Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Title:
Mirror (Mayport, FL)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, FL
Creation Date:
March 11, 2013
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00098614:00316


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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannChief Petty Officer (CPO) Selects from Naval Station Mayport sing Anchors Away during a CPO pinning ceremony on Sept. 13 at the Base Chapel. Friends, family and shipmates joined together in congratulating the new Chiefs for their advancement. See more photos, Page 4.Wreath At Navy Memorial Honors Shooting VictimsFrom American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel and other senior Defense Department leaders will lay a wreath at the U.S. Navy Memorial plaza Sept. 17 to honor the victims of the Sept. 16 shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard. The wreath was placed adjacent to The Lone Sailor, who represents all people who have ever served, are serving now, or are yet to serve in the United States Navy, Pentagon officials said. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama has ordered that U.S. flags be flown at half-staff through sundown Sept. 20 to honor the victims. Hagel issued a state ment in the aftermath of the shooting spree that authorities said killed 12 people and wounded at least eight others. The suspected shooter was killed in an encounter with security personnel, officials said. This is a tragic day for the Department of Defense, the national cap ital area, and the nation. My thoughts and prayers are with the victims of this outrageous act of violence, their families, and all those affected by todays events, Hagel said in his statement. I am grateful for the swift response of federal and local law enforce ment, and for the profes sionalism of DOD personnel at the Navy Yard com plex, the secretary con tinued. The Department of Defense will continue to offer its full assistance in the investigation of this terrible and senseless vio lence. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said he was deep ly shocked and saddened by the shooting. Our thoughts and New Chiefs Join Mayport Goat Locker Mayport Runs To Help Others-Photo by MCC William TownsendRunners set out on a 5K Fun Run on Sept. 10 in support of September as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and Patriots Day memoralizing the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.NEX Mayport Sponsors 1st Chili CookoffFrom NEXThe NEX is inviting all Mayport commands to compete in the 1st annual Last Command Standing Chili Cookoff to be held in front of the Main Exchange on Oct 25. This event is opened to all departments and tenant com mands based at Mayport. This also includes Family Readiness Groups. More than one depart ment from the same command can enter. In addition to competing for the best chili on base, each department or group may use this opportunity to raise funds by selling their chili to custom ers from 11 a.m. -3 p.m. Each group will determine what price they want to sell their chili for. Side dishes and drinks may also be sold but will not be part of the judging. Judging will begin at noon but you may setup as early as you like. A panel of 5 judges will select the three best tasting chili entries. The NEX will award 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes to the winners. Each group that enters the contest will receive a certifi cate from the NEX that they can use at a later date for up to 5 percent off their total purchase for their Christmas party or other function (discount not to exceed $250. Some exclusions do apply). To enter, contact Pam Haley at pamela.haley@nexweb.org prior to Oct 11. NPASE Det SoutheastMore than 70 Sailors and family members par ticipated in a 5-kilometer run and 3-kilometer walk aboard Naval Station Mayport to raise aware ness about suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and commands across the Navy have been providing general military training and events to raise awareness. With the run today, we want to help bring to the forefront the flags and indications that may lead to someone inter vening in a case where a person may be think ing about committing suicide, said Martina Williams, fleet and family advocacy program educator. On board Mayport 32 yellow ribbons are tied See Fun Run, Page 12 See Wreath, Page 16

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror School has started. Have those homework battles begun? Avoid those nasty battles with five strategies to help your children get the most out of their study time. Each strategy begins with a question about your child. Your answer should help you to identify your childs overall strengths and weaknesses when it comes to studying. Getting Started: Does your child dive right in or get stuck at the begin ning? Many children need help with planning so get them started on an assignment by breaking it into smaller parts. For example, if your child has four chapters to read, sug gest tackling one or two in the first study session. The others can be saved for later. By decreasing the initial task, it may be easier to begin. Schedule as many sessions as necessary to complete the entire assignment. Knowing that part of the assignment is already completed will make it easier for completing the overall requirement. Managing Time: Does your child manage time well? The key to time management is planning. Help your child map out study sessions in writing so the study plan is vis ible, much like a builder uses blueprints. If the school doesnt provide a planner, buy one. Then demonstrate its use! Even though it may look userfriendly to you, if you have never used one, it might be initially tricky for your child to figure out how to write in assignments or projects. Also as part of the planning, assist with finding the right time for study sessions. Does right after school work best? Maybe after a snack? After dinner? Or maybe the sessions work better as mini-sessions? Evaluate different strat egies over a couple of weeks to determine which study strategy works best. Taking Notes: When you help your child study for a test, does he have notes from class? If not, why not? Trying to write word-for-word transcrip tions in class is nearly impossible. Some stu dents even those in high school still have trouble copying notes from the board, an overhead, or a power point. Suggest focusing on getting the key words and/or ideas down on paper. Then that night at home, encourage rewriting the notes and filling in the details that are still fresh from the lec ture or class that day. This has the added benefit of looking at those notes a second time. Organizing Study: Is your child the organized type? If not, color-coded folders for each subject may provide some organization. Notes, handouts, classwork, and returned tests will go into that sub jects folder so study time will not be taken up with looking for all the infor mation needed to study. But when it is time to study, where does your child study? Some chil dren do better in a com mon area like the kitch en table so that help is readily available. Other children like a quiet spot away from the hustle and bustle of family life. It is important to have a des ignated place and have at that place the materi als needed for most types of studying: highlight ers, note cards, sticky notes, pens, pencils, pen cil sharpener, notebook paper, a dictionary, and maybe a thesaurus. So now you that know where your child stud ies, ask how does your child study? Does he go over the questions at the end of each chapter the test will cover? Does he check out those high lighted boxes in his text that might be called Important Points or Keys to Understanding? What does he do with his class notes? Check out this next section on Reviewing the Material for a better understanding of how to use class notes as a study guide. Reviewing the Material: Does your child avoid reviewing course material until right before a test? Bad idea! Reviewing is one of the most important study skills! Each night prior to starting on that nights homework, your child should review what was done in class that day. He should look over his notes to fill in any blanks, correct misspellings, and highlight the main ideas of the lesson. Or if your child tells you there is no homework in a class for that night, then empha size that the review of the days lesson IS tonights homework. The next step is to review at regular intervals daily, weekly, every couple of weeks all of the material that is being covered, paying special attention to all the material that he has highlighted in his notes. Then when it is test time, the material is fresh! Getting Expert Help: Go to www.tutor.com/ military to get a profes sional tutor to help with math, science, social studies, and English from elementary through high school. These tutors are screened, certified, and background-checked. They only work with one student at a time. No exceptions. The tutor will make sure that your child understands the mate rial whether it is a single homework problem in 5th grade math, a unit test in social studies, or a quar ter exam in 18th Century British lit. Remind your child that getting the most out of a study session will bring many rewards, including more time for other activities, greater confidence, and better grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Avoiding Homework Battles With Your StudentJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingIt is the year 5013. Despite several hun dred World Wars, twelve Ice Ages, nine asteroid hits, three robot takeovers, seven alien inva sions, and an unfortunate but brief worldwide pro hibition on bacon; human beings have survived. The Earth, along with its sister colonies on Mars and Venus, is experienc ing her 177th recorded Period of Enlightenment a time of flourish ing advances in science, art, philosophy, culture, and, ever since the recent eradication of male pat tern baldness, cosmetol ogy. With the publics fasci nation with ancient his tory on an upswing, more and more young schol ars have chosen to study Archaeology, a science which had been some what neglected in recent centuries. One such aspiring archaeologist, Fizzeq 7.5, is the Principal Investigator of an ambi tious excavation that has captured the worlds attention. Mr. Fizzeq has embarked on a Phase III Data Recovery of an extensive site located at Sector 52b, formerly known as the Tinker Air Force base housing com plex in Oklahoma. Since the Great Ocean receded to prehistoric lev els, evidence of complex ancient civilizations have been uncovered, dating back as early as the 21st Century. Although most material remains have eroded with time and environmental events, a curious substance known as plastic is conspicu ously present in the strata of Mr. Fizzeqs particular survey, shedding light on the ethnography of this ancient society. Shortly after breaking ground, the archeologi cal team uncovered an assemblage of brightly colored plastic arti facts indicating that the people of this period of Earths history were much smaller than the people of today. A veritable fleet of tiny little red cars and several hundred whimsi cally pastel colored hous es, along with countless itty-bitty kitchenettes and eensy-weensy tool benches were unearthed all bearing the mark of the manufacturer, Little Tykes clearly indicating that the humanoids of this era were no taller than three feet. Also, a staggering array of plastic bottles littered the entire excavation site. Wasting no time in hav ing the remains tested to determine their origi nal contents, Mr. Fizzeq found that, although it is long been proven that the peoples of the 21st Century had an abun dance of easily accessible Age of Unreason Here Sooner Than You ThinkLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesHere is a hypotheti cal for you to consid er: As you are walking home one day you pass a crowd gathered in a circle around a man clearly in distress. Lets say he is showing all the signs of having cardiac distress, and perhaps even stops breathing. It is clear that he is in a life threaten ing emergency. In this crowd is a world reknown heart surgeon, but for the sake of our hypotheti cal, lets say our doctor doesnt know CPR. Then there is you, fully quali fied in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. In that moment, what does our victim need more? A bril liant, extensively trained, heart surgeon or someone that can extend his life even by a few minutes till an ambulance can arrive? The answer, I hope, is obvious. And in the answer also lies the rea son why our Navy spends so much time, resources and energy on making you and I aware of suicide and suicide prevention. A better topic to focus on this month I dont know, because September is officially Suicide Prevention Awareness Month in our nation. There are no shortages of statistics to draw upon to illustrate and empha sis the importance of this life threatening issue, but here is one that hits close to home. According to pentagon reports, for the second straight year there were more suicides than combat deaths in the Armed Forces of the United States. However, the reality is that suicide is a national problem plagu ing civilian sectors equal ly as hard as military ones. In truth, because of our suicide prevention pro grams and resources, the Navy and by extension the DOD, may have bet ter success rates in pre vention. Statistics only take you so far though. Some experts in the field of suicide prevention sus pect that our statistics our on the low side and only reveal the tip of the iceberg. Why? Because determining cause of death for officials can not always be 100 per cent ascertained. What was the cause of death for that single vehicle acci dent? How did that per son drown? Why did that individual fall? While it can be help ful to point to numbers to illustrate the scope and depth of the problem, personally I feel it only can go so far. Suicide by its very nature is very personal and traumatiz ing on all that are con nected to the individual even remotely. If we are looking to motivate and galvanize communities into awareness and con cern strictly through sta tistics I think we fail on some level. There is an old Jewish proverb that essentially says if you have saved even one life it is as if you have saved an entire world. This is a beautiful expression, cap turing the value of life on the singular level, not in broad statistics. The likely truth is that most who are reading this have been affected in some way, whether distantly or directly, by sui cide. And for those who havent been touched, the likely truth is one day you will be. In our Navy we have great prevention programs for the problem of suicide. We also have dedicated health care professionals that are trained in post vention care for those who are fortunate enough to survive a suicide attempt, but most of real life takes place between the lines. That is why we need people trained and equipped in intervention. We need people who are prepared, caring and capable to intervene in one critical moment. Not to solve all the problems of the world but to extend life one day to the next. In short, we need you. Most moments of life affirming and preserving encounters are going to happen in the barracks, galleys, deck plates, hang ers, work spaces we dwell in. Medical, Chaplains, Fleet and Family and oth ers are resources at your disposal but the problem of suicide in our culture is a community challenge and the solution will always be a community response. Here is a hypothetical for you to consider: As your walking home one day you meet a person whos life is at risk to sui cide. Do you know what to do? Save A World One Life At A TimeChap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSSee Unreason, Page 3

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MCPON Thanks Ombudsmen For ServiceFrom Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael StevensNavy Ombudsmen, Theresa and I would like to take some time to say thank you for your support and dedication that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. For the past 43 years, Ombudsmen have been an irreplaceable resource for our Sailors, while serving as an information link between com mand leadership and command families. As an Ombudsman, you work collaboratively with the com mand to maintain and sustain the morale and welfare of the commands service members, their families and single Sailors on active duty. As we all know, family readi ness is tied to mission readiness and having a strong family sup port structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to accomplish its missions. Your help successfully navigates the unique challenges of our life style and know that the job you do is immeasurable! Thank you, Ombudsmen, for your continued support and selfless dedication. Very Respectfully, MCPON and Theresa Stevens MCPON Michael Stevensfresh water, every bottle tested at the site con tained H2O. Even more puzzling was the discovery of a veritable plethora of plastic bags, each tied in a knot, containing petri fied canine fecal material, more commonly known as, Doggie Doo Doo. Mr. Fizzeq planned to further research why this tiny ancient culture felt the need to bag up and pre serve this naturally pro lific substance. After all, Everyone Poops. Other items found preserved in copious amounts: sensible foot wear labeled Crocs, bev erage implements known as K-cups, Ikea furniture, Tupperwear containers, defunct television remotes, and molded plastic lawn furniture. But the most amazing discovery was found just beneath the excavations datum point. Deep in the ancient strata of one of the Tinker base houses lay the well-preserved remains of an ancient tool of communication, known as an iPhone. Mr. Fizzeq knew that, by extracting the data from the iPhone, he could effectively reveal a complete chronology and cultural analysis of 21st century humans that would blow the top off the archaeological world. However, exhaustive laboratory testing failed to produce anything Earth shattering, other than an acronymic language of colloquial terms such as idk lol srsly and vom. That, and sev eral dozen downloads of digital videos bearing the common tag twerk. Despite this disap pointment, Mr. Fizzeq went on to successfully finish his doctoral thesis, appropriately entitled, The Dimly-Lit Ages: An archeological analysis of 21st Century Culture. Get more wit and obser vations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2Unreason Navy Honors Hispanic American Heritage MonthFrom Navy Office of Diversity and InclusionThe Navy joins the nation Sept. 15 in cele brating Hispanic Heritage Month, which will be observed until Oct. 15. With a national theme of Hispanics: Serving and Leading Our Nation with Pride and Honor, the observance celebrates the histories, cultures, and contribu tions of Americans who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. According to 2010 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics com prise 16.3 percent of the total United States population, or 50.5 mil lion people, forming our countys largest racial or ethnic minority. Additionally, it is project ed that by 2050, a quarter of the nations workforce will be Hispanic. Today, more than 58,000 Hispanic active duty and Reserve Sailors serve in the Navy, includ ing five Hispanic flag offi cers and 216 Hispanic master chiefs. In his 2012 National Hispanic Heritage Month Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama stated that our Nations story would not be possible without generations of Hispanics who have shaped and strengthened the fabric of our Union. They have enriched every aspect of our national identity with traditions that stretch across centuries and reflect the many ances tries that comprise the Hispanic community. All commands are encouraged to expand their awareness of Hispanic heritage through programs, exhibits, publi cations, and participation in military and commu nity events. For more information about the history of Hispanics in the Navy, visit http://www.history. navy.mil/special%20high lights/hispanic/hispanicindex.htm. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 NS Mayport Welcomes New Chief To MessFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport and its tenant commands welcomed nearly 70 new Chief Petty Officers (CPO) to their messes during several pinning ceremo mies around base on Sept. 13. NS Mayport host ed a pinning ceremo ny at the base Chapel in conjunction with COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt, EOD and NBHC Mayport. During the event, the 11 newly appointed chiefs were ceremoniously pinned to the rank of CPO by family members and fellow chiefs. The ceremony was moving, said Chief Master-at-Arms Jason Pavlica. It just let me know that I made it. Putting on the uniform, watching friends and fam ily and other fellow chiefs in the crowd all the years of hard work paid off and I had arrived in the chiefs mess. This Navy tradition dates back to when the CPO pay-grade was cre ated in 1893. -Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport CMDCM Bob White shakes the hand of newly pinned Chief Master-at-Arms Jeremy Aldrich during a Chief pinning ceremony held at the Base Chapel on Sept. 13. -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Culinary Specialist Linda A. Colter is pinned by her mother, husband and daugh ter during the CPO pinning ceremony at the Base Chapel.-Photo by Paige GnannNewly pinned Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Ryan M. Waller walks through side boys after entering the Chiefs Mess during the pinning ceremony.-Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyA Chief Select from a NS Mayport helicopter squadron kneels so that family members can reach his collars during a pinning ceremony held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Sept. 13.-Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyA Chief Select from a NS Mayport helicopter squadron is pinned during a Chief pinning ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Sept. 13.-Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Petty Officer Selectees gather at the Veterans Memorial Wall to honor the Chiefs that came before them during Chiefs Pride Day on Sept. 8.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 5 -Photo by Marcus L. StanleyChief (select) Aviation Electronics Technician Gregory Harris prepares to hoist the National Ensign during colors at Naval Station Mayports 9/11 memorial ceremony. NS Mayport Remembers 9/11From StaffMore than 100 service members and civilians filled the NS Mayports Memorial Park to remem ber the thousands of victims of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall spoke to the crowd about the horrible events that unfolded that day and why it is important never to forget the attack on the United States and its citizens. Afterwards, Chief Petty Officer Selects read a timeline of events of the day, including the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93. They went on to recount the thousands of lives lost in the Global War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan. In honor of all first responders, those who served our country and all who lost their lives on September 11th 2001; our nation stands tall to honor you and still 11 years later, America has not forgotten and We SHALL NEVER FORGET!, concluded Chief Avation Maintenance Administrationman Marilyn Buford. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Master-at-Arms Joshua Cox holds a salute as the American Flag is raised during colors.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Helicopter) Matt Haydu reads a timeline of events of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Boatswains Mate Jessica M Curry waits to sound a bell as the names of fallen Chief Petty Officers are read out loud during the 9/11 memorial ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wes McCall talks to service members and civilians who attended a memorial service sponsored by CPO Selects in remembrance of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.-Photo by Paige GnannEmergency response personnel from Naval Station Mayport put their hands over their hearts during morning colors at the 9/11 memorial ceremony.

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Website Launched To Support Carney Sailors Forward Deploying To RotaFrom Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Public AffairsTo ease the transition process, a new website is available to Sailors and families who are slat ed to soon be forward deployed to Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota, Spain, Navy officials announced Sept. 16. Lets Move to NAVSTA Rota, Spain, a Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) and Naval Station Rota collabora tion, was designed to give Sailors and family mem bers the opportunity to become more familiar with NAVSTA Rota and the surrounding areas. It offers information, pho tos and videos to familiar ize Sailors with their new duty station and better prepare them for a suc cessful transition. While the site should be helpful to anyone tran sitioning there, it was developed to be a onestop shop for families and Sailors aboard the four destroyers that will soon be forward deployed to Rota, said Capt. Frank Dowd, SURFLANT Forward Deployed Naval Force Rota project lead. We worked closely with Rota leaders and service providers there in devel oping the site to ensure the information is not only accurate, but that it really addresses the topics these folks want and need to know about. The four Arleigh Burkeclass guided-missile destroyers headed for Rota include three from Norfolk: USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and USS Porter (DDG 78), along with USS Carney (DDG 64), from Mayport, Fla. To support Sailors and families as they prepare for the transition to Spain, a joint Rota-SURFLANT team has worked closely with 6th Fleet leadership to prepare a comprehen sive slate of informationgathering opportunities. These include a four-day visit to Norfolk in June for group briefings and one-on-one discussions with Sailors, updating and issuing a new print and electronic Rota Welcome Aboard brochure, and the recently unveiled website. The diverse site offers nine different tabs, or topic areas, which lead to more than 250 infor mational websites, more than 350 photos and videos to show what the housing, the base and the local area looks like. There are also nearly 500 Frequently Asked Questions, or FAQs, cat egorized by topic area, displayed to help answer typical questions ser vice members and their families might have about moving to the area. It also features contact information so Sailors can ask questions and address any concerns they might have. Family members and Sailors can call or email Rota experts with ques tions and concerns spe cific to them, said Chief Mass Communications Mikel Bookwalter, Rotas deputy public affairs offi cer. We want this website to prompt and provide for two-way communica tion to provide a prompt response or open up an ongoing dialogue, if it is a complicated issue, Bookwalter explained, Rotas leadership includes seasoned experts in numerous topic areas, from the local community and Morale Welfare and Recreation, to housing, health care and the local schools. Regardless of the concern, there is some one available here that can respond to your ques tions, via email, to ease your transition. To help prepare for the move, the website offers a Move Planning tab containing numerous check lists from pet clearance and screening informa tion to shipping house hold goods, from ship ping the right automobile to things to know before you go. The Housing tab links to different housing floor plans and photos of on-base and off-base housing. Sailors can also find temporary lodging information and an early housing application link to help service mem bers with their housing needs prior to arriving to NAVSTA Rota. The website also offers a Health care tab that provides information on the NAVSTA Rota hos pital, off-base hospitals and health care facilities, the Exceptional Family Member Program and TRICAREs Overseas Program. For dependents, the Family Support tab leads to childrens school information, childcare services and programs, counseling programs, Human Resources Office and employment oppor tunities information as well as commissary infor mation and youth ser vices such as Scouts and sports. Other tabs include offduty activities offered by Morale, Welfare and Recreation, command information and contacts, ombudsman information, Rota and Spain informa tion for places to go and things to do, like beach locations and transporta tion alternatives. From Spanish food to flamenco, from the near by beach to bullfighting, the website includes a wealth of data and capti vating images for deploy ing service members and their families to get a head-start in their move preparations to NAVSTA Rota. Plans for the site include continuously updated FAQs, more vid eos and enhanced firstperson accounts of life in Rota. To visit the Lets Move to NAVSTA Rota, Spain website, click on http:// www.public.navy.mil/ surflant/hq/Pages/ RotaMove.aspx NAVSTA Rota: http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/ regions/cnreurafswa/ installations/ns_rota.html NAVSTA Rota Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ USNavalStationRota The four Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers headed for Rota include three from Norfolk: USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and USS Porter (DDG 78), along with USS Carney (DDG 64), from Mayport, Fla. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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USS De Wert Remembers Tragedy Of 9/11 USS De Wert PAOFrequently Sailors are asked, Why did you join the military? Today each crew member was able to take time out of their day to ponder the answer to that deep, yet commonly asked question. Sailors gathered on the mess decks of USS De Wert (FFG 45) for the remembrance of 9/11. During his speech, USS De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, reminded each crew member of that tragic day. Sailors read through a timeline of the events of that day. There were whisperings throughout the tables reminiscing of their locations when the tow ers were hit. Sailors who joined the Navy this year at the age of 18 were just entering their first year of elementary school when the terrorist attacks hap pened. Those Sailors, whose childhoods were marked by the Global War on Terror, made a conscious decision to volunteer to fight for our freedom. Among those Sailors is Seaman Ramunno who joined USS De Werts family on Aug. 25. He volun teered to create a video to play at the ceremony that displayed the devas tating pictures from the scene in New York, over laid with the soundtrack of Heaven and a note from a little girl who lost her dad in 9/11. On Sept. 11, 2001, I was in English class sitting with my friends, Seaman Ramunno recalled. The phone rang to which my teacher answered and within seconds tears rushed down her face and she let the phone fall as she walked toward the television. That moment stuck with my forever as we all began to watch the news in fear. Within hours my classroom was empty with the exception of only a few of us. That night at home was morbid and dark. From that moment on, pride and patriotism led me to where I am today, a 19-year-old Sailor on board USS De Wert. -Photo by Ensign Kierstin King The crew listens as Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, speaks about the ter rorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 during a memorial ceremony held aboard the ship. USS De Wert is currently deployed with Coalition Task Force (CTF) 508 in support of antipiracy operations within the Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin. Chief of Naval Personnel Seeks Nominations For 2013 CSADD Chapter of the Year AwardsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsUnit commanders are encouraged to nominate outstanding chapters of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) to be recognized as sea and shore chapters of the year, according to NAVADMIN 229/13 released September 10. CSADD is a peer influ ence social group meant to encourage Sailors 18 to 25 years old to com bat destructive behavior through a culture of ship mates helping shipmates. CSADD also serves to build leadership skills in young Sailors. CSADD chapters throughout the Navy are finding creative and fun ways to help our young Sailors make right deci sions, and their efforts are paying off, said Rear Admiral Sean Buck, direc tor of the 21st Century Sailor Office (N17). The chapter of the year awards recognize chapters that have gone above and beyond in fostering a cli mate of responsible deci sion making in our Navy, giving our Sailors tools needed to face the chal lenges of the twenty-first century while preserving the skills and talents they bring to the fight. According to the NAVADMIN, the CSADD Chapter of the Year awards were established to recognize the positive social interaction, leader ship and decision making demonstrated through CSADD efforts, which employ a variety of com munication tools and social networking estab lished and sustained by the chapters. Since the awards were established in 2010, one sea-based chapter and one shore-based chap ter were recognized as chapters of the year. For 2013, the categories are expanded to include two sea-based chapters, one large chapter and one small, and two shorebased chapters, one from an installation command and one from a training command. The NAVADMIN pro vides detailed guidance to commanders on sub mitting a nomination. All registered active duty, Reserve Component and Reserve Officers Training Corps Unit CSADD chap ters are eligible; however, only activities and suc cesses that occurred in fiscal year 2013 shall be included. The deadline for sub missions by command ers to their appropriate regional commanders is October 1, 2013. Regional commanders must mail or email their submissions no later than November 1, 2013. Results will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 7

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UNITAS Exercise Wraps Up In ColombiaFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from 15 partner nations con cluded UNITAS 2013, the 54th annual multina tional maritime exercise, Sept. 15 in Cartagena, Colombia. Hosted this year by the Colombian navy, UNITAS included naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, the United Kingdom and the United States, with observers from Belize, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico. UNITAS, the longestrunning exercise of its type in the world, has evolved and now includes training for many of the threats encountered in the 21st-century maritime environment, along with essential seamanship and navigational skills that are core competencies for maritime services in the Americas. During 10 days at sea, 19 ships conducted a full spectrum of maritime operations, includ ing electronic warfare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface war fare and maritime inter diction operations. U.S. 4th Fleet was rep resented by USS Rentz (FFG 46) and other naval units, including Patrol Squadron 10 (VP-10) and Destroyer Squadron 40. This was a robust schedule of events, packed with a myriad of warfare areas that stressed the multi-national forces and their ability to interoperate and work together towards com mon goals, said Cmdr. Lance Lantier, the com manding officer of the Rentz. Rentz could not have been prouder to repre sent the United States as the sole U.S. Navy ship to participate in UNITAS, and we could not be prouder to have success fully completed all events with enthusiasm and dev astating firepower, he said. Any ship invited to participate in this robust exercise in the future should be excited at the opportunity. The immediate pur pose of the exercise was to train participating forces in a variety of high-end maritime scenarios to test command and con trol of forces at sea, while operating as a multina tional force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. The training objec tives of each one of the participating navies were incorporated during sev eral planning confer ences conducted before the exercise, allowing this years UNITAS to pro vide effective training to increase interoperabil ity while supporting the training requirements of all participating nations, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the command er of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. At the same time, the intense training resulted in coalition building, mul tilateral security coop eration and promoting friendship, professional ism and mutual under standing among the par ticipating partner nations. UNITAS is undoubt edly a top-shelf training opportunity, but it much more than that, Harris said. UNITAS builds last ing friendships, bonds and confidence among the participants, so when we are called to respond to a region or global crisis, we can do so as a coor dinated and experienced team. The next UNITAS exer cise is scheduled for summer 2014. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Rentz (FFG 46) conduct boarding and search training aboard the Canadian navy destroyer HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280) during the multinational maritime exercise UNITAS 2013 off the coast of Cartegena, Colombia. DoD Announces Missile Defense Siting StudyFrom American Forces Press ServicePursuant to the fiscal year 2013 National Defense Authorization Act, the Defense Department has initiated a study to evaluate five candi date sites in the continental United States for the potential future deployment of addition al ground-based interceptors, Pentagon officials announced Sept. 12. Two missile defense sites with long-range interceptor missiles already are active at Fort Greely, Alaska, and Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Today, these sites provide protection for the United States against limited intercontinental ballistic missile attacks, officials said. In response to a congres sional requirement, we are evaluating several sites in the continental United States for a potential future deployment of additional Ground-based Interceptors, or GBIs, said Navy Vice Adm. James D. Syring, director of the Missile Defense Agency. While the administra tion has not made a decision to build another missile defense facility in the U.S. for homeland defense, if a decision were to be made in the future to construct a new site, completing the required site study and environmental impact statement would shorten the timeline required to build such a site. Completing the mandatory siting study and the associ ated follow-on environmen tal impact statement would decrease the time necessary to build a site if a decision is made to do so, officials said. An environmental impact study would take 18 to 24 months to com plete once the siting study is finished, they added. A small Defense Department team will visit each candidate site to obtain information on basic infrastructure, includ ing the electrical power sup ply, water resources, transpor tation access and other areas for assessing the suitability of a potential site. All of the sites are on fed eral land and are operated by the Defense Department, the National Guard or both, officials said. They are: Fort Drum, N.Y.; Camp Ethan Allen Training Site, Vt.; Naval Air Station Portsmouth SERE Training Area, Maine; Camp Ravenna Joint Training Center, Ohio; Fort Custer Training Center, Mich. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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4th Fleet Talks Suicide Prevention4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Maritime Operations Center direc tor for U.S. 4th Fleet spoke to suicide prevention coordinators from vari ous commands Sept. 12 at the base galley in recog nition of National Suicide Prevention Month. Capt. Chuck Nygaard, who volunteered on a sui cide hot line in the early 1990s while attending the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., brought a unique perspective to the discus sion. Before starting gradu ate school, he was a divi sion officer aboard ship, responsible for 25 to 30 people, Nygaard recalled. Once classes started, he was responsible only for himself. It was quite an adjust ment, so I talked to my minister about it, and he suggested I volun teer at this suicide hot line, so that is what I did, Nygaard said. The experience helped him develop a much greater acceptance for people and an apprecia tion for the problems that they face. There were many valuable lessons that I learned there that I took with me in my Navy career, Nygaard said. It real ly helps me talk to and understand Sailors. Among those attending the event were suicideprevention representa tives from SERVMART, Helicopter Maritime Squadron 48, the Fleet and Family Support Center and the base cha pel. You guys are first responders, and I applaud you, Nygaard said, noting that the Navy has changed since he began his career. Sailors no longer live on board ships, he said. When they live in ships, it is easier for leader ship to be aware of what is going on, and if there are indicators. Now that a majority of junior Sailors live in barracks, they are not around leadership and co-workers as much as before. The change makes a suicide-prevention coor dinators job much more challenging, Nygaard said. Amie McKague, the counseling and advo cacy program manager with the Fleet and Family Support Center here, said it was important for Sailors to know about the services her organization offers, including mar riage counseling, finan cial counseling and help adjusting after deploy ments. Problems in these areas are some of the common causes of sui cide, she said. Each year, Americas armed forces recognize September as Suicide Prevention Month. According to the Department of the Navy, suicide is one of the leading causes of death among Sailors. This years theme is Thrive in your Community, encourag ing Sailors to work togeth er as commands, units, installations or other groups to contribute to projects that benefits others. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenCapt. Chuck Nygaard, the Maritime Operations Center director for U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks to suicide pre vention coordinators Sept. 12 aboard Naval Station Mayport in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Month. Nygaard, who volunteered on a suicide hot line while attending the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey, Calif., spoke to the group about how the experi ence helped him appreciate the problems that people face. Logistics Center Director Thinks Of Others Right Up To His RetirementU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet public affairsThe captain sat by two tables in a snug passage way at 4th Fleet head quarters here. As people passed by, he casually asked if they needed any uniform items. Capt. Ian Pollitt, the director of the 4th Fleets Logistics Readiness Center, was holding a uniform sale, with all pro ceeds going to benefit the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and anything not sold to be donated to the base thrift store. In the middle of the sale, Pollitt was interrupt ed by a lieutenant com mander with a missionrelated dilemma. The captains tone shifted, and his choice of words became precise. He was confident and compe tent in his knowledge and advice. Just as a uniform sale is not a typical scene for a Navy headquarters, Pollitt who was scheduled to retire Sept. 16 in an out door ceremony near the entrance to the naval sta tion was not a typical senior officer. Hes very smart and articulate and sticks to the rules, said Hector Correa, the readiness centers deputy director, who has worked for Pollitt for the past two years. Hes also very down to earth and approachable. Hes the most fair CO Ive ever seen, Correa continued. Peers seek his advice, yet Pollitt remains a humble man. Pollitt said he came up with the idea for the uni form sale, which he held Sept. 12, when he real ized that after almost 25 years of service, he wont be needing uniforms anymore. By holding the sale, he hoped to support Sailors and encourage others to do the same. His retirement may have been days away, but his desire to do things above and outside of whats expected had not wavered. Even when Pollitt was just a boy, he was doing things differently. A native of Inglewood, Calif., Pollitt spent six years of his childhood on a sailboat, but even with out formal schooling, his education was not lack ing, he said. In fact, he tested two grades above his age group when he eventually enrolled in tra ditional school at age 12. Theres a lot of time to read on a sailboat, so my English scores were through the roof, he recalled. Math wasnt bad either. I saw my dad using the sextant, navigat ing by the stars, marking our position and course on the chart and asked him to teach me how to do it. When his father said he would have to learn the decimal system, the son accomplished that in two days. Pollitts path led him to Harvard University, from which he graduated cum laude. It is the best, and thats what I wanted, Pollitt said. Ive always sought the greatest possible challenge. said Pollitt. He received his commission through the NROTC pro gram in 1989. His career took him on seven deployments and led him to command of USS Thunderbolt (PC 12) and USS Klakring (FFG 42). On those assign ments, he was most proud of bringing everyone home that we left with, he said. Pollitt continued his formal education at the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College in Quantico, Va., and through Joint Professional Military Education, Phase II. For 4th Fleet, he was respon sible for logistics support to naval forces in the U.S. Southern Commands area of operation, which includes Central and South America. Of his many accom plishments, one of the most rewarding to Pollitt came out of the time he spent with the Joint Enabling Capabilities Command of U.S. Joint Forces Command. While he was serving as chief of plans for the Joint Deployable Teams, his team was called up to support Department of Defense disaster relief and humanitarian assis tance missions following the Haiti earthquake of 2010. Being on the ground in Haiti after the earthquake showed me how much DoD can do when we put our minds to it, Pollitt said. We saved thou sands of lives. After Pollitt retires, he and his wife, Catherine, will continue to live in St. Johns with their two chil dren, Eleanor, 13, and Nathaniel, 11. Correa predicted Pollitt will never really leave the Navy. He joined the St. Augustine Navy League so he could stay con nected, Correa said. He has a sailboat and loves to sail. He may have retired from the Navy, but he will always be a Sailor. -Photo by Lt. Megan DoonerCapt. Ian Pollitt, seated, reacts to a comment by Mike Smith, a retired naval officer who works as a contractor for U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and 4th Fleet, during a uniform sale Pollitt held for charity Sept. 12. Pollitt was 4th Fleet's Logistics Readiness Center director until he retired Sept. 16. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 9

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Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder: More Common Than You May RealizeNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport Perinatal Mood Disorder Support CounselorAccording to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwidewith an estimated 350 million affectedand is one of many symptoms that could indicate a form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMAD) in women. PMADs are a set of dis orders that can occur dur ing pregnancy and up to the first year postpartum. Other disorders that can be associated with PMAD include panic, obsessivecompulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress dis order and postpartum psychosis. PMAD has been identified in women of all ages, race, culture and financial status. Studies have shown that approximately 10-20 percent of women expe rience depression either during pregnancy or in the first 12 months post partum, yet less than 25 percent of Obstetrics (OB) and Gynecology (GYN) patients have had their diagnoses recognized. Despite the health risks and complications associated with mater nal depression, pregnant women and new mothers experiencing depression often do not get the treat ment they need due to fear of discussing mental health concerns with their primary care providers or the lack of education about depression. Military families are often faced with increased stressors and challenges due to frequent deploy ments, career decisions and family migration due to new duty assignments. The presence of these fac tors, to an expected mother, can be extremely over whelming and may have a direct impact on their partner as well, present ing the feelings of being overwhelmed, confused, angry and afraid. Screening and early intervention can pro tect the well-being of the mother, baby and entire family. If left untreated, PMAD can affect the mother and child bond, the childs physical health, emotional health and long-term behavior. Common symptoms of PMAD can include, but are not limited to, feel ings of loneliness, sad ness and helplessness; difficulty bonding with baby; anxiety, panic or excessive worry; fear of being left alone with baby; thoughts of hurting your self or those around you; frequent mood swings or crying; lack of interest in life or a previous history of depression, postpar tum depression or anxi ety. Delays in treatment can relate to a signifi cantly longer duration of PMAD. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport uses the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) as part of its screening process for depression and anxiety. It is a 10-item self-report questionnaire given to new obstetric patients. This process is repeated at 28 weeks and again dur ing their six week post partum visit. Based on answers provided, the test gives the health care pro vider an assessment tool to detect the presence of depression symptoms. Many military moms, and some dads, are accus tomed to being the sole caregiver and are not used to asking for help. It is vital for parents to know that resources are avail able to them at any time. Social support is essen tial to assure the mental health of women, chil dren and their families during pregnancy and postpartum. Social sup port networks include family, friends, peer groups and faith commu nities. Active-duty service members should contact their primary health care provider for assistance with counseling servic es and or treatment for depression or anxiety dis orders. Dependent family members should call the NBHC Mayport appoint ment line to schedule an appointment at 904-5424677. Counseling services are also available through Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) by contact ing 904-270-6600. NBHC Mayport is cur rently looking for moth ers that are interested in volunteering their time to assist with local support to other mothersin the Mayport areaaffected by perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Those interested are encour aged to contact Xiomara Lemmey, perinatal mood disorder support counselor and obstetrics clinic nurse manager assigned to NBHC Mayport, at 904270-4289 or by email: Xiomara.lemmey@med. navy.mil. Active duty members and their families are pro vided social support and parenting classes with assistance from NBHC Mayports New Parent Support Group. In addi tion, Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society pro vides a visiting nurse program to assist with basic parenting tips and educating new parents. To take advantage of this program, contact 904270-5418, ext. 1512. NBHC Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient pop ulationabout 163,000 active and retired sail ors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 11

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around trees to represent each Sailor who has com mitted suicide this year. Weve lost 32 Sailors to suicide this year; 30 active duty and 2 reserve, said Williams. Just one Sailor is too many. The host of the event, Fleet and Family Support Center, brought pam phlets and other reading material to give Sailors. They also welcomed sui cide prevention coordina tors from different com mands on base to the run. We want every Sailor to know that there is always someone to help them, said Williams. No one has to do it alone. There is Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy chaplains, and suicide prevention coordinators at every command. Williams added that the Navy is a family, and that suicide not only affects the one that has taken their own life, but every one else in close proxim ity to that person. Chief petty officer selectee assigned to Mayport showed their support by running together in formation while singing cadence. Its very motivating to see the support from the base and to see everyone come together for a good cause, said Chief (select) Master-at-Arms Jason Pavlica. This was a great way to meet people who are all standing together for the common interest of preventing suicide by educating ourselves. The Navy has desig nated its theme for this years National Suicide Prevention Month as Thrive in Your Community.From Page 1Fun Run -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyChief petty offier selectees assigned to Naval Station Mayport partcipate in a 5K run and 3K walk for suicide preven tion awareness. September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and the Navys 2013 theme is Thrive in Your Community. Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowl ing for active duty when they bring a non-active duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 2705377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburg er or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) Surfside Fitness class sched ule Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located ocean front behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equip ment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your workout to the next level. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox Gymnasium class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Community Events Oct. 26: Make a Difference Day 8 a.m.-1 p.m. True Blue Navy Family Benefactors has partnered with First Coast News to assist in Naval Station Mayports Lake Wonderwood Project. We are inviting volun teers from the Naval Station Mayport Community to assist in this event focusing on helping our base community. We will follow this event with our annu al Fall Fest. 270-5228 Oct. 26: Fall Fest 2013. 1-5 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pic tures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available. A variety of ven dors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked goodies, and more. Purchase your seasonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and depen dents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be noti fied Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Prizes for the winning team. 270-7205 Sept. 21: UFC 165-Jones vs. Gustafsson. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Sept. 27: Reggae Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering ban ner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 4: Freedom FridayFreaky Creepy Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 18: Freedom FridaySpooktacular Costume Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 19: Teen TripIce Skating at Jacksonville Ice and Sports Complex Departs 6 p.m.; returns no later than 11 p.m. Cost $15.00, open to ages 13-18. Permission slip required by Oct. 11. 2460347 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: Jacksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 2: Mess Lords Celebrity Chefs at Mayport Galley. 11-1 pm. A special lunchtime menu from celebrity chefs Sarah Simington, Hodad and Brian Duffy. This special lunchtime event is open to active duty personnel only. Lunch is free for those on a Galley meal plan; all other eligible Galley patrons pay $4.25. 270-5373. Oct. 2: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 4: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 6: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 11: Halloween Horror Nights at Universal. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $40.00. Sign up by Oct. 8. Oct. 14: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Oct. 16: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Oct. 7. Oct. 18: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Oct. 20: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Diego Chargers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 23: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 27: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Francisco 49ers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 13

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Proclamation Recognizes Navy Ombudsmen Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfight ers and their families, Williamson said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for their continued support. Our Sailors and their fam ilies would face a much more difficult task with out you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and wel fare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between command ing officers and the fami lies of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family mem bers with official informa tion and emergency assis tance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 mil lion annually. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast deployment support program man ager and ombudsman program coordina tor, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to rec ognize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the com mand support team, they make sure families know what resources are avail able to them, and help them adjust to the mili tary way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties. -Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region.Proclamation Signing Emphasizes National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a suicide preven tion awareness proclama tion on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation recognizes September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention throughout the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Williamson said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family members to suicide and these losses can be pre vented. It is our collective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including everyone in the Navy family, is key to the successful prevention of suicide. The proclamations theme highlights the importance of taking action as individuals and to recognize the impact of stressors in our day-today lives, as well how to develop protective factors against stress and suicide. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast assistant suicide prevention outreach coordinator, there is no better way to have a suc cessful program than ensuring suicide preven tion information and indi cators are available to all personnel. Suicide continues to be a major issue for all hands, she said. Our goal is to reduce the num ber of these tragedies through education and awareness campaigns, and we hope this procla mation will go a long way in those efforts. One of the latest tools the Navy is using toward suicide prevention efforts is the NavyTHRIVE cam paign, which encour ages Sailors, commands, families and civilians to empower themselves by taking personal respon sibility for their health, wellness and growth. The program is a new approach to resilience and it really emphasizes self-empowerment and growth, Parker said. The goal is not for Sailors to merely overcome adversity, but to come back from it stronger than they were before. In addition to those efforts, the region imple mented an aggressive suicide prevention coor dinator (SPC) training program in September 2011 that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 300 newly-qualified coordinators throughout the region and more than 1,700 worldwide. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) educational services and See Suicide, Page 15 14 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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work and family life spe cialists assist command SPCs with training in the areas of stress manage ment, conflict manage ment, parent education, anger management and suicide prevention. So far this fiscal year, command SPCs and FFSC person nel have conducted more than 1,200 training ses sions attended by more than 43,000 people. The program has been instrumental in raising awareness and get ting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, Parker said. Each year, hundreds of DoD personnel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and co-workers only knew what to look for and took action, she added. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about suicide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is noth ing. For more information about NavyTHRIVE, visit http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/21st_Century_ Sailor/suicide_preven tion/spmonth/Pages/ default.aspx.FFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, devel opment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already hap pened, but to instill hope that things can change. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 CNRSE Visits NS Mayport FFSC-Photo by Paige GnannRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, shakes hands with acting Fleet and Family Support Center Director Master Chief Electricians Mate Carl Stewart during a visit to the department on Sept. 13. Williamson was at NS Mayport to tour the base and attend the Chief Petty Officer pinning ceremony. Also pictured from left, FFSC Deputy Director Amie McKague, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, and CMDCM Bob White.From Page 14Suicide Simpson Welcomes CNRSE Back-Photo by Paige GnannRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, looks at ease on the bridge of USS Simpson (FFG 56) as he talks with the ships Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Christopher Follin, and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Kenneth Anderson. Williamson served as commanding officer of Simpson from May 2003-January 2005. He took the opportunity to reconnect with the ship and take a look at his old stomping grounds during his visit to Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 13. Help Clean Up Mayport Beach, JettiesFrom NS Mayport EnvironmentalNS Mayport Environmental is solicit ing volunteers in sup port of the 28th Annual International Coastal Cleanup, to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on Sept. 21 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion), near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. Community service hours may be earned from this event. Pre-registration is not required. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. -Photo submittedA family volunteers at last years International Coastal Cleanup event at NS Mayports Jetties. Volunteers are needed for this years event, which will be on Sept. 21. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 15

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16 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 prayers are with the victims and their families, he said. I have complete confidence in our first responders, and I continue to be completely focused on this very difficult situation. Mabus pledged his sup port in a video message to those affected by the shoot ing. Earlier in the day, during a news conference at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Mabus announced he had con ferred SECNAV Designee sta tus on injured personnel. The Secretary of the Navy Designee Program provides special eli gibility for medical and dental care from naval medical facili ties for patients affected by the shooting. The Navys top military officer also expressed condolences to the victims and their families on behalf of himself and his wife, Darleen. Our team of Sailors and Navy civilians at the Navy Yard deserve our care and concern at this time, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert said. I applaud the efforts of all who immediate ly responded to this course of events in order to care for the injured victims and ensure the safety of our personnel. Navy officials have estab lished an emergency family support task force to assist vic tims, workers and families with related issues. The task force is led by Navy Vice. Adm. William D. French, commander of the Navys Installations Command. That support includes several phone numbers established by the installations Warfighter and Family Support Center for families seeking information about their loved ones who work at the Navy Yard. The numbers, which can also be used to request additional services, are: 1-855-677-1755, 202-433-6151, 202-433-9713, 202-433-3234 or 202-685-6019. Also, critical incident stress management and counseling services are available at 1-800222-0364. Family services counsel ors and chaplains also have been called into action, Navy officials said. Teams of chap lains throughout the region are standing by to provide assis tance, as needed, over the next several days. Those in need of chaplain support can contact the Warfighter and Family Support Center at 202-433-6151 or 202-433-9713. Agencies investigating the incident include the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, D.C. Metro Police, and the FBI has the lead, officials said. Aaron Alexis, a former Navy reservist, is alleged to have been the shooter. Alexis was killed in a gun duel with police.From Page 1WreathJU Military Appreciation Game Come out Sept. 21 to watch the Jacksonville University Dolphins take on the Warner University Royals for their military appreciation football game. Kickoff is at 1 p.m. and admission is free to active and retired military personnel with I.D. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Sept. 30, from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve chicken pot pie, broccoli, salad, and dessert. Free I-TEXTS To Support Your Greater Jax Area USO-Opt In Want to help your Greater Jacksonville Area USO to continue its mis sion of supporting troops and families? Here is a free opportunity to do so. For those of you with cell phones and unlimited texting, please opt-in to I-TEXTS. TEXT: USOJAX, YOUR ZIP CODE, AND YOUR EMAIL TO: 70000 Youll receive a confir mation text with a link to build your profile and receive only the deals that interest you (restaurants, sporting goods, etc). Checker Yellow Cab Of Jacksonville-Rate Discounts The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is proud to announce a new partnership with Checker Yellow Cab of Jacksonville to support troops and families. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes divi sion, and medals to all finishers. Southern Womens Show The Southern Womens show will be at the Prime Osborn Convention Center on Oct. 17-20. Come on out to enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health informa tion, along with beauty and lifestyle informa tion. For more informa tion please visit: www. southernwomensshow. com. Mayport and NAS JAX USO Centers are sell ing tickets for $5 each/ cash only. Tickets will also be available for purchase through the ITT office at Kings Bay. Military Spouse Vendor Show Looking for holiday gift ideas? Are you a military spouse with a small busi ness? If you answered yes to either of these questions, the Military Spouse Vendor Show at the Mayport USO on November 2 from 9 a.m.3 p.m. is for you. Please email milwivesbusines sandevents@gmail.com for more information or to become a vendor. Vendor slots fill fast, so sign up today. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game season. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their tran sition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more informa tion, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOThursday, Sept. 19 Culinary author Jeffrey Spear will speak at the next Beaches Museum Whistle Talk about his new book, First Coast Heritage Cookbook at 6:30 p.m., in the Beaches Museum Chapel, 505 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville Beach. The lecture will be preceded by the Annual Member Meeting of the Beaches Area Historical Society at 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend the meeting. At a recep tion following the talk, Spear will conduct a tast ing of some of his recipes the book at the Beaches Museum, 381 Beach Blvd., located 2 two blocks east of the cha pel. Admission to the talk and reception is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. For information about the book or talk, please visit BeachesMuseum.org. R.S.V.P. at 904-241-5657 or by e-mail at info@ BeachesMuseum.org. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Attendees will make their own 55 gallon plastic rain barrels to take home. You will learn how to connect a rain barrel to a rain garden and learn some important infor mation on water conser vation. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per per son to make a rain barrel, $5 for attendance only (no rain barrel) Pre-payment and registration required for barrel. Payment must be received by Monday, Sept. 16th. Make check to DCOHAC and send to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N. McDuff Ave, Jax., Fl 32254. You can register with credit card at http:// rainbarrel92013.event brite.com. Seating is lim ited to 35 pre-paid regis trations. No walk-ins for make and take. For ques tions, call 904-255-7450. Saturday, Sept. 21 The American Heart Association First Coast is proud to announce the 2013 Heart Walk will be held at Metropolitan Park. Festivities begin at 8 a.m., Walk begins at 9 a.m. Dollars raised through the Heart Walk fund critical research, education and community programs to help combat heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 4 killers of American men and women. For fur ther information about the 2013 Heart Walk or to make a donation, call 904256-5721 or visit www. firstcoastheartwalk.org. This interpretive pro gram at 2 p.m. explores the snakes that are native to Florida and live at the Talbot Islands State Parks. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., announc es the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza at 10 a.m. The opening of the Sculpture Garden, located in the front lawn of the Art Connections building, marks the com pletion of the Landscape Enhancement Project, which launched in September 2012, and includes the renovation of the entire Riverside Avenue portion of The Cummer campus. The Sculpture Garden opens with its inaugural exhibition, The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti fea turing works on loan by the St. Augustine-based sculptor. Torcoletti will visit The Cummer for the Community Opening on Saturday, September 21 to host a demonstration of his working methods. This free event will fea ture live music and artmaking activities. Food and drink will be available for purchase from Chefs Garden, Corner Taco and Le Petit Cheri Cupcakery. Saturday, Sept. 21-22 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a weekend event to commemorate the part that Fort Clinch played in the Spanish-American War. The event is held on Sept. 21 from 9 a.m.5 p.m. and Sept. 22 from 9 a.m.1 p.m. The fort will be filled with uniformed interpreters and participants will also be able to enjoy exhibits of the armament and period military equipment. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional infor mation, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Saturday, Sept. 28 The Florida Park Service is working hard to remove invasive exot ic plants which are not native to our natural eco systems. These outsid ers are overtaking natu ral areas within our parks and displacing native and endangered vegetation. This is leading to a loss of natural habitat utilized by beloved Florida wildlife including the gopher tor toise, bobcat and whitetailed deer. In honor of National Public Lands Day, come learn about the impact these plants are having, what we are doing to combat them, and what you can do at home to help. Join AmeriCorps mem bers and park staff at 10 a.m. for an informative talk followed by a nature walk highlighting some amazing native species and an opportunity to help remove some invad ers. Afterwards, stick around for kid-friendly invasive plant games and bring your own pic nic lunch to enjoy on the lawn. The event is free and open to all ages. Please wear comfortable sturdy shoes and bring sunscreen, bug spray, a water bottle and a snack or lunch. Cameras, bin oculars and field guides are recommended also. Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida will present their first 5K open to the public in the history of the council to kick-off a 10-year anniversary cel ebration at 5 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida Lace It UpScholarship Program. Registration is open to the first 1200 partici pants. Registration is $45 through Sept. 24, and $55 through Sept. 28. Online registration ends on Sept. 24. For more information, www.gotrnefl.org, www.facebook. com/gotrnefl, @gotrnefl. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com -Photo by Paige GnannChief Petty Officer (CPO) Selects from Naval Station Mayport sing Anchors Away during a CPO pinning ceremony on Sept. 13 at the Base Chapel. Friends, family and shipmates joined together in congratulating the new Chiefs for their advancement. See more photos, Page 4.Wreath At Navy Memorial Honors Shooting VictimsFrom American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel and other senior Defense Department leaders will lay a wreath at the U.S. Navy Memorial plaza Sept. 17 to honor the victims of the Sept. 16 shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard. The wreath was placed adjacent to The Lone Sailor, who represents all people who have ever served, are serving now, or are yet to serve in the United States Navy, Pentagon officials said. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama has ordered that U.S. flags be flown at half-staff through sundown Sept. 20 to honor the victims. Hagel issued a state ment in the aftermath of the shooting spree that authorities said killed 12 people and wounded at least eight others. The suspected shooter was killed in an encounter with security personnel, officials said. This is a tragic day for the Department of Defense, the national capital area, and the nation. My thoughts and prayers are with the victims of this outrageous act of violence, their families, and all those affected by todays events, Hagel said in his statement. I am grateful for the swift response of federal and local law enforce ment, and for the profes sionalism of DOD personnel at the Navy Yard complex, the secretary con tinued. The Department of Defense will continue to offer its full assistance in the investigation of this terrible and senseless violence. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said he was deeply shocked and saddened by the shooting. Our thoughts and New Chiefs Join Mayport Goat Locker Mayport Runs To Help Others-Photo by MCC William TownsendRunners set out on a 5K Fun Run on Sept. 10 in support of September as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and Patriots Day memoralizing the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.NEX Mayport Sponsors 1st Chili CookoffFrom NEXThe NEX is inviting all Mayport commands to compete in the 1st annual Last Command Standing Chili Cookoff to be held in front of the Main Exchange on Oct 25. This event is opened to all departments and tenant com mands based at Mayport. This also includes Family Readiness Groups. More than one department from the same command can enter. In addition to competing for the best chili on base, each department or group may use this opportunity to raise funds by selling their chili to custom ers from 11 a.m. -3 p.m. Each group will determine what price they want to sell their chili for. Side dishes and drinks may also be sold but will not be part of the judging. Judging will begin at noon but you may setup as early as you like. A panel of 5 judges will select the three best tasting chili entries. The NEX will award 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes to the winners. Each group that enters the contest will receive a certifi cate from the NEX that they can use at a later date for up to 5 percent off their total purchase for their Christmas party or other function (discount not to exceed $250. Some exclusions do apply). To enter, contact Pam Haley at pamela.haley@nexweb.org prior to Oct 11. NPASE Det SoutheastMore than 70 Sailors and family members participated in a 5-kilometer run and 3-kilometer walk aboard Naval Station Mayport to raise aware ness about suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and commands across the Navy have been providing general military training and events to raise awareness. With the run today, we want to help bring to the forefront the flags and indications that may lead to someone inter vening in a case where a person may be think ing about committing suicide, said Martina Williams, fleet and family advocacy program educator. On board Mayport 32 yellow ribbons are tied See Fun Run, Page 12 See Wreath, Page 16

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror School has started. Have those homework battles begun? Avoid those nasty battles with five strategies to help your children get the most out of their study time. Each strategy begins with a question about your child. Your answer should help you to identify your childs overall strengths and weaknesses when it comes to studying. Getting Started: Does your child dive right in or get stuck at the begin ning? Many children need help with planning so get them started on an assignment by breaking it into smaller parts. For example, if your child has four chapters to read, suggest tackling one or two in the first study session. The others can be saved for later. By decreasing the initial task, it may be easier to begin. Schedule as many sessions as necessary to complete the entire assignment. Knowing that part of the assignment is already completed will make it easier for completing the overall requirement. Managing Time: Does your child manage time well? The key to time management is planning. Help your child map out study sessions in writing so the study plan is vis ible, much like a builder uses blueprints. If the school doesnt provide a planner, buy one. Then demonstrate its use! Even though it may look userfriendly to you, if you have never used one, it might be initially tricky for your child to figure out how to write in assignments or projects. Also as part of the planning, assist with finding the right time for study sessions. Does right after school work best? Maybe after a snack? After dinner? Or maybe the sessions work better as mini-sessions? Evaluate different strat egies over a couple of weeks to determine which study strategy works best. Taking Notes: When you help your child study for a test, does he have notes from class? If not, why not? Trying to write word-for-word transcrip tions in class is nearly impossible. Some stu dents even those in high school still have trouble copying notes from the board, an overhead, or a power point. Suggest focusing on getting the key words and/or ideas down on paper. Then that night at home, encourage rewriting the notes and filling in the details that are still fresh from the lecture or class that day. This has the added benefit of looking at those notes a second time. Organizing Study: Is your child the organized type? If not, color-coded folders for each subject may provide some organization. Notes, handouts, classwork, and returned tests will go into that subjects folder so study time will not be taken up with looking for all the infor mation needed to study. But when it is time to study, where does your child study? Some chil dren do better in a com mon area like the kitch en table so that help is readily available. Other children like a quiet spot away from the hustle and bustle of family life. It is important to have a des ignated place and have at that place the materi als needed for most types of studying: highlight ers, note cards, sticky notes, pens, pencils, pen cil sharpener, notebook paper, a dictionary, and maybe a thesaurus. So now you that know where your child stud ies, ask how does your child study? Does he go over the questions at the end of each chapter the test will cover? Does he check out those high lighted boxes in his text that might be called Important Points or Keys to Understanding? What does he do with his class notes? Check out this next section on Reviewing the Material for a better understanding of how to use class notes as a study guide. Reviewing the Material: Does your child avoid reviewing course material until right before a test? Bad idea! Reviewing is one of the most important study skills! Each night prior to starting on that nights homework, your child should review what was done in class that day. He should look over his notes to fill in any blanks, correct misspellings, and highlight the main ideas of the lesson. Or if your child tells you there is no homework in a class for that night, then empha size that the review of the days lesson IS tonights homework. The next step is to review at regular intervals daily, weekly, every couple of weeks all of the material that is being covered, paying special attention to all the material that he has highlighted in his notes. Then when it is test time, the material is fresh! Getting Expert Help: Go to www.tutor.com/ military to get a profes sional tutor to help with math, science, social studies, and English from elementary through high school. These tutors are screened, certified, and background-checked. They only work with one student at a time. No exceptions. The tutor will make sure that your child understands the mate rial whether it is a single homework problem in 5th grade math, a unit test in social studies, or a quar ter exam in 18th Century British lit. Remind your child that getting the most out of a study session will bring many rewards, including more time for other activities, greater confidence, and better grades. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at Judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Avoiding Homework Battles With Your StudentJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingIt is the year 5013. Despite several hun dred World Wars, twelve Ice Ages, nine asteroid hits, three robot takeovers, seven alien inva sions, and an unfortunate but brief worldwide pro hibition on bacon; human beings have survived. The Earth, along with its sister colonies on Mars and Venus, is experienc ing her 177th recorded Period of Enlightenment a time of flourish ing advances in science, art, philosophy, culture, and, ever since the recent eradication of male pat tern baldness, cosmetol ogy. With the publics fasci nation with ancient his tory on an upswing, more and more young schol ars have chosen to study Archaeology, a science which had been some what neglected in recent centuries. One such aspiring archaeologist, Fizzeq 7.5, is the Principal Investigator of an ambi tious excavation that has captured the worlds attention. Mr. Fizzeq has embarked on a Phase III Data Recovery of an extensive site located at Sector 52b, formerly known as the Tinker Air Force base housing com plex in Oklahoma. Since the Great Ocean receded to prehistoric levels, evidence of complex ancient civilizations have been uncovered, dating back as early as the 21st Century. Although most material remains have eroded with time and environmental events, a curious substance known as plastic is conspicu ously present in the strata of Mr. Fizzeqs particular survey, shedding light on the ethnography of this ancient society. Shortly after breaking ground, the archeologi cal team uncovered an assemblage of brightly colored plastic arti facts indicating that the people of this period of Earths history were much smaller than the people of today. A veritable fleet of tiny little red cars and several hundred whimsi cally pastel colored houses, along with countless itty-bitty kitchenettes and eensy-weensy tool benches were unearthed all bearing the mark of the manufacturer, Little Tykes clearly indicating that the humanoids of this era were no taller than three feet. Also, a staggering array of plastic bottles littered the entire excavation site. Wasting no time in hav ing the remains tested to determine their origi nal contents, Mr. Fizzeq found that, although it is long been proven that the peoples of the 21st Century had an abun dance of easily accessible Age of Unreason Here Sooner Than You ThinkLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesHere is a hypotheti cal for you to consid er: As you are walking home one day you pass a crowd gathered in a circle around a man clearly in distress. Lets say he is showing all the signs of having cardiac distress, and perhaps even stops breathing. It is clear that he is in a life threaten ing emergency. In this crowd is a world reknown heart surgeon, but for the sake of our hypotheti cal, lets say our doctor doesnt know CPR. Then there is you, fully quali fied in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. In that moment, what does our victim need more? A brilliant, extensively trained, heart surgeon or someone that can extend his life even by a few minutes till an ambulance can arrive? The answer, I hope, is obvious. And in the answer also lies the rea son why our Navy spends so much time, resources and energy on making you and I aware of suicide and suicide prevention. A better topic to focus on this month I dont know, because September is officially Suicide Prevention Awareness Month in our nation. There are no shortages of statistics to draw upon to illustrate and empha sis the importance of this life threatening issue, but here is one that hits close to home. According to pentagon reports, for the second straight year there were more suicides than combat deaths in the Armed Forces of the United States. However, the reality is that suicide is a national problem plaguing civilian sectors equal ly as hard as military ones. In truth, because of our suicide prevention pro grams and resources, the Navy and by extension the DOD, may have bet ter success rates in pre vention. Statistics only take you so far though. Some experts in the field of suicide prevention suspect that our statistics our on the low side and only reveal the tip of the iceberg. Why? Because determining cause of death for officials can not always be 100 per cent ascertained. What was the cause of death for that single vehicle acci dent? How did that per son drown? Why did that individual fall? While it can be help ful to point to numbers to illustrate the scope and depth of the problem, personally I feel it only can go so far. Suicide by its very nature is very personal and traumatiz ing on all that are con nected to the individual even remotely. If we are looking to motivate and galvanize communities into awareness and con cern strictly through sta tistics I think we fail on some level. There is an old Jewish proverb that essentially says if you have saved even one life it is as if you have saved an entire world. This is a beautiful expression, cap turing the value of life on the singular level, not in broad statistics. The likely truth is that most who are reading this have been affected in some way, whether distantly or directly, by sui cide. And for those who havent been touched, the likely truth is one day you will be. In our Navy we have great prevention programs for the problem of suicide. We also have dedicated health care professionals that are trained in post vention care for those who are fortunate enough to survive a suicide attempt, but most of real life takes place between the lines. That is why we need people trained and equipped in intervention. We need people who are prepared, caring and capable to intervene in one critical moment. Not to solve all the problems of the world but to extend life one day to the next. In short, we need you. Most moments of life affirming and preserving encounters are going to happen in the barracks, galleys, deck plates, hangers, work spaces we dwell in. Medical, Chaplains, Fleet and Family and others are resources at your disposal but the problem of suicide in our culture is a community challenge and the solution will always be a community response. Here is a hypothetical for you to consider: As your walking home one day you meet a person whos life is at risk to sui cide. Do you know what to do? Save A World One Life At A TimeChap Darin Dunham CHSMWL Chaplain CHAPLAINSSee Unreason, Page 3

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MCPON Thanks Ombudsmen For ServiceFrom Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael StevensNavy Ombudsmen, Theresa and I would like to take some time to say thank you for your support and dedication that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. For the past 43 years, Ombudsmen have been an irreplaceable resource for our Sailors, while serving as an information link between com mand leadership and command families. As an Ombudsman, you work collaboratively with the com mand to maintain and sustain the morale and welfare of the commands service members, their families and single Sailors on active duty. As we all know, family readi ness is tied to mission readiness and having a strong family support structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to accomplish its missions. Your help successfully navigates the unique challenges of our life style and know that the job you do is immeasurable! Thank you, Ombudsmen, for your continued support and selfless dedication. Very Respectfully, MCPON and Theresa Stevens MCPON Michael Stevensfresh water, every bottle tested at the site con tained H2O. Even more puzzling was the discovery of a veritable plethora of plastic bags, each tied in a knot, containing petri fied canine fecal material, more commonly known as, Doggie Doo Doo. Mr. Fizzeq planned to further research why this tiny ancient culture felt the need to bag up and pre serve this naturally pro lific substance. After all, Everyone Poops. Other items found preserved in copious amounts: sensible foot wear labeled Crocs, beverage implements known as K-cups, Ikea furniture, Tupperwear containers, defunct television remotes, and molded plastic lawn furniture. But the most amazing discovery was found just beneath the excavations datum point. Deep in the ancient strata of one of the Tinker base houses lay the well-preserved remains of an ancient tool of communication, known as an iPhone. Mr. Fizzeq knew that, by extracting the data from the iPhone, he could effectively reveal a complete chronology and cultural analysis of 21st century humans that would blow the top off the archaeological world. However, exhaustive laboratory testing failed to produce anything Earth shattering, other than an acronymic language of colloquial terms such as idk lol srsly and vom. That, and sev eral dozen downloads of digital videos bearing the common tag twerk. Despite this disap pointment, Mr. Fizzeq went on to successfully finish his doctoral thesis, appropriately entitled, The Dimly-Lit Ages: An archeological analysis of 21st Century Culture. Get more wit and obser vations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.comFrom Page 2Unreason Navy Honors Hispanic American Heritage MonthFrom Navy Office of Diversity and InclusionThe Navy joins the nation Sept. 15 in cele brating Hispanic Heritage Month, which will be observed until Oct. 15. With a national theme of Hispanics: Serving and Leading Our Nation with Pride and Honor, the observance celebrates the histories, cultures, and contribu tions of Americans who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. According to 2010 data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics com prise 16.3 percent of the total United States population, or 50.5 mil lion people, forming our countys largest racial or ethnic minority. Additionally, it is project ed that by 2050, a quarter of the nations workforce will be Hispanic. Today, more than 58,000 Hispanic active duty and Reserve Sailors serve in the Navy, including five Hispanic flag officers and 216 Hispanic master chiefs. In his 2012 National Hispanic Heritage Month Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama stated that our Nations story would not be possible without generations of Hispanics who have shaped and strengthened the fabric of our Union. They have enriched every aspect of our national identity with traditions that stretch across centuries and reflect the many ances tries that comprise the Hispanic community. All commands are encouraged to expand their awareness of Hispanic heritage through programs, exhibits, publi cations, and participation in military and commu nity events. For more information about the history of Hispanics in the Navy, visit http://www.history. navy.mil/special%20high lights/hispanic/hispanicindex.htm. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 NS Mayport Welcomes New Chief To MessFrom StaffNaval Station Mayport and its tenant commands welcomed nearly 70 new Chief Petty Officers (CPO) to their messes during several pinning ceremo mies around base on Sept. 13. NS Mayport host ed a pinning ceremo ny at the base Chapel in conjunction with COMUSNAVSO/4thFlt, EOD and NBHC Mayport. During the event, the 11 newly appointed chiefs were ceremoniously pinned to the rank of CPO by family members and fellow chiefs. The ceremony was moving, said Chief Master-at-Arms Jason Pavlica. It just let me know that I made it. Putting on the uniform, watching friends and family and other fellow chiefs in the crowd all the years of hard work paid off and I had arrived in the chiefs mess. This Navy tradition dates back to when the CPO pay-grade was cre ated in 1893. -Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport CMDCM Bob White shakes the hand of newly pinned Chief Master-at-Arms Jeremy Aldrich during a Chief pinning ceremony held at the Base Chapel on Sept. 13. -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Culinary Specialist Linda A. Colter is pinned by her mother, husband and daughter during the CPO pinning ceremony at the Base Chapel.-Photo by Paige GnannNewly pinned Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Ryan M. Waller walks through sideboys after entering the Chiefs Mess during the pinning ceremony.-Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyA Chief Select from a NS Mayport helicopter squadron kneels so that family members can reach his collars during a pinning ceremony held at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Sept. 13.-Photo by MC2 Marcus StanleyA Chief Select from a NS Mayport helicopter squadron is pinned during a Chief pinning ceremony at Ocean Breeze Conference Center on Sept. 13.-Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Petty Officer Selectees gather at the Veterans Memorial Wall to honor the Chiefs that came before them during Chiefs Pride Day on Sept. 8.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 5 -Photo by Marcus L. StanleyChief (select) Aviation Electronics Technician Gregory Harris prepares to hoist the National Ensign during colors at Naval Station Mayports 9/11 memorial ceremony. NS Mayport Remembers 9/11From StaffMore than 100 service members and civilians filled the NS Mayports Memorial Park to remember the thousands of victims of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall spoke to the crowd about the horrible events that unfolded that day and why it is important never to forget the attack on the United States and its citizens. Afterwards, Chief Petty Officer Selects read a timeline of events of the day, including the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and Flight 93. They went on to recount the thousands of lives lost in the Global War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan. In honor of all first responders, those who served our country and all who lost their lives on September 11th 2001; our nation stands tall to honor you and still 11 years later, America has not forgotten and We SHALL NEVER FORGET!, concluded Chief Avation Maintenance Administrationman Marilyn Buford. -Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Master-at-Arms Joshua Cox holds a salute as the American Flag is raised during colors.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Helicopter) Matt Haydu reads a timeline of events of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.-Photo by Paige GnannChief Select Boatswains Mate Jessica M Curry waits to sound a bell as the names of fallen Chief Petty Officers are read out loud during the 9/11 memorial ceremony.-Photo by Paige GnannNS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wes McCall talks to service members and civilians who attended a memorial service sponsored by CPO Selects in remembrance of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.-Photo by Paige GnannEmergency response personnel from Naval Station Mayport put their hands over their hearts during morning colors at the 9/11 memorial ceremony.

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Website Launched To Support Carney Sailors Forward Deploying To RotaFrom Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet Public AffairsTo ease the transition process, a new website is available to Sailors and families who are slat ed to soon be forward deployed to Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota, Spain, Navy officials announced Sept. 16. Lets Move to NAVSTA Rota, Spain, a Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) and Naval Station Rota collabora tion, was designed to give Sailors and family mem bers the opportunity to become more familiar with NAVSTA Rota and the surrounding areas. It offers information, pho tos and videos to familiarize Sailors with their new duty station and better prepare them for a suc cessful transition. While the site should be helpful to anyone transitioning there, it was developed to be a onestop shop for families and Sailors aboard the four destroyers that will soon be forward deployed to Rota, said Capt. Frank Dowd, SURFLANT Forward Deployed Naval Force Rota project lead. We worked closely with Rota leaders and service providers there in devel oping the site to ensure the information is not only accurate, but that it really addresses the topics these folks want and need to know about. The four Arleigh Burkeclass guided-missile destroyers headed for Rota include three from Norfolk: USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and USS Porter (DDG 78), along with USS Carney (DDG 64), from Mayport, Fla. To support Sailors and families as they prepare for the transition to Spain, a joint Rota-SURFLANT team has worked closely with 6th Fleet leadership to prepare a comprehen sive slate of informationgathering opportunities. These include a four-day visit to Norfolk in June for group briefings and one-on-one discussions with Sailors, updating and issuing a new print and electronic Rota Welcome Aboard brochure, and the recently unveiled website. The diverse site offers nine different tabs, or topic areas, which lead to more than 250 infor mational websites, more than 350 photos and videos to show what the housing, the base and the local area looks like. There are also nearly 500 Frequently Asked Questions, or FAQs, cat egorized by topic area, displayed to help answer typical questions ser vice members and their families might have about moving to the area. It also features contact information so Sailors can ask questions and address any concerns they might have. Family members and Sailors can call or email Rota experts with ques tions and concerns spe cific to them, said Chief Mass Communications Mikel Bookwalter, Rotas deputy public affairs offi cer. We want this website to prompt and provide for two-way communica tion to provide a prompt response or open up an ongoing dialogue, if it is a complicated issue, Bookwalter explained, Rotas leadership includes seasoned experts in numerous topic areas, from the local community and Morale Welfare and Recreation, to housing, health care and the local schools. Regardless of the concern, there is some one available here that can respond to your questions, via email, to ease your transition. To help prepare for the move, the website offers a Move Planning tab containing numerous check lists from pet clearance and screening informa tion to shipping house hold goods, from ship ping the right automobile to things to know before you go. The Housing tab links to different housing floor plans and photos of on-base and off-base housing. Sailors can also find temporary lodging information and an early housing application link to help service mem bers with their housing needs prior to arriving to NAVSTA Rota. The website also offers a Health care tab that provides information on the NAVSTA Rota hos pital, off-base hospitals and health care facilities, the Exceptional Family Member Program and TRICAREs Overseas Program. For dependents, the Family Support tab leads to childrens school information, childcare services and programs, counseling programs, Human Resources Office and employment oppor tunities information as well as commissary infor mation and youth ser vices such as Scouts and sports. Other tabs include offduty activities offered by Morale, Welfare and Recreation, command information and contacts, ombudsman information, Rota and Spain informa tion for places to go and things to do, like beach locations and transporta tion alternatives. From Spanish food to flamenco, from the near by beach to bullfighting, the website includes a wealth of data and capti vating images for deploy ing service members and their families to get a head-start in their move preparations to NAVSTA Rota. Plans for the site include continuously updated FAQs, more vid eos and enhanced firstperson accounts of life in Rota. To visit the Lets Move to NAVSTA Rota, Spain website, click on http:// www.public.navy.mil/ surflant/hq/Pages/ RotaMove.aspx NAVSTA Rota: http:// www.cnic.navy.mil/ regions/cnreurafswa/ installations/ns_rota.html NAVSTA Rota Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com/ USNavalStationRota The four Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers headed for Rota include three from Norfolk: USS Ross (DDG 71), USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) and USS Porter (DDG 78), along with USS Carney (DDG 64), from Mayport, Fla. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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USS De Wert Remembers Tragedy Of 9/11 USS De Wert PAOFrequently Sailors are asked, Why did you join the military? Today each crew member was able to take time out of their day to ponder the answer to that deep, yet commonly asked question. Sailors gathered on the mess decks of USS De Wert (FFG 45) for the remembrance of 9/11. During his speech, USS De Wert Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, reminded each crew member of that tragic day. Sailors read through a timeline of the events of that day. There were whisperings throughout the tables reminiscing of their locations when the tow ers were hit. Sailors who joined the Navy this year at the age of 18 were just entering their first year of elementary school when the terrorist attacks hap pened. Those Sailors, whose childhoods were marked by the Global War on Terror, made a conscious decision to volunteer to fight for our freedom. Among those Sailors is Seaman Ramunno who joined USS De Werts family on Aug. 25. He volunteered to create a video to play at the ceremony that displayed the devas tating pictures from the scene in New York, over laid with the soundtrack of Heaven and a note from a little girl who lost her dad in 9/11. On Sept. 11, 2001, I was in English class sitting with my friends, Seaman Ramunno recalled. The phone rang to which my teacher answered and within seconds tears rushed down her face and she let the phone fall as she walked toward the television. That moment stuck with my forever as we all began to watch the news in fear. Within hours my classroom was empty with the exception of only a few of us. That night at home was morbid and dark. From that moment on, pride and patriotism led me to where I am today, a 19-year-old Sailor on board USS De Wert. -Photo by Ensign Kierstin King The crew listens as Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joseph Thomas, speaks about the ter rorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 during a memorial ceremony held aboard the ship. USS De Wert is currently deployed with Coalition Task Force (CTF) 508 in support of antipiracy operations within the Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin. Chief of Naval Personnel Seeks Nominations For 2013 CSADD Chapter of the Year AwardsFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsUnit commanders are encouraged to nominate outstanding chapters of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) to be recognized as sea and shore chapters of the year, according to NAVADMIN 229/13 released September 10. CSADD is a peer influ ence social group meant to encourage Sailors 18 to 25 years old to com bat destructive behavior through a culture of shipmates helping shipmates. CSADD also serves to build leadership skills in young Sailors. CSADD chapters throughout the Navy are finding creative and fun ways to help our young Sailors make right deci sions, and their efforts are paying off, said Rear Admiral Sean Buck, director of the 21st Century Sailor Office (N17). The chapter of the year awards recognize chapters that have gone above and beyond in fostering a cli mate of responsible deci sion making in our Navy, giving our Sailors tools needed to face the chal lenges of the twenty-first century while preserving the skills and talents they bring to the fight. According to the NAVADMIN, the CSADD Chapter of the Year awards were established to recognize the positive social interaction, leader ship and decision making demonstrated through CSADD efforts, which employ a variety of com munication tools and social networking estab lished and sustained by the chapters. Since the awards were established in 2010, one sea-based chapter and one shore-based chap ter were recognized as chapters of the year. For 2013, the categories are expanded to include two sea-based chapters, one large chapter and one small, and two shorebased chapters, one from an installation command and one from a training command. The NAVADMIN pro vides detailed guidance to commanders on sub mitting a nomination. All registered active duty, Reserve Component and Reserve Officers Training Corps Unit CSADD chapters are eligible; however, only activities and suc cesses that occurred in fiscal year 2013 shall be included. The deadline for sub missions by command ers to their appropriate regional commanders is October 1, 2013. Regional commanders must mail or email their submissions no later than November 1, 2013. Results will be announced in a future NAVADMIN. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 7

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UNITAS Exercise Wraps Up In ColombiaFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from 15 partner nations con cluded UNITAS 2013, the 54th annual multina tional maritime exercise, Sept. 15 in Cartagena, Colombia. Hosted this year by the Colombian navy, UNITAS included naval forces from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, the United Kingdom and the United States, with observers from Belize, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico. UNITAS, the longestrunning exercise of its type in the world, has evolved and now includes training for many of the threats encountered in the 21st-century maritime environment, along with essential seamanship and navigational skills that are core competencies for maritime services in the Americas. During 10 days at sea, 19 ships conducted a full spectrum of maritime operations, includ ing electronic warfare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface war fare and maritime inter diction operations. U.S. 4th Fleet was represented by USS Rentz (FFG 46) and other naval units, including Patrol Squadron 10 (VP-10) and Destroyer Squadron 40. This was a robust schedule of events, packed with a myriad of warfare areas that stressed the multi-national forces and their ability to interoperate and work together towards com mon goals, said Cmdr. Lance Lantier, the com manding officer of the Rentz. Rentz could not have been prouder to repre sent the United States as the sole U.S. Navy ship to participate in UNITAS, and we could not be prouder to have success fully completed all events with enthusiasm and devastating firepower, he said. Any ship invited to participate in this robust exercise in the future should be excited at the opportunity. The immediate pur pose of the exercise was to train participating forces in a variety of high-end maritime scenarios to test command and con trol of forces at sea, while operating as a multina tional force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. The training objec tives of each one of the participating navies were incorporated during sev eral planning confer ences conducted before the exercise, allowing this years UNITAS to pro vide effective training to increase interoperabil ity while supporting the training requirements of all participating nations, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the command er of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet. At the same time, the intense training resulted in coalition building, multilateral security coop eration and promoting friendship, professional ism and mutual under standing among the par ticipating partner nations. UNITAS is undoubt edly a top-shelf training opportunity, but it much more than that, Harris said. UNITAS builds lasting friendships, bonds and confidence among the participants, so when we are called to respond to a region or global crisis, we can do so as a coor dinated and experienced team. The next UNITAS exer cise is scheduled for summer 2014. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonSailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Rentz (FFG 46) conduct boarding and search training aboard the Canadian navy destroyer HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280) during the multinational maritime exercise UNITAS 2013 off the coast of Cartegena, Colombia. DoD Announces Missile Defense Siting StudyFrom American Forces Press ServicePursuant to the fiscal year 2013 National Defense Authorization Act, the Defense Department has initiated a study to evaluate five candi date sites in the continental United States for the potential future deployment of additional ground-based interceptors, Pentagon officials announced Sept. 12. Two missile defense sites with long-range interceptor missiles already are active at Fort Greely, Alaska, and Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Today, these sites provide protection for the United States against limited intercontinental ballistic missile attacks, officials said. In response to a congres sional requirement, we are evaluating several sites in the continental United States for a potential future deployment of additional Ground-based Interceptors, or GBIs, said Navy Vice Adm. James D. Syring, director of the Missile Defense Agency. While the administra tion has not made a decision to build another missile defense facility in the U.S. for homeland defense, if a decision were to be made in the future to construct a new site, completing the required site study and environmental impact statement would shorten the timeline required to build such a site. Completing the mandatory siting study and the associ ated follow-on environmen tal impact statement would decrease the time necessary to build a site if a decision is made to do so, officials said. An environmental impact study would take 18 to 24 months to com plete once the siting study is finished, they added. A small Defense Department team will visit each candidate site to obtain information on basic infrastructure, includ ing the electrical power sup ply, water resources, transpor tation access and other areas for assessing the suitability of a potential site. All of the sites are on fed eral land and are operated by the Defense Department, the National Guard or both, officials said. They are: Fort Drum, N.Y.; Camp Ethan Allen Training Site, Vt.; Naval Air Station Portsmouth SERE Training Area, Maine; Camp Ravenna Joint Training Center, Ohio; Fort Custer Training Center, Mich. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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4th Fleet Talks Suicide Prevention4th Fleet Public AffairsThe Maritime Operations Center direc tor for U.S. 4th Fleet spoke to suicide prevention coordinators from vari ous commands Sept. 12 at the base galley in recog nition of National Suicide Prevention Month. Capt. Chuck Nygaard, who volunteered on a suicide hot line in the early 1990s while attending the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., brought a unique perspective to the discussion. Before starting gradu ate school, he was a divi sion officer aboard ship, responsible for 25 to 30 people, Nygaard recalled. Once classes started, he was responsible only for himself. It was quite an adjust ment, so I talked to my minister about it, and he suggested I volun teer at this suicide hot line, so that is what I did, Nygaard said. The experience helped him develop a much greater acceptance for people and an apprecia tion for the problems that they face. There were many valuable lessons that I learned there that I took with me in my Navy career, Nygaard said. It real ly helps me talk to and understand Sailors. Among those attending the event were suicideprevention representa tives from SERVMART, Helicopter Maritime Squadron 48, the Fleet and Family Support Center and the base cha pel. You guys are first responders, and I applaud you, Nygaard said, noting that the Navy has changed since he began his career. Sailors no longer live on board ships, he said. When they live in ships, it is easier for leader ship to be aware of what is going on, and if there are indicators. Now that a majority of junior Sailors live in barracks, they are not around leadership and co-workers as much as before. The change makes a suicide-prevention coor dinators job much more challenging, Nygaard said. Amie McKague, the counseling and advo cacy program manager with the Fleet and Family Support Center here, said it was important for Sailors to know about the services her organization offers, including mar riage counseling, finan cial counseling and help adjusting after deploy ments. Problems in these areas are some of the common causes of sui cide, she said. Each year, Americas armed forces recognize September as Suicide Prevention Month. According to the Department of the Navy, suicide is one of the leading causes of death among Sailors. This years theme is Thrive in your Community, encourag ing Sailors to work together as commands, units, installations or other groups to contribute to projects that benefits others. -Photo by MC1 Sean AllenCapt. Chuck Nygaard, the Maritime Operations Center director for U.S. 4th Fleet, speaks to suicide pre vention coordinators Sept. 12 aboard Naval Station Mayport in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Month. Nygaard, who volunteered on a suicide hot line while attending the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey, Calif., spoke to the group about how the experience helped him appreciate the problems that people face. Logistics Center Director Thinks Of Others Right Up To His RetirementU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet public affairsThe captain sat by two tables in a snug passage way at 4th Fleet head quarters here. As people passed by, he casually asked if they needed any uniform items. Capt. Ian Pollitt, the director of the 4th Fleets Logistics Readiness Center, was holding a uniform sale, with all proceeds going to benefit the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and anything not sold to be donated to the base thrift store. In the middle of the sale, Pollitt was interrupted by a lieutenant com mander with a missionrelated dilemma. The captains tone shifted, and his choice of words became precise. He was confident and compe tent in his knowledge and advice. Just as a uniform sale is not a typical scene for a Navy headquarters, Pollitt who was scheduled to retire Sept. 16 in an out door ceremony near the entrance to the naval sta tion was not a typical senior officer. Hes very smart and articulate and sticks to the rules, said Hector Correa, the readiness centers deputy director, who has worked for Pollitt for the past two years. Hes also very down to earth and approachable. Hes the most fair CO Ive ever seen, Correa continued. Peers seek his advice, yet Pollitt remains a humble man. Pollitt said he came up with the idea for the uni form sale, which he held Sept. 12, when he real ized that after almost 25 years of service, he wont be needing uniforms anymore. By holding the sale, he hoped to support Sailors and encourage others to do the same. His retirement may have been days away, but his desire to do things above and outside of whats expected had not wavered. Even when Pollitt was just a boy, he was doing things differently. A native of Inglewood, Calif., Pollitt spent six years of his childhood on a sailboat, but even with out formal schooling, his education was not lack ing, he said. In fact, he tested two grades above his age group when he eventually enrolled in traditional school at age 12. Theres a lot of time to read on a sailboat, so my English scores were through the roof, he recalled. Math wasnt bad either. I saw my dad using the sextant, navigating by the stars, marking our position and course on the chart and asked him to teach me how to do it. When his father said he would have to learn the decimal system, the son accomplished that in two days. Pollitts path led him to Harvard University, from which he graduated cum laude. It is the best, and thats what I wanted, Pollitt said. Ive always sought the greatest possible challenge. said Pollitt. He received his commission through the NROTC pro gram in 1989. His career took him on seven deployments and led him to command of USS Thunderbolt (PC 12) and USS Klakring (FFG 42). On those assign ments, he was most proud of bringing everyone home that we left with, he said. Pollitt continued his formal education at the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College in Quantico, Va., and through Joint Professional Military Education, Phase II. For 4th Fleet, he was respon sible for logistics support to naval forces in the U.S. Southern Commands area of operation, which includes Central and South America. Of his many accom plishments, one of the most rewarding to Pollitt came out of the time he spent with the Joint Enabling Capabilities Command of U.S. Joint Forces Command. While he was serving as chief of plans for the Joint Deployable Teams, his team was called up to support Department of Defense disaster relief and humanitarian assis tance missions following the Haiti earthquake of 2010. Being on the ground in Haiti after the earthquake showed me how much DoD can do when we put our minds to it, Pollitt said. We saved thou sands of lives. After Pollitt retires, he and his wife, Catherine, will continue to live in St. Johns with their two chil dren, Eleanor, 13, and Nathaniel, 11. Correa predicted Pollitt will never really leave the Navy. He joined the St. Augustine Navy League so he could stay con nected, Correa said. He has a sailboat and loves to sail. He may have retired from the Navy, but he will always be a Sailor. -Photo by Lt. Megan DoonerCapt. Ian Pollitt, seated, reacts to a comment by Mike Smith, a retired naval officer who works as a contractor for U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and 4th Fleet, during a uniform sale Pollitt held for charity Sept. 12. Pollitt was 4th Fleet's Logistics Readiness Center director until he retired Sept. 16. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 9

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Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder: More Common Than You May RealizeNaval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport Perinatal Mood Disorder Support CounselorAccording to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwidewith an estimated 350 million affectedand is one of many symptoms that could indicate a form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMAD) in women. PMADs are a set of disorders that can occur during pregnancy and up to the first year postpartum. Other disorders that can be associated with PMAD include panic, obsessivecompulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress dis order and postpartum psychosis. PMAD has been identified in women of all ages, race, culture and financial status. Studies have shown that approximately 10-20 percent of women expe rience depression either during pregnancy or in the first 12 months post partum, yet less than 25 percent of Obstetrics (OB) and Gynecology (GYN) patients have had their diagnoses recognized. Despite the health risks and complications associated with mater nal depression, pregnant women and new mothers experiencing depression often do not get the treatment they need due to fear of discussing mental health concerns with their primary care providers or the lack of education about depression. Military families are often faced with increased stressors and challenges due to frequent deploy ments, career decisions and family migration due to new duty assignments. The presence of these factors, to an expected mother, can be extremely overwhelming and may have a direct impact on their partner as well, present ing the feelings of being overwhelmed, confused, angry and afraid. Screening and early intervention can pro tect the well-being of the mother, baby and entire family. If left untreated, PMAD can affect the mother and child bond, the childs physical health, emotional health and long-term behavior. Common symptoms of PMAD can include, but are not limited to, feel ings of loneliness, sad ness and helplessness; difficulty bonding with baby; anxiety, panic or excessive worry; fear of being left alone with baby; thoughts of hurting your self or those around you; frequent mood swings or crying; lack of interest in life or a previous history of depression, postpar tum depression or anxi ety. Delays in treatment can relate to a signifi cantly longer duration of PMAD. Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Mayport uses the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) as part of its screening process for depression and anxiety. It is a 10-item self-report questionnaire given to new obstetric patients. This process is repeated at 28 weeks and again dur ing their six week post partum visit. Based on answers provided, the test gives the health care pro vider an assessment tool to detect the presence of depression symptoms. Many military moms, and some dads, are accustomed to being the sole caregiver and are not used to asking for help. It is vital for parents to know that resources are avail able to them at any time. Social support is essential to assure the mental health of women, chil dren and their families during pregnancy and postpartum. Social sup port networks include family, friends, peer groups and faith commu nities. Active-duty service members should contact their primary health care provider for assistance with counseling servic es and or treatment for depression or anxiety disorders. Dependent family members should call the NBHC Mayport appoint ment line to schedule an appointment at 904-5424677. Counseling services are also available through Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) by contacting 904-270-6600. NBHC Mayport is cur rently looking for moth ers that are interested in volunteering their time to assist with local support to other mothersin the Mayport areaaffected by perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Those interested are encour aged to contact Xiomara Lemmey, perinatal mood disorder support counselor and obstetrics clinic nurse manager assigned to NBHC Mayport, at 904270-4289 or by email: Xiomara.lemmey@med. navy.mil. Active duty members and their families are provided social support and parenting classes with assistance from NBHC Mayports New Parent Support Group. In addi tion, Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society pro vides a visiting nurse program to assist with basic parenting tips and educating new parents. To take advantage of this program, contact 904270-5418, ext. 1512. NBHC Mayport is one of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sail ors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manag er at one of its facilities. To find out more about NBHC Mayport, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 11

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around trees to represent each Sailor who has committed suicide this year. Weve lost 32 Sailors to suicide this year; 30 active duty and 2 reserve, said Williams. Just one Sailor is too many. The host of the event, Fleet and Family Support Center, brought pam phlets and other reading material to give Sailors. They also welcomed sui cide prevention coordinators from different com mands on base to the run. We want every Sailor to know that there is always someone to help them, said Williams. No one has to do it alone. There is Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy chaplains, and suicide prevention coordinators at every command. Williams added that the Navy is a family, and that suicide not only affects the one that has taken their own life, but every one else in close proxim ity to that person. Chief petty officer selectee assigned to Mayport showed their support by running together in formation while singing cadence. Its very motivating to see the support from the base and to see everyone come together for a good cause, said Chief (select) Master-at-Arms Jason Pavlica. This was a great way to meet people who are all standing together for the common interest of preventing suicide by educating ourselves. The Navy has desig nated its theme for this years National Suicide Prevention Month as Thrive in Your Community.From Page 1Fun Run -Photo by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyChief petty offier selectees assigned to Naval Station Mayport partcipate in a 5K run and 3K walk for suicide prevention awareness. September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and the Navys 2013 theme is Thrive in Your Community. Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowl ing for active duty when they bring a non-active duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 2705377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored headpin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) Surfside Fitness class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Kickboxing Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Yoga 11:30 a.m., Zumba Wednesday 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Thursday 9:30 a.m., Strength Fundamentals 11:30 a.m., Zumba Friday 9:30 a.m., Zumba Basics 11:30 a.m., Strength Training For Women Mayport Sandbox The Mayport Sandbox is a high intensity (H.I.T.) outdoor workout area located ocean front behind Surfside Fitness Center. The area includes a Pull -up Bar and Ring rig, Kettlebells, Sleds, Tires, TRX Suspension Frame, Slam Balls, Ropes, Ab Mats, Sledge Hammers, Farmers Walk, Olympic Lift area and equip ment, Monkey Bars, Low Crawl, Sprint and Drag area. H.I.T. training involves functional programming that will take your workout to the next level. Monday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7:30 a.m., Command Bootcamp 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Tuesday 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Wednesday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., NOFFS 9:30 a.m., TRX Suspension Training 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Open Sandbox Thursday 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga 7-8:30 a.m. Open Sandbox 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Friday 7-8:30 a.m., Open Sandbox 7 a.m., Command Bootcamp. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Open Sandbox Saturday 9:30-11:30 a.m. Open Sandbox Gymnasium class schedule Monday 11:30 a.m., Spinning 5:45 p.m., Kids Clinic Tuesday 11:30 a.m., Steel Anchor 4:30 p.m., Spinning Wednesday 7 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Rowing 11:30 a.m., Spinning Thursday 5:30 p.m., Steel Anchor Friday 7:30 a.m., Spinning 11:30 a.m., Rowing 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Community Events Oct. 26: Make a Difference Day 8 a.m.-1 p.m. True Blue Navy Family Benefactors has partnered with First Coast News to assist in Naval Station Mayports Lake Wonderwood Project. We are inviting volun teers from the Naval Station Mayport Community to assist in this event focusing on helping our base community. We will follow this event with our annual Fall Fest. 270-5228 Oct. 26: Fall Fest 2013. 1-5 p.m. at Sea Otter Pavilion. Free activities include a haunted house, games, rides, bounce houses, take your own pic tures in the pumpkin patch and more. Food and beverages will be available. A variety of ven dors will be on-hand selling arts and crafts, baked goodies, and more. Purchase your seasonal pumpkin from the pumpkin patch. 270-5228 Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and dependents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be notified Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Prizes for the winning team. 270-7205 Sept. 21: UFC 165-Jones vs. Gustafsson. 10 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. 270-7205 Sept. 27: Reggae Night 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-candrink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 2705431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 4: Freedom FridayFreaky Creepy Friday Movie Night. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced signup and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 18: Freedom FridaySpooktacular Costume Dance Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 Oct. 19: Teen TripIce Skating at Jacksonville Ice and Sports Complex Departs 6 p.m.; returns no later than 11 p.m. Cost $15.00, open to ages 13-18. Permission slip required by Oct. 11. 2460347 The following activities target single or unaccompanied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: Jacksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 2: Mess Lords Celebrity Chefs at Mayport Galley. 11-1 pm. A special lunchtime menu from celebrity chefs Sarah Simington, Hodad and Brian Duffy. This special lunchtime event is open to active duty personnel only. Lunch is free for those on a Galley meal plan; all other eligible Galley patrons pay $4.25. 270-5373. Oct. 2: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 4: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 6: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Oct. 2. Oct. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 11: Halloween Horror Nights at Universal. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $40.00. Sign up by Oct. 8. Oct. 14: Ping Pong Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 15: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Free Food! Stop by and bring your ideas! Oct. 16: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Oct. 7. Oct. 18: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Oct. 20: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Diego Chargers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. Sign up by Oct. 14. Oct. 23: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Oct. 27: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. San Francisco 49ers. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 13

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Proclamation Recognizes Navy Ombudsmen Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfight ers and their families, Williamson said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for their continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more difficult task with out you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and wel fare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between command ing officers and the fami lies of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family members with official information and emergency assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 mil lion annually. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast deployment support program man ager and ombudsman program coordina tor, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledges the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to rec ognize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the com mand support team, they make sure families know what resources are avail able to them, and help them adjust to the mili tary way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties. -Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region.Proclamation Signing Emphasizes National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a suicide preven tion awareness proclamation on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation recognizes September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention throughout the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Williamson said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family members to suicide and these losses can be pre vented. It is our collective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including everyone in the Navy family, is key to the successful prevention of suicide. The proclamations theme highlights the importance of taking action as individuals and to recognize the impact of stressors in our day-today lives, as well how to develop protective factors against stress and suicide. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast assistant suicide prevention outreach coordinator, there is no better way to have a suc cessful program than ensuring suicide preven tion information and indicators are available to all personnel. Suicide continues to be a major issue for all hands, she said. Our goal is to reduce the number of these tragedies through education and awareness campaigns, and we hope this procla mation will go a long way in those efforts. One of the latest tools the Navy is using toward suicide prevention efforts is the NavyTHRIVE cam paign, which encour ages Sailors, commands, families and civilians to empower themselves by taking personal respon sibility for their health, wellness and growth. The program is a new approach to resilience and it really emphasizes self-empowerment and growth, Parker said. The goal is not for Sailors to merely overcome adversity, but to come back from it stronger than they were before. In addition to those efforts, the region imple mented an aggressive suicide prevention coor dinator (SPC) training program in September 2011 that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 300 newly-qualified coordinators throughout the region and more than 1,700 worldwide. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) educational services and See Suicide, Page 15 14 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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work and family life spe cialists assist command SPCs with training in the areas of stress manage ment, conflict manage ment, parent education, anger management and suicide prevention. So far this fiscal year, command SPCs and FFSC person nel have conducted more than 1,200 training ses sions attended by more than 43,000 people. The program has been instrumental in raising awareness and get ting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, Parker said. Each year, hundreds of DoD personnel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and co-workers only knew what to look for and took action, she added. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about suicide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is noth ing. For more information about NavyTHRIVE, visit http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/ support/21st_Century_ Sailor/suicide_preven tion/spmonth/Pages/ default.aspx.FFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment problems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompassing behavior, emotion, devel opment and socialization. Parents need to under stand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned violent behavior. The purpose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already hap pened, but to instill hope that things can change. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 CNRSE Visits NS Mayport FFSC-Photo by Paige GnannRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, shakes hands with acting Fleet and Family Support Center Director Master Chief Electricians Mate Carl Stewart during a visit to the department on Sept. 13. Williamson was at NS Mayport to tour the base and attend the Chief Petty Officer pinning ceremony. Also pictured from left, FFSC Deputy Director Amie McKague, NS Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, and CMDCM Bob White.From Page 14Suicide Simpson Welcomes CNRSE Back-Photo by Paige GnannRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, looks at ease on the bridge of USS Simpson (FFG 56) as he talks with the ships Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Christopher Follin, and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Kenneth Anderson. Williamson served as commanding officer of Simpson from May 2003-January 2005. He took the opportunity to reconnect with the ship and take a look at his old stomping grounds during his visit to Naval Station Mayport on Sept. 13. Help Clean Up Mayport Beach, JettiesFrom NS Mayport EnvironmentalNS Mayport Environmental is solicit ing volunteers in sup port of the 28th Annual International Coastal Cleanup, to collect litter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on Sept. 21 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the eastern-most covered pavilion), near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. Community service hours may be earned from this event. Pre-registration is not required. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. -Photo submittedA family volunteers at last years International Coastal Cleanup event at NS Mayports Jetties. Volunteers are needed for this years event, which will be on Sept. 21. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 15

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16 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 19, 2013 prayers are with the victims and their families, he said. I have complete confidence in our first responders, and I continue to be completely focused on this very difficult situation. Mabus pledged his sup port in a video message to those affected by the shoot ing. Earlier in the day, during a news conference at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Mabus announced he had conferred SECNAV Designee sta tus on injured personnel. The Secretary of the Navy Designee Program provides special eli gibility for medical and dental care from naval medical facili ties for patients affected by the shooting. The Navys top military officer also expressed condolences to the victims and their families on behalf of himself and his wife, Darleen. Our team of Sailors and Navy civilians at the Navy Yard deserve our care and concern at this time, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert said. I applaud the efforts of all who immediate ly responded to this course of events in order to care for the injured victims and ensure the safety of our personnel. Navy officials have estab lished an emergency family support task force to assist vic tims, workers and families with related issues. The task force is led by Navy Vice. Adm. William D. French, commander of the Navys Installations Command. That support includes several phone numbers established by the installations Warfighter and Family Support Center for families seeking information about their loved ones who work at the Navy Yard. The numbers, which can also be used to request additional services, are: 1-855-677-1755, 202-433-6151, 202-433-9713, 202-433-3234 or 202-685-6019. Also, critical incident stress management and counseling services are available at 1-800222-0364. Family services counsel ors and chaplains also have been called into action, Navy officials said. Teams of chap lains throughout the region are standing by to provide assis tance, as needed, over the next several days. Those in need of chaplain support can contact the Warfighter and Family Support Center at 202-433-6151 or 202-433-9713. Agencies investigating the incident include the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, D.C. Metro Police, and the FBI has the lead, officials said. Aaron Alexis, a former Navy reservist, is alleged to have been the shooter. Alexis was killed in a gun duel with police.From Page 1WreathJU Military Appreciation Game Come out Sept. 21 to watch the Jacksonville University Dolphins take on the Warner University Royals for their military appreciation football game. Kickoff is at 1 p.m. and admission is free to active and retired military personnel with I.D. No Dough Dinner The Mayport USO Center will host a No Dough Dinner on Sept. 30, from 5-7 p.m. This is free for Active Duty Service Members and their immediate fami lies. The wonderful staff and volunteers will serve chicken pot pie, broccoli, salad, and dessert. Free I-TEXTS To Support Your Greater Jax Area USO-Opt In Want to help your Greater Jacksonville Area USO to continue its mis sion of supporting troops and families? Here is a free opportunity to do so. For those of you with cell phones and unlimited texting, please opt-in to I-TEXTS. TEXT: USOJAX, YOUR ZIP CODE, AND YOUR EMAIL TO: 70000 Youll receive a confir mation text with a link to build your profile and receive only the deals that interest you (restaurants, sporting goods, etc). Checker Yellow Cab Of Jacksonville-Rate Discounts The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is proud to announce a new partnership with Checker Yellow Cab of Jacksonville to support troops and families. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes divi sion, and medals to all finishers. Southern Womens Show The Southern Womens show will be at the Prime Osborn Convention Center on Oct. 17-20. Come on out to enjoy food, fashion, celebrity guests, health informa tion, along with beauty and lifestyle informa tion. For more informa tion please visit: www. southernwomensshow. com. Mayport and NAS JAX USO Centers are selling tickets for $5 each/ cash only. Tickets will also be available for purchase through the ITT office at Kings Bay. Military Spouse Vendor Show Looking for holiday gift ideas? Are you a military spouse with a small business? If you answered yes to either of these questions, the Military Spouse Vendor Show at the Mayport USO on November 2 from 9 a.m.3 p.m. is for you. Please email milwivesbusines sandevents@gmail.com for more information or to become a vendor. Vendor slots fill fast, so sign up today. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game season. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. Supporting Americas Heroes The American Red Cross is expanding ser vices to provide assis tance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to help support their transition into civilian life. Emergency needs that may warrant assistance may include medical and dental needs, rent assis tance, utility payments, and food; access to refer ral services; or other assistance depending on need. Applicants for these funds must demonstrate financial hardship, and/ or lack of other available resources due to par ticipation in OEF or OIF. Eligible veterans include those of all services, the Reserve component and National Guard. For more informa tion, please contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at (904) 2461395 Recycling Recycling has come to the Greater Jacksonville Area USO. If you have any office paper, shred ded paper, old magazines, and newspapers that you would like to donate, please bring it to either the Mayport or NAS JAX USO Center. This will be a great fundraiser for the USO so please help us fill the bins. Help support the troops with your unwant ed paper! United Through Reading program makes it possible to share in the enjoyment of reading to the children in your life, even while thousands of miles apart. The Mayport Center and NAS Center can record you reading a book to your children and send it to them after you have gone on deployment. It is a great way to make them smile on their special day even when you can not be there with them. Please contact your local USO center for more information. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. Watch TV or a movie from the video library Service members can also enjoy video games or use the sports equipment. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meeti ngs, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. A TV, VCR and overhead projector are available for use. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOThursday, Sept. 19 Culinary author Jeffrey Spear will speak at the next Beaches Museum Whistle Talk about his new book, First Coast Heritage Cookbook at 6:30 p.m., in the Beaches Museum Chapel, 505 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville Beach. The lecture will be preceded by the Annual Member Meeting of the Beaches Area Historical Society at 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend the meeting. At a recep tion following the talk, Spear will conduct a tast ing of some of his recipes the book at the Beaches Museum, 381 Beach Blvd., located 2 two blocks east of the cha pel. Admission to the talk and reception is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. For information about the book or talk, please visit BeachesMuseum.org. R.S.V.P. at 904-241-5657 or by e-mail at info@ BeachesMuseum.org. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Attendees will make their own 55 gallon plastic rain barrels to take home. You will learn how to connect a rain barrel to a rain garden and learn some important infor mation on water conser vation. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per person to make a rain barrel, $5 for attendance only (no rain barrel) Pre-payment and registration required for barrel. Payment must be received by Monday, Sept. 16th. Make check to DCOHAC and send to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N. McDuff Ave, Jax., Fl 32254. You can register with credit card at http:// rainbarrel92013.event brite.com. Seating is lim ited to 35 pre-paid regis trations. No walk-ins for make and take. For questions, call 904-255-7450. Saturday, Sept. 21 The American Heart Association First Coast is proud to announce the 2013 Heart Walk will be held at Metropolitan Park. Festivities begin at 8 a.m., Walk begins at 9 a.m. Dollars raised through the Heart Walk fund critical research, education and community programs to help combat heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 4 killers of American men and women. For further information about the 2013 Heart Walk or to make a donation, call 904256-5721 or visit www. firstcoastheartwalk.org. This interpretive pro gram at 2 p.m. explores the snakes that are native to Florida and live at the Talbot Islands State Parks. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., announc es the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza at 10 a.m. The opening of the Sculpture Garden, located in the front lawn of the Art Connections building, marks the com pletion of the Landscape Enhancement Project, which launched in September 2012, and includes the renovation of the entire Riverside Avenue portion of The Cummer campus. The Sculpture Garden opens with its inaugural exhibition, The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti fea turing works on loan by the St. Augustine-based sculptor. Torcoletti will visit The Cummer for the Community Opening on Saturday, September 21 to host a demonstration of his working methods. This free event will feature live music and artmaking activities. Food and drink will be available for purchase from Chefs Garden, Corner Taco and Le Petit Cheri Cupcakery. Saturday, Sept. 21-22 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a weekend event to commemorate the part that Fort Clinch played in the Spanish-American War. The event is held on Sept. 21 from 9 a.m.5 p.m. and Sept. 22 from 9 a.m.1 p.m. The fort will be filled with uniformed interpreters and participants will also be able to enjoy exhibits of the armament and period military equipment. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admis sion. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks. org. Saturday, Sept. 28 The Florida Park Service is working hard to remove invasive exot ic plants which are not native to our natural ecosystems. These outsid ers are overtaking natu ral areas within our parks and displacing native and endangered vegetation. This is leading to a loss of natural habitat utilized by beloved Florida wildlife including the gopher tor toise, bobcat and whitetailed deer. In honor of National Public Lands Day, come learn about the impact these plants are having, what we are doing to combat them, and what you can do at home to help. Join AmeriCorps mem bers and park staff at 10 a.m. for an informative talk followed by a nature walk highlighting some amazing native species and an opportunity to help remove some invad ers. Afterwards, stick around for kid-friendly invasive plant games and bring your own pic nic lunch to enjoy on the lawn. The event is free and open to all ages. Please wear comfortable sturdy shoes and bring sunscreen, bug spray, a water bottle and a snack or lunch. Cameras, bin oculars and field guides are recommended also. Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida will present their first 5K open to the public in the history of the council to kick-off a 10-year anniversary cel ebration at 5 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Girls on the Run of Northeast Florida Lace It UpScholarship Program. Registration is open to the first 1200 partici pants. Registration is $45 through Sept. 24, and $55 through Sept. 28. Online registration ends on Sept. 24. For more information, www.gotrnefl.org, www.facebook. com/gotrnefl, @gotrnefl. Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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