Mirror (Mayport, FL)

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Mirror (Mayport, FL)
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Newspaper
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English
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Naval Station Mayport, Public Affairs Office
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Jacksonville, FL
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March 11, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com CNO Details Navys BudgetAmerican Forces Press ServiceEven without the uncertainty caused by budget negotiations, it will take years for the Navy to recov er from the effects of sequestration, the chief of naval operations told an audience at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington Sept 5. Sequestration and the effects of the continuing budget resolu tion damaged readiness, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert said. The Navys budget reduction was $11 billion, the admiral said. The ser vice cancelled five ship deployments, and the reduction cut into the ser vices surge capacity, he added. Usually, we have three carrier strike groups and three amphibious ready groups able to respond within a week, Greenert said. We have one now, and thats going to be the story in fiscal 2014. The reduction in fiscal 2014 is $14 billion. The service exempted military manpower from the cuts, and this would mean 14 percent reductions for all other accounts, the admiral said. Barring help from Congress in the next budget, he told the audience, the Navy will have to cancel half of its ship availability. We will cancel a lot of aircraft availabilities, he added. If we restored the budget after [fiscal 2014] and said, You have a full-up opera tions and maintenance budget, itll take about five years to get that back log in aircraft maintenance down. Navywide, the service will reduce training for those not deploying, Greenert said. Some air wings will fly and aircrews will receive training, he said, but officials are uncomfortable with the amount of flight hours. Shipbuilding will drop in fiscal 2014 also. I would see the loss of a littoral combat ship, an afloat-for ward staging base and advanced pro curement for a Virginia-class subma rine and a carrier overhaul, Greenert said. We might lose two more a submarine and a destroyer if we are unable to reprogram and move money into those accounts. The Navy will lose about 25 air -Photos by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, middle, stands with Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) staff, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, kneeling, and CMDCM Bob White, right, after signing a proclamation declaring September Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport.From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsEach year Americas Armed Forces recognize September as Suicide Prevention Month. For 2013, Navy is focusing on the importance of com munity and self-purpose when dealing with adver sity, officials announced in NAVADMIN 212/13. The theme of this years Navy Suicide Prevention (SP) Month is Thrive in Your Community, encouraging Sailors to work together as commands, units, installa tions or other groups to con tribute to a project of their choice that benefits others. Participation is not mandatory and there is no minimum for engagement. Sailors can work together to do something pos itive for their commands or installations, or get involved in their local communities. Family and civilian engage ment is encouraged. While we dont often think of it this way, suicide preven tion actually happens every day at the deckplate, in our neighborhoods, even in our own homes, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy Resilience chief. When we do small things that make a difference to those around us, we may not real ize the effect were having on others lives-or our own, Scott said. Navy seeks to promote unity and cohesion in this context to emphasize the posi tive impacts of seeking help; Sailors that are willing to help others may be more willing to receive it when needed. Throughout the month, resources will be released on www.suicide.navy.mil > Suicide Prevention Month to guide discussion on stress navigation, comprehen sive wellness, and a sense of community-all protective factors against suicide. The website also houses ideas and guidance for Thrive in Your Community engage ment for any command envi ronment. Command Suicide Prevention Coordinators will also be available to help organize local efforts. Sailors are encouraged to send details and/or photos of their September events to sui cideprevention@navy.mil to be shared with the fleet on the SP Month website and Navy Operational Stress Control social media. Navys efforts to help Sailors better navigate their stress are an all hands evo lution, all of the time. These initiatives extend far beyond September and serve as a launch pad for year-long local efforts to build resilience and unit cohesion, promoting a Navywide culture supportive of seeking help, said Scott. For more information, ref erence NAVADMIN 212/13 or visit http://www.public. navy.mil/BUPERS-NPC/ SUPPORT/21ST_CENTURY_ SAILOR/SUICIDE_ PREVENTION/SPMONTH/ Pages/default.aspx and receive the latest updates by following @NavStress on Twitter and Facebook. McCall signs a proclamation declaring September Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. FFSC tied 28 yellow ribbons around trees at Memorial Park to represent the 28 Sailors who died in 2012 due to suicide.September Is Suicide Prevention Month At Naval Station Mayport 2013 Holiday Season Mailing Deadlines SetFrom NAVSUP Office of Corpo rate CommunicationsThe Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25 delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were released Sept. 3. For mail addressed to: APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 All classes of mail addressed to FPO/APO addresses must use the nine-digit ZIP code to ensure delivery. Mail not addressed correctly will be returned to the sender as undeliverable. Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is avail able from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-avail able basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth com bined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addi tion to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to par cels mailed to APO/ FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domesti cally by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space avail able basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is recommended that customers check with their local civilian or military post office for information on size restrictions and possible need for customs decla ration forms. Customers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items cannot be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, por nography, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, custom ers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have See Budget, Page 6 See Holiday, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Early last Thursday morning, I met members of Mayports Fleet and Family Support team at Memorial Park in a grove of trees with yellow ribbons tied around them. In fact, there were 28 rib bons tied around 28 trees and unlike the 70s song by Tony Orlando, there was no happy ending. I was there to attend a proclamation ceremony declaring September as Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. The yellow ribbons are there in recognition of our ship mates that we have lost to this enemy this past year. The theme of this years Navy Suicide Prevention (SP) Month is Thrive in Your Community, which encourages Sailors to work together as commands, units, installations or other groups to contribute to a project of their choice that benefits others. Saving some ones life could be as easy as asking a simple question. Most triggers of suicide are preventable. As a Navy community, it is up to us to take this matter seriously and provide assistance to our shipmates and their families. Our people are our most valuable asset and we must strive to prevent our Sailors and our dedicated civilians from making suicide a perma nent solution to a temporary problem. Resources on suicide prevention are available through FFSC and suicidepre vention@navy.mil Lets see if we can make this a happy ending after all by saving someones life. Thanks to the Chief Petty Officer Selectees for supporting Mayports September 11 Remembrance Ceremony yesterday at Memorial Park. Its hard to believe that it has been 12 years since the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, Flight 93 in Pennsylvania and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.. We should all take time to remember the thousands of lives lost, as well as the warriors who have fallen during the War on Terrorism since then. We are still fighting this fight today. Whether we are in Afghanistan or at home, there are people out there who wish to do us harm. Stay vigilant! Congratulations also go out to all the Chief Petty Officer Selectees who are get ting ready to put on their anchors tomor row. This is an exciting time for you and your families. Chiefs hold a special place in the U.S. Navy and our Sailors rely on your wealth of experience, mentorship and leadership. When you put on your pin tomorrow, you are making a promise to yourself, your family, and your ship mates to be the best that you can be. I am extremely proud of all of you. Well done! On Sept. 14, Navy commands through out the country will recognize the thousands of Navy Ombudsmen who vol unteer their time, talents and energy making a difference in the lives of Navy families. These volunteers help Sailors and families during all phases of deploy ment, disaster or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday ques tions and challenges that face Navy fami lies. Navy Ombudsman play an important role in the success of a commands mis sion and they are often the first person family members to turn to during a crisis to ensure they are guided to the proper resources. Connecting Navy families to needed assistance is what Ombudsmen have been doing for 43 years and I thank all of them for their service, and tireless dedication. Lastly, I want to congratulate the USS Gettysburg family support group for their win at the third annual Cupcake Wars, sponsored by the Navy Exchange. Reyna and I had the pleasure of being two of the judges at this years event. The cupcakes tasted great and some of the displays were down right amazing. I really had a hard time deciding which was my favorite. When it comes down to it, all of the entries did a great job and definitely satisfied my sweet tooth for the next month. I cant wait for next year! Please continue sending your sugges tions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSYou and your child made it through last school year. But there were some bumps in the road which might have been avoided with better parent-teacher or coun selor communication. Checking the planner and/or going online to check grades just didnt get the job done. So what can you do? You may need to set up a phone or face-to-face conference with your childs teacher or teach ers and the counselor. Different schools have different procedures for setting up these confer ences. At some schools you will need to speak to the teacher directly while at others, appointments for conferences are made through the schools guid ance office. An early-in-theyear conference usu ally involves letting your childs teacher and/or counselor know about ongoing concerns or any special circumstances which might affect his work in school. Provide his teachers and/or counselor with informa tion about major chang es which have occurred or are about to occur in your family like a par ent is on or about to go on deployment, that this is the childs 3rd school in three years, or a critical injury to a parent which requires rehab in another city. Some families are reluctant to reveal private matters, but you might consider simply alerting his counselor or teachers that your family is going through difficult times. Teachers and coun selors welcome parental involvement especially when you want to collab orate on improving aca demic success. Research shows that parental involvement and collabo ration with schools help children perform better academically. When par ents work with schools and school counselors, their children get more As and Bs and fewer Cs, Ds, and Fs. A good rela tionship with the teacher will also make it easier for you to understand what your child experiences every day and inform you about his schoolwork and responsibilities. If you have questions for the teacher, be sure to formulate the ques tions before the confer ence. Try to be as specific as possible. Some ques tions you may want to ask include the following: 1. In past grades, he has not been successful in getting in his home work. Do you have any ideas which can help me to help him with this? 2. Is tutoring available and how does my child access it? 3. What other resources are available at school to help my child with your class? 4. Are there additional books or resources avail able at school or in the community which would help him overall with study skills, note-taking, or time management, for example? If you and the teacher or counselor decide on a course of action for solv ing a particular problem, determine how you are going to monitor your childs progress. For monitoring purposes, will the teacher contact you by phone or email? Will he write comments daily, weekly, quarterly in your childs planner? Will he post it on OnCourse? Will the counselor email you? If there is not improve ment in a predetermined period of time, what will the next step be? If your child did not attend the conference, share with him the issues which were discussed. If a plan of action was determined, make sure that your child under stands what his role will be even if he was pres ent for the conference. For example, it may be his responsibility to bring home his planner each night or have you sign his graded tests. As you work with your childs teacher, the improvement may not happen immediately. It may require some time for the plan to work. Or it may require that the plan be tweaked or even discarded. There is cer tainly nothing wrong with developing a Plan B. But whatever happens, remain in touch with the teacher and/or counselor. Share successes and failures. Key your eye on the prize of having your child achieve success in that class. With your deter mination and patience, it will happen. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One.Parent-Teacher/Counselor Communication Key For Your Childs Successful School YearJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAs human beings we have built in needs that we cannot live without. Food, water, and shelter are needs that quickly come to mind, but let me mention a fourth need less talked about; the need to feel connected to other people. As Navy families, we discover this really quick when we deploy. There is a pain and heartache we feel when we are separat ed from our loved ones. Why is this? Because these are the people we have spent the most time with, lived life with, who know us the best! Being separated from them is never enjoyable, because we are without the presence of a person we confide in the most. Consider for a moment that the harshest punish ment in prison is solitary confinement. The act of separating people from people for long periods of time is extremely dif ficult because we are hard wired to connect with people on a daily basis. Our need to live in community is a powerful driving force in our lives. People will choose a job, a place to live, and other major life decisions based on who they know. People will often choose to go and do something where they feel loved and accepted, regardless if the outcome is favorable or not. I have seen people move across the US, quit Chaplain Stephen Cloer CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSometimes Connection Is All You Need To Livetheir job for another, all based on going where they feel loved and accepted. September is Suicide Prevention Month in the U.S. Navy, and our theme is Thrive in Your com munity. When a person feels known and accepted in their community, the by product is a person who likes where they live and work, and has great er resiliency to emerge stronger from lifes chal lenges. Let me encourage you to think about this very central truth, that we all have a deep inner need to feel connected to others. So often when a person decides to try and end their life, it is because they feel like there is no one around them that they can truly connect with. When a person feels all alone, unable to con nect, it can seem as if life is not worth living. As people we draw our sense life purpose and selfworth from our commu nity. You have heard it said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If everyone worked to make the people around them feel accepted and connected, we could do a lot to reduce suicides in our community. Next time you see someone and give them the greeting of the day, take a few minutes lon ger and say, How are you really doing, and is there anything I can help you with? Talk to people about their lives, ask about their families, take someone to lunch and just hang out. The Golden rule cer tainly applies, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If we all did that, Suicide statistics might be greatly reduced.

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USS The Sullivans Helps Saudi DhowsUSS The Sullivans Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) provided medical assistance to a vessel in distress in the Arabian Sea, approximately 40 miles off the coast of Saudi Arabia, Aug. 18, while conducting mari time security operations in the area. The three-person crew of motor vessel Abir Alqaray No. 4, a 35-meter Saudi Arabian-flagged dhow contacted The Sullivans by visual means asking for medical assis tance for an unconscious crew member. The Sullivans received the request while in the process of assisting another Saudi Arabianflagged dhow named Pal Khat No. 4 with a casualty to her engine. According to Ensign Elizabeth Decker, con ning officer, the crew did not speak English, but it was clear that they were in some form of distress. We saw the dhow incoming at a high rate of speed, and we maneu vered to prevent a colli sion. After our maneuver, we noticed the personnel on board waving franti cally, and it was apparent they needed assistance, said Decker. Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Christina McCullough embarked The Sullivans small boat to assist the Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) team along with a translator and boarded the dhow to provide sup plies and medical assis tance to the cre Chief Hospital Corpsman Dawn Isais, The Sullivans indepen dent duty corpsman diagnosed the patient with heat exhaustion via bridge-to-bridge radio communication with McCullough who checked the Saudi patients vital signs. The Sullivans pro vided food, water and ice to treat the patient. Twenty minutes after embarking the dhow the member became con scious, and was able to retain water and food. This was my first time in 70-plus approaches doing anything like this, and it was a very exciting and rewarding experience. They were extreme ly appreciative, said Ensign Mathew Stevens, the VBSS boarding officer. Coalition forces have a longstanding tradition of helping mariners in dis tress by providing medi cal assistance, engineer ing assistance, and search and rescue efforts, said Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, commanding officer of The Sullivans. The Sullivans crew was happy to provide maritime support, and relieved that the dhow contacted us for help, Castro said. The dhow crew had been out fishing for multi ple hours in the high tem peratures of the Northern Arabian Gulf summer heat and miscalculated water consumption, he added. We were pleased to be able to assist them in the way of food, water, and medical assistance. The Sullivans is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by MC3 Billy HoThe guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Petty Officers and Selects join volunteers and residents of the Clara White Mission for a group photo after a day of volunteering at the downtown Jacksonville facility. The day was one of several outreach events coordinated by the Selects during Phase II of CPO 365 training. Mayport Chief Selects On A MissionCPO Selects Tee Off -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChiefs and Chief Selects from Naval Station Mayport take a tour of the Clara White Mission Sept. 2 after serving lunch to the community. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief Selects from Naval Station Mayport visit with locals Sept. 2 after serving lunch to the community at the Clara White Mission downtown. -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Selects get an extra helping hand as they prepare food to serve at the Clara White Mission during a community relations project on Sept. 2. -Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Gunners Mate Brandon D. Clark serves as caddy at the 2013 CPO Selectee Golf Tournament held at Windy Harbor Golf Club.-Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Intelligence Specialist Angela Calhoun smiles as Chief Select Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Crystal Mack shows off a piece of paper eaten by a goat mascot brought out to Windy Harbor Golf Club for the annual CPO Selectee Golf Tournament last week. The Selects will participate in a pinning ceremony this Friday.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 5 -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFirst Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division conduct firefighting training on the airfield at Naval Station Mayport using a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device. The device can simulate 13 different fires that can happen aboard an aircraft. Mayport Fire Fighters Feel The Heat First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division point their water hoses at one of several fires that have erupted on a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device during recent training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division spray down the inside of a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device during recent training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division check hoses during training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division race towards an airplane on fire. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division assess the situation before heading towards an airplane on fire during a training event.

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craft, from helicopters to P-8s to F-35s, the admiral said. We need about a billion dollars to get into the operations and maintenance account and a billion into the procure ment accounts so we can get it into ship building, which will be my No. 1 priority in the Navy, he said. Beyond fiscal 2014, Greenert said, the bywords will be forward presence, readiness of deployed forces, developing and stressing asymmetric capabilities and new technologies, and cyber capa bilities. We will reduce force structure in this plan, but we have to do it while preserving the right capacity to do one [major combat operation] in the future, he added.From Page 1Budget -Photos by Paige GnannUSS Gettysburg Family Readiness Group (FRG) gather around their award winning Apple Pie cupcakes as Ombudsman Stephanie Sanders holds the groups blue ribbon for win ning the 3rd Annual Cupcake Wars sponsored by Navy Exchange Mayport on Sept. 6. Nine teams competed for this years title for top cupcake and sold their baked good to sponsor MWR and FRG events for the commands. Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, talks with Malissa Richter of USS Farragut about their cupcake display, a scale model of the ship. The cupcakes manned the rails of the ship and were decorated to mimic Navy Working Uniforms while Minion cupcakes waited on shore. NS Mayport CMDCM Bob White checks out USS Robert G. Bradley FRG cupcake display based on The Great Gatsby, where they served up strawberry champagne cup cakes.Gettysburg FRG Has Blue Ribbon RecipeFrom StaffUSS Gettysburg had this years win ning recipe at the Navy Exchange (NEX) Mayport 3rd Annual Cupcake Wars held Sept. 6 at the off-base Exchange. Fleet Readiness Group teams from USS Philippine Sea, USS Robert G. Bradley, USS Gettysburg, USS Farragut, USS Hu City, NBHC Mayport and three teams from MWR served up sweet treats to the judges for the chance to win gift cards from NEX and bragging rights. USS Philippine Sea and USS Farragut won second and third place, respective ly. Each team was judged on the look and taste of their cupcakes as well as the teams display. Coincidentally, Gettysburgs win comes right after the ships Culinary Specialist brought home their own win during a culinary competition while deployed with USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Gettysburg Wins Celebrity Chef Competition USS Gettysburg Public AffairsCulinary special ists from guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) participated in a celebrity chef culinary competition on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Aug. 30. Celebrity chefs John Conley, Sarah Simington, and Mike Harden fea tured on Food Networks Diners, Drive Ins and Dives, each coached one of the three culinary spe cialist teams for the com petition. Chef Conley coached culinary specialists Shelby Shorr, Justin Tereza, Arlee Arenas and Roeneil Williams assigned to Gettysburg. It was a great experi ence to learn from the chefs. We were able to rotate through the dif ferent teams and learn a little bit from each, said Shorr. Each team was given the same ingredients to use, as well as the same amount of time to prepare their meals. Gettysburgs CSs came up with a recipe that con sisted of coconut encrust ed chicken breasts and island mango pineapple salsa with a side of stirfried rice. The event was judged by Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander of Carrier Strike Group 10, Capt. S. Robert Roth, commanding officer of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), and Capt. Sara Joyner, commander of Carrier Air Wing Three. First, second and third place prizes were award ed to the three teams for their hard work and par ticipation in the competi tion. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration in the U. S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC2 Lyle H. Wilkie IIICulinary Specialists from USS Gettysburg dominate the Culinary Challenge held by USS Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. The winning CSs are featured with their Professional Coach, Chef John Conley, who helped lead them to an unanimous victory. Gettysburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, supporting theater cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logis tics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, secu rity assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces, including food service, postal ser vices, Navy Exchanges, and movement of house hold goods. From Page 1Holiday Getting Ready For A Pinning-Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Chief (Select) Fire Controlman Mark Tynes attaches an anchor to his vessel in the machine shop aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). The vessel is a wooden box used by chief petty officer selectees to transport notes, tools and memorabilia that will guide them through their induction period. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 7

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UNITAS 2013 Kicks Off In ColombiaFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, the United Kingdom and the United States kicked off UNITAS 2013, an annual multination al exercise, Sept. 8 in Cartagena, Colombia. This years exercise is hosted by the Colombian navy and will include 19 warships that will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean Sea through Sept. 15. Observers from Belize, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico are also partici pating in the exercise. UNITAS is intended to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test com mand and control of forc es at sea while operating as a multinational force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. While the overarch ing goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the U.S. 4th Fleet com mander. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships that improve the capacity of U.S. and partner nation maritime forces through complex and comprehensive multinational train ing at sea. Specifically, there will be high-end warfare sce narios addressing elec tronic warfare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, and maritime interdiction operations, Harris said. The training focuses on developing coalition building, multilateral security cooperation, promoting tactical interop erability and friendship, professionalism and mutual understanding among the participating partner nations. The next UNITAS exer cise is scheduled for spring 2014. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Harris speaks with a group of schoolchildren during a community-relations project in Bocachica, a neighborhood on Tierra Bomba, an island off Cartegena. At the school, about 60 volunteers from participating navies, including half a dozen from the U.S. Navy, installed ceiling fans, built a vegetable garden, removed debris, fixed the flag pole and installed running water. They also renovated a church nearby. 8 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Honorary Old Tar Still Serving 4th FleetU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsMany things have changed since Joseph Casper joined the Navy more than 40 years ago, but his willingness to undertake new challenges and continue to serve in the Navy has not. Casper, of Fredonia, Wis., joined the Navy in May 1972. Now a gas tur bine systems electrical chief in the Navy Reserve, he has been on active duty orders with the sup ply department of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet here since November. In April, he was named an honorary Old Tar by the Springfield, Va.-based Surface Navy Association. After completing boot camp at Naval Training Center San Diego, Casper attended electricians mate A school and served aboard USS Edson (DD-946) and USS Preble (DDG-46) at sea. In 1979, Casper changed ratings, and was among the first wave of Sailors to attend gas turbine engine sys tems A and C school. After graduating from that school, he reported to the pre-commissioning unit of USS Clark (FFG11) and in 1981 became Enlisted Surface Warfare qualified the accom plishment for which the Surface Navy Association honored him. The association, which was created in 1985 to bring together the military, business, and aca demic communities that share an interest in surface warfare, pres ents its Old Tar award to the active duty Enlisted Surface Warfare special ist with the earliest date of qualification. The current Old Tar is Master Chief Fire Controlman Thomas Ward. Casper left active duty in 1985 and in 1988 took a job with a contrac tor, working as the elec trical foreman for the North Florida Shipyard at Naval Station Mayport. In October 2001 a month after the terror attacks on New York and Washington, and aboard an aircraft that crashed in Somerset County, Pa. he affiliated with the Navy Reserve. Casper felt it was his duty to serve his coun try, he said, but he faced a significant obstacle to continuing his career. In 2004, after he turned 50, Casper had an elec trocardiogram done and an irregular heartbeat was detected, he said. To correct the condition and resume his career, he had his heart stopped twice. In his cur rent assignment at COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet, Casper is the ships material officer, serv ing as a liaison between ships in the 4th Fleet area of responsibility and regional maintenance centers and coordinat ing emergency repairs for deployed units. This coor dination is essential to the execution of countering transnational organized crime and other missions. Chief Casper has been a valuable member of our directorate, said Capt. Ian Pollitt, 4th Fleets supply and logistics director. Because of his back ground in engineering, he knows what ships need to keep them running. Because of the limited number of ships in the AOR, its even more essential that we maxi mize their readiness, Pollitt said. Chief Casper has accomplished this exceptionally well. When his 4th Fleet assignment ends Sept. 30, Casper will return to his civil service job with the Marinette, Wis., detach ment of Naval Sea System Commands Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair activity in Bath, Me. He will retire from the Navy Reserve, closing out a military career that has spanned five decades. It has been a reward ing experience, he said. I have seen things and gone places that I never dreamed I would. I am proud of my time, both in uniform and serving as a civilian. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command area of respon sibility. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief Gas Turbine Systems (Electrical) Joseph Casper has been working in and around the U.S. Navy for more than 40 years, including his current assignment at U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet.Volunteers Needed For NS Mayport Coastal CleanupFrom NS Mayport EnvironmentalNS Mayport Environmental is soliciting volunteers in support of the 28th Annual International Coastal Cleanup, to collect lit ter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on Sept. 21 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the easternmost covered pavilion), near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Detailing Countdown Quick Reference Guide AvailableA detailing countdown reference guide is available for your Sailors. The guide lists what Sailors should be doing and expecting as they begin to enter the orders window. A step by step timeline from 18 months out from their PRD all the way until their PRD is outlined in the guide. The guide is available at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/toolbox/Documents/ Detailing%20Countdown%20(20%20AUG%20 2013).pdf THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and depen dents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be noti fied Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 14: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Sept. 27: Reggae Night. 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering ban ner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awe some music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day MWR Sports/ Fitness Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: J acksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. 10 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Navy Program Excelerates Alternative EnergyOffice of Naval ResearchAs the Department of the Navy (DoN) continues to emphasize the need for energy security, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) today announced it will increase its support for Energy Excelerator, a Hawaii-based program that funds development of new and innovative ener gy ideas. The program, part of ONRs Asia-Pacific Technology and Education Program (APTEP), is an effort to discover groundbreaking energy technologies, and supports startup com panies in bringing those technologies to the mar ket. The $30 million invest ment from ONR will not only help such promis ing companies grow, but also draw in other part ners to help energy inno vation flourish. The cur rent 17 Energy Excelerator portfolio companies have raised more than $38 mil lion in follow-on funding over the past three years. In the modern era, technological break throughs offer unprec edented opportunities to move toward diversified energy sources, said Dr. Richard Carlin, director of ONRs Sea Warfare and Weapons Department. Its vital for our Sailors and Marines, and the nation, to discover and develop new sustainable sources of energy-as well as dramatically improve the way we manage ener gy. Hawaii is uniquely posi tioned for such research, experts say, with unparal leled wind, solar, bioener gy, wave and geothermal resources. Its population is also keenly aware of the need for alternatives to fossil fuels because the state is dependent on imported oil for its power and energy use, and resi dents face the highest electricity costs in the nation. APTEP and the Energy Excelerator program offer unique support for the nations strategic pivot toward the Asia-Pacific region, as well as the Department of the Navys Energy Goals, established by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, to decrease Navy and Marine Corps dependence on fossil fuels. The DoNs Energy Goals policy statement reads in part: The United States Navy and Marine Corps rely far too much on petroleum, a depen dency that degrades the strategic position of our country and the tactical performance of our forc es. The global supply of oil is finite, it is becom ing increasingly difficult to find and exploit, and over time cost continues to rise. ONRs APTEP efforts are intended to help achieve the secretarys goals not only through science and technology break throughs, but also by encouraging technology commercialization and industry partnerships, as well as early education in science, technology, engineering and math. Partnerships are vital if were going to reach our energy goals, said Carlin. With this program that helps small companies bring their products out of the lab and into the market, were supporting a forward-thinking orga nization that can make a significant contribution to future energy needs. The Energy Excelerator program provides seed money to companies looking to provide tech nological capability that can better integrate power from renewable energy sources like solar and wind; energy stor age breakthroughs like smaller and more efficient batteries; transporta tion advances; and more. The program is accept ing applications online at http://www.energyexcel erator.com until Sept. 27, 2013. The Energy Excelerator helps start ups succeed, starting in Hawaii one of the best early markets for energy innovation, said Dawn Lippert, the projects senior manager. We are excited to see ONR sup porting companies that have the potential to make a really big impact in solving global energy problems. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 11

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FFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and play grounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 12, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 16-20, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The Fleet and Family Support Center offers this class to military spouses new to the area, and those new to the military way of life. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will pres ent useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. Sept. 17, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintend ed victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an addi tional motivator for end ing the violence and seek ing intervention. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Dedicated To Service-Photo by GSM3 Hillary HicksFleet and Family Support Center held its Ombudsman Training program recently. Pictured from left is FFSC Key West Ombudsman Coordinator Mary Vokes, Ombudsman Claire Corcoran, Ombudsman Tracy Kitting, Work & Family Life Consultant Ron Lancaster, FFSC NS Mayport Ombudsman Coordinator Kris Edmondson, Ombudsman Rachel Thompson, and Command Leadership Spouse Amy Tillotson. 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Jason Burnett Motorcycle Ride Join us on Saturday, Sept. 14 for the 9th Annual Jason Burnett Motorcycle Ride. Ride registrations benefit the USO care package cam paign. Participants can enjoy food, raffles, live music and a silent auction after the ride to benefit the Greater Jacksonville USO. For more informa tion, see the attached flyer or visit usobenefitride. com. NF Walk At The Jacksonville Zoo Get wild about ending NF (neurofibromatosis) at the Jacksonville NF Walk and 5K fun run held at the Jacksonville Zoo on Sept. 14. Registration and check-in start at 7:30. Adult registration is $25 and children are $15. For more information, visit www.NFWalk.org/jack sonville2013 or email Ken Linkous at klinkousjaxfl@ gmail.com. Registration includes Zoo admission and catered lunch. JU Military Appreciation Game Come out Sept. 21 to watch the Jacksonville University Dolphins take on the Warner University Royals for their military appreciation football game. Kickoff is at 1 p.m. and admission is free to active and retired military personnel with I.D. Free I-TEXTS To Support Your Greater Jax Area USO-Opt In Want to help your Greater Jacksonville Area USO to continue its mis sion of supporting troops and families? Here is a free opportunity to do so. For those of you with cell phones and unlimited texting, please opt-in to I-TEXTS. TEXT: USOJAX, YOUR ZIP CODE, AND YOUR EMAIL TO: 70000 Youll receive a confir mation text with a link to build your profile and receive only the deals that interest you (restaurants, sporting goods, etc). Checker Yellow Cab Of Jacksonville-Rate Discounts The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is proud to announce a new partnership with Checker Yellow Cab of Jacksonville to support troops and families. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes divi sion, and medals to all finishers. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game season. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary ser vice is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meet ings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOSaturday, Sept. 14 An Eating and Growing Seasonally Workshop; Learning how to grow cool-season veg etables, Composting, and Food sampling using seasonal produce at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.1 p.m.. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Volunteers needed for Childrens Tumor Foundation NF WALK at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens. Checkin is 7:30a.m. walk and 5k fun run at 8:30 a.m. Register your team at WWW.NFWalk.org/ jacksonville2013. Fees: Adults $25 and Children $15. Questions contact Chrissie Connors at ccon nors@ctf.org or 904-6195130 Trish (leave mes sage.) Come celebrate five centuries of Spanish influence in Florida with an informative talk at 2 p.m.about the San Juan del Puerto Mission on Ft. George Island. Learn about Fr. Pareja, who translated the native Timucuan language and gained insight into their unique culture. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Attendees will make their own 55 gallon plastic rain bar rels to take home. You will learn how to con nect a rain barrel to a rain garden and learn some important information on water conservation. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per person to make a rain barrel, $5 for attendance only (no rain barrel) Pre-payment and registration required for barrel. Payment must be received by Monday, Sept. 16th. Make check to DCOHAC and send to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N. McDuff Ave, Jax., Fl 32254. You can register with credit card at http:// rainbarrel92013.event brite.com. Seating is lim ited to 35 pre-paid regis trations. No walk-ins for make and take. For ques tions, call 904-255-7450. Saturday, Sept. 21 This interpretive pro gram at 2 p.m. explores the snakes that are native to Florida and live at the Talbot Islands State Parks. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., announc es the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza at 10 a.m. The opening of the Sculpture Garden, located in the front lawn of the Art Connections building, marks the com pletion of the Landscape Enhancement Project, which launched in September 2012, and includes the renovation of the entire Riverside Avenue portion of The Cummer campus. The Sculpture Garden opens with its inaugural exhibition, The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti fea turing works on loan by the St. Augustine-based sculptor. Torcoletti will visit The Cummer for the Community Opening on Saturday, September 21 to host a demonstration of his working methods. This free event will feature live music and art-making activities. Saturday, Sept. 21-22 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a weekend event to commemorate the part that Fort Clinch played in the Spanish-American War. The event is held on Sept. 21 from 9 a.m.5 p.m. and Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. p.m. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 13

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Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com CNO Details Navys BudgetAmerican Forces Press ServiceEven without the uncertainty caused by budget negotiations, it will take years for the Navy to recover from the effects of sequestration, the chief of naval operations told an audience at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington Sept 5. Sequestration and the effects of the continuing budget resolu tion damaged readiness, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert said. The Navys budget reduction was $11 billion, the admiral said. The service cancelled five ship deployments, and the reduction cut into the ser vices surge capacity, he added. Usually, we have three carrier strike groups and three amphibious ready groups able to respond within a week, Greenert said. We have one now, and thats going to be the story in fiscal 2014. The reduction in fiscal 2014 is $14 billion. The service exempted military manpower from the cuts, and this would mean 14 percent reductions for all other accounts, the admiral said. Barring help from Congress in the next budget, he told the audience, the Navy will have to cancel half of its ship availability. We will cancel a lot of aircraft availabilities, he added. If we restored the budget after [fiscal 2014] and said, You have a full-up operations and maintenance budget, itll take about five years to get that backlog in aircraft maintenance down. Navywide, the service will reduce training for those not deploying, Greenert said. Some air wings will fly and aircrews will receive training, he said, but officials are uncomfortable with the amount of flight hours. Shipbuilding will drop in fiscal 2014 also. I would see the loss of a littoral combat ship, an afloat-forward staging base and advanced procurement for a Virginia-class submarine and a carrier overhaul, Greenert said. We might lose two more a submarine and a destroyer if we are unable to reprogram and move money into those accounts. The Navy will lose about 25 air -Photos by Paige GnannNaval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, middle, stands with Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) staff, NS Mayport Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, kneeling, and CMDCM Bob White, right, after signing a proclamation declaring September Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport.From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsEach year Americas Armed Forces recognize September as Suicide Prevention Month. For 2013, Navy is focusing on the importance of com munity and self-purpose when dealing with adver sity, officials announced in NAVADMIN 212/13. The theme of this years Navy Suicide Prevention (SP) Month is Thrive in Your Community, encouraging Sailors to work together as commands, units, installa tions or other groups to con tribute to a project of their choice that benefits others. Participation is not mandatory and there is no minimum for engagement. Sailors can work together to do something positive for their commands or installations, or get involved in their local communities. Family and civilian engage ment is encouraged. While we dont often think of it this way, suicide preven tion actually happens every day at the deckplate, in our neighborhoods, even in our own homes, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy Resilience chief. When we do small things that make a difference to those around us, we may not real ize the effect were having on others lives-or our own, Scott said. Navy seeks to promote unity and cohesion in this context to emphasize the positive impacts of seeking help; Sailors that are willing to help others may be more willing to receive it when needed. Throughout the month, resources will be released on www.suicide.navy.mil > Suicide Prevention Month to guide discussion on stress navigation, comprehen sive wellness, and a sense of community-all protective factors against suicide. The website also houses ideas and guidance for Thrive in Your Community engage ment for any command envi ronment. Command Suicide Prevention Coordinators will also be available to help organize local efforts. Sailors are encouraged to send details and/or photos of their September events to sui cideprevention@navy.mil to be shared with the fleet on the SP Month website and Navy Operational Stress Control social media. Navys efforts to help Sailors better navigate their stress are an all hands evo lution, all of the time. These initiatives extend far beyond September and serve as a launch pad for year-long local efforts to build resilience and unit cohesion, promoting a Navywide culture supportive of seeking help, said Scott. For more information, ref erence NAVADMIN 212/13 or visit http://www.public. navy.mil/BUPERS-NPC/ SUPPORT/21ST_CENTURY_ SAILOR/SUICIDE_ PREVENTION/SPMONTH/ Pages/default.aspx and receive the latest updates by following @NavStress on Twitter and Facebook. McCall signs a proclamation declaring September Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. FFSC tied 28 yellow ribbons around trees at Memorial Park to represent the 28 Sailors who died in 2012 due to suicide.September Is Suicide Prevention Month At Naval Station Mayport 2013 Holiday Season Mailing Deadlines SetFrom NAVSUP Office of Corporate CommunicationsThe Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25 delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were released Sept. 3. For mail addressed to: APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962-966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (let ters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 All classes of mail addressed to FPO/APO addresses must use the nine-digit ZIP code to ensure delivery. Mail not addressed correctly will be returned to the sender as undeliverable. Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is avail able from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local post office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-avail able basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth com bined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addi tion to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to par cels mailed to APO/ FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domesti cally by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space avail able basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is recommended that customers check with their local civilian or military post office for information on size restrictions and possible need for customs decla ration forms. Customers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items cannot be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, por nography, controlled substances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have See Budget, Page 6 See Holiday, Page 7

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2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. The Mirror The Mirror The Mirror Early last Thursday morning, I met members of Mayports Fleet and Family Support team at Memorial Park in a grove of trees with yellow ribbons tied around them. In fact, there were 28 rib bons tied around 28 trees and unlike the 70s song by Tony Orlando, there was no happy ending. I was there to attend a proclamation ceremony declaring September as Suicide Prevention Month at Naval Station Mayport. The yellow ribbons are there in recognition of our shipmates that we have lost to this enemy this past year. The theme of this years Navy Suicide Prevention (SP) Month is Thrive in Your Community, which encourages Sailors to work together as commands, units, installations or other groups to contribute to a project of their choice that benefits others. Saving someones life could be as easy as asking a simple question. Most triggers of suicide are preventable. As a Navy community, it is up to us to take this matter seriously and provide assistance to our shipmates and their families. Our people are our most valuable asset and we must strive to prevent our Sailors and our dedicated civilians from making suicide a perma nent solution to a temporary problem. Resources on suicide prevention are available through FFSC and suicideprevention@navy.mil Lets see if we can make this a happy ending after all by saving someones life. Thanks to the Chief Petty Officer Selectees for supporting Mayports September 11 Remembrance Ceremony yesterday at Memorial Park. Its hard to believe that it has been 12 years since the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, Flight 93 in Pennsylvania and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.. We should all take time to remember the thousands of lives lost, as well as the warriors who have fallen during the War on Terrorism since then. We are still fighting this fight today. Whether we are in Afghanistan or at home, there are people out there who wish to do us harm. Stay vigilant! Congratulations also go out to all the Chief Petty Officer Selectees who are getting ready to put on their anchors tomorrow. This is an exciting time for you and your families. Chiefs hold a special place in the U.S. Navy and our Sailors rely on your wealth of experience, mentorship and leadership. When you put on your pin tomorrow, you are making a promise to yourself, your family, and your ship mates to be the best that you can be. I am extremely proud of all of you. Well done! On Sept. 14, Navy commands throughout the country will recognize the thousands of Navy Ombudsmen who vol unteer their time, talents and energy making a difference in the lives of Navy families. These volunteers help Sailors and families during all phases of deployment, disaster or crisis. They are also there to assist with the everyday ques tions and challenges that face Navy families. Navy Ombudsman play an important role in the success of a commands mission and they are often the first person family members to turn to during a crisis to ensure they are guided to the proper resources. Connecting Navy families to needed assistance is what Ombudsmen have been doing for 43 years and I thank all of them for their service, and tireless dedication. Lastly, I want to congratulate the USS Gettysburg family support group for their win at the third annual Cupcake Wars, sponsored by the Navy Exchange. Reyna and I had the pleasure of being two of the judges at this years event. The cupcakes tasted great and some of the displays were down right amazing. I really had a hard time deciding which was my favorite. When it comes down to it, all of the entries did a great job and definitely satisfied my sweet tooth for the next month. I cant wait for next year! Please continue sending your suggestions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil.Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSYou and your child made it through last school year. But there were some bumps in the road which might have been avoided with better parent-teacher or coun selor communication. Checking the planner and/or going online to check grades just didnt get the job done. So what can you do? You may need to set up a phone or face-to-face conference with your childs teacher or teach ers and the counselor. Different schools have different procedures for setting up these confer ences. At some schools you will need to speak to the teacher directly while at others, appointments for conferences are made through the schools guidance office. An early-in-theyear conference usu ally involves letting your childs teacher and/or counselor know about ongoing concerns or any special circumstances which might affect his work in school. Provide his teachers and/or counselor with informa tion about major chang es which have occurred or are about to occur in your family like a par ent is on or about to go on deployment, that this is the childs 3rd school in three years, or a critical injury to a parent which requires rehab in another city. Some families are reluctant to reveal private matters, but you might consider simply alerting his counselor or teachers that your family is going through difficult times. Teachers and coun selors welcome parental involvement especially when you want to collaborate on improving aca demic success. Research shows that parental involvement and collabo ration with schools help children perform better academically. When par ents work with schools and school counselors, their children get more As and Bs and fewer Cs, Ds, and Fs. A good relationship with the teacher will also make it easier for you to understand what your child experiences every day and inform you about his schoolwork and responsibilities. If you have questions for the teacher, be sure to formulate the ques tions before the confer ence. Try to be as specific as possible. Some ques tions you may want to ask include the following: 1. In past grades, he has not been successful in getting in his home work. Do you have any ideas which can help me to help him with this? 2. Is tutoring available and how does my child access it? 3. What other resources are available at school to help my child with your class? 4. Are there additional books or resources avail able at school or in the community which would help him overall with study skills, note-taking, or time management, for example? If you and the teacher or counselor decide on a course of action for solv ing a particular problem, determine how you are going to monitor your childs progress. For monitoring purposes, will the teacher contact you by phone or email? Will he write comments daily, weekly, quarterly in your childs planner? Will he post it on OnCourse? Will the counselor email you? If there is not improve ment in a predetermined period of time, what will the next step be? If your child did not attend the conference, share with him the issues which were discussed. If a plan of action was determined, make sure that your child under stands what his role will be even if he was pres ent for the conference. For example, it may be his responsibility to bring home his planner each night or have you sign his graded tests. As you work with your childs teacher, the improvement may not happen immediately. It may require some time for the plan to work. Or it may require that the plan be tweaked or even discarded. There is cer tainly nothing wrong with developing a Plan B. But whatever happens, remain in touch with the teacher and/or counselor. Share successes and failures. Key your eye on the prize of having your child achieve success in that class. With your deter mination and patience, it will happen. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One.Parent-Teacher/Counselor Communication Key For Your Childs Successful School YearJudy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingAs human beings we have built in needs that we cannot live without. Food, water, and shelter are needs that quickly come to mind, but let me mention a fourth need less talked about; the need to feel connected to other people. As Navy families, we discover this really quick when we deploy. There is a pain and heartache we feel when we are separated from our loved ones. Why is this? Because these are the people we have spent the most time with, lived life with, who know us the best! Being separated from them is never enjoyable, because we are without the presence of a person we confide in the most. Consider for a moment that the harshest punish ment in prison is solitary confinement. The act of separating people from people for long periods of time is extremely dif ficult because we are hard wired to connect with people on a daily basis. Our need to live in community is a powerful driving force in our lives. People will choose a job, a place to live, and other major life decisions based on who they know. People will often choose to go and do something where they feel loved and accepted, regardless if the outcome is favorable or not. I have seen people move across the US, quit Chaplain Stephen Cloer CNSL Ministry Center CHAPLAINSSometimes Connection Is All You Need To Livetheir job for another, all based on going where they feel loved and accepted. September is Suicide Prevention Month in the U.S. Navy, and our theme is Thrive in Your com munity. When a person feels known and accepted in their community, the by product is a person who likes where they live and work, and has great er resiliency to emerge stronger from lifes chal lenges. Let me encourage you to think about this very central truth, that we all have a deep inner need to feel connected to others. So often when a person decides to try and end their life, it is because they feel like there is no one around them that they can truly connect with. When a person feels all alone, unable to con nect, it can seem as if life is not worth living. As people we draw our sense life purpose and selfworth from our commu nity. You have heard it said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If everyone worked to make the people around them feel accepted and connected, we could do a lot to reduce suicides in our community. Next time you see someone and give them the greeting of the day, take a few minutes lon ger and say, How are you really doing, and is there anything I can help you with? Talk to people about their lives, ask about their families, take someone to lunch and just hang out. The Golden rule cer tainly applies, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If we all did that, Suicide statistics might be greatly reduced.

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USS The Sullivans Helps Saudi DhowsUSS The Sullivans Public AffairsThe guided-missile cruiser USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) provided medical assistance to a vessel in distress in the Arabian Sea, approximately 40 miles off the coast of Saudi Arabia, Aug. 18, while conducting mari time security operations in the area. The three-person crew of motor vessel Abir Alqaray No. 4, a 35-meter Saudi Arabian-flagged dhow contacted The Sullivans by visual means asking for medical assis tance for an unconscious crew member. The Sullivans received the request while in the process of assisting another Saudi Arabianflagged dhow named Pal Khat No. 4 with a casualty to her engine. According to Ensign Elizabeth Decker, con ning officer, the crew did not speak English, but it was clear that they were in some form of distress. We saw the dhow incoming at a high rate of speed, and we maneu vered to prevent a colli sion. After our maneuver, we noticed the personnel on board waving franti cally, and it was apparent they needed assistance, said Decker. Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Christina McCullough embarked The Sullivans small boat to assist the Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) team along with a translator and boarded the dhow to provide supplies and medical assis tance to the cre Chief Hospital Corpsman Dawn Isais, The Sullivans indepen dent duty corpsman diagnosed the patient with heat exhaustion via bridge-to-bridge radio communication with McCullough who checked the Saudi patients vital signs. The Sullivans pro vided food, water and ice to treat the patient. Twenty minutes after embarking the dhow the member became con scious, and was able to retain water and food. This was my first time in 70-plus approaches doing anything like this, and it was a very exciting and rewarding experience. They were extremely appreciative, said Ensign Mathew Stevens, the VBSS boarding officer. Coalition forces have a longstanding tradition of helping mariners in dis tress by providing medi cal assistance, engineer ing assistance, and search and rescue efforts, said Cmdr. Samuel de Castro, commanding officer of The Sullivans. The Sullivans crew was happy to provide maritime support, and relieved that the dhow contacted us for help, Castro said. The dhow crew had been out fishing for multiple hours in the high temperatures of the Northern Arabian Gulf summer heat and miscalculated water consumption, he added. We were pleased to be able to assist them in the way of food, water, and medical assistance. The Sullivans is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting maritime security opera tions and theater security cooperation efforts. -Photo by MC3 Billy HoThe guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Petty Officers and Selects join volunteers and residents of the Clara White Mission for a group photo after a day of volunteering at the downtown Jacksonville facility. The day was one of several outreach events coordinated by the Selects during Phase II of CPO 365 training. Mayport Chief Selects On A MissionCPO Selects Tee Off -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChiefs and Chief Selects from Naval Station Mayport take a tour of the Clara White Mission Sept. 2 after serving lunch to the community. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief Selects from Naval Station Mayport visit with locals Sept. 2 after serving lunch to the community at the Clara White Mission downtown. -Photo by MCC William TownsendChief Selects get an extra helping hand as they prepare food to serve at the Clara White Mission during a community relations project on Sept. 2. -Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Gunners Mate Brandon D. Clark serves as caddy at the 2013 CPO Selectee Golf Tournament held at Windy Harbor Golf Club.-Photo by MCCS Eric PowellChief Select Intelligence Specialist Angela Calhoun smiles as Chief Select Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Crystal Mack shows off a piece of paper eaten by a goat mascot brought out to Windy Harbor Golf Club for the annual CPO Selectee Golf Tournament last week. The Selects will participate in a pinning ceremony this Friday.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 5 -Photos by MC2 Marcus L. StanleyFirst Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division conduct firefighting training on the airfield at Naval Station Mayport using a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device. The device can simulate 13 different fires that can happen aboard an aircraft. Mayport Fire Fighters Feel The Heat First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division point their water hoses at one of several fires that have erupted on a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device during recent training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division spray down the inside of a Mobile Aircraft Firefighting Training Device during recent training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division check hoses during training. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division race towards an airplane on fire. First Coast Navy Fire and Rescue Mayport Division assess the situation before heading towards an airplane on fire during a training event.

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craft, from helicopters to P-8s to F-35s, the admiral said. We need about a billion dollars to get into the operations and maintenance account and a billion into the procure ment accounts so we can get it into shipbuilding, which will be my No. 1 priority in the Navy, he said. Beyond fiscal 2014, Greenert said, the bywords will be forward presence, readiness of deployed forces, developing and stressing asymmetric capabilities and new technologies, and cyber capa bilities. We will reduce force structure in this plan, but we have to do it while preserving the right capacity to do one [major combat operation] in the future, he added.From Page 1Budget -Photos by Paige GnannUSS Gettysburg Family Readiness Group (FRG) gather around their award winning Apple Pie cupcakes as Ombudsman Stephanie Sanders holds the groups blue ribbon for winning the 3rd Annual Cupcake Wars sponsored by Navy Exchange Mayport on Sept. 6. Nine teams competed for this years title for top cupcake and sold their baked good to sponsor MWR and FRG events for the commands. Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wes McCall, talks with Malissa Richter of USS Farragut about their cupcake display, a scale model of the ship. The cupcakes manned the rails of the ship and were decorated to mimic Navy Working Uniforms while Minion cupcakes waited on shore. NS Mayport CMDCM Bob White checks out USS Robert G. Bradley FRG cupcake display based on The Great Gatsby, where they served up strawberry champagne cupcakes.Gettysburg FRG Has Blue Ribbon RecipeFrom StaffUSS Gettysburg had this years win ning recipe at the Navy Exchange (NEX) Mayport 3rd Annual Cupcake Wars held Sept. 6 at the off-base Exchange. Fleet Readiness Group teams from USS Philippine Sea, USS Robert G. Bradley, USS Gettysburg, USS Farragut, USS Hu City, NBHC Mayport and three teams from MWR served up sweet treats to the judges for the chance to win gift cards from NEX and bragging rights. USS Philippine Sea and USS Farragut won second and third place, respectively. Each team was judged on the look and taste of their cupcakes as well as the teams display. Coincidentally, Gettysburgs win comes right after the ships Culinary Specialist brought home their own win during a culinary competition while deployed with USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Gettysburg Wins Celebrity Chef Competition USS Gettysburg Public AffairsCulinary special ists from guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) participated in a celebrity chef culinary competition on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Aug. 30. Celebrity chefs John Conley, Sarah Simington, and Mike Harden fea tured on Food Networks Diners, Drive Ins and Dives, each coached one of the three culinary specialist teams for the competition. Chef Conley coached culinary specialists Shelby Shorr, Justin Tereza, Arlee Arenas and Roeneil Williams assigned to Gettysburg. It was a great experi ence to learn from the chefs. We were able to rotate through the dif ferent teams and learn a little bit from each, said Shorr. Each team was given the same ingredients to use, as well as the same amount of time to prepare their meals. Gettysburgs CSs came up with a recipe that consisted of coconut encrusted chicken breasts and island mango pineapple salsa with a side of stirfried rice. The event was judged by Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander of Carrier Strike Group 10, Capt. S. Robert Roth, commanding officer of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), and Capt. Sara Joyner, commander of Carrier Air Wing Three. First, second and third place prizes were award ed to the three teams for their hard work and par ticipation in the competi tion. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security cooperation in the U. S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. -Photo by MC2 Lyle H. Wilkie IIICulinary Specialists from USS Gettysburg dominate the Culinary Challenge held by USS Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. The winning CSs are featured with their Professional Coach, Chef John Conley, who helped lead them to an unanimous victory. Gettysburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, supporting theater cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. markings related to any type of hazardous mate rial, such as bleach, alco hol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. The NAVSUP and Navy Supply Corps team share one mission--to deliver sustained global logis tics capabilities to the Navy and Joint warfighter. NAVSUP/Navy Supply Corps diverse team of more than 25,000 civilian and military personnel oversee a diverse portfo lio including supply chain management for material support to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and coalition partners, supply opera tions, conventional ord nance, contracting, resale, fuel, transportation, security assistance, and quality of life issues for the naval forces, including food service, postal ser vices, Navy Exchanges, and movement of house hold goods. From Page 1Holiday Getting Ready For A Pinning-Photo by MC2 Donald R. White Jr.Chief (Select) Fire Controlman Mark Tynes attaches an anchor to his vessel in the machine shop aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). The vessel is a wooden box used by chief petty officer selectees to transport notes, tools and memorabilia that will guide them through their induction period. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 7

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UNITAS 2013 Kicks Off In ColombiaFrom U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsNaval forces from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, the United Kingdom and the United States kicked off UNITAS 2013, an annual multination al exercise, Sept. 8 in Cartagena, Colombia. This years exercise is hosted by the Colombian navy and will include 19 warships that will conduct operations in the Western Caribbean Sea through Sept. 15. Observers from Belize, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico are also partici pating in the exercise. UNITAS is intended to train participating forces in a variety of maritime scenarios to test com mand and control of forces at sea while operating as a multinational force to provide the maximum opportunity to improve interoperability. While the overarch ing goal of the exercise is to develop and test command and control of forces at sea, training in this exercise will address the spectrum of maritime operations, said Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, the U.S. 4th Fleet commander. UNITAS develops and sustains relationships that improve the capacity of U.S. and partner nation maritime forces through complex and comprehensive multinational train ing at sea. Specifically, there will be high-end warfare sce narios addressing elec tronic warfare, anti-air warfare and air defense, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, and maritime interdiction operations, Harris said. The training focuses on developing coalition building, multilateral security cooperation, promoting tactical interop erability and friendship, professionalism and mutual understanding among the participating partner nations. The next UNITAS exer cise is scheduled for spring 2014. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. -Photo by MC2 Adam HendersonRear Adm. Harris speaks with a group of schoolchildren during a community-relations project in Bocachica, a neighborhood on Tierra Bomba, an island off Cartegena. At the school, about 60 volunteers from participating navies, including half a dozen from the U.S. Navy, installed ceiling fans, built a vegetable garden, removed debris, fixed the flagpole and installed running water. They also renovated a church nearby. 8 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Honorary Old Tar Still Serving 4th FleetU.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsMany things have changed since Joseph Casper joined the Navy more than 40 years ago, but his willingness to undertake new challenges and continue to serve in the Navy has not. Casper, of Fredonia, Wis., joined the Navy in May 1972. Now a gas tur bine systems electrical chief in the Navy Reserve, he has been on active duty orders with the sup ply department of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet here since November. In April, he was named an honorary Old Tar by the Springfield, Va.-based Surface Navy Association. After completing boot camp at Naval Training Center San Diego, Casper attended electricians mate A school and served aboard USS Edson (DD-946) and USS Preble (DDG-46) at sea. In 1979, Casper changed ratings, and was among the first wave of Sailors to attend gas turbine engine sys tems A and C school. After graduating from that school, he reported to the pre-commissioning unit of USS Clark (FFG11) and in 1981 became Enlisted Surface Warfare qualified the accom plishment for which the Surface Navy Association honored him. The association, which was created in 1985 to bring together the military, business, and aca demic communities that share an interest in surface warfare, pres ents its Old Tar award to the active duty Enlisted Surface Warfare special ist with the earliest date of qualification. The current Old Tar is Master Chief Fire Controlman Thomas Ward. Casper left active duty in 1985 and in 1988 took a job with a contrac tor, working as the elec trical foreman for the North Florida Shipyard at Naval Station Mayport. In October 2001 a month after the terror attacks on New York and Washington, and aboard an aircraft that crashed in Somerset County, Pa. he affiliated with the Navy Reserve. Casper felt it was his duty to serve his country, he said, but he faced a significant obstacle to continuing his career. In 2004, after he turned 50, Casper had an elec trocardiogram done and an irregular heartbeat was detected, he said. To correct the condition and resume his career, he had his heart stopped twice. In his cur rent assignment at COMUSNAVSO/4th Fleet, Casper is the ships material officer, serv ing as a liaison between ships in the 4th Fleet area of responsibility and regional maintenance centers and coordinat ing emergency repairs for deployed units. This coordination is essential to the execution of countering transnational organized crime and other missions. Chief Casper has been a valuable member of our directorate, said Capt. Ian Pollitt, 4th Fleets supply and logistics director. Because of his back ground in engineering, he knows what ships need to keep them running. Because of the limited number of ships in the AOR, its even more essential that we maxi mize their readiness, Pollitt said. Chief Casper has accomplished this exceptionally well. When his 4th Fleet assignment ends Sept. 30, Casper will return to his civil service job with the Marinette, Wis., detach ment of Naval Sea System Commands Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair activity in Bath, Me. He will retire from the Navy Reserve, closing out a military career that has spanned five decades. It has been a reward ing experience, he said. I have seen things and gone places that I never dreamed I would. I am proud of my time, both in uniform and serving as a civilian. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime securi ty operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional secu rity in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. -Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief Gas Turbine Systems (Electrical) Joseph Casper has been working in and around the U.S. Navy for more than 40 years, including his current assignment at U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet.Volunteers Needed For NS Mayport Coastal CleanupFrom NS Mayport EnvironmentalNS Mayport Environmental is soliciting volunteers in support of the 28th Annual International Coastal Cleanup, to collect lit ter and debris on the beach and along the Jetties at Naval Station Mayport. Participants should plan to meet at 9 a.m. on Sept. 21 at Jetties Pavilion #3 (the easternmost covered pavilion), near Pelican Roost RV Park on Bon Homme Richard Street. This event will run until approximately 11 a.m. Volunteers are welcome to participate for part or all of that time frame. Community Service hours may be earned from participation in this event. Pre-registration is not required. Gloves and garbage bags will be provided. To learn more, call Keep Jacksonville Beautiful at (904) 630-3420 or visit www.coj.net/KJB or contact Naval Station Mayport Water Quality Program Manager, Scott Dombrosky at 270-6781. Detailing Countdown Quick Reference Guide AvailableA detailing countdown reference guide is available for your Sailors. The guide lists what Sailors should be doing and expecting as they begin to enter the orders window. A step by step timeline from 18 months out from their PRD all the way until their PRD is outlined in the guide. The guide is available at http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/career/toolbox/Documents/ Detailing%20Countdown%20(20%20AUG%20 2013).pdf THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 9

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Auto Skills Center Sept. Special: 10% off vehicle diagnostics and open stall fees. 270-5392 Tire Special: Buy four tires and receive free rotation on those tires for life (must show receipt to receive rotation). 2705392 Sept. 28: NAPA Brake Clinic. Open to active duty and dependents; limit 10 people. Register in person at the Auto Skills Center Sept. 1-24. One lucky participant will win a FREE front brake job (pads only; and $85 value); Winner will be notified Sept. 25. 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo. Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every MondayFriday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 270-7205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 2707205 Sept. 14: Poker Tournament 7 p.m. at Castaways Lounge. Test your card shark abilities for great prizes. Free to enter. 2707205 Sept. 18: Game Night. 7:30 p.m. at Castaways Lounge Enjoy a nigh of your favorite games: Life-Sized Jenga, Twister & more. 270-7205 Sept. 21: 1st Annual Castaways Mens Beach Volleyball Tournament. Check in at 8:30 a.m. Open to military and civilian teams. Sept. 27: Reggae Night. 8 pm at Castaways Lounge. Live music by Sugar Bear, giveaways and more! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and all-you-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 2705431 ITT Sea World/Busch Gardens Military Special. Qualified ser vice members and veterans can receive off a 1-day pass to Sea World or Busch Gardens from now until Nov. 11, 2013. Offer only available at ITT office. 2705145 Monster Jam Tickets Now On Sale. Tickets are now on sale for Monster Jam on Feb. 22, 2014 at Everbank Stadium. 200s section is $22 and 100s is $42. 270-5145 Medieval Times Orlando Special. Free Royalty Upgrade when you purchase an adult or child admission at ITT. Royalty upgrade includes preferred seating, Knights Cheering banner, commemorative program and more! 270-5145 Halloween Horror Nights Now On Sale. Tickets are now available for Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Orlando select nights from Sept. 20Oct. 31. Prices range from $44.25-$74.25. 270-5145 Every Friday in September: Active Duty Bowl Free. Every Friday from 4-6 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Free bowling for active duty when they bring a nonactive duty friend; guest fee $5. Includes 2 hours of Xtreme Bowling and awesome music videos and light show! 270-5377 Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, prizes and dazzling laser light show. 270-5377 Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hot dog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes, music videos, light show and colored head pin bowling for prizes. 270-5377 Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day MWR Sports/ Fitness Sept 20: Freedom FridayPuro Piata Party. 7-11 p.m. at the Youth Center. Cost is $8 advanced sign-up and $10 day of, space permitting. 270-5680 The following activities target single or unaccom panied Sailors. For more information, call 2707788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the month ly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Every Tuesday in Sept.: Ping Pong Champ Joan Rugglero. Learn how to play ping pong from the 1998 World Championship Doubles Bronze Medalist.4-6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Aug. 29: Water Wars. 7-10 p.m. at the Base Pool. Music, food and wet and wild fun! FREE. Aug. 30: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Aug. 31: NBA2K13 Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 1: Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 4: Texas Holdem Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 6: Movie Trip. Van Departs 5:15 p.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 7: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 8: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Kansas City Chiefs. Van departs 11 a.m. Cost $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. Sept. 9: Liberty Programmer Meeting. 4:30 p.m. at the Liberty Center. This is a chance to tell the programmer what you want on YOUR Liberty Calendar. Sept. 13: Movie Trip. Van departs Liberty Center 5:15 p.m. Transportation only; sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 14: Car, Truck and Automobile Show. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. FREE. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 15: Paintball. Van Departs 7:30 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; includes transportation, field fees and gear. Sign up by Sept. 12. Sept. 16: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Sept. 18: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sept. 20: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 5 p.m; transportation only. Sept. 22: Jacksonville Festival of Horrors. Van Departs 1 p.m. at Liberty Center. $20 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 19. Sept. 28: J acksonville Tattoo Convention. Van Departs 10 a.m. at Liberty Center. $15 at the door. Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 29: Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colt. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Cost $15; Sign up by Sept. 26. Sept. 30: Chess Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. 10 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Navy Program Excelerates Alternative EnergyOffice of Naval ResearchAs the Department of the Navy (DoN) continues to emphasize the need for energy security, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) today announced it will increase its support for Energy Excelerator, a Hawaii-based program that funds development of new and innovative ener gy ideas. The program, part of ONRs Asia-Pacific Technology and Education Program (APTEP), is an effort to discover groundbreaking energy technologies, and supports startup com panies in bringing those technologies to the mar ket. The $30 million investment from ONR will not only help such promis ing companies grow, but also draw in other part ners to help energy inno vation flourish. The cur rent 17 Energy Excelerator portfolio companies have raised more than $38 million in follow-on funding over the past three years. In the modern era, technological break throughs offer unprec edented opportunities to move toward diversified energy sources, said Dr. Richard Carlin, director of ONRs Sea Warfare and Weapons Department. Its vital for our Sailors and Marines, and the nation, to discover and develop new sustainable sources of energy-as well as dramatically improve the way we manage ener gy. Hawaii is uniquely positioned for such research, experts say, with unparalleled wind, solar, bioenergy, wave and geothermal resources. Its population is also keenly aware of the need for alternatives to fossil fuels because the state is dependent on imported oil for its power and energy use, and resi dents face the highest electricity costs in the nation. APTEP and the Energy Excelerator program offer unique support for the nations strategic pivot toward the Asia-Pacific region, as well as the Department of the Navys Energy Goals, established by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, to decrease Navy and Marine Corps dependence on fossil fuels. The DoNs Energy Goals policy statement reads in part: The United States Navy and Marine Corps rely far too much on petroleum, a depen dency that degrades the strategic position of our country and the tactical performance of our forc es. The global supply of oil is finite, it is becom ing increasingly difficult to find and exploit, and over time cost continues to rise. ONRs APTEP efforts are intended to help achieve the secretarys goals not only through science and technology break throughs, but also by encouraging technology commercialization and industry partnerships, as well as early education in science, technology, engineering and math. Partnerships are vital if were going to reach our energy goals, said Carlin. With this program that helps small companies bring their products out of the lab and into the market, were supporting a forward-thinking orga nization that can make a significant contribution to future energy needs. The Energy Excelerator program provides seed money to companies looking to provide tech nological capability that can better integrate power from renewable energy sources like solar and wind; energy stor age breakthroughs like smaller and more efficient batteries; transporta tion advances; and more. The program is accept ing applications online at http://www.energyexcel erator.com until Sept. 27, 2013. The Energy Excelerator helps start ups succeed, starting in Hawaii one of the best early markets for energy innovation, said Dawn Lippert, the projects senior manager. We are excited to see ONR sup porting companies that have the potential to make a really big impact in solving global energy problems. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 11

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FFSC Offers Classes For Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey. Sept. 12, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutrition, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips sev eral times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to inter act with other children their childs age. All chil dren age four and below are invited to attend. Sept. 12, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 16-20, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Military Spouse 101 Workshop, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 The Fleet and Family Support Center offers this class to military spouses new to the area, and those new to the military way of life. Guest speakers from the military and civilian communities will pres ent useful information to help you have a pleasant tour here at Naval Station Mayport. Sept. 17, 1-3 p.m., PFM Forum Building 1 Room 1616 Sept. 18, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-noon, Your Insurance Needs FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 19, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-noon, What About The Kids?, FFSC Building 1, Room 702 Children who witness family violence are often forgotten as the unintended victims. A wide range of child adjustment prob lems has been found to be associated with expo sure to domestic violence. Parents need to see, understand the effects of domestic violence on children as encompass ing behavior, emotion, development and social ization. Parents need to understand that there is an intergenerational cycle of violence and they may be creating a legacy for their child of learned vio lent behavior. The pur pose of this program is not to shame parents for events that have already happened, but to instill hope that things can change. The knowledge that the violence, which many parents incorrectly believe is unseen by their children, is negatively impacting their childrens growth and development and may provide an additional motivator for end ing the violence and seeking intervention. Sept. 23-27, 8 a.m.4:30 p.m., Victim Advocate Training Building 1 Room 104Sept. 23-27, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Transition GPS Separatee Workshop FFSC Building 1, Room 1616 Sept. 25, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m., Military Family Employment Orientation FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m., Military Family Employment Resume Writing, FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 25, 11 a.m.noon, Planning For Your Retirement FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 10-11 a.m., Healthy You, Healthy Family FFSC Building 1, Room 719 Sept. 26, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Ages 5-12 FFSC Building 1, Room 607 Dedicated To Service-Photo by GSM3 Hillary HicksFleet and Family Support Center held its Ombudsman Training program recently. Pictured from left is FFSC Key West Ombudsman Coordinator Mary Vokes, Ombudsman Claire Corcoran, Ombudsman Tracy Kitting, Work & Family Life Consultant Ron Lancaster, FFSC NS Mayport Ombudsman Coordinator Kris Edmondson, Ombudsman Rachel Thompson, and Command Leadership Spouse Amy Tillotson. 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Jason Burnett Motorcycle Ride Join us on Saturday, Sept. 14 for the 9th Annual Jason Burnett Motorcycle Ride. Ride registrations benefit the USO care package cam paign. Participants can enjoy food, raffles, live music and a silent auction after the ride to benefit the Greater Jacksonville USO. For more informa tion, see the attached flyer or visit usobenefitride. com. NF Walk At The Jacksonville Zoo Get wild about ending NF (neurofibromatosis) at the Jacksonville NF Walk and 5K fun run held at the Jacksonville Zoo on Sept. 14. Registration and check-in start at 7:30. Adult registration is $25 and children are $15. For more information, visit www.NFWalk.org/jack sonville2013 or email Ken Linkous at klinkousjaxfl@ gmail.com. Registration includes Zoo admission and catered lunch. JU Military Appreciation Game Come out Sept. 21 to watch the Jacksonville University Dolphins take on the Warner University Royals for their military appreciation football game. Kickoff is at 1 p.m. and admission is free to active and retired military personnel with I.D. Free I-TEXTS To Support Your Greater Jax Area USO-Opt In Want to help your Greater Jacksonville Area USO to continue its mis sion of supporting troops and families? Here is a free opportunity to do so. For those of you with cell phones and unlimited texting, please opt-in to I-TEXTS. TEXT: USOJAX, YOUR ZIP CODE, AND YOUR EMAIL TO: 70000 Youll receive a confir mation text with a link to build your profile and receive only the deals that interest you (restaurants, sporting goods, etc). Checker Yellow Cab Of Jacksonville-Rate Discounts The Greater Jacksonville Area USO is proud to announce a new partnership with Checker Yellow Cab of Jacksonville to support troops and families. 2013 Marine Corps Marathon And Freedom 5k Join us for the 10th Anniversary Marine Corps Marathon and Freedom 5K down at Metropolitan Park on Saturday, Oct. 5. Over 3,500 runners take to the roads at 7 a.m.! Come out for one of Jacksonvilles finest races. For registra tion forms, stop by either your Mayport or NAS Jax USO Centers. There will be age group awards, overall prize payouts, a challenged athletes divi sion, and medals to all finishers. Are You Ready For Some Football? Jaguar Ticket sales will begin at noon. Price is $15 per ticket (cash only). All active duty mem bers, including Florida National Guard, Reserve personnel who are on current active duty orders and dependents are eligi ble to purchase/use these tickets. Tickets are first come, first served. Jacksonville Suns 2013 Baseball Season The Jacksonville Suns AA Baseball Organization (Florida Marlins Affiliate) has teamed with your Greater Jacksonville Area USO for the 2013 sea son. We have purchased 18 tickets (1st Base Side, Lower Level) for each home game during this years 70-game season. The intent of these free tickets is for use as a command social, evenly spread out through out all ranks, with the hope of fostering unity and morale. August and September dates are still available. Military Spouse COMPASS Program COMPASS is a spouseto-spouse mentoring program that introduces participants to all aspects of the military lifestyle. COMPASS offers mili tary spouses the oppor tunity to establish a peer network, acquire knowl edge and develop skills necessary to successfully meet future challenges of military life. Please come join us! Well be sure to make you smile, help you meet other spouses, pro vide you with YUMMY Dinners, and even reim burse you for babysitting fees** (please inquire with a Compass Mentor for more info). Registration IS REQUIRED! Please visit www.gocompass.org to find a Session near you. There is a computer resource center avail able to all service mem bers with email, Internet and word processing. Fax, copy and free notary service is also available. There is a full kitchen, showers, a quiet reading room and a meeting room available at the USO. The USO is available for meetings, support groups, receptions, parties and pre-deployment briefs. For more information about activities or meet ing availabilities, call 2463481 or stop by the center at 2560 Mayport Road. USOSaturday, Sept. 14 An Eating and Growing Seasonally Workshop; Learning how to grow cool-season veg etables, Composting, and Food sampling using seasonal produce at Duval County Extension Office 1010 N. McDuff Ave. 32254, from 9 a.m.1 p.m.. Cost is $10 with Pre-registration and prepayment being required. Please contact Jeannie Crosby @ 255-7450. Make checks payable to: DCOHAC and mail to: Duval County Extension Office, Attention: Jeannie. Volunteers needed for Childrens Tumor Foundation NF WALK at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens. Checkin is 7:30a.m. walk and 5k fun run at 8:30 a.m. Register your team at WWW.NFWalk.org/ jacksonville2013. Fees: Adults $25 and Children $15. Questions contact Chrissie Connors at cconnors@ctf.org or 904-6195130 Trish (leave mes sage.) Come celebrate five centuries of Spanish influence in Florida with an informative talk at 2 p.m.about the San Juan del Puerto Mission on Ft. George Island. Learn about Fr. Pareja, who translated the native Timucuan language and gained insight into their unique culture. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reserva tions are necessary and the program is free. Friday, Sept 20 The Duval County Extension Office is offer ing a Make-and-take Rain Barrel Workshop from 9:30 a.m.-noon. Attendees will make their own 55 gallon plastic rain bar rels to take home. You will learn how to con nect a rain barrel to a rain garden and learn some important information on water conservation. The workshop will be located at 1010 N McDuff Ave. Jacksonville, Fl. The cost is $45 per person to make a rain barrel, $5 for attendance only (no rain barrel) Pre-payment and registration required for barrel. Payment must be received by Monday, Sept. 16th. Make check to DCOHAC and send to Rain Barrel Workshop, 1010 N. McDuff Ave, Jax., Fl 32254. You can register with credit card at http:// rainbarrel92013.event brite.com. Seating is lim ited to 35 pre-paid regis trations. No walk-ins for make and take. For questions, call 904-255-7450. Saturday, Sept. 21 This interpretive pro gram at 2 p.m. explores the snakes that are native to Florida and live at the Talbot Islands State Parks. This program will take place at the Ribault Club on Fort George Island Cultural State Park. No reservations are necessary and the program is free. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., announc es the opening of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community Sculpture Garden & Plaza at 10 a.m. The opening of the Sculpture Garden, located in the front lawn of the Art Connections building, marks the com pletion of the Landscape Enhancement Project, which launched in September 2012, and includes the renovation of the entire Riverside Avenue portion of The Cummer campus. The Sculpture Garden opens with its inaugural exhibition, The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti fea turing works on loan by the St. Augustine-based sculptor. Torcoletti will visit The Cummer for the Community Opening on Saturday, September 21 to host a demonstration of his working methods. This free event will feature live music and art-making activities. Saturday, Sept. 21-22 The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach will host a weekend event to commemorate the part that Fort Clinch played in the Spanish-American War. The event is held on Sept. 21 from 9 a.m.5 p.m. and Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. p.m. Fees include the $6 per vehicle Park entrance fee plus $2 per person Fort admission. For information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org.Out in Town COMMUNITYCALENDAR THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, September 12, 2013 13

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