancy and hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world when they hit the beach and the Jetties for the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup. Volunteers spent two hours picking up trash and debris from these areas resulting in the col lection of many large bags of trash. The largest group to turn out for the event was from the Navy JROTC at Terry Parker High School. Every year, count less marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, and other animals are sick ened, injured, or killed because of dangerous items that are carried by rain water and wind into rivers and ultimately the ocean. -Photos by Paige GnannVolunteers from Terry Parker High School NJROTC pick up trash along Naval Station Mayports Jetties during the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup held Sept. 21. Military and civilian personnel from Naval Station Mayport joined with the Ocean Conservancy and hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world Brownies Jaiden Rucker, 7, and Ariana Lovelace, 8, pick up trash along the edge of the base jetties, at the mouth of the St. Johns River. Mom Rebecca Hofsheier holds a trash bag and makes sure the girls dont go out too far on the rocks. Scott Dombrowsky of Mayport Environmental thanks volunteers for coming out Saturday morning to participate in the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup to help clear out trash and debris from Mayports jetties and beach. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 9

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Simpson, HSM-46 Deploy To 6th Fleet AORThe guided-missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG 56) and embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8 deployed on Sept. 18 from its Mayport, Fla. home port on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). In preparation for their deployment the Simpson crew recently complet ed a basic/intermedi ate training period and a shipyard availability, where the ship was out fitted with four Fire Scout (MQ-8B) Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical (VTLT) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). Follin is excited about bringing the maritime surveillance and reconnaissance asset into the operational theater. As Simpson returns to the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility with the highest level of combat readiness and certified for Maritime Security Operations, we will per form our mission in one of the most dynamic and exciting surface warfare environments, he said. Our ship and this crew is well prepared to do our nations business. Simpson returned from her previous deployment, also to the Mediterranean Sea, in July 2012 and recently completed an Independent Deployer Certification Exercise (IDCERTEX). This is a three-week long wargame specifically tailored to prepare independent deployers for a wide range of war fighting capabili ties. Simpson is one the few remaining Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates. She is a multi-warfare platform and stands ready to take on any task in the 6th Fleet AOR. Commissioned on Sept. 13. 1985, Simpson was named after Rear Adm. Rodger W. Simpson, who commanded USS Mahan (DD-364) and Destroyer Division Fifteen during World War II. During his years of com bat duty in the Pacific, Simpson was awarded the Navy Cross, the Silver Star and the Legion of Merit for rescuing and evacu ating more than 7,500 Allied POWs and civilians interned in Japanese concentration camps as well as other significant tacti cal operations. For more information, contact pao@ffg56.navy. mil or CNSL PAO. -Photos by Paige GnannDamage Controlman 2nd Class (SW/EXW) Gage Radtke takes a quiet moment to say goodbye to his fiance Hannah Thomas before deploying with USS Simpson (FFG 56) on Sept. 18. The guided-missile frigate, led by Cmdr. Chris Follin, left its NS Mayport homeport on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Families wave fairwell to the Sailors aboard guided-missile frigate USS Simpson as it deploys with embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8. Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class (AW) Raul Hernandez of HSM-46 Detachment 8 holds his family close before deploying with guided-missile frigateUSS Simpson (FFG 56) on Sept. 18. USS Simpson, with embarked HSM-46 Detachment 8, left its NS Mayport homeport on Sept. 18 on a NATO deployment to conduct theater security operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR). Martha White holds her 11-year-old daughter Jasmine after they say goodbye to Hull Technician 2nd Class Donald White who is deploying with USS Simpson on a NATO deployment to U.S. Sixth Fleet Area of Responsibility. Lt.j.g. Nils Mattson says his last goodbyes to girlfriend Carmen Figueroa before USS Simpson deploys from Naval Station Mayport for its NATO deployment. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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De Wert Families Stay United Through Reading More than wearing the uniform and fighting for our country, most Sailors share the dual role as parents. Parents leaving for deployment can put a strain on the children that are left at home. The United Through Reading program gives Sailors the opportunity to have a video recorded in which they read a book to a loved one or friends. This video is placed onto a DVD and mailed to the family or friend. Seeing and hearing the voice of the recorded Sailor is especially great for chil dren and young fam ily members to hear their Mom or Dad. The DVD recording may also help with ease separation issues, provide comfort, and bridge the distance deployment may cause. Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Benjamin Rera has established the project for USS De Wert Sailors. He personally connected with this program as an expecting father himself. Emily Rera, his wife, will be giving birth to their first child shortly after deployment. A lot of Sailors today experience depression or separation anxiety due to lengthy deployments and lack of communication with loved ones back home. The United Through Reading program was of great interest to our Sailors as many of them are parents. Many Sailors have missed their childs first day of school and have used this program to become more involved from far away. Several Sailors have contacted their childs teachers and will be reading their childrens homework assignments to them. This helps the parents feel involved in their childs education while helping the child to see their mother, father, uncle, brother. There are many sacri fices that Sailors and their families make to ensure our freedom. It is of great appreciation for programs like United Through Reading to ease of trials of deployment. -Photo by Ensign Kierstin King Sonar Technician (Surface) Seaman Apprentice Juan Thigpen, Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Bradley Laroche, Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Benjamin Rera, and Seaman John Acebu read to their loved ones through United Through Reading.USS De Wert Pins New ChiefsThe USS De Wert Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Selectees lined up in ranks on the flight deck with the rest of the crew during their CPO pin ning ceremony on Sept. 13. This was the final CPO induction ceremony held on her decks before her decommission in the spring. De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Thomas, gave a power ful speech to the crew, explaining how the CPO Selectees had earned such a major achieve ment. He explained the new responsibility that came with wearing the Anchors of Chief Petty Officer. He also explained how many of the new Selectee Chiefs had overcome numerous trials and tribulations to achieve this once in life time goal in U.S. Navy. As the pinning ceremo ny ended, Chief Tyrone Lumpkin led the Chiefs Mess in a cheer for the new selectees. Navy Chief! To which the USS De Wert Chief Mess replied, Navy Pride! in unison. Their voices echoed on the flight deck and throughout Gulf of Aden. This Phase II season was a successful, knowl edge refreshing experi ence, said Lumpkin. Our past, present, and FY14 Chiefs have paved the way for todays Navy. Making it the most powerful Navy in the world This is my 4th pinning ceremony and every time this day comes I get excited and emotional at the same time because the feeling is real. I would like to also congratulate CMC Thomas Caudle, Chief Michael Flowers (Phase II Lead), Chief Nicholas Caciopoli and the rest of the Chief Mess on USS De Wert for a successful Phase II experience this year. The culmination of all the hard work and events that led to the pinning ceremony made for the proudest day of my Navy career, said newly pinned Chief Fire Controlman (SW) Fairbanks. Being pinned as a Chief Petty Officer has topped all the great experiences of my Navy career, Chief Yoeman (SW/PJ) Breshion Benn said. Im looking forward to continue taken care of Sailors and service to my country. Newly pinned Chiefs stand proudly with their fellow chiefs mess. USS De Wert is currently deployed with Coalition Task Force (CTF) 508 in support of Anti-Piracy operations within the Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin. -Photo by CTT1 Rioridannegative credit informa tion. During his Navy service, Alexis received a nonjudicial punishment for an unauthorized absence during service with VF-46 in Atlanta, Ga. His unau thorized absence coin cided with a brief stay in jail after being arrested for disorderly conduct out side a nightclub. There were other inci dents, but there were no further Article 15s. In one, Alexis discharged a firearm in his quarters. He stated he accidently dis charged the weapon while cleaning it. His commander initiat ed actions to administra tively separate Alexis from the service, but once the charges were dropped, that process stopped. On December 2, 2010, Alexis requested separa tion from the service in accordance with a reduc tion-in-force program. On Jan. 31, 2011, he received an honorable discharge with a reentry code of RE-1 the most favor able code.From Page 1Security Detailing Countdown Quick Reference Is Guide AvailableA detailing countdown reference guide is available for your Sailors; the guide lists what Sailors should be doing and expecting as they begin to enter the orders window. A step by step timeline from 18 months out from their PRD all the way until their PRD is outlined in the guide. The guide is available at http://www.pub lic.navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/toolbox/ Documents/Detailing%20Countdown%20 (20%20AUG%202013).pdf THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 11

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Intramural Sports Please contact Rita Hammerstad at rita.hammerstad@navy.mi l for more information Oct. 8: Knock Out Domestic Violence 3K Walk/5K Run 8:10 a.m. in front of the gym. Oct. 8: Mens Basketball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. Oct. 18: Surf Contest. 10 a.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Sign up by Oct. 9. Oct. 21-24: Pre-Season Basketball Tournament. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 28: Mens Basketball Season Begins Season ends Feb. 13. Mayport Bowling Center Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowl ing for active duty when they bring a non-active duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 2705377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Oct. 27: Halloween Family Fun Night 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Enjoy a night of ghoulish fun which includes Xtreme Bowling, shoe rental, goodie bags, costume contest (4 age brackets) and more. $10.00 for adults, $7.00 for children 12 and under. Advanced tick ets and reservations required. To purchase tickets, please call (904) 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) Surfside Fitness class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located ocean front behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equip ment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your workout to the next level. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox Gymnasium class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Sept. 30, from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve chicken pot pie, broccoli, salad, and dessert. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes division, and medals to all finishers. Southern Womens Show The Southern Womens show will be at the Prime Osborn Convention Center on Oct. 17-20. Come on out to enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health informa tion, along with beauty and lifestyle informa tion. For more informa tion please visit: www. southernwomensshow. com. Mayport and NAS JAX USO Centers are selling tickets for $5 each/ cash only. Tickets will also be available for purchase through the ITT office at Kings Bay. Military Spouse Vendor Show Looking for holiday gift ideas? Are you a military spouse with a small busi ness? If you answered yes to either of these questions, the Military Spouse Vendor Show at the Mayport USO on Nov. 2 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. is for you. Please email milwivesbusinessande vents@gmail.com for more information or to become a vendor. Vendor slots fill fast, so sign up today. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers military spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USONEWS 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Oct. Special: 10% off open stall fees and 4-wheel brake job, turn rotors, tire rotation and balance $225 (most vehicles). 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and dependents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be notified Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 NFL Sunday Ticket. Every Sunday at Noon at Castaways. Watch you favorite NFL team on one of Castaways 9 flat-screens. Drink specials throughout the day and opportunity to win prizes every Sunday. 270-7205 Sept. 27: Reggae Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Oct. 2: Poker Tournament. 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Oct. 16: Game Night 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Oct. 18: UFC 166-Velasquez vs. Dos Santos. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Oct. 25: Liberty Halloween Party. 8 p.m. at Beachside Community Center. Be pre pared to be scared to death. DJ, food, costume contest, prizes, games and more. 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Jacksonville Zoo Halloween Spooktacular Tickets on Sale. Dates available Oct. 18-20 and Oct. 25-31. Tickets are $9.00, ages 3 and up (under 3 are free) 270-5145 Oct. 2: Halloween Horror Nights Day at ITT. 10:30 a.m.2 p.m. Come and speak to a Universal representative who can help you plan your visit. Prizes will be awarded every half hour, plus there is a grand prize of a Halloween Horror Nights Getaway including 2 tickets to the park and a 2-night getaway to Coco Key Resort. 270-5145 Oct. 4: Freedom FridayFreaky Creepy Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 18: Freedom FridaySpooktacular Costume Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of. Oct. 19: Teen TripIce Skating at Jacksonville Ice and Sports Complex Departs 6 p.m.; returns no later than 11 p.m. Cost $15. The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Sept. 28: Jacksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 2: Mess Lords Celebrity Chefs at Mayport Galley. 11-1 pm. A special lunchtime menu from celebrity chefs Sarah Simington, Hodad and Brian Duffy. This special lunchtime event is open to active duty personnel only. Lunch is free for those on a Galley meal plan; all other eligible Galley patrons pay $4.25. 270-5373. Oct. 2: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 4: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 6: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 11: Halloween Horror Nights at Universal. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $40.00. Sign up by Oct. 8. Oct. 14: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Oct. 16: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up dead line Oct. 7. Oct. 18: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Oct. 20: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Diego Chargers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 23: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 27: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Francisco 49ers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Oct. 21. Oct. 29: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 30: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 26, 2013 13

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